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                                                      Calendar No. 541
115th Congress       }                                    {     Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session          }                                    {    115-321

======================================================================



 
                FOWLER AND BOSKOFF PEAKS DESIGNATION ACT

                                _______
                                

                August 15, 2018.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Ms. Murkowski, from the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 497]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, to which was 
referred the bill (H.R. 2768) to designate certain mountain 
peaks in the State of Colorado as ``Fowler Peak'' and ``Boskoff 
Peak,'' having considered the same, reports favorably thereon 
without amendment and recommends that the bill do pass.

                                PURPOSE

    The purpose of H.R. 2768 is to designate certain mountain 
peaks in the State of Colorado as ``Fowler Peak'' and ``Boskoff 
Peak.''

                          BACKGROUND AND NEED

    Charlie Fowler and Christine Boskoff were renowned mountain 
climbers, champions for the pristine backcountry of Colorado, 
and long-time residents of San Miguel County, Colorado. They 
died in an avalanche in November 2006, while attempting to 
summit a peak in China's Sichuan province.
    Christine Boskoff was one of the leading female alpinists 
in the United States, having climbed six of the 14 mountain 
peaks in the world that are higher than 8,000 meters. Ms. 
Boskoff also dedicated her time and expertise to support a 
number of charitable causes related to climbing, including the 
rights of porters and Sherpas, women's education, and global 
literacy and other issues. Ms. Boskoff was recognized by the 
education communities in the United States and Nepal as a role 
model for students.
    Charlie Fowler was one of the most experienced mountain 
climbers in North America, having successfully climbed many of 
the highest peaks in the world; an author, guide, filmmaker, 
photographer, and wilderness advocate; and the recipient of the 
2004 Robert and Miriam Underhill Award from the American Alpine 
Club. Mr. Fowler summited several 8,000-meter peaks including 
Everest, Cho Oyu, and Shishapangma.
    H.R. 2768 will honor the life and careers of Ms. Boskoff 
and Mr. Fowler by designating two currently unnamed peaks in 
Uncompahgre National Forest in the State of Colorado as 
``Fowler Peak'' and ``Boskoff Peak.''

                          LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

    Representative Tipton introduced H.R. 2768 in the House of 
Representatives on May 30, 2017, which was referred to the 
Committee on Natural Resources. On July 26, 2017, H.R. 2768 was 
ordered reported by unanimous consent by the Committee on 
Natural Resources (H. Rept. 115-291). On November 28, 2017, the 
House of Representatives passed H.R. 2768 by a vote of 409-0.
    Senators Bennet and Gardner introduced companion 
legislation, S. 1271, on May 25, 2017. The Senate Subcommittee 
on Public Lands, Forests, and Mining held a hearing on S. 1271 
on July 26, 2017.
    On May 17, 2018, the Committee on Energy and Natural 
Resources met in open business session and ordered H.R. 2768 
favorably reported without amendment.

                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION

    The Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in 
open business session on May 17, 2018, by a majority voice vote 
of a quorum present recommends that the Senate pass H.R. 2768.

                      SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 provides a short title for the measure.

Section 2. Findings

    Section 2 contains key findings.

Section 3. Designation of Fowler Peak and Boskoff Peak, Colorado

    Subsection (a) provides the coordinates and description of 
a peak in the Uncompahgre National Forest in Colorado and 
designates it as ``Fowler Peak.'' This subsection further 
requires any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, 
record, or other paper of the United States to refer to this 
peak as ``Fowler Peak.''
    Subsection (b) provides the coordinates and description of 
a peak in the Uncompahgre National Forest in Colorado and 
designates it as ``Boskoff Peak.'' This subsection further 
requires any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, 
record, or other paper of the United States to refer to this 
peak as ``Boskoff Peak.''

                   COST AND BUDGETARY CONSIDERATIONS

    The following estimate of the costs of this measure has 
been provided by the Congressional Budget Office:
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 2768 to name two mountain 
peaks on federal land would have no significant effect on the 
federal budget and would not affect direct spending or 
revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 2768 would not increase 
net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four 
consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2029.
    H.R. 2768 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.
    On August 29, 2017, CBO transmitted a cost estimate for 
H.R. 2768, the Fowler and Boskoff Peaks Designation Act, as 
ordered reported by the House Committee on Natural Resources on 
July 26, 2017. The two versions of the legislation are similar, 
and CBO's estimates of their budgetary effects are the same.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Jeff LaFave.

                      REGULATORY IMPACT EVALUATION

    In compliance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
evaluation of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in 
carrying out H.R. 2768. The bill is not a regulatory measure in 
the sense of imposing Government-established standards or 
significant economic responsibilities on private individuals 
and businesses.
    No personal information would be collected in administering 
the program. Therefore, there would be no impact on personal 
privacy.
    Little, if any, additional paperwork would result from the 
enactment of H.R. 2768, as ordered reported.

                   CONGRESSIONALLY DIRECTED SPENDING

    H.R. 2768, as ordered reported, does not contain any 
congressionally directed spending items, limited tax benefits, 
or limited tariff benefits as defined in rule XLIV of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate.

                        EXECUTIVE COMMUNICATIONS

    The testimony provided by the Department of Agriculture at 
the July 26, 2017, hearing on S. 1271, the companion 
legislation to H.R. 2768, follows:

 Statement of Glenn Casamassa, Associate Deputy Chief, National Forest 
  System U.S. Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture

    Chairman Lee, Ranking Member Wyden, members of the 
Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to present the 
views of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regarding S. 
32--the California Desert Protection and Recreation Act of 
2017, S. 468--the Historic Routes Preservation Act, S. 941--the 
Yellowstone Gateway Protection Act, S. 1230--the Water Rights 
Protection Act, S. 1271--the Fowler and Boskoff Peaks 
Designation Act, and S. 1548--the Oregon Wildlands Act. I am 
Glenn Casamassa, Associate Deputy Chief for the National Forest 
System (NFS), USDA Forest Service.
S. 1271--Fowler and Boskoff Peaks Designation Act
    S. 1271 would name one mountain peak within the Lizard Head 
Wilderness on the Uncompahgre National Forest for Charlie 
Fowler, and another peak in the same wilderness for Christine 
Boskoff. As a general matter, the Forest Service recommends 
adherence to naming guidance provided by the U.S. Board on 
Geographic Names (BGN), which discourages naming unnamed 
features within wilderness unless an overriding need can be 
demonstrated. In recognition of the contributions to 
mountaineering made by Fowler and Boskoff, USDA does not oppose 
S. 1271.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee notes that no 
changes in existing law are made by the bill as ordered 
reported.

                                  [all]