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                                                      Calendar No. 271
116th Congress      }                                   {       Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session        }                                   {      116-150

======================================================================



 
               21ST CENTURY ENERGY WORKFORCE ACT OF 2019

                                _______
                                

                October 24, 2019.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

        Ms. Murkowski, from the Committee on Energy and Natural 
                   Resources, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 2334]

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, to which was 
referred the bill (S. 2334) to require the Secretary of Energy 
to establish the 21st Century Energy Workforce Advisory Board, 
and for other purposes, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon without amendment and recommends that the 
bill do pass.

                                PURPOSE

    The purpose of S. 2334 is to require the Secretary of 
Energy (Secretary) to establish the 21st Century Energy 
Workforce Advisory Board.

                          BACKGROUND AND NEED

    The 2017 U.S. Energy and Employment Report (2017 employment 
report) found that energy and energy efficiency industries in 
the U.S. employed 6.4 million Americans in 2016. A later 
industry report led by the National Association of State Energy 
Officials and the Energy Futures Initiative, using the same 
methodology, found that that figure had increased to 6.7 
million jobs by the end of 2018.
    The 2017 employment report found that 73 percent of energy-
related employers reported difficulty hiring qualified workers 
over the last 12 months, and that 26 percent found it was very 
difficult. As the energy sector grows increasing more diverse, 
a wider variety of technical qualifications and skillsets will 
be required.
    The Department of Energy's (DOE or Department) second 
installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review, ``Transforming 
the Nation's Electricity System,'' found that workforce 
retirement is a particularly large issue for the electric power 
industry. According to DOE, a dip in workforce training 
programs in the 1980s will result in an upper management gap 
with the retirement of baby boomers. The 2017 employment report 
also noted that energy employment is less diverse than other 
industries, with women representing 22 to 34 percent of 
workforce, compared to the U.S. average of 47 percent.
    Traditionally, DOE's role in workforce development has 
focused on research investments that support students, 
universities, and the national laboratories. DOE operates a 
Jobs Strategy Council that has several programs related to 
workforce development, including a variety of programs 
dedicated to supporting veterans. The Department also sponsors 
scholarships and funding for K-12 education through 
postdoctoral fellowships. Each national laboratory also has an 
outreach program dedicated to education and workforce 
development.
    S. 2334, the 21st Century Energy Workforce Act would create 
an advisory board and grant program to ensure the U.S. energy 
industry has a skilled and diverse workforce.

                          LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

    S. 2334 was introduced by Senators Cantwell and Hirono on 
July 30, 2019.
    Similar legislation, H.R. 398, was introduced in the House 
of Representatives by Representative Norcross on January 9, 
2019, and referred to the Committee on Education and Labor.
    In the 115th Congress, a similar measure was included in S. 
1460, the Energy and Natural Resources Act of 2017. S. 1460 was 
introduced by Senators Murkowski and Cantwell on June 28, 2017, 
and placed directly on the Legislative Calendar (Cal. 162). 
Senators Cantwell and Hirono also introduced nearly identical 
legislation, S. 2449, on February 15, 2018.
    Related legislation, H.R. 1837, was introduced in the House 
of Representatives by Representative Norcross on March 30, 
2017, and referred to the Committee on Education and Workforce.
    In the 114th Congress, Senator Cantwell introduced similar 
legislation, S.1304, on May 12, 2015. The Senate Committee on 
Energy and Natural Resources held a hearing on S. 1304 on May 
19, 2015. A similar measure was included in S. 2012, the Energy 
Policy Modernization Act of 2016. An original bill, S. 2012 was 
reported by the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on 
July 30, 2015, and passed by the Senate, as amended, on April 
26, 2016, by a vote of 85-12.
    Related legislation, H.R. 3386, was introduced in the House 
of Representatives by Representative Norcross on July 29, 2015, 
and referred to the Committee on Education and the Workforce.
    The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources met in 
open business session on September 25, 2019, and ordered S. 
2334 favorably reported.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in 
open business session on September 25, 2019, by a majority 
voice vote of a quorum present, recommends that the Senate pass 
S. 2334. Senators Barrasso, Risch, and Lee asked to be recorded 
as voting no.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 sets forth the short title of the bill.

Sec. 2. Definitions

    Section 2 provides key definitions.

Sec. 3. 21st century energy workforce advisory board

    Section 3(a) requires the Secretary of Energy to establish 
the 21st Century Energy Workforce Advisory Board (Board) to 
develop a strategy for the support and development of a skilled 
energy workforce.
    Subsection (b) specifies that the Board shall have nine 
members, to be appointed by the Secretary within one year of 
enactment. Within this timeframe, the President's Council of 
Advisors on Science and Technology shall nominate at least 18 
qualified individuals for the Board positions. This subsection 
further specifies that the relevant qualifications include 
eminence in the field of economics or workforce development or 
expertise in the energy industry; education; energy workforce; 
organized labor organizations; or bringing in underrepresented 
groups into the workforce.
    Subsection (c) details the Board's requirements in 
developing a strategy pursuant to subsection (a). The Board 
must determine how to more effectively and efficiently use DOE 
and other Federal agencies in the development of a skilled 
energy workforce; identify ways DOE can work with other Federal 
agencies, States, local governments, educational institutions, 
labor, and industry in workforce development; identify ways DOE 
and the National Laboratories can increase opportunities for 
minorities, women, and displaced energy sector workers; and 
identify the energy sectors in greatest need of workforce 
training and develop workforce training guidelines. The 
subsection also directs the Board to provide a public report to 
the Secretary and Congress, within one year of the Board's 
establishment and annually thereafter, of its findings and 
model energy curricula.
    Subsection (d) requires the Secretary to provide a report 
to Congress describing the Secretary's approval or disapproval 
of the Board's recommendations. The report is to provide an 
implementation plan, if applicable, and is due within 18 months 
of the Board's establishment.
    Subsection (e) requires the Secretary to establish a 
clearinghouse based on the Board's recommendations, in order to 
maintain information and resources on energy and manufacturing 
workforce development.
    Subsection (f) requires the Board to conduct outreach and 
make resources available to minority-serving institutions.
    Subsection (g) specifies that the Board will sunset on 
September 30, 2024.

Sec. 4. Energy workforce pilot grant program

    Section 4(a) directs the Secretary, in consultation with 
the Secretaries of Labor and Education, to establish an energy 
workforce pilot program to award grants on a competitive basis 
to eligible entities for job training programs that lead to an 
industry-recognized credential.
    Subsection (b) defines the eligibility for the grant 
program.
    Subsection (c) requires entities desiring a grant under the 
program to submit an application to the Secretary.
    Subsection (d) requires the Secretary, in selecting grant 
awardees, to give priority to specific applicants.
    Subsection (e) requires the Secretary to consider regional 
diversity.
    Subsection (f) limits the number of submissions from any 
eligible entity to one per year.
    Subsection (g) limits the amount of any individual grant to 
$2 million per fiscal year.
    Subsection (h) specifies that the Federal share of the cost 
of a job training and education program carried out using a 
grant under this section shall not exceed 65 percent. It also 
specifies that the non-Federal share must be at least 50 
percent cash and not more than 50 percent in the form of in-
kind services.
    Subsection (i) requires each applicant to consult with 
other Federal agencies and relevant State and local programs to 
reduce duplication.
    Subsection (j) requires the Secretary to provide direct 
assistance to entities that receive a grant under this section.
    Subsection (k) directs the Secretary to provide technical 
assistance and capacity building to national and State energy 
partnerships to leverage the existing job training and 
education programs of the Department.
    Subsection (l) requires the Secretary to provide an annual 
report to Congress outlining the activities and impact of the 
pilot program.
    Subsection (m) authorizes $20 million for each of fiscal 
years 2020 through 2024 to carry out the pilot program.

                   COST AND BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS

    The Congressional Budget Office estimate of the costs of 
this measure has been requested but was not received at the 
time the report was filed. When the Congressional Budget Office 
completes its cost estimate, it will be posted on the internet 
at www.cbo.gov.

                      REGULATORY IMPACT EVALUATION

    In compliance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
evaluation of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in 
carrying out S. 2334. The bill is not a regulatory measure in 
the sense of imposing Government-established standards or 
significant economic responsibilities on private individuals 
and businesses.
    No personal information would be collected in administering 
the program. Therefore, there would be no impact on personal 
privacy.
    Little, if any, additional paperwork would result from the 
enactment of S. 2334, as ordered reported.

                   CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING

    S. 2334, as ordered reported, does not contain any 
congressionally directed spending items, limited tax benefits, 
or limited tariff benefits as defined in rule XLIV of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate.

                        EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS

    Executive views on S. 2334 were not requested by the 
Committee.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee notes that no 
changes in existing law are made by S. 2334 as ordered 
reported.

                                  [all]