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115th Congress    }                                    {        Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session       }                                    {       115-634

======================================================================



 
        KISSIMMEE RIVER WILD AND SCENIC RIVER STUDY ACT OF 2018

                                _______
                                

 April 13, 2018.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Bishop of Utah, from the Committee on Natural Resources, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3961]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee Natural Resources, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 3961) to amend the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act to 
designate segments of the Kissimmee River and its tributaries 
in the State of Florida for study for potential addition to the 
National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, report favorably thereon with an 
amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Kissimmee River Wild and Scenic River 
Study Act of 2018''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) The Kissimmee River has undergone, over the course of two 
        decades, the largest river restoration effort in the world.
          (2) Extending approximately 105 miles from Orlando to Lake 
        Okeechobee, the Kissimmee River forms the headwaters of Lake 
        Okeechobee and the Everglades and serves as a vital component 
        of ecosystem restoration in South Florida as a whole.
          (3) The Kissimmee River Restoration Project has significantly 
        improved approximately 63,000 acres of wetlands within the 
        Kissimmee River watershed and reestablished an environment 
        suitable for fish, wildlife, and the wetland plants that 
        existed prior to the Kissimmee River's channelization in the 
        1960s.
          (4) The Kissimmee River Restoration Project is expected to be 
        completed in 2020, at which point it is expected to reestablish 
        historic hydrologic conditions, recreate historic river and 
        floodplain connectivity, recreate the historic mosaic of 
        wetland plant communities, and restore historic biological 
        diversity and functionality.
          (5) After decades of restoration efforts and the expenditure 
        of nearly a billion dollars, upon completion of the Kissimmee 
        River Restoration Project, a study should be conducted to 
        determine the eligibility of including the fully restored 
        Kissimmee River into the National Wild and Scenic River program 
        to preserve the fully restored free-flowing condition and 
        immediate environment of the river for the benefit and 
        enjoyment of present and future generations.
          (6) Inclusion of the Kissimmee River into the National Wild 
        and Scenic River program would be a fitting tribute to the hard 
        work of the Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water 
        Management District's restoration work.

SEC. 3. DESIGNATION FOR STUDY.

  (a) Designation for Potential Addition.--Section 5(a) of the Wild and 
Scenic Rivers Act (16 U.S.C. 1276(a)) is amended by adding at the end 
the following:
          ``(__) Kissimmee river, florida.--The segment from the 
        southern shore of Lake Kissimmee to its confluence with Lake 
        Okeechobee.''.
  (b) Study.--Section 5(b) of the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (16 U.S.C. 
1276(b)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
          ``(__) Kissimmee river, florida.--
                  ``(A) In general.--Not later than 3 years after the 
                date on which funds are made available to carry out 
                this paragraph, the Secretary of the Interior shall 
                complete a study of the Kissimmee River, as described 
                in subsection (a)(__), and submit a report describing 
                the results of such study to the Committee on Natural 
                Resources of the House of Representatives and the 
                Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the 
                Senate.
                  ``(B) Report requirements.--The report required under 
                subparagraph (A) shall--
                          ``(i) include a discussion of the effect of 
                        the designation of the segment to be studied 
                        under subsection (a)(__) on--
                                  ``(I) existing commercial and 
                                recreational activities, such as cattle 
                                ranching, dairy production, hunting, 
                                fishing, trapping, recreational 
                                shooting, motor boat use, or bridge 
                                construction;
                                  ``(II) the authorization, 
                                construction, operation, maintenance, 
                                or improvement of energy production and 
                                transmission infrastructure;
                                  ``(III) military operations; and
                                  ``(IV) the authority of State and 
                                local governments to manage the 
                                activities described in subclauses (I) 
                                and (II); and
                          ``(ii) identify--
                                  ``(I) all authorities that will 
                                authorize or require the Secretary of 
                                the Interior to influence local land 
                                use decisions (such as zoning) or place 
                                restrictions on non-Federal land if the 
                                area studied under subsection (a)(__) 
                                is designated under the Wild and Scenic 
                                Rivers Act;
                                  ``(II) all authorities that the 
                                Secretary of the Interior may use to 
                                condemn property if the area studied 
                                under subsection (a)(__) is designated 
                                under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act; 
                                and
                                  ``(III) all private property located 
                                in the area to be studied under 
                                subsection (a)(__).
                  ``(C) Noninterference.--This study shall not 
                interfere with the Kissimmee River Restoration Project 
                authorized under section 101(8) of the Water Resources 
                Development Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-580).''.
  (c) No Negative Impact.--Nothing authorized by this Act may 
negatively impact agricultural production in the Kissimmee River basin.

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of H.R. 3961 is to amend the Wild and Scenic 
Rivers Act to designate segments of the Kissimmee River and its 
tributaries in the State of Florida for study for potential 
addition to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.

                  Background and Need for Legislation

    Stretching over 100 miles from Lake Kissimmee to Lake 
Okeechobee in Central Florida, the Kissimmee River is a 
naturally winding river that serves as both the headwaters for 
the Everglades and the main drainage route for the expansive 
Kissimmee River Basin. The River was historically characterized 
by an extensive floodplain, reaching up to three miles wide in 
certain areas, which is seasonally inundated by heavy rains.
    Following widespread flooding and property damage in the 
1940s, public outcry prompted Congress to direct the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers to channelize the waterway. This led to the 
Central and South Florida Project, which resulted in 
engineering changes to deepen and straighten the Kissimmee 
River, draining much of the surrounding floodplain. In 1992, 
citing changing public views and biological changes to the 
region, Congress approved efforts to restore the original flow 
of the Kissimmee River. At a cost of more than $1 billion, the 
Kissimmee River Restoration Project is expected to be completed 
in 2020, at which point it is expected to reestablish historic 
conditions in 44 miles of the River and restore nearly 63,000 
acres of wetlands.
    H.R. 3961 would designate the entire Kissimmee River for 
study under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (WSRA, 16 U.S.C. 
1271 et seq.) in an attempt to preserve the billion-dollar 
taxpayer investment in the River restoration. Importantly, 
designating a river for study grants the river protection under 
the Act until it can later be classified or removed from study. 
Additionally, because much of the Kissimmee River above and 
below the 44-mile restored segment is already impounded, the 
Kissimmee River is likely only eligible for a ``recreational'' 
designation under the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act.
    The WSRA was created by Congress in 1968 to ``preserve 
certain rivers with outstanding natural, cultural, and 
recreational values in a free-flowing condition for the 
enjoyment of present and future generations.'' Authorized at 
the time to compliment the then-current policy of hydroelectric 
dam building, the Act is designed to provide land management 
agencies the authority to protect and preserve designated 
rivers from future degradation.
    Wild and scenic rivers designated by Congress generally are 
managed by one of the four federal land management agencies--
the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Forest Service, the 
National Park Service, or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 
By law, federal agencies must work in cooperation with State 
and local management agencies to develop corridor management 
plans for the region. Further, the WSRA provides authority for 
the federal government to acquire land surrounding the river by 
purchase, donation, or in some instances, condemnation.
    Proponents of wild and scenic river expansion assert that 
designation helps balance future development and recreational 
uses with ecological preservation. Opponents point out that 
with such previous designations, the Act has often resulted in 
the federal government's overreach into local management 
decisions, and can be used to control everything from 
agricultural development within the designated river basin to 
restricted access to recreational activities on the river.
    Additionally, H.R. 3961 will require the local 
municipalities and water management districts to develop 
management plans prior to the designation, potentially 
increasing the cost at the local level.

                            Committee Action

    H.R. 3961 was introduced on October 4, 2017, by Congressman 
Darren Soto (D-FL). The bill was referred to the Committee on 
Natural Resources, and within the Committee to the Subcommittee 
on Federal Lands. On December 7, 2017, the Subcommittee held a 
hearing on the legislation. On January 17, 2018, the Natural 
Resources Committee met to consider the bill. The Subcommittee 
was discharged by unanimous consent. Congressman Soto offered 
an amendment designated #1; it was adopted by unanimous 
consent. No additional amendments were offered, and the bill, 
as amended, was ordered favorably reported to the House of 
Representatives by unanimous consent.

            Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    Regarding clause 2(b)(1) of rule X and clause 3(c)(1) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee on Natural Resources' oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

      Compliance With House Rule XIII and Congressional Budget Act

    1. Cost of Legislation and the Congressional Budget Act. 
With respect to the requirements of clause 3(c)(2) and (3) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
sections 308(a) and 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974, the Committee has received the following estimate for the 
bill from the Director of the Congressional Budget Office:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                  Washington, DC, January 26, 2018.
Hon. Rob Bishop,
 Chairman, Committee on Natural Resources,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 3961, the 
Kissimmee River Wild and Scenic River Study Act of 2017.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Janani 
Shankaran.
            Sincerely,
                                                Keith Hall,
                                                          Director.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 3961--Kissimmee River Wild and Scenic River Study Act of 2017

    H.R. 3961 would require the National Park Service to study 
a segment of the Kissimmee River in Florida for potential 
addition to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. Based 
on the costs of similar studies, CBO estimates that 
implementing H.R. 3961 would cost less than $500,000; such 
spending would be subject to the availability of appropriated 
funds.
    Enacting H.R. 3961 would not affect direct spending or 
revenues; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures do not apply.
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 3961 would not increase 
net direct spending or on-budget deficits in any of the four 
consecutive 10-year periods beginning in 2028.
    H.R. 3961 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Janani 
Shankaran. The estimate was approved by H. Samuel Papenfuss, 
Deputy Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.
    2. General Performance Goals and Objectives. As required by 
clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII, the general performance goal or 
objective of this bill is to amend the Wild and Scenic Rivers 
Act to designate segments of the Kissimmee River and its 
tributaries in the State of Florida for study for potential 
addition to the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.

                           Earmark Statement

    This bill does not contain any Congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined 
under clause 9(e), 9(f), and 9(g) of rule XXI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.

                    Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    This bill contains no unfunded mandates.

                       Compliance With H. Res. 5

    Directed Rule Making. This bill does not contain any 
directed rule makings.
    Duplication of Existing Programs. This bill does not 
establish or reauthorize a program of the federal government 
known to be duplicative of another program. Such program was 
not included in any report from the Government Accountability 
Office to Congress pursuant to section 21 of Public Law 111-139 
or identified in the most recent Catalog of Federal Domestic 
Assistance published pursuant to the Federal Program 
Information Act (Public Law 95-220, as amended by Public Law 
98-169) as relating to other programs.

                Preemption of State, Local or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any State, local or 
tribal law.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is 
printed in italic and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

WILD AND SCENIC RIVERS ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  Sec. 5. (a) The following rivers are hereby designated for 
potential addition to the national wild and scenic rivers 
system:
  (1) Allegheny, Pennsylvania: The segment from its mouth to 
the town of East Brady, Pennsylvania.
  (2) Bruneau, Idaho: The entire main stem.
  (3) Buffalo, Tennessee: The entire river.
  (4) Chattooga, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia: 
The entire river.
  (5) Clarion, Pennsylvania: The segment between Ridgway and 
its confluence with the Allegheny River.
  (6) Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York: The segment from 
Hancock, New York, to Matamoras, Pennsylvania.
  (7) Flathead, Montana: The North Fork from the Canadian 
border downstream to its confluence with the Middle Fork; the 
Middle Fork from its headwaters to its confluence with the 
South Fork; and the South Fork from its origin to Hungry Horse 
Reservoir.
  (8) Gasconade, Missouri: The entire river.
  (9) Illinois, Oregon: The entire river.
  (10) Little Beaver, Ohio: The segment of the North and Middle 
Forks of the Little Beaver River in Columbiana County from a 
point in the vicinity of Negly and Elkton, Ohio, downstream to 
a point in the vicinity of East Liverpool, Ohio.
  (11) Little Miami, Ohio: That segment of the main stem of the 
river, exclusive of its tributaries, from a point at the 
Warren-Clermont County line at Loveland, Ohio, upstream to the 
sources of Little Miami including North Fork.
  (12) Maumee, Ohio and Indiana: The main stem from Perrysburg, 
Ohio, to Fort Wayne, Indiana, exclusive of its tributaries in 
Ohio and inclusive of its tributaries in Indiana.
  (13) Missouri, Montana: The segment between Fort Benton and 
Ryan Island.
  (14) Moyie, Idaho: The segment from the Canadian border to 
its confluence with the Kootenai River.
  (15) Obed, Tennessee: The entire river and its tributaries, 
Clear Creek and Daddys Creek.
  (16) Penobscot, Maine: Its east and west branches.
  (17) Pere Marquette, Michigan: The entire river.
  (18) Pine Creek, Pennsylvania: the segment from Ansonia to 
Waterville.
  (19) Priest, Idaho: The entire main stem.
  (20) Rio Grande, Texas: The portion of the river between the 
west boundary of Hudspeth County and the east boundary of 
Terrell County on the United States side of the river: 
Provided, That before undertaking any study of this potential 
scenic river, the Secretary of the Interior shall determine, 
through the channels of appropriate executive agencies, that 
Mexico has no objection to its being included among the studies 
authorized by this Act.
  (21) Saint Croix, Minnesota and Wisconsin: The segment 
between the dam near Taylors Falls and its confluence with the 
Mississippi River.
  (22) Saint Joe, Idaho: The entire main stem.
  (23) Salmon, Idaho: The segment from the town of North Fork 
to its confluence with the Snake River.
  (24) Skagit, Washington: The segment from the town of Mount 
Vernon to and including the mouth of Bacon Creek; the Cascade 
River between its mouth and the junction of its North and South 
Forks; the South Fork to the boundary of the Glacier Peak 
Wilderness Area; the Suiattle River from its mouth to the 
Glacier Peak Wilderness Area boundary at Milk Creek; the Sauk 
River from its mouth to its junction with Elliott Creek; the 
North Fork of the Sauk River from its junction with the South 
Fork of the Sauk to the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area boundary.
  (25) Suwannee, Georgia and Florida: The entire river from its 
source in the Okefenokee Swamp in Georgia to the gulf and the 
outlying Ichetucknee Springs, Florida.
  (26) Upper Iowa, Iowa: The entire river.
  (27) Youghiogheny, Maryland and Pennsylvania: The segment 
from Oakland, Maryland, to the Youghiogheny Reservoir, and from 
the Youghiogheny Dam downstream to the town of Connellsville, 
Pennsylvania.
  (28) American, California: The North Fork from the Cedars to 
the Auburn Reservoir.
  (29) Au Sable, Michigan: The segment downstream from Foot Dam 
to Oscoda and upstream from Loud Reservoir to its source, 
including its principal tributaries and excluding Mio and 
Bamfield Reservoirs.
  (30) Big Thompson, Colorado: The segment from its source to 
the boundary of Rocky Mountain National Park.
  (31) Cache la Poudre, Colorado: Both forks from their sources 
to their confluence, thence the Cache la Poudre to the eastern 
boundary of Roosevelt National Forest.
  (32) Cahaba, Alabama: The segment from its junction with 
United States Highway 31 south of Birmingham downstream to its 
junction with United States Highway 80 west of Selma.
  (33) Clarks Fork, Wyoming: The segment from the Clark's Fork 
Canyon to the Crandall Creek Bridge.
  (34) Colorado, Colorado and Utah: The segment from its 
confluence with the Dolores River, Utah, upstream to a point 
19.5 miles from the Utah-Colorado border in Colorado.
  (35) Conejos, Colorado: The three forks from their sources to 
their confluence, thence the Conejos to its first junction with 
State Highway 17, excluding Platoro Reservoir.
  (36) Elk, Colorado: The segment from its source to Clark.
  (37) Encampment, Colorado: The Main Fork and West Fork to 
their confluence, thence the Encampment to the Colorado-Wyoming 
border, including the tributaries and headwaters.
  (38) Green, Colorado: The entire segment within the State of 
Colorado.
  (39) Gunnison, Colorado: The segment from the upstream 
(southern) boundary of the Black Canyon of the Gunnison 
National Monument to its confluence with the North Fork.
  (40) Illinois, Oklahoma: The segment from Tenkiller Ferry 
Reservoir upstream to the Arkansas-Oklahoma border, including 
the Flint and Barren Fork Creeks.
  (41) John Day, Oregon: The main stem from Service Creek 
Bridge (at river mile 157) downstream to Tumwater Falls (at 
river mile 10).
  (42) Kettle, Minnesota: The entire segment within the State 
of Minnesota.
  (43) Los Pinos, Colorado: The segment from its source, 
including the tributaries and headwaters within the San Juan 
Primitive Area, to the northern boundary of the Granite Peak 
Ranch.
  (44) Manistee, Michigan: The entire river from its source to 
Manistee Lake, including its principal tributaries and 
excluding Tippy and Hodenpyl Reservoirs.
  (45) Nolichuckey, Tennessee and North Carolina: The entire 
main stem.
  (46) Owyhee, South Fork, Oregon: The main stem from the 
Oregon-Idaho border downstream to the Owyhee Reservoir.
  (47) Piedra, Colorado: The Middle Fork and East Fork from 
their sources to their confluence, thence the Piedra to its 
junction with Colorado Highway 10.
  (48) Shepaug, Connecticut: The entire river.
  (49) Sipsey Fork, West Fork, Alabama: The segment, including 
its tributaries, from the impoundment formed by the Lewis M. 
Smith Dam upstream to its source in the William B. Bankhead 
National Forest.
  (50) Snake, Wyoming: The segment from the southern boundaries 
of Teton National Park to the entrance to Palisades Reservoir.
  (51) Sweetwater, Wyoming: The segment from Wilson Bar 
downstream to Spring Creek.
  (52) Tuolumne, California: The main river from its source on 
Mount Dana and Mount Lyell in Yosemite National Park to Don 
Pedro Reservoir.
  (53) Upper Mississippi, Minnesota: The segment from its 
source at the outlet of Itasca Lake to its junction with the 
northwestern boundary of the city of Anoka.
  (54) Wisconsin, Wisconsin: The segment from Prarie du Sac to 
its confluence with the Mississippi River at Prairie du Chien.
  (55) Yampa, Colorado: The segment within the boundaries of 
the Dinosaur National Monument.
  (56) Dolores, Colorado: The segment of the main stem from 
Rico upstream to its source, including its headwaters; the West 
Dolores from its source, including its headwaters, downstream 
to its confluence with the main stem; and the segment from the 
west boundary, section 2, township 38 north, range 16 west, 
NMPM, below the proposed McPhee Dam, downstream to the 
Colorado-Utah border, excluding the segment from one mile above 
Highway 90 to the confluence of the San Miguel River.
  (57) Snake, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho: The segment from 
an eastward extension of the north boundary of section 1, 
township 5 north, range 47 east, Williamette meridian, 
downstream to the town of Asotin, Washington.
  (58) Housatonic, Connecticut: The segment from the 
Massachusetts-Connecticut boundary downstream to its confluence 
with the Shepaug River.
  (59) Kern, California.--The main stem of the North Fork from 
its source to Isabelle Reservoir excluding its tributaries.
  (60) Loxahatchee, Florida.--The entire river including its 
tributary, North Fork.
  (61) Ogeechee, Georgia.--The entire river.
  (62) Salt, Arizona.--The main stem from a point on the north 
side of the river intersected by the Fort Apache Indian 
Reservation boundary (north of Buck Mountain) downstream to 
Arizona State Highway 288.
  (63) Verde, Arizona.--The main stem from the Prescott 
National Forest boundary near Paulden to the vicinity of Table 
Mountain, approximately 14 miles above Horseshoe Reservoir, 
except for the segment not included in the national forest 
between Clarkdale and Camp Verde, North segment.
  (64) San Francisco, Arizona.--The main stem from confluence 
with the Gila upstream to the Arizona-New Mexico border, except 
for the segment between Clifton and the Apache National Forest.
  (65) Fish Creek, New York.--The entire East Branch.
  (66) Black Creek, Mississippi.--The segment from Big Creek 
Landing in Forrest County downstream to Old Alexander Bridge 
Landing in Stone County.
  (67) Allegheny, Pennsylvania.--The main stem from Kinzua Dam 
downstream to East Brady.
  (68) Cacapon, West Virginia.--The entire river.
  (69) Escatawpa, Alabama and Mississippi.--The segment 
upstream from a point approximately one mile downstream from 
the confluence of the Escatawpa River and Jackson Creek to a 
point where the Escatawpa River is joined by the Yellowhouse 
Branch in Washington County, Alabama, near the town of Deer 
Park, Alabama; and the segment of Brushy Creek upstream from 
its confluence with the Escatawpa to its confluence with 
Scarsborough Creek.
  (70) Myakka, Florida.--The segment south of the southern 
boundary of the Myakka River State Park.
  (71) Soldier Creek, Alabama.--The segment beginning at the 
point where Soldier Creek intersects the south line of section 
31, township 7 south, range 6 east, downstream to a point on 
the south line of section 6, township 8 south, range 6 east, 
which point is 1,322 feet west of the south line of section 5, 
township 8 south, range 6 east in the county of Baldwin, State 
of Alabama.
  (72) Red, Kentucky.--The segment from Highway numbered 746 
(also known as Spradlin Bridge) in Wolf County, Kentucky, 
downstream to the point where the river descends below seven 
hundred feet above sea level (in its normal flow) which point 
is at the Menifee and Powell County line just downstream of the 
iron bridge where Kentucky Highway numbered 77 passes over the 
river.
  (73) Bluestone, West Virginia.--From its headwaters to its 
confluence with the New.
  (74) Gauley, West Virginia.--Including the tributaries of the 
Meadow and the Cranberry, from the headwaters to its confluence 
with the New.
  (75) Greenbrier, West Virginia.--From its headwaters to its 
confluence with the New.
  (76) Birch, West Virginia.--The main stem from the Cora Brown 
Bridge in Nicholas County to the confluence of the river with 
the Elk River in Braxton County.
  (77) Colville, Alaska.
  (78) Etivluk-Nigu, Alaska.
  (79) Utukok, Alaska.
  (80) Kanektok, Alaska.
  (81) Kisaralik, Alaska.
  (82) Melozitna, Alaska.
  (83) Sheenjek (lower segment), Alaska.
  (84) Situk, Alaska.
  (85) Porcupine, Alaska.
  (86) Yukon (Ramparts section), Alaska.
  (87) Squirrel, Alaska.
  (88) Koyuk, Alaska.
  (89) Wildcat Brook, New Hampshire: The segment from its 
headwaters including the principal tributaries to its 
confluence with the Ellis River. The study authorized in this 
paragraph shall be completed no later than six years from the 
date of enactment of this paragraph and an interim report shall 
be prepared and submitted to the Congress no later than three 
years from the date of enactment of this paragraph.
  (90) Horsepasture, North Carolina: The segment from Bohaynee 
Road (N.C. 281) downstream to Lake Jocassee.
  (91) The North Umpqua, Oregon: The segment from the Soda 
Springs Powerhouse to the confluence of Rock Creek. The 
provisions of section 7(a) shall apply to tributary Steamboat 
Creek in the same manner as such provisions apply to the rivers 
referred to in such section 7(a). The Secretary of Agriculture 
shall, in the Umpqua National Forest plan, provide that 
management practices for Steamboat Creek and its immediate 
environment conserve, protect, and enhance the anadromous fish 
habitat and population.
  (92) Farmington, West Branch, Connecticut and 
Massachusetts.--The segment from the intersection of the New 
Hartford-Canton, Connecticut, town line upstream to the base of 
the West Branch Reservoir in Hartland, Connecticut; and the 
segment from the confluence with Thorp Brook in Sandisfield, 
Massachusetts, to Hayden Pond in Otis, Massachusetts.
  (93) Great Egg Harbor River, New Jersey: The entire river.
  (94) Klickitat, Washington: The segment from the southern 
boundary of the Yakima Indian Reservation, Washington, as 
described in the Treaty with the Yakimas of 1855 (12 Stat. 
951), and as acknowledged by the Indian Claims Commission in 
Yakima Tribe of Indians v. U.S., 16 Ind. Cl. Comm. 536 (1966), 
to its confluence with the Little Klickitat River, Washington: 
Provided, That said study shall be carried on in consultation 
with the Yakima Indian Nation and shall include a determination 
of the degree to which the Yakima Indian Nation should 
participate in the preservation and administration of the river 
segment should it be proposed for inclusion in the Wild and 
Scenic Rivers system.
  (95) White Salmon, Washington: The segment from its 
confluence with Trout Lake Creek, Washington, to its confluence 
with Gilmer Creek, Washington, near the town of B Z Corner, 
Washington. Studies of the river named in paragraphs (38), 
(55), (83), and (87) shall be completed and the reports 
transmitted to the Congress not later than January 1, 1987.
  (96) Maurice, New Jersey.--The segment from Shell Pile to the 
point three miles north of Laurel Lake.
  (97) Manumuskin, New Jersey.--The segment from its confluence 
with the Maurice River to the crossing of State Route 49.
  (98) Menantico Creek, New Jersey.--The segment from its 
confluence with the Maurice River to its source.
  (99) Merced, California.--The segment from a point 300 feet 
upstream of the confluence with Bear Creek downstream to the 
point of maximum flood control storage of Lake McClure 
(elevation 867 feet mean sea level).
  (100) Blue, Oregon.--The segment from its headwaters to the 
Blue River Reservoir; by the Secretary of Agriculture.
  (101) Chewaucan, Oregon.--The segment from its headwaters to 
the Paisley Urban Growth boundary to be studied in cooperation 
with, and integrated with, the Klamath River Basin Plan; by the 
Secretary of Agriculture.
  (102) North Fork Malheur, Oregon.--The segment from the 
Malheur National Forest boundary to Beulah Reservoir; by the 
Secretary of the Interior.
  (103) South Fork McKenzie, Oregon.--The segments from its 
headwaters to the upper end of Cougar Reservoir and from the 
lower end of Cougar Reservoir to its confluence with the 
McKenzie River; by the Secretary of Agriculture.
  (104) Steamboat Creek, Oregon.--The entire creek; by the 
Secretary of Agriculture.
  (105) Wallowa, Oregon.--The segment from its confluence with 
the Minam River to its confluence with the Grande Ronde River; 
by the Secretary of Agriculture.
  (106) Merrimack River, New Hampshire.--The segment from its 
origin at the confluence of the Pemigewasset and Winnipesaukee 
Rivers in Franklin, New Hampshire, to the backwater impoundment 
at Hooksett Dam, excluding the Garvins Falls Dam and its 
impoundment.
  (107) Pemigewasset, New Hampshire.--The segments from Profile 
Lake downstream to the southern boundary of the Franconia Notch 
State Park and from the northern Thornton town-line downstream 
to the backwater of the Ayers Island Dam; by the Secretary of 
the Interior.
  (108) St. Marys River, Florida and Georgia.--The segment from 
its headwaters to its confluence with the Bells River.
  (109) Mills River, North Carolina.--The North Fork from the 
bottom of the spillway of the Hendersonville Reservoir 
downstream to its confluence with the South Fork; the South 
Fork from its confluence with the Pigeon Branch downstream to 
its confluence with the North Fork; and the main stem from the 
confluence of the North and South Forks downstream to a point 
750 feet upstream from the centerline of North Carolina Highway 
191/280.
  (110) Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord, Massachussets.-- The 
segment of the Sudbury from the Danforth Street Bridge in the 
town of Framingham, to its confluence with the Assabet, the 
Assabet from 1,000 feet downstream of the Damon Mill Dam in 
Concord to its confluence with the Sudbury and the Concord from 
the confluence of the Sudbury and Assabet downstream to the 
Route 3 Bridge in the town of Billerica. The study of such 
river segments shall be completed and the report submitted 
thereon not later than at the end of the third fiscal year 
beginning after the date of enactment of this paragraph.
  (111) Niobrara, Nebraska.--The 6-mile segment of the river 
from its confluence with Chimney Creek to its confluence with 
Rock Creek.
  (112) Lamprey, New Hampshire.--The segment from the southern 
Lee town line downstream to the confluence with Woodman's Brook 
at the base of Sullivan Falls in Durham.
  (113) White Clay Creek, Delaware and Pennsylvania.--The 
headwaters of the river in Pennsylvania to its confluence with 
the Christina River in Delaware, including the East, West, and 
Middle Branches, Middle Run, Pike Creek, Mill Creek, and other 
main branches and tributaries as determined by the Secretary of 
the Interior (herein after referred to as the White Clay 
Creek).
  (114) Brule, Michigan and Wisconsin.--The 33-mile segment 
from Brule Lake in the northeast quarter of section 15, 
township 41 north, range 13 east, to the National Forest 
boundary at the southeast quarter of section 31, township 41 
north, range 17 east.
  (115) Carp, Michigan.--The 7.6-mile segment from its origin 
at the confluence of the outlets of Frenchman Lake and Carp 
Lake in section 26, township 44 north, range 6 west, to the 
west section line of section 30, township 43 north, range 5 
west.
  (116) Little Manistee, Michigan.--The 42-mile segment within 
the Huron-Manistee National Forest.
  (117) White, Michigan.--The 75.4-mile segment within the 
Huron-Manistee National Forest as follows:
          (A) The 30.8-mile segment of the main stem from U.S. 
        31 to the Huron-Manistee National Forest boundary at 
        the north line of section 2, township 13 north, range 
        15 west, 1.5 miles southwest of Hesperia.
          (B) The 18.9-mile segment of the South Branch White 
        from the Huron-Manistee National Forest boundary east 
        of Hesperia at the west line of section 22, township 14 
        north, range 14 west, to Echo Drive, section 6, 
        township 13 north, range 12 west.
          (C) The 25.7-mile segment of the North Branch White 
        from its confluence with the South Branch White in 
        section 25, township 13 north, range 16 west, to 
        McLaren Lake in section 11, township 14 north, range 15 
        west.
  (118) Ontonagon, Michigan.--The 32-mile segment of the 
Ontonagon as follows:
          (A) The 12-mile segment of the West Branch from the 
        Michigan State Highway 28 crossing to Cascade Falls.
          (B) The 20-mile segment of the South Branch from the 
        confluence of the Cisco Branch and Tenmile Creek to the 
        confluence with the West Branch Ontonagon.
  (119) Paint, Michigan.--The 70-mile segment as follows:
          (A) 34 miles of the mainstream beginning at the 
        eastern boundary of the Ottawa National Forest in 
        section 1, township 44 north, range 35 west, to the 
        city of Crystal Falls.
          (B) 15 miles of the mainstream of the Net River from 
        its confluence with the east and west branches to its 
        confluence with the mainstream of the Paint River.
          (C) 15 miles of the east branch of the Net River from 
        its source in section 8, township 47 north, range 32 
        west, to its confluence with the mainstream of the Net 
        River in section 24, township 46 north, range 34 west.
          (D) 14 miles of the west branch of the Net River from 
        its source in section 35, township 48 north, range 34 
        west, to its confluence with the mainstream of the Net 
        River in section 24, township 46 north, range 34 west.
  (120) Presque Isle, Michigan.--The 13-mile segment of the 
mainstream from Minnewawa Falls to Lake Superior.
  (121) Sturgeon, Ottawa National Forest, Michigan.--The 36-
mile segment of the mainstream from the source at Wagner Lake 
in section 13, township 49 north, range 31 west, to the eastern 
boundary of the Ottawa National Forest in section 12, township 
48 north, range 35 west.
  (122) Sturgeon, Hiawatha National Forest, Michigan.--The 
18.1-mile segment from Sixteen Mile Lake to the north line of 
section 26, township 43 north, range 19 west.
  (123) Tahquamenon, Michigan.--The 103.5-mile segment as 
follows--
          (A) the 90-mile segment of the mainstream beginning 
        at the source in section 21, township 47 north, range 
        12 west, to the mouth at Whitefish Bay; and
          (B) the 13.5-mile segment of the east branch from the 
        western boundary of the Hiawatha National Forest in 
        section 19, township 46 north, range 6 west, to its 
        confluence with the mainstream.
  (124) Whitefish, Michigan.--The 26-mile segment of the West 
Branch Whitefish from its source in section 26, township 46 
north, range 23 west, to County Road 444.
  (125) Clarion, Pennsylvania.--The segment of the main stem of 
the river from Ridgway to its confluence with the Allegheny 
River. The Secretary of Agriculture shall conduct the study of 
such segment.
  (126) Mill Creek, Jefferson and Clarion Counties, 
Pennsylvania.--The segment of the main stem of the creek from 
its headwaters near Gumbert Hill in Jefferson County, 
downstream to the confluence with the Clarion River.
  (127) Piru Creek, California.--The segment of the main stem 
of the creek from its source downstream to the maximum pool of 
Pyramid Lake and the segment of the main stem of the creek 
beginning 300 feet below the dam at Pyramid Lake downstream to 
the maximum pool at Lake Piru, for a total distance of 
approximately 49 miles.
  (128) Little Sur River, California.--The segment of the main 
stem of the river from its headwaters downstream to the Pacific 
Ocean, a distance of approximately 23 miles. The Secretary of 
Agriculture shall consult with the Big Sur Multiagency Advisory 
Council during the study of the river.
  (129) Matilija Creek, California.--The segment from its 
headwaters to its junction with Murietta Canyon, a distance of 
approximately 16 miles.
  (130) Lopez Creek, California.--The segments from its 
headwaters to Lopez Reservoir, a distance of approximately 11 
miles.
  (131) Sespe Creek, California.--The segment from Chorro 
Grande Canyon downstream to its confluence with Rock Creek and 
Howard Creek, a distance of about 10.5 miles.
  (132) North Fork Merced, California.--The segment from its 
headwaters to its confluence with the Merced River, by the 
Secretary of Agriculture and the Secretary of the Interior.
  (133) Delaware River, Pennsylvania and New Jersey.--(A) The 
approximately 3.6-mile segment from the Erie Lackawanna 
Railroad Bridge to the southern tip of Dildine Island.
  (B) The approximately 2-mile segment from the southern tip of 
Mack Island to the northern border of the town of Belvidere, 
New Jersey.
  (C) The approximately 12.5-mile segment from the southern 
border of the town of Belvidere, New Jersey, to the northern 
border of the city of Easton, Pennsylvania, excluding river 
mile 196.0 to 193.8.
  (D) The approximately 9.5-mile segment from the southern 
border of the town of Phillipsburg, New Jersey, to a point just 
north of the Gilbert Generating Station.
  (E) The approximately 14.2-mile segment from a point just 
south of the Gilbert Generating Station to a point just north 
of the Point Pleasant Pumping Station.
  (F) The approximately 6.5-mile segment from a point just 
south of the Point Pleasant Pumping Station to the north side 
of the Route 202 bridge.
  (G) The approximately 6-mile segment from the southern 
boundary of the town of New Hope, Pennsylvania, to the town of 
Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania.
  (H) The Cook's Creek tributary.
  (I) The Tinicum Creek tributary.
  (J) The Tohickon Creek tributary.
  (134) New River, West Virginia and Virginia.--The segment 
defined by public lands commencing at the U.S. Route 460 bridge 
over the New River in Virginia to the maximum summer pool 
elevation (one thousand four hundred and ten feet above mean 
sea level) of Bluestone Lake in West Virginia; by the Secretary 
of the Interior. Nothing in this Act shall affect or impair the 
management of the Bluestone project or the authority of any 
department, agency or instrumentality of the United States to 
carry out the project purposes of that project as of the date 
of enactment of this paragraph. The study of the river segment 
identified in this paragraph shall be completed and reported on 
within one year after the date of enactment of this paragraph.
  (135) Rio Grande, New Mexico.--The segment from the west 
section line of Section 15, Township 23 North, Range 10 East, 
downstream approximately 8 miles to the southern line of the 
northwest quarter of Section 34, Township 23 North, Range 9 
East.
  (136) Wekiva River, Florida.--(A) The entire river.
  (B) The Seminole Creek tributary.
  (C) The Rock Springs Run tributary.
  (137) Taunton River, Massachusetts.--The segment downstream 
from the headwaters, from the confluence of the Town River and 
the Matfield River in Bridgewater to the confluence with the 
Forge River in Raynham, Massachusetts.
  (138) Eightmile River, Connecticut.--The segment from its 
headwaters downstream to its confluence with the Connecticut 
River.
  (139) Lower Farmington River and Salmon Brook, Connecticut.--
The segment of the Farmington River downstream from the segment 
designated as a recreational river by section 3(a)(156) to its 
confluence with the Connecticut River, and the segment of the 
Salmon Brook including its mainstream and east and west 
branches.
          (140) Missisquoi and trout rivers, vermont.--The 
        approximately 25-mile segment of the upper Missisquoi 
        from its headwaters in Lowell to the Canadian border in 
        North Troy, the approximately 25-mile segment from the 
        Canadian border in East Richford to Enosburg Falls, and 
        the approximately 20-mile segment of the Trout River 
        from its headwaters to its confluence with the 
        Missisquoi River.
          (141) Oregon caves national monument and preserve, 
        oregon.--
                  (A) Cave creek, oregon.--The 2.6-mile segment 
                of Cave Creek from the headwaters at the River 
                Styx to the boundary of the Rogue River 
                Siskiyou National Forest.
                  (B) Lake creek, oregon.--The 3.6-mile segment 
                of Lake Creek from the headwaters at Bigelow 
                Lakes to the confluence with Cave Creek.
                  (C) No name creek, oregon.--The 0.6-mile 
                segment of No Name Creek from the headwaters to 
                the confluence with Cave Creek.
                  (D) Panther creek.--The 0.8-mile segment of 
                Panther Creek from the headwaters to the 
                confluence with Lake Creek.
                  (E) Upper cave creek.--The segment of Upper 
                Cave Creek from the headwaters to the 
                confluence with River Styx.
          (142) Beaver, chipuxet, queen, wood, and pawcatuck 
        rivers, rhode island and connecticut.--The following 
        segments:
                  (A) The approximately 10-mile segment of the 
                Beaver River from the headwaters in Exeter, 
                Rhode Island, to the confluence with the 
                Pawcatuck River.
                  (B) The approximately 5-mile segment of the 
                Chipuxet River from Hundred Acre Pond to the 
                outlet into Worden Pond.
                  (C) The approximately 10-mile segment of the 
                upper Queen River from the headwaters to the 
                Usquepaugh Dam in South Kingstown, Rhode 
                Island, including all tributaries of the upper 
                Queen River.
                  (D) The approximately 5-mile segment of the 
                lower Queen (Usquepaugh) River from the 
                Usquepaugh Dam to the confluence with the 
                Pawcatuck River.
                  (E) The approximately 11-mile segment of the 
                upper Wood River from the headwaters to Skunk 
                Hill Road in Richmond and Hopkinton, Rhode 
                Island, including all tributaries of the upper 
                Wood River.
                  (F) The approximately 10-mile segment of the 
                lower Wood River from Skunk Hill Road to the 
                confluence with the Pawcatuck River.
                  (G) The approximately 28-mile segment of the 
                Pawcatuck River from Worden Pond to Nooseneck 
                Hill Road (Rhode Island Rte 3) in Hopkinton and 
                Westerly, Rhode Island.
                  (H) The approximately 7-mile segment of the 
                lower Pawcatuck River from Nooseneck Hill Road 
                to Pawcatuck Rock, Stonington, Connecticut, and 
                Westerly, Rhode Island.
          (143) Nashua river, massachusetts.--The following 
        segments:
                  (A) The approximately 19-mile segment of the 
                mainstem of the Nashua River from the 
                confluence with the North and South Nashua 
                Rivers in Lancaster, Massachusetts, north to 
                the Massachusetts-New Hampshire State line, 
                excluding the approximately 4.8-mile segment of 
                the mainstem of the Nashua River from the Route 
                119 bridge in Groton, Massachusetts, downstream 
                to the confluence with the Nissitissit River in 
                Pepperell, Massachusetts.
                  (B) The 10-mile segment of the Squannacook 
                River from the headwaters at Ash Swamp 
                downstream to the confluence with the Nashua 
                River in the towns of Shirley and Ayer, 
                Massachusetts.
                  (C) The 3.5-mile segment of the Nissitissit 
                River from the Massachusetts-New Hampshire 
                State line downstream to the confluence with 
                the Nashua River in Pepperell, Massachusetts.
          (144) York river, maine.--The segment of the York 
        River that flows 11.25 miles from the headwaters of the 
        York River at York Pond to the mouth of the river at 
        York Harbor, and any associated tributaries.
          (__) Kissimmee river, florida.--The segment from the 
        southern shore of Lake Kissimmee to its confluence with 
        Lake Okeechobee.
  (b)(1) The studies of rivers named in subparagraphs (28) 
through (55) of subsection (a) of this section shall be 
completed and reports thereon submitted by not later than 
October 2, 1979: Provided, That with respect to the rivers 
named in subparagraphs (33), (50), and (51), the Secretaries 
shall not commence any studies until (i) the State legislature 
has acted with respect to such rivers or (ii) one year from the 
date of enactment of this Act, whichever is earlier. Studies of 
the river named in paragraphs (38), (55), (83), and (87) shall 
be completed and the reports transmitted to the Congress not 
later than January 1, 1987.
  (2) The study of the river named in subparagraph (56) of 
subsection (a) of this section shall be completed and the 
report thereon submitted by not later than January 3, 1976.
  (3) The studies of the rivers named in paragraphs (59) 
through (76) of subsection (a) shall be completed and reports 
submitted thereon not later than five full fiscal years after 
the date of the enactment of this paragraph. The study of 
rivers named in paragraphs (62) through (64) of subsection (a) 
shall be completed and the report thereon submitted by not 
later than April 1981. The study of the river named in 
paragraph (90) of subsection (a) shall be completed not later 
than three years after the date of the enactment of this 
sentence. The study of the river named in paragraph (93) of 
subsection (a) shall be completed not later than three years 
after the date of the enactment of this sentence.
  (4) For the purposes of conducting the studies of the rivers 
named in subsection (a), there are authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as necessary.
  (5) The studies of the rivers in paragraphs (77) through (88) 
shall be completed and reports transmitted thereon not later 
than three full fiscal years from date of enactment of this 
paragraph. For the rivers listed in paragraphs (77), (78), and 
(79) the studies prepared and transmitted to the Congress 
pursuant to section 105(c) of the Naval Petroleum Reserves 
Production Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-258) shall satisfy the 
requirements of this section.
  (6) Studies of rivers listed in paragraphs (80) and (81) 
shall be completed, and reports submitted within and not later 
than the time when the Bristol Bay Cooperative Region Plan is 
submitted to Congress in Accordance with section 1204 of the 
Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act.
  (7) The study of the West Branch of the Framington River 
identified in paragraph (92) of subsection (a) shall be 
completed and the report submitted thereon not later than the 
end of the third fiscal year beginning after the enactment of 
this paragraph. Such report shall include a discussion of 
management alternatives for the river if it were to be included 
in the national wild and scenic river system.
  (8) The study of the Merrimack River, New Hampshire, shall be 
completed and the report thereon submitted not later than three 
years after the date of enactment of this paragraph.
  (9) The study of the Pemigewasset River, New Hampshire, shall 
be completed and the report thereon submitted not later than 
three years after the date of enactment of this paragraph.
  (10) The study of the river named in paragraph (106) of 
subsection (a) shall be completed not later than three years 
after the date of enactment of this paragraph. In carrying out 
the study, the Secretary of the Interior shall consult with the 
Governors of the States of Florida and Georgia or their 
representatives, representatives of affected local governments, 
and owners of land adjacent to the river. Such consultation 
shall include participation in the assessment of resource 
values and the development of alternatives for the protection 
of those resource values, and shall be carried out through 
public meetings and media notification. The study shall also 
include a recommendation on the part of the Secretary as to the 
role the States, local governments and landowners should play 
in the management of the river if it were designated as a 
component of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.
  (11) The study of the Lamprey River, New Hampshire, shall be 
completed by the Secretary of the Interior and the report 
thereon submitted not later than 3 years after the date of 
enactment of this paragraph.
  (12)(A) The study of the White Clay Creek in Delaware and 
Pennsylvania shall be completed and the report submitted not 
later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this 
paragraph.
  (B) In carrying out the study, the Secretary of the Interior 
shall prepare a map of the White Clay Creek watershed in 
Delaware and Pennsylvania, and shall develop a recommended 
management plan for the White Clay Creek. The plan shall 
provide recommendations as to the protection and management of 
the White Clay Creek, including the role the State and local 
governments, and affected landowners, should play in the 
management of the White Clay Creek if it is designated as a 
component of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System.
  (C) The Secretary shall prepare the study, including the 
recommended management plan, in cooperation and consultation 
with appropriate State and local governments, and affected 
landowners.
  (13) The study of segments of the Brule, Carp, Little 
Manistee, White, Paint, Presque Isle, Ontonagon, Sturgeon 
(Hiawatha), Sturgeon (Ottawa), Whitefish, and Tahquamenon 
Rivers in Michigan under subsection (a) shall be completed by 
the Secretary of Agriculture and the report submitted thereon 
not later than at the end of the third fiscal year beginning 
after the date of enactment of this paragraph. For purposes of 
such river studies, the Secretary shall consult with each River 
Study Committee authorized under section 5 of the Michigan 
Scenic Rivers Act of 1990, and shall encourage public 
participation and involvement through hearings, workshops, and 
such other means as are necessary to be effective.
  (14)(A) The study of the Delaware River segments and 
tributaries designated for potential addition to the National 
Wild and Scenic Rivers System pursuant to section 5(a)(  ) of 
this Act shall be completed and the report submitted to 
Congress not later than one year after the date of enactment of 
this paragraph.
  (B) The Secretary shall--
          (i) prepare the study in cooperation and consultation 
        with appropriate Federal, State, regional, and local 
        agencies, including but not limited to, the 
        Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, the 
        New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and 
        Energy, the Delaware and Lehigh Navigation Canal 
        National Heritage Corridor Commission, and the Delaware 
        and Raritan Canal Commission; and
          (ii) consider previous plans for the protection of 
        affected cultural, recreational, and natural resources 
        (including water supply and water quality) and existing 
        State and local regulations, so as to avoid unnecessary 
        duplication.
  (C) Pursuant to section 11(b)(1) of this Act, the Secretary 
shall undertake a river conservation plan for the segment of 
the Delaware River from the northern city limits of Trenton, 
New Jersey, to the Southern boundary of Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania.
  (15) The study of the Rio Grande in New Mexico shall be 
completed and the report submitted not later than 3 years after 
the date of enactment of this paragraph.
  (16) The study of the Wekiva River and the tributaries 
designated in paragraph (136) of subsection (a) shall be 
completed and the report transmitted to Congress not later than 
two years after the date of the enactment of this paragraph.
  (17) Taunton River, Massachusetts.--Not later than 3 years 
after the date of the enactment of this paragraph, the 
Secretary of the Interior--
          (A) shall complete the study of the Taunton River, 
        Massachusetts; and
          (B) shall submit to Congress a report describing the 
        results of the study.
  (18) The study of the Eightmile River, Connecticut, named in 
paragraph (138) of subsection (a) shall be completed by the 
Secretary of the Interior and the report thereon submitted to 
Congress not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment 
of this paragraph.
          (19) Missisquoi and trout rivers, vermont.--Not later 
        than 3 years after the date on which funds are made 
        available to carry out this paragraph, the Secretary of 
        the Interior shall--
                  (A) complete the study of the Missisquoi and 
                Trout Rivers, Vermont, described in subsection 
                (a)(140); and
                  (B) submit a report describing the results of 
                that study to the appropriate committees of 
                Congress.
          (20) Oregon caves national monument and preserve, 
        oregon.--Not later than 3 years after the date on which 
        funds are made available to carry out this paragraph, 
        the Secretary shall--
                  (A) complete the study of the Oregon Caves 
                National Monument and Preserve segments 
                described in subsection (a)(141); and
                  (B) submit to Congress a report containing 
                the results of the study.
          (21) Beaver, chipuxet, queen, wood, and pawcatuck 
        rivers, rhode island and connecticut; nashua river, 
        massachusetts; york river, maine.--
                  (A) In general.--Not later than 3 years after 
                the date on which funds are made available to 
                carry out this paragraph, the Secretary of the 
                Interior shall--
                          (i) complete each of the studies 
                        described in paragraphs (142), (143), 
                        and (144) of subsection (a); and
                          (ii) submit to the Committee on 
                        Natural Resources of the House of 
                        Representatives and the Committee on 
                        Energy and Natural Resources of the 
                        Senate a report that describes the 
                        results of each of the studies.
                  (B) Report requirements.--In assessing the 
                potential additions to the wild and scenic 
                river system, the report submitted under 
                subparagraph (A)(ii) shall--
                          (i) determine the effect of the 
                        designation on--
                                  (I) existing commercial and 
                                recreational activities, such 
                                as hunting, fishing, trapping, 
                                recreational shooting, motor 
                                boat use, and bridge 
                                construction;
                                  (II) the authorization, 
                                construction, operation, 
                                maintenance, or improvement of 
                                energy production, 
                                transmission, or other 
                                infrastructure; and
                                  (III) the authority of State 
                                and local governments to manage 
                                the activities described in 
                                subclauses (I) and (II);
                          (ii) identify any authorities that, 
                        in a case in which an area studied 
                        under paragraph (142), (143), or (144) 
                        of subsection (a) is designated under 
                        this Act--
                                  (I) would authorize or 
                                require the Secretary of the 
                                Interior--
                                          (aa) to influence 
                                        local land use 
                                        decisions, such as 
                                        zoning; or
                                          (bb) to place 
                                        restrictions on non-
                                        Federal land if 
                                        designated under this 
                                        Act; and
                                  (II) the Secretary of the 
                                Interior may use to condemn 
                                property; and
                          (iii) identify any private property 
                        located in an area studied under 
                        paragraph (142), (143), or (144) of 
                        subsection (a).
          (__) Kissimmee river, florida.--
                  (A) In general.--Not later than 3 years after 
                the date on which funds are made available to 
                carry out this paragraph, the Secretary of the 
                Interior shall complete a study of the 
                Kissimmee River, as described in subsection 
                (a)(__), and submit a report describing the 
                results of such study to the Committee on 
                Natural Resources of the House of 
                Representatives and the Committee on Energy and 
                Natural Resources of the Senate.
                  (B) Report requirements.--The report required 
                under subparagraph (A) shall--
                          (i) include a discussion of the 
                        effect of the designation of the 
                        segment to be studied under subsection 
                        (a)(__) on--
                                  (I) existing commercial and 
                                recreational activities, such 
                                as cattle ranching, dairy 
                                production, hunting, fishing, 
                                trapping, recreational 
                                shooting, motor boat use, or 
                                bridge construction;
                                  (II) the authorization, 
                                construction, operation, 
                                maintenance, or improvement of 
                                energy production and 
                                transmission infrastructure;
                                  (III) military operations; 
                                and
                                  (IV) the authority of State 
                                and local governments to manage 
                                the activities described in 
                                subclauses (I) and (II); and
                          (ii) identify--
                                  (I) all authorities that will 
                                authorize or require the 
                                Secretary of the Interior to 
                                influence local land use 
                                decisions (such as zoning) or 
                                place restrictions on non-
                                Federal land if the area 
                                studied under subsection 
                                (a)(__) is designated under the 
                                Wild and Scenic Rivers Act;
                                  (II) all authorities that the 
                                Secretary of the Interior may 
                                use to condemn property if the 
                                area studied under subsection 
                                (a)(__) is designated under the 
                                Wild and Scenic Rivers Act; and
                                  (III) all private property 
                                located in the area to be 
                                studied under subsection 
                                (a)(__).
                  (C) Noninterference.--This study shall not 
                interfere with the Kissimmee River Restoration 
                Project authorized under section 101(8) of the 
                Water Resources Development Act of 1992 (Public 
                Law 102-580).
  (c) The study of any of said rivers shall be pursued in as 
close cooperation with appropriate agencies of the affected 
State and its political subdivisions as possible, shall be 
carried on jointly with such agencies if request for such joint 
study is made by the State, and shall include a determination 
of the degree to which the State or its political subdivisions 
might participate in the preservation and administration of the 
river should it be proposed for inclusion in the national wild 
and scenic rivers system.
  (d)(1) In all planning for the use and development of water 
and related land resources, consideration shall be given by all 
Federal agencies involved to potential national wild, scenic 
and recreational river areas, and all river basin and project 
plan reports submitted to the Congress shall consider and 
discuss any such potentials. The Secretary of the Interior and 
the Secretary of Agriculture shall make specific studies and 
investigations to determine which additional wild, scenic and 
recreational river areas within the United States shall be 
evaluated in planning reports by all Federal agencies as 
potential alternative uses of the water and related land 
resources involved.
          (2) The Congress finds that the Secretary of the 
        Interior, in preparing the Nationwide Rivers Inventory 
        as a specific study for possible additions to the 
        National Wild and Scenic Rivers System, identified the 
        Upper Klamath River from below the John Boyle Dam to 
        the Oregon-California State line. The Secretary, acting 
        through the Bureau of Land Management, is authorized 
        under this subsection to complete a study of the 
        eligibility and suitability of such segment for 
        potential addition to the National Wild and Scenic 
        Rivers System. Such study shall be completed, and a 
        report containing the results of the study shall be 
        submitted to Congress by April 1, 1990. Nothing in this 
        paragraph shall affect the authority or 
        responsibilities of any other Federal agency with 
        respect to activities or actions on this segment and 
        its immediate environment.

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