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                                                 Union Calendar No. 851
                                                 
115th Congress }                                              {  Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session    }                                              {  115-1099

======================================================================



 
    SUMMARY ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND 
                 INFRASTRUCTURE FOR THE 115TH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

  December 21, 2018.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Shuster, from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

       JURISDICTION OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND 
                             INFRASTRUCTURE


    The jurisdiction of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure, as prescribed by clause 1(r) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, is as follows:
    (1) Coast Guard, including lifesaving service, lighthouses, 
lightships, ocean derelicts, and the Coast Guard Academy.
    (2) Federal management of emergencies and natural 
disasters.
    (3) Flood control and improvement of rivers and harbors.
    (4) Inland waterways.
    (5) Inspection of merchant marine vessels, lights and 
signals, lifesaving equipment, and fire protection on such 
vessels.
    (6) Navigation and laws relating thereto, including 
pilotage.
    (7) Registering and licensing of vessels and small boats.
    (8) Rules and international arrangements to prevent 
collisions at sea.
    (9) The Capitol Building and the Senate and House Office 
Buildings.
    (10) Construction or maintenance of roads and post roads 
(other than appropriations therefor).
    (11) Construction or reconstruction, maintenance, and care 
of buildings and grounds of the Botanic Garden, the Library of 
Congress, and the Smithsonian Institution.
    (12) Merchant marine (except for national security aspects 
thereof).
    (13) Purchase of sites and construction of post offices, 
customhouses, Federal courthouses, and Government buildings 
within the District of Columbia.
    (14) Oil and other pollution of navigable waters, including 
inland, coastal, and ocean waters.
    (15) Marine affairs, including coastal zone management, as 
they relate to oil and other pollution of navigable waters.
    (16) Public buildings and occupied or improved grounds of 
the United States generally.
    (17) Public works for the benefit of navigation, including 
bridges and dams (other than international bridges and dams).
    (18) Related transportation regulatory agencies (except the 
Transportation Security Administration).
    (19) Roads and the safety thereof.
    (20) Transportation, including civil aviation, railroads, 
water transportation, transportation safety (except automobile 
safety and transportation security functions of the Department 
of Homeland Security), transportation infrastructure, 
transportation labor, and railroad retirement and unemployment 
(except revenue measures related thereto).
    (21) Water power.

  RULES OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE, UNITED 
            STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, 115TH CONGRESS


                       (Adopted January 31, 2017)


Rule I. General Provisions

    (a) Applicability of House Rules.--
          (1) In general.--The Rules of the House are the rules 
        of the Committee and its subcommittees so far as 
        applicable, except that a motion to recess from day to 
        day, and a motion to dispense with the first reading 
        (in full) of a bill or resolution, if printed copies 
        are available, are non-debatable privileged motions in 
        the Committee and its subcommittees.
          (2) Subcommittees.--Each subcommittee is part of the 
        Committee, and is subject to the authority and 
        direction of the Committee and its rules so far as 
        applicable.
          (3) Incorporation of House Rule on Committee 
        procedure.--Rule XI of the Rules of the House, which 
        pertains entirely to Committee procedure, is 
        incorporated and made a part of the rules of the 
        Committee to the extent applicable. Pursuant to clause 
        2(a)(3) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House, the 
        Chairman of the Committee is authorized to offer a 
        motion under clause 1 of Rule XXII of the Rules of the 
        House whenever the Chairman considers it appropriate.
  (b) Publication of Rules.--Pursuant to clause 2(a) of Rule XI 
of the Rules of the House, the Committee's rules shall be 
publicly available in electronic form and published in the 
Congressional Record not later than 30 days after the Chairman 
is elected in each odd-numbered year.
  (c) Vice Chairman.--The Chairman shall appoint a vice 
chairman of the Committee and of each subcommittee. If the 
Chairman of the Committee or subcommittee is not present at any 
meeting of the Committee or subcommittee, as the case may be, 
the vice chairman shall preside. If the vice chairman is not 
present, the ranking member of the majority party on the 
Committee or subcommittee who is present shall preside at that 
meeting.

Rule II. Regular, Additional, and Special Meetings

  (a) Regular Meetings.--Regular meetings of the Committee 
shall be held on the last Wednesday of every month to transact 
its business unless such day is a holiday, or the House is in 
recess or is adjourned, in which case the Chairman shall 
determine the regular meeting day of the Committee for that 
month. A regular meeting of the Committee may be dispensed with 
if, in the judgment of the Chairman, there is no need for the 
meeting. This paragraph shall not apply to meetings of any 
subcommittee.
    (b) Additional Meetings.--The Chairman may call and 
convene, as he or she considers necessary, additional meetings 
of the Committee for the consideration of any bill or 
resolution pending before the Committee or for the conduct of 
other committee business. The Committee shall meet for such 
purpose pursuant to the call of the Chairman.
    (c) Special Meetings.--If at least three members of the 
Committee desire that a special meeting of the Committee be 
called by the Chairman, those members may file in the offices 
of the Committee their written request to the Chairman for that 
special meeting. Such request shall specify the measure or 
matter to be considered. Immediately upon the filing of the 
request, the clerk of the Committee shall notify the Chairman 
of the filing of the request. If, within 3 calendar days after 
the filing of the request, the Chairman does not call the 
requested special meeting to be held within 7 calendar days 
after the filing of the request, a majority of the members of 
the Committee may file in the offices of the Committee their 
written notice that a special meeting of the Committee will be 
held, specifying the date and hour thereof, and the measure or 
matter to be considered at that special meeting. The Committee 
shall meet on that date and hour. Immediately upon the filing 
of the notice, the clerk of the Committee shall notify all 
members of the Committee that such meeting will be held and 
inform them of its date and hour and the measure or matter to 
be considered; and only the measure or matter specified in that 
notice may be considered at that special meeting. Such notice 
shall also be made publicly available in electronic form and 
shall be deemed to satisfy paragraph (d)(1).
    (d) Notice.--
          (1) Minimum notice period.--Pursuant to clause 
        2(g)(3) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House, the 
        Chairman shall make a public announcement of the date, 
        place, and subject matter of a Committee or 
        subcommittee meeting, which may not commence earlier 
        than the third day on which members have notice 
        thereof.
          (2) Changes in meeting times.--A meeting may commence 
        sooner than announced if the Chairman, with concurrence 
        of the ranking minority member, determines there is 
        good cause to begin the meeting sooner or the Committee 
        or subcommittee so determines by majority vote, a 
        quorum being present for the transaction of business. 
        The Chairman shall make a public announcement of the 
        meeting time change at the earliest possible 
        opportunity.
          (3) Notification of Daily Digest Clerk.--The clerk of 
        the Committee shall notify the Daily Digest Clerk of 
        the Congressional Record as soon as possible after a 
        public announcement of a time change for a Committee or 
        subcommittee meeting is made under this paragraph.
    (e) Prohibition on Sitting During Joint Session.--The 
Committee may not sit during a joint session of the House and 
Senate or during a recess when a joint meeting of the House and 
Senate is in progress.

Rule III. Meetings and Hearings Generally

    (a) Minimum Period For Availability of Committee Markup 
Text.--Pursuant to clause 2(g)(4) of Rule XI of the Rules of 
the House, the Chairman shall make publicly available, in 
electronic form, the text of any legislation to be marked up at 
least 24 hours prior to the commencement of a meeting for the 
markup of legislation, or at the time of a meeting announcement 
under paragraph (d)(2) of Committee Rule II if made within 24 
hours before such meeting.
    (b) Open Meetings.--Each meeting for the transaction of 
business, including the markup of legislation, and each hearing 
of the Committee or a subcommittee shall be open to the public, 
except as provided by clause 2(g) of Rule XI of the Rules of 
the House.
    (c) Meetings To Begin Promptly.--Each meeting or hearing of 
the Committee shall begin promptly at the time so stipulated in 
the public announcement of the meeting or hearing.
    (d) Addressing the Committee.--Except as provided under 
paragraph (e) of Committee Rule VI, a Committee member may 
address the Committee or a subcommittee on any bill, motion, or 
other matter under consideration--
          (1) only when recognized by the Chairman for that 
        purpose; and
          (2) only for 5 minutes, or for a period of time 
        designated by the Chairman with concurrence of the 
        ranking minority member, until such time as each member 
        of the Committee or subcommittee who so desires has had 
        an opportunity to address the Committee or 
        subcommittee.
    A member shall be limited in his or her remarks to the 
subject matter under consideration. The Chairman shall enforce 
this paragraph.
    (e) Participation of Members in Subcommittee Meetings and 
Hearings.--All members of the Committee who are not members of 
a particular subcommittee may, by unanimous consent of the 
members of such subcommittee, participate in any subcommittee 
meeting or hearing. However, a member who is not a member of 
the subcommittee may not vote on any matter before the 
subcommittee, be counted for purposes of establishing a quorum, 
or raise points of order.
    (f) Broadcasting.--Whenever a meeting for the transaction 
of business, including the markup of legislation, or a hearing 
is open to the public, that meeting or hearing shall be open to 
coverage by television, radio, and still photography in 
accordance with clause 4 of Rule XI of the Rules of the House. 
Operation and use of any Committee Internet broadcast system 
shall be fair and nonpartisan and in accordance with clause 
4(b) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House and all other 
applicable rules of the Committee and the House. Further, 
pursuant to clause 2(e)(5) of Rule XI of the Rules of the 
House, the Committee shall provide audio and video coverage of 
each hearing or meeting for the transaction of business in a 
manner that allows the public to easily listen to and view the 
proceedings. The Committee shall also maintain the recordings 
of such coverage in a manner that is easily accessible to the 
public.
    (g) Access to the Dais and Lounges.--Access to the hearing 
rooms' daises and to the lounges adjacent to the Committee 
hearing rooms shall be limited to Members of Congress and 
employees of Congress during a meeting or hearing of the 
Committee unless specifically permitted by the Chairman or 
ranking minority member.
    (h) Use of Cellular Telephones.--During a hearing, markup, 
or other meeting of the Committee, ringing or audible sounds or 
conversational use of cellular telephones or other electronic 
devices is prohibited in the Committee room.
    (i) Availability of Text of Amendments in Electronic 
Form.--Pursuant to clause 2(e) of Rule XI of the Rules of the 
House, not later than 24 hours after the adoption of any 
amendment to a measure or matter considered by the Committee, 
the Chairman shall cause the text of the amendment to be made 
publicly available in electronic form.

Rule IV. Power to Sit and Act; Power to Conduct Investigations; Oaths; 
        Subpoena Power

    (a) Authority To Sit and Act.--For the purpose of carrying 
out any of its functions and duties under Rules X and XI of the 
Rules of the House, the Committee and each of its 
subcommittees, is authorized (subject to paragraph (d)(1))--
          (1) to sit and act at such times and places within 
        the United States whether the House is in session, has 
        recessed, or has adjourned and to hold such hearings; 
        and
          (2) to require, by subpoena or otherwise, the 
        attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the 
        production of such books, records, correspondence, 
        memorandums, papers, and documents, as it deems 
        necessary.
    (b) Authority To Conduct Investigations.--
          (1) In general.--The Committee is authorized at any 
        time to conduct such investigations and studies as it 
        may consider necessary or appropriate in the exercise 
        of its responsibilities under Rule X of the Rules of 
        the House and (subject to the adoption of expense 
        resolutions as required by Rule X, clause 6 of the 
        Rules of the House) to incur expenses (including travel 
        expenses) in connection therewith.
          (2) Major investigations by subcommittees.--A 
        subcommittee may not begin a major investigation 
        without approval of a majority of such subcommittee.
    (c) Oaths.--The Chairman, or any member designated by the 
Chairman, may administer oaths to any witness.
    (d) Issuance of Subpoenas.--
          (1) In general.--A subpoena may be issued by the 
        Committee or subcommittee under paragraph (a)(2) in the 
        conduct of any investigation or activity or series of 
        investigations or activities, only when authorized by a 
        majority of the members voting, a majority being 
        present. Such authorized subpoenas shall be signed by 
        the Chairman of the Committee or by any member 
        designated by the Committee. If a specific request for 
        a subpoena has not been previously rejected by either 
        the Committee or subcommittee, the Chairman of the 
        Committee, after consultation with the ranking minority 
        member of the Committee, may authorize and issue a 
        subpoena under paragraph (a)(2) in the conduct of any 
        investigation or activity or series of investigations 
        or activities, and such subpoena shall for all purposes 
        be deemed a subpoena issued by the Committee. As soon 
        as practicable after a subpoena is issued under this 
        rule, the Chairman shall notify all members of the 
        Committee of such action.
          (2) Enforcement.--Compliance with any subpoena issued 
        by the Committee or subcommittee under paragraph (a)(2) 
        may be enforced only as authorized or directed by the 
        House.
    (e) Expenses of Subpoenaed Witnesses.--Each witness who has 
been subpoenaed, upon the completion of his or her testimony 
before the Committee or any subcommittee, may report to the 
offices of the Committee, and there sign appropriate vouchers 
for travel allowances and attendance fees. If hearings are held 
in cities other than Washington, D.C., the witness may contact 
the counsel of the Committee, or his or her representative, 
before leaving the hearing room.

Rule V. Quorums and Record Votes; Postponement of Votes

    (a) Working Quorum.--One-third of the members of the 
Committee or a subcommittee shall constitute a quorum for 
taking any action other than the closing of a meeting pursuant 
to clauses 2(g) and 2(k)(5) of Rule XI of the Rules of the 
House, the authorizing of a subpoena pursuant to paragraph (d) 
of Committee Rule IV, the reporting of a measure or 
recommendation pursuant to paragraph (b)(1) of Committee Rule 
VII, and the actions described in paragraphs (b), (c) and (d) 
of this rule.
    (b) Quorum for Reporting.--A majority of the members of the 
Committee or a subcommittee shall constitute a quorum for the 
reporting of a measure or recommendation.
    (c) Approval of Certain Matters.--A majority of the members 
of the Committee or a subcommittee shall constitute a quorum 
for approval of a resolution concerning any of the following 
actions:
          (1) A prospectus for construction, alteration, 
        purchase or acquisition of a public building or the 
        lease of space as required by section 3307 of title 40, 
        United States Code.
          (2) Survey investigation of a proposed project for 
        navigation, flood control, and other purposes by the 
        Corps of Engineers (section 4 of the Rivers and Harbors 
        Act of March 4, 1913, 33 U.S.C. 542).
          (3) Construction of a water resources development 
        project by the Corps of Engineers with an estimated 
        Federal cost not exceeding $15,000,000 (section 201 of 
        the Flood Control Act of 1965).
          (4) Deletion of water quality storage in a Federal 
        reservoir project where the benefits attributable to 
        water quality are 15 percent or more but not greater 
        than 25 percent of the total project benefits (section 
        65 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1974).
          (5) Authorization of a Natural Resources Conservation 
        Service watershed project involving any single 
        structure of more than 4,000 acre feet of total 
        capacity (section 2 of P.L. 566, 83rd Congress).
    (d) Quorum for Taking Testimony.--Two members of the 
Committee or subcommittee shall constitute a quorum for the 
purpose of taking testimony and receiving evidence.
    (e) Record Votes.--A record vote may be demanded by one-
fifth of the members present.
    (f) Postponement of Votes.--
          (1) In general.--In accordance with clause 2(h)(4) of 
        Rule XI of the Rules of the House, the Chairman of the 
        Committee or a subcommittee, after consultation with 
        the ranking minority member of the Committee or 
        subcommittee, may--
                  (A) postpone further proceedings when a 
                record vote is ordered on the question of 
                approving a measure or matter or on adopting an 
                amendment; and
                  (B) resume proceedings on a postponed 
                question at any time after reasonable notice.
          (2) Resumption of proceedings.--When proceedings 
        resume on a postponed question, notwithstanding any 
        intervening order for the previous question, an 
        underlying proposition shall remain subject to further 
        debate or amendment to the same extent as when the 
        question was postponed.
    (g) Availability of Record Votes in Electronic Form.--
Pursuant to clause 2(e)(1)(B)(i) of Rule XI of the Rules of the 
House, the Chairman shall make the result of any record vote 
publicly available for inspection at reasonable times in the 
offices of the Committee and in electronic form within 48 hours 
of such record vote.

Rule VI. Hearing Procedures

    (a) Announcement of Hearing.--
          (1) Minimum notice period.--Pursuant to clause 
        2(g)(3) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House, the 
        Chairman shall make a public announcement of the date, 
        place, and subject matter of a Committee or 
        subcommittee hearing, which may not commence earlier 
        than the one week after such notice.
          (2) Changes in hearing times.--A hearing may commence 
        sooner than announced if the Chairman, with concurrence 
        of the ranking minority member, determines there is 
        good cause to begin the hearing sooner or the Committee 
        so determines by majority vote, a quorum being present 
        for the transaction of business. The Chairman shall 
        make a public announcement of the hearing time change 
        at the earliest possible opportunity.
          (3) Notification of Daily Digest Clerk.--The clerk of 
        the Committee shall notify the Daily Digest Clerk of 
        the Congressional Record as soon as possible after a 
        public announcement of a time change for a Committee or 
        subcommittee hearing is made under this paragraph.
    (b) Written Statement; Oral Testimony.--
          (1) Filing of statement.--So far as practicable, each 
        witness who is to appear before the Committee or a 
        subcommittee shall file with the clerk of the Committee 
        or subcommittee, at least 2 working days before the day 
        of his or her appearance, a written statement of 
        proposed testimony. The Chairman, with the concurrence 
        of the ranking minority member, may take the following 
        actions for failure to comply with this requirement: 
        (A) exclude such witness' written testimony from the 
        hearing record; (B) bar such witness' oral presentation 
        of the testimony; or (C) both (A) and (B). Each witness 
        shall limit his or her oral presentation to a summary 
        of the written statement.
          (2) Truth in testimony information.--Pursuant to 
        clause 2(g)(5) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House, in 
        the case of a witness appearing in a nongovernmental 
        capacity, a written statement of proposed testimony 
        shall include a curriculum vitae and a disclosure of 
        the amount and source of each Federal grant (or 
        subgrant thereof) or contract (or subcontract thereof), 
        or the amount and country of origin of any contract or 
        payment originating with a foreign government, received 
        during the current calendar year or either of the two 
        previous calendar years by the witness or by an entity 
        represented by the witness and related to the subject 
        matter of the hearing.
          (3) Availability of information in electronic form.--
        Statements filed under this paragraph, with appropriate 
        redaction to protect the privacy of the witness, shall 
        be made publicly available in electronic form not later 
        than one day after the witness appears.
    (c) Minority Witnesses.--When any hearing is conducted by 
the Committee or any subcommittee upon any measure or matter, 
the minority party members on the Committee or subcommittee 
shall be entitled, upon request to the Chairman by a majority 
of those minority members before the completion of such 
hearing, to call witnesses selected by the minority to testify 
with respect to that measure or matter during at least one day 
of hearing thereon.
    (d) Summary of Subject Matter.--Upon announcement of a 
hearing, to the extent practicable, the Committee shall make 
available immediately to all members of the Committee a concise 
summary of the subject matter (including legislative reports 
and other material) under consideration. In addition, upon 
announcement of a hearing and subsequently as they are 
received, the Chairman shall make available to the members of 
the Committee any official reports from departments and 
agencies on such matter.
    (e) Opening Statements; Questioning of Witnesses.--
          (1) Opening Statements.--
                  (A) Chairman and Ranking Member.--At a 
                hearing of the Full Committee, the Chairman and 
                ranking minority member of the Committee shall 
                each be entitled to present an oral opening 
                statement of five minutes. At a hearing of a 
                subcommittee, the Chairman and ranking minority 
                member of the Committee and the Chairman and 
                ranking minority member of the subcommittee 
                shall each be entitled to present an opening 
                statement for five minutes.
                  (B) Other Members.--At a hearing of the Full 
                Committee or a subcommittee, other members of 
                the Committee or subcommittee, as appropriate, 
                may submit written opening statements for the 
                record. The Chairman presiding over the hearing 
                may permit oral opening statements by other 
                members of the Committee or subcommittee, as 
                appropriate, with the concurrence of the 
                ranking minority member.
          (2) Questioning of Witnesses.--The questioning of 
        witnesses in Committee and subcommittee hearings shall 
        be initiated by the Chairman, followed by the ranking 
        minority member and all other members alternating 
        between the majority and minority parties. In 
        recognizing members to question witnesses in this 
        fashion, the Chairman shall take into consideration the 
        ratio of the majority to minority members present and 
        shall establish the order of recognition for 
        questioning in such a manner as not to disadvantage the 
        members of the majority nor the members of the 
        minority. The Chairman may accomplish this by 
        recognizing two majority members for each minority 
        member recognized.
    (f) Procedures for Questions.--
          (1) In general.--A Committee member may question a 
        witness at a hearing--
                  (A) only when recognized by the Chairman for 
                that purpose; and
                  (B) subject to subparagraphs (2) and (3), 
                only for 5 minutes until such time as each 
                member of the Committee or subcommittee who so 
                desires has had an opportunity to question the 
                witness.
    A member shall be limited in his or her remarks to the 
subject matter under consideration. The Chairman shall enforce 
this subparagraph.
          (2) Extended questioning of witnesses by members.--
        The Chairman of the Committee or a subcommittee, with 
        the concurrence of the ranking minority member, or the 
        Committee or subcommittee by motion, may permit a 
        specified number of its members to question a witness 
        for longer than 5 minutes. The time for extended 
        questioning of a witness under this subdivision shall 
        be equal for the majority party and minority party and 
        may not exceed one hour in the aggregate.
          (3) Extended questioning of witnesses by staff.--The 
        Chairman of the Committee or a subcommittee, with the 
        concurrence of the ranking minority member, or the 
        Committee or subcommittee by motion, may permit 
        Committee staff for its majority and minority party 
        members to question a witness for equal specified 
        periods. The time for extended questioning of a witness 
        under this subdivision shall be equal for the majority 
        party and minority party and may not exceed one hour in 
        the aggregate.
          (4) Right to question witnesses following extended 
        questioning.--Nothing in subparagraph (2) or (3) 
        affects the right of a member (other than a member 
        designated under subparagraph (2)) to question a 
        witness for 5 minutes in accordance with subparagraph 
        (1)(B) after the questioning permitted under 
        subparagraph (2) or (3).
    (g) Additional Hearing Procedures.--Clause 2(k) of Rule XI 
of the Rules of the House (relating to additional rules for 
hearings) applies to hearings of the Committee and its 
subcommittees.

Rule VII. Procedures for Reporting Bills, Resolutions, and Reports

    (a) Filing of Reports.--
          (1) In general.--The Chairman of the Committee shall 
        report promptly to the House any measure or matter 
        approved by the Committee and take necessary steps to 
        bring the measure or matter to a vote.
          (2) Requests for reporting.--The report of the 
        Committee on a measure or matter which has been 
        approved by the Committee shall be filed within 7 
        calendar days (exclusive of days on which the House is 
        not in session) after the day on which there has been 
        filed with the clerk of the Committee a written 
        request, signed by a majority of the members of the 
        Committee, for the reporting of that measure or matter. 
        Upon the filing of any such request, the clerk of the 
        Committee shall transmit immediately to the Chairman of 
        the Committee notice of the filing of that request.
    (b) Quorum; Record Votes.--
          (1) Quorum.--No measure, matter, or recommendation 
        shall be reported from the Committee unless a majority 
        of the Committee was actually present.
          (2) Record votes.--With respect to each record vote 
        on a motion to report any measure or matter of a public 
        character, and on any amendment offered to the measure 
        or matter, the total number of votes cast for and 
        against, and the names of those members voting for and 
        against, shall be included in the Committee report on 
        the measure or matter.
    (c) Required Matters.--The report of the Committee on a 
measure or matter which has been approved by the Committee 
shall include the items required to be included by clauses 2(c) 
and 3 of Rule XIII of the Rules of the House.
    (d) Additional Views.--If, at the time of approval of any 
measure or matter by the Committee, any member of the Committee 
gives notice of intention to file supplemental, minority, 
additional, or dissenting views, all members shall be entitled 
to not less than two additional calendar days after the day of 
such notice (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays) 
in which to file such written and signed views in accordance 
with clause 2(l) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House.
    (e) Activities Report.--
          (1) In general.--Not later than January 2 of each odd 
        numbered year, the Committee shall submit to the House 
        a report on the activities of the Committee.
          (2) Contents.--The report shall include--
                  (A) separate sections summarizing the 
                legislative and oversight activities of the 
                Committee under Rules X and XI of the Rules of 
                the House during the Congress;
                  (B) a summary of the authorization and 
                oversight plan submitted by the Committee under 
                clause 2(d) of Rule X of the Rules of the 
                House;
                  (C) a summary of the actions taken and 
                recommendations made with respect to the 
                authorization and oversight plan specified in 
                subdivision (B);
                  (D) a summary of any additional oversight 
                activities undertaken by the Committee and any 
                recommendations made or actions taken thereon; 
                and
                  (E) a delineation of any hearings held 
                pursuant to clauses 2(n), (o), or (p) of Rule 
                XI of the Rules of the House.
          (3) Filing.--After an adjournment sine die of the 
        last regular session of a Congress, or after December 
        15 of an even numbered year, whichever occurs first, 
        the Chairman may file the report described in 
        subparagraph (1) with the Clerk of the House at any 
        time and without approval of the Committee, provided 
        that--
                  (A) a copy of the report has been available 
                to each member of the Committee for at least 
                seven calendar days; and
                  (B) the report includes any supplemental, 
                minority, additional, or dissenting views 
                submitted by a member of the Committee.
    (f) Other Committee Materials.--
          (1) In general.--All Committee and subcommittee 
        prints, reports, documents, or other materials, not 
        otherwise provided for under this rule, that purport to 
        express publicly the views of the Committee or any of 
        its subcommittees or members of the Committee or its 
        subcommittees shall be approved by the Committee or the 
        subcommittee prior to printing and distribution and any 
        member shall be given an opportunity to have views 
        included as part of such material prior to printing, 
        release, and distribution in accordance with paragraph 
        (d) of this rule.
          (2) Documents containing views other than member 
        views.--A Committee or subcommittee document containing 
        views other than those of members of the Committee or 
        subcommittee shall not be published without approval of 
        the Committee or subcommittee.
          (3) Disclaimer.--All Committee or subcommittee 
        reports printed pursuant to legislative study or 
        investigation and not approved by a majority vote of 
        the Committee or subcommittee, as appropriate, shall 
        contain the following disclaimer on the cover of such 
        report: ``This report has not been officially adopted 
        by the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
        (or pertinent subcommittee thereof) and may not 
        therefore necessarily reflect the views of its 
        members.''.
          (4) Compilations of laws.--To the maximum extent 
        practicable, the Committee shall publish a compilation 
        of laws under the jurisdiction of each subcommittee.
    (g) Availability of Publications.--Pursuant to clause 
2(e)(4) of Rule XI of the Rules of the House, the Committee 
shall make its publications available in electronic form to the 
maximum extent feasible.

Rule VIII. Establishment of Subcommittees; Size and Party Ratios

    (a) Establishment.--There shall be 6 standing 
subcommittees. These subcommittees, with the following sizes 
(including delegates) and majority/minority ratios, are:
          (1) Subcommittee on Aviation (39 Members: 22 Majority 
        and 17 Minority).
          (2) Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
        Transportation ((16 Members: 9 Majority and 7 
        Minority).
          (3) Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
        Buildings, and Emergency Management (15 Members: 9 
        Majority and 6 Minority).
          (4) Subcommittee on Highways and Transit (50 Members: 
        28 Majority and 22 Minority).
          (5) Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and 
        Hazardous Materials (34 Members: 19 Majority and 15 
        Minority).
          (6) Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment 
        (32 Members: 18 Majority and 14 Minority).
    (b) Ex Officio Members.--The Chairman and ranking minority 
member of the Committee shall serve as ex officio voting 
members on each subcommittee.
    (c) Ratios.--On each subcommittee there shall be a ratio of 
majority party members to minority party members which shall be 
no less favorable to the majority party than the ratio for the 
Full Committee. In calculating the ratio of majority party 
members to minority party members, there shall be included the 
ex officio members of the subcommittees.

Rule IX. Powers and Duties of Subcommittees

    (a) Authority To Sit.--Each subcommittee is authorized to 
meet, hold hearings, receive evidence, and report to the Full 
Committee on all matters referred to it or under its 
jurisdiction. Subcommittee chairmen shall set dates for 
hearings and meetings of their respective subcommittees after 
consultation with the Chairman and other subcommittee chairmen 
with a view toward avoiding simultaneous scheduling of Full 
Committee and subcommittee meetings or hearings whenever 
possible.
    (b) Consideration by Committee.--Each bill, resolution, or 
other matter favorably reported by a subcommittee shall 
automatically be placed upon the agenda of the Committee. Any 
such matter reported by a subcommittee shall not be considered 
by the Committee unless it has been delivered to the offices of 
all members of the Committee at least 48 hours before the 
meeting, unless the Chairman determines that the matter is of 
such urgency that it should be given early consideration. Where 
practicable, such matters shall be accompanied by a comparison 
with present law and a section-by-section analysis.

Rule X. Referral of Legislation to Subcommittees

    (a) General Requirement.--Except where the Chairman of the 
Committee determines, in consultation with the majority members 
of the Committee, that consideration is to be by the Full 
Committee, each bill, resolution, investigation, or other 
matter which relates to a subject listed under the jurisdiction 
of any subcommittee established in Committee Rule VIII referred 
to or initiated by the Full Committee shall be referred by the 
Chairman to all subcommittees of appropriate jurisdiction 
within two weeks. All bills shall be referred to the 
subcommittee of proper jurisdiction without regard to whether 
the author is or is not a member of the subcommittee.
    (b) Recall from Subcommittee.--A bill, resolution, or other 
matter referred to a subcommittee in accordance with this rule 
may be recalled therefrom at any time by a vote of a majority 
of the members of the Committee voting, a quorum being present, 
for the Committee's direct consideration or for reference to 
another subcommittee.
    (c) Multiple Referrals.--In carrying out this rule with 
respect to any matter, the Chairman may refer the matter 
simultaneously to two or more subcommittees for concurrent 
consideration or for consideration in sequence (subject to 
appropriate time limitations in the case of any subcommittee 
after the first), or divide the matter into two or more parts 
(reflecting different subjects and jurisdictions) and refer 
each such part to a different subcommittee, or make such other 
provisions as he or she considers appropriate.

Rule XI. Recommendation of Conferees

    The Chairman of the Committee shall recommend to the 
Speaker as conferees the names of those members (1) of the 
majority party selected by the Chairman, and (2) of the 
minority party selected by the ranking minority member of the 
Committee. Recommendations of conferees to the Speaker shall 
provide a ratio of majority party members to minority party 
members which shall be no less favorable to the majority party 
than the ratio for the Committee.

Rule XII. Oversight

    (a) Purpose.--The Committee shall carry out oversight 
responsibilities as provided in this rule in order to assist 
the House in--
          (1) its analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of--
                  (A) the application, administration, 
                execution, and effectiveness of the laws 
                enacted by the Congress; or
                  (B) conditions and circumstances which may 
                indicate the necessity or desirability of 
                enacting new or additional legislation; and
          (2) its formulation, consideration, and enactment of 
        such modifications or changes in those laws, and of 
        such additional legislation, as may be necessary or 
        appropriate.
    (b) Authorization of Oversight Plan.--Not later than 
February 15 of the first session of each Congress, the 
Committee shall adopt its authorization and oversight plan for 
that Congress in accordance with clause 2(d)(1) of Rule X of 
the Rules of the House.
    (c) Review of Laws and Programs.--The Committee and the 
appropriate subcommittees shall cooperatively review and study, 
on a continuing basis, the application, administration, 
execution, and effectiveness of those laws, or parts of laws, 
the subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction of the 
Committee, and the organization and operation of the Federal 
agencies and entities having responsibilities in or for the 
administration and execution thereof, in order to determine 
whether such laws and the programs thereunder are being 
implemented and carried out in accordance with the intent of 
the Congress and whether such programs should be continued, 
curtailed, or eliminated. In addition, the Committee and the 
appropriate subcommittees shall cooperatively review and study 
any conditions or circumstances which may indicate the 
necessity or desirability of enacting new or additional 
legislation within the jurisdiction of the Committee (whether 
or not any bill or resolution has been introduced with respect 
thereto), and shall on a continuing basis undertake future 
research and forecasting on matters within the jurisdiction of 
the Committee.
    (d) Review of Tax Policies.--The Committee and the 
appropriate subcommittees shall cooperatively review and study 
on a continuing basis the impact or probable impact of tax 
policies affecting subjects within the jurisdiction of the 
Committee.

Rule XIII. Review of Continuing Programs; Budget Act
        Provisions

    (a) Ensuring Annual Appropriations.--The Committee shall, 
in its consideration of all bills and joint resolutions of a 
public character within its jurisdiction, ensure that 
appropriations for continuing programs and activities of the 
Federal Government and the District of Columbia government will 
be made annually to the maximum extent feasible and consistent 
with the nature, requirements, and objectives of the programs 
and activities involved.
    (b) Review of Multi-Year Appropriations.--The Committee 
shall review, from time to time, each continuing program within 
its jurisdiction for which appropriations are not made annually 
in order to ascertain whether such program could be modified so 
that appropriations therefore would be made annually.
    (c) Views and Estimates.--In accordance with clause 4(f)(1) 
of Rule X of the Rules of the House, the Committee shall submit 
to the Committee on the Budget--
          (1) its views and estimates with respect to all 
        matters to be set forth in the concurrent resolution on 
        the budget for the ensuing fiscal year which are within 
        its jurisdiction or functions; and
          (2) an estimate of the total amount of new budget 
        authority, and budget outlays resulting therefrom, to 
        be provided or authorized in all bills and resolutions 
        within its jurisdiction which it intends to be 
        effective during that fiscal yea.
    (d) Budget Allocations.--As soon as practicable after a 
concurrent resolution on the budget for any fiscal year is 
agreed to, the Committee (after consulting with the appropriate 
committee or committees of the Senate) shall subdivide any 
allocations made to it in the joint explanatory statement 
accompanying the conference report on such resolution, and 
promptly report such subdivisions to the House, in the manner 
provided by section 302 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974.
    (e) Reconciliation.--Whenever the Committee is directed in 
a concurrent resolution on the budget to determine and 
recommend changes in laws, bills, or resolutions under the 
reconciliation process, it shall promptly make such 
determination and recommendations, and report a reconciliation 
bill or resolution (or both) to the House or submit such 
recommendations to the Committee on the Budget, in accordance 
with the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

Rule XIV. Records

    (a) Keeping of Records.--The Committee shall keep a 
complete record of all Committee action which shall include--
          (1) in the case of any meeting or hearing 
        transcripts, a substantially verbatim account of 
        remarks actually made during the proceedings, subject 
        only to technical, grammatical, and typographical 
        corrections authorized by the person making the remarks 
        involved; and
          (2) a record of the votes on any question on which a 
        record vote is taken.
    (b) Public Inspection.--The result of each such record vote 
shall be made available by the Committee for inspection by the 
public at reasonable times in the offices of the Committee. 
Information so available for public inspection shall include a 
description of the amendment, motion, order, or other 
proposition and the name of each member voting for and each 
member voting against such amendment, motion, order, or 
proposition, and the names of those members present but not 
voting.
    (c) Property of the House.--All Committee records 
(including hearings, data, charts, and files) shall be kept 
separate and distinct from the congressional office records of 
the member serving as Chairman of the Committee; and such 
records shall be the property of the House and all members of 
the House shall have access thereto.
    (d) Availability of Archived Records.--The records of the 
Committee at the National Archives and Records Administration 
shall be made available for public use in accordance with Rule 
VII of the Rules of the House. The Chairman shall notify the 
ranking minority member of the Committee of any decision, 
pursuant to clause 3(b)(3) or clause 4(b) of such rule, to 
withhold a record otherwise available, and the matter shall be 
presented to the Committee for a determination on written 
request of any member of the Committee.
    (e) Authority To Print.--The Committee is authorized to 
have printed and bound testimony and other data presented at 
hearings held by the Committee. All costs of stenographic 
services and transcripts in connection with any meeting or 
hearing of the Committee shall be paid as provided in clause 
1(c) of Rule XI of the House.

Rule XV. Committee Budgets

    (a) Biennial Budget.--The Chairman, in consultation with 
the chairman of each subcommittee, the majority members of the 
Committee, and the minority members of the Committee, shall, 
for each Congress, prepare a consolidated Committee budget. 
Such budget shall include necessary amounts for staff 
personnel, necessary travel, investigation, and other expenses 
of the Committee.
    (b) Additional Expenses.--Authorization for the payment of 
additional or unforeseen Committee expenses may be procured by 
one or more additional expense resolutions processed in the 
same manner as set out herein.
    (c) Travel Requests.--The Chairman or any chairman of a 
subcommittee may initiate necessary travel requests as provided 
in Committee Rule XVII within the limits of the consolidated 
budget as approved by the House and the Chairman may execute 
necessary vouchers thereof.
    (d) Monthly Reports.--Once monthly, the Chairman shall 
submit to the Committee on House Administration, in writing, a 
full and detailed accounting of all expenditures made during 
the period since the last such accounting from the amount 
budgeted to the Committee. Such report shall show the amount 
and purpose of such expenditure and the budget to which such 
expenditure is attributed. A copy of such monthly report shall 
be available in the Committee office for review by members of 
the Committee.

Rule XVI. Committee Staff

    (a) Appointment by Chairman.--The Chairman shall appoint 
and determine the remuneration of, and may remove, the 
employees of the Committee not assigned to the minority. The 
staff of the Committee not assigned to the minority shall be 
under the general supervision and direction of the Chairman, 
who shall establish and assign the duties and responsibilities 
of such staff members and delegate such authority as he or she 
determines appropriate.
    (b) Appointment by Ranking Minority Member.--The ranking 
minority member of the Committee shall appoint and determine 
the remuneration of, and may remove, the staff assigned to the 
minority within the budget approved for such purposes. The 
staff assigned to the minority shall be under the general 
supervision and direction of the ranking minority member of the 
Committee who may delegate such authority as he or she 
determines appropriate.
    (c) Intention Regarding Staff.--It is intended that the 
skills and experience of all members of the Committee staff 
shall be available to all members of the Committee.

Rule XVII. Travel of Members and Staff

    (a) Approval.--Consistent with the primary expense 
resolution and such additional expense resolutions as may have 
been approved, the provisions of this rule shall govern travel 
of Committee members and staff. Travel to be reimbursed from 
funds set aside for the Committee for any member or any staff 
member shall be paid only upon the prior authorization of the 
Chairman. Travel shall be authorized by the Chairman for any 
member and any staff member in connection with the attendance 
of hearings conducted by the Committee or any subcommittee and 
meetings, conferences, and investigations which involve 
activities or subject matter under the general jurisdiction of 
the Committee. Before such authorization is given there shall 
be submitted to the Chairman in writing the following:
          (1) The purpose of the travel.
          (2) The dates during which the travel is to be made 
        and the date or dates of the event for which the travel 
        is being made.
          (3) The location of the event for which the travel is 
        to be made.
          (4) The names of members and staff seeking 
        authorization.
    (b) Subcommittee Travel.--In the case of travel of members 
and staff of a subcommittee to hearings, meetings, conferences, 
and investigations involving activities or subject matter under 
the legislative assignment of such subcommittee, prior 
authorization must be obtained from the subcommittee chairman 
and the Chairman. Such prior authorization shall be given by 
the Chairman only upon the representation by the chairman of 
such subcommittee in writing setting forth those items 
enumerated in subparagraphs (1), (2), (3), and (4) of paragraph 
(a) and that there has been a compliance where applicable with 
Committee Rule VI.
    (c) Travel Outside the United States.--
          (1) In general.--In the case of travel outside the 
        United States of members and staff of the Committee or 
        of a subcommittee for the purpose of conducting 
        hearings, investigations, studies, or attending 
        meetings and conferences involving activities or 
        subject matter under the legislative assignment of the 
        Committee or pertinent subcommittee, prior 
        authorization must be obtained from the Chairman, or, 
        in the case of a subcommittee from the subcommittee 
        chairman and the Chairman. Before such authorization is 
        given there shall be submitted to the Chairman, in 
        writing, a request for such authorization. Each 
        request, which shall be filed in a manner that allows 
        for a reasonable period of time for review before such 
        travel is scheduled to begin, shall include the 
        following:
                  (A) The purpose of the travel.
                  (B) The dates during which the travel will 
                occur.
                  (C) The names of the countries to be visited 
                and the length of time to be spent in each.
                  (D) An agenda of anticipated activities for 
                each country for which travel is authorized 
                together with a description of the purpose to 
                be served and the areas of Committee 
                jurisdiction involved.
                  (E) The names of members and staff for whom 
                authorization is sought.
          (2) Initiation of requests.--Requests for travel 
        outside the United States may be initiated by the 
        Chairman or the chairman of a subcommittee (except that 
        individuals may submit a request to the Chairman for 
        the purpose of attending a conference or meeting) and 
        shall be limited to members and permanent employees of 
        the Committee.
    (d) Reports by Members and Staff.--Within 15 legislative 
days from the conclusion of any hearing, investigation, study, 
meeting, or conference for which travel has been authorized 
pursuant to this rule, each member and staff member involved in 
such travel shall submit a written report to the Chairman 
covering the activities and other pertinent observations or 
information gained as a result of such travel.
    (e) Applicability of Laws, Rules, Policies.--Members and 
staff of the Committee performing authorized travel on official 
business shall be governed by applicable laws, resolutions, or 
regulations of the House and of the Committees on House 
Administration and Ethics pertaining to such travel, and by the 
travel policy of the Committee.

Rule XVIII. Committee Panels

    (a) Designation.--In accordance with clause 5(b)(2)(C) of 
Rule X of the Rules of the House, the Chairman of the 
Committee, with the concurrence of the ranking minority member, 
may designate a panel of the Committee consisting of members of 
the Committee to inquire into and take testimony on a matter or 
matters that fall within the jurisdiction of more than one 
subcommittee and to report to the Committee.
    (b) Duration.--No panel designated under paragraph (a) 
shall continue in existence for more than six months after the 
date of the designation.
    (c) Party Ratios and Appointment.--The ratio of majority 
members to minority members on a panel designated under 
paragraph (a) shall be as close as practicable to the ratio of 
the Full Committee. All majority members of the panels shall be 
appointed by the Chairman of the Committee, and all minority 
members shall be appointed by the ranking minority member of 
the Committee. The Chairman of the Committee shall choose one 
of the majority members so appointed to serve as Chairman of 
the panel. The ranking minority member of the Committee shall 
similarly choose the ranking minority member of the panel.
    (d) Ex Officio Members.--The Chairman and ranking minority 
member of the Committee may serve as ex-officio members of a 
panel designated under paragraph (a). The Chairman and ranking 
minority member are authorized to vote on matters that arise 
before the panel and shall be counted to satisfy the quorum 
requirement for any purpose.
    (e) Jurisdiction.--No panel designated under paragraph (a) 
shall have legislative jurisdiction.
    (f) Applicability of Committee Rules.--A panel designated 
under paragraph (a) shall be subject to all Committee Rules 
herein.

                    STATISTICAL OVERVIEW: 2017-2018


Total number of Bills and Resolutions referred to the 
        Committee: 570
Total number of Public Laws: 39
Total number of Bills and Resolutions that passed the House: 71
Total number of Bills and Resolutions reported to the House: 46
Total number of Bills ordered reported: 50

Total number of Meeting Days: 79

Full Committee: 19
        Hearings: 6
        Markups: 12
        Organizational Meeting: 1

Subcommittee on Aviation: 9
        Hearings: 8
        Roundtable: 1

Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation: 16
        Hearings: 14
        Roundtable: 1
        Bipartisan Listening Session: 1

Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and 
        Emergency Management: 9
        Hearings: 7
        Roundtable: 1
        Field Roundtable: 1

Subcommittee on Highways and Transit: 7
        Hearings: 6
        Roundtable: 1

Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials: 
        9
        Hearings: 7
        Field Hearing: 1
        Roundtable: 1

Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment: 10
        Hearings: 8
        Field Roundtables: 2
             COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115TH CONGRESS


   BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman
  PETE DeFAZIO, Oregon, Ranking 
              Member

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON,               DON YOUNG, Alaska
  District of Columbia               JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee,
EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas           Vice Chair
ELIJAH E. CUMMINGS, Maryland         FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey
RICK LARSEN, Washington              SAM GRAVES, Missouri
MICHAEL E. CAPUANO, Massachusetts    ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
GRACE F. NAPOLITANO, California      Arkansas
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois            LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania
STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               BOB GIBBS, Ohio
ALBIO SIRES, New Jersey              DANIEL WEBSTER, Florida
JOHN GARAMENDI, California           JEFF DENHAM, California
HENRY C. ``HANK'' JOHNSON, Jr.,      THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky
  Georgia                            MARK MEADOWS, North Carolina
ANDRE CARSON, Indiana                SCOTT PERRY, Pennsylvania
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
DINA TITUS, Nevada                   MARK SANFORD, South Carolina
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       ROB WOODALL, Georgia
ELIZABETH H. ESTY, Connecticut,      TODD ROKITA, Indiana
  Vice Ranking Member                JOHN KATKO, New York
LOIS FRANKEL, Florida                BRIAN BABIN, Texas
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               GARRET GRAVES, Louisiana
JARED HUFFMAN, California            BARBARA COMSTOCK, Virginia
JULIA BROWNLEY, California           DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida         MIKE BOST, Illinois
DONALD M. PAYNE, Jr., New Jersey     RANDY K. WEBER, Sr., Texas
ALAN S. LOWENTHAL, California        DOUG LaMALFA, California
BRENDA L. LAWRENCE, Michigan         BRUCE WESTERMAN, Arkansas
MARK DeSAULNIER, California          LLOYD SMUCKER, Pennsylvania
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   PAUL MITCHELL, Michigan
                                     JOHN J. FASO, New York
                                     A. DREW FERGUSON IV, Georgia
                                     BRIAN J. MAST, Florida
                                     JASON LEWIS, Minnesota
                                     MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
                                     VACANCY

                              Public Laws


      Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act of 2017


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-278 (H.R. 3359)

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
redesignate the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) 
National Protection and Programs Directorate as the 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) to be 
headed by a Director of National Cybersecurity and 
Infrastructure Security to lead national efforts to protect and 
enhance the security and resilience of U.S. cybersecurity, 
emergency communications, and critical infrastructure.
    CISA shall be composed of DHS components reorganized as: 
(1) the Cybersecurity Division; (2) the Infrastructure Security 
Division; and (3) the Emergency Communications Division, which 
was previously the Office for Emergency Communications. The 
agency will also have a privacy officer to ensure compliance 
with relevant federal laws.
    CISA must carry out DHS's responsibilities concerning 
chemical facilities antiterrorism standards.

Legislative History

    July 24, 2017. Referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committees on Energy and 
Commerce, Oversight and Government Reform, and Transportation 
and Infrastructure, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned July 25, 2017. Mr. Donovan moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    July 26, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-454, Part I.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Committee on Energy and Commerce discharged.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Committee on Oversight and Government 
discharged.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
336.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Mr. McCaul moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Dec. 11, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H9761-9768)
    Dec. 11, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3359.
    Dec. 11, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H9761-9765)
    Dec. 11, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
    Feb. 7, 2018. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Hearings held.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4043 Amendment SA 4043 proposed by 
Senator Sullivan for Senator Johnson.
    In the nature of a substitute.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4044 Amendment SA 4044 proposed by 
Senator Sullivan for Senator Murkowski to Amendment SA 4043.
    To improve the amendment.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4044 Amendment SA 4044 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4043 Amendment SA 4043 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Oct. 4, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Mr. McCaul asked unanimous consent to take 
from the Speaker's Table and agree to the Senate amendment.
    Nov. 13, 2018. On motion that the House agree to the Senate 
amendment Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 14, 2018. Presented to President.
    Nov. 16, 2018. Signed by President.
    Nov. 16, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-278.

                  Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018


                                (H.R. 2)

Summary

    Provides for the reform and continuation of agricultural 
and other programs of the Department of Agriculture through 
fiscal year 2023, and for other purposes.

Legislative History

    Apr. 12, 2018. Referred to the Committee on Agriculture.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
held.
    May 3, 2018. Ordered to be reported, as amended, by 26 yeas 
to 20 nays.
    May 3, 2018. Reported, amended, by the Committee on 
Agriculture. H. Rept. 115-661.
    May 3, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
508.
    May 15, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 891 
reported to the House. The resolution provides for 1 hour of 
general debate under a structured rule.
    May 16, 2018. H. Res. 891 passed the House.
    May 16, 2018. General debate occurred, and amendment debate 
began.
    May 17, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 900 
reported the House. The resolution provides for additional 
amendment debate.
    May 17, 2018. Amendment debate continued.
    May 18, 2018. Motion to recommit failed by a vote of 183 
yeas to 226 nays..
    May 18, 2018. On passage, failed by a vote of 198 yeas and 
213 nays.
    May 18, 2018. Mr. Ryan moved to reconsider the vote.
    May 18, 2018. The Chair put the question to the motion to 
reconsider and by voice vote, announced the ayes had prevailed. 
Mr. Hoyer demanded a recorded vote and the Chair postponed 
further proceedings until a time to be announced.
    June 21, 2018. On passage, passed by a vote of 213 yeas to 
211 nays.
    June 21, 2018. Received in the Senate and read twice.
    June 25, 2018. Cloture motion to proceed to the measure 
invoked in the Senate by a vote of 89 yeas to 3 nays.
    June 28, 2018. Passed the Senate with an amendment by 86 
yeas to 11 nays.
    June 29, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    July 18, 2018. Mr. Conaway asked unanimous consent that the 
House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H6493-6495)
    July 18, 2018. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection. (consideration: CR H6493-6495)
    July 18, 2018. Mr. Peterson moved that the House instruct 
conferees. (consideration: CR H6493-6495; text: CR H6493)
    July 18, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Peterson motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 2. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House at the conference on the 
disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the Senate amendment be 
instructed to insist on section 1101 of the House bill 
(relating to animal disease preparedness and response) with an 
amendment to section 10417(d)(1)(B) of the Animal Health 
Protection Act (7 U.S.C. 8316(d)(1)B)), as proposed to be added 
to such Act by such section 11101, to strike ``2023'' and 
insert ``thereafter''.
    July 18, 2018. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    July 18, 2018. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 392-20 (Roll no. 336).
    July 18, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Agriculture for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Conaway, Thompson (PA), Goodlatte, Lucas, Rogers 
(AL), Scott, Austin, Crawford, Hartzler, Davis, Rodney, Yoho, 
Rouzer, Marshall, Arrington, Peterson, Scott, David, Costa, 
Walz, Fudge, McGovern, Vela, Lujan Grisham, M., Kuster (NH), 
and O'Halleran.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce for consideration of 
secs. 4204, 4205, and 9131 of the House bill, and modifications 
committed to conference: Foxx, Allen, and Adams.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of subtitles 
A and B of title VI, secs. 6202, 6203, 6401, 6406, 6407, 6409, 
6603, 7301, 7605, 8106, 8507, 9119, 9121, and 11101 of the 
House bill, and secs. 6116, 6117, 6202, 6206-09, 6301, 6303, 
7412, 9102, 9104, 9106, 9111-13, 12408, 12627, and 12628 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Shimkus, Cramer, and Tonko.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of sec. 12609 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Hensarling, Duffy, and Waters, Maxine.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of title III of 
the House bill, and modifications committed to conference: 
Royce (CA), Chabot, and Engel.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of secs. 2802, 
6408, 8104, 8107, 8109, subtitles B and C of title VIII, 8402, 
8502, 8503, 8506, 8507, 8509, 8510, 9111, 11614, and 11615 of 
the House bill, and sec. 2425, subtitle D of title VIII, secs. 
8601, 8611, 8621-28, 8631, 8632, 12515, 12601, and 12602 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Bishop (UT), Westerman, and Grijalva.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for consideration 
of secs. 1601, 4022, 4026, 8502, and 11609 of the House bill, 
and secs. 3113, 7128, 8623, 8630, 8632, 12301, and 12407 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Walker, Comer, and Plaskett.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for consideration 
of sec. 7509 of the House bill, and sec. 7409 of the Senate 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: Abraham, 
Dunn, and Johnson, E.B.
    July 18, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs. 2404, 6223, 6224, 6503, 9117, and 9118 
of the House bill, and secs. 2415, 2416, 6124, 6304, and 7412 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Denham, Gibbs, and Bustos.
    July 18, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House requests a conference.
    July 31, 2018. Senate insists on its amendment, agrees to 
request for conference, and authorizes the Presiding Officer to 
appoint conferees by Voice Vote. (consideration: CR S5503)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Senate appointed conferees. Roberts; 
McConnell; Boozman; Hoeven; Ernst; Stabenow; Leahy; Brown; 
Heitkamp.
    Aug. 2, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Conference held.
    Dec. 10, 2018. Conference report to accompany H.R. 2, filed 
in the House. H. Rpt. 115-1072.
    Dec. 11, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
Senate agreed to conference report by Yea-Nay Vote. 87-13. 
Record Vote Number: 259.
    Dec. 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Dec. 11, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1176 
Reported to House. The resolution provides for consideration of 
the Conference Report to accompany H.R. 2. The resolution 
provides for one hour of debate and one motion to recommit.

         Department of Transportation Reports Harmonization Act


                               (S. 3367)

Summary

    S. 3367 makes several amendments to title 49 to enhance 
transparency of certain reports by the Department of 
Transportation, eliminate or sunset advisory councils, and make 
technical amendments to rail grant improvement programs.

Legislative History

    Aug. 22, 2008. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute favorably.
    Nov,. 27, 2018. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune with an amendment in 
the nature of a substitute. With written report No. 115-390.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 677.
    Dec. 18, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S7817-7820; text of measure as 
reported in Senate: CR S7817-7819)
    Dec. 18, 2018. The committee substitute withdrawn by 
Unanimous Consent.
    Dec. 18, 2018. S.Amdt.4159 Amendment SA 4159 proposed by 
Senator Boozman for Senator Thune. (consideration: CR S7819-
7820; text: CR S7819-7820) In the nature of a substitute.
    Dec. 18, 2018. S.Amdt.4159 Amendment SA 4159 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Dec. 18, 2018. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Dec. 19, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Dec. 19, 2018. Received in the House. Held at the desk.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Expected to be considered in the House.

                         Pending in the Senate


           Department of Homeland Security Authorization Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2825)

Summary

    H.R. 2825 amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make 
certain improvements in the laws administered by the Secretary 
of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 2825 authorizes the activities of the Department of 
Homeland Security (DHS), aims to create efficiencies and 
streamline programs and offices by clarifying and uniting the 
offices that constitute ``DHS Headquarters.'' This legislation 
also integrates existing DHS intelligence systems, strengthens 
the role of the Under Secretary for Management to implement 
efficiencies across components to better ensure proper 
oversight and accountability, and requires DHS to review the 
organization of its offices with research and development and 
chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives 
activities in order to eliminate duplication. Division E of the 
House passed version of H.R. 2825 contains the Committee passed 
version of H.R. 2518, the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 
2017. The Committee worked with the Committee on Homeland 
Security to clear other provisions in H.R. 2825 within the 
Committee's jurisdiction.

Legislative History

    July 6, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on Armed 
Services. H. Rept. 115-200.
    June 8, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    June 14, 2017. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held. (Markup report: CQ)
    June 14, 2017. Ordered to be Reported (Amended).
    June 28, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Homeland Security. H. Rept. 115-198.
    June 28, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
135.
    July 20, 2017. Mr. McCaul moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    July 20, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6047-6120)
    July 20, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2825.
    July 20, 2017. At the conclusion of debate, the Yeas and 
Nays were demanded and ordered. Pursuant to the provisions of 
clause 8, rule XX, the Chair announced that further proceedings 
on the motion would be postponed.
    July 20, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H6128)
    July 20, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 386-41 (Roll no. 403). (text: CR H6047-6109)
    July 20, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 20, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
    Feb. 7, 2018. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Hearings held.
    Mar. 7, 2018. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Ordered to be reported with an amendment 
in the nature of a substitute favorably. (Markup report: CQ)
    Apr. 16, 2018. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Reported by Senator Johnson with an 
amendment in the nature of a substitute. Without written 
report.
    Apr. 16, 2018. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Reported by Senator Johnson with an 
amendment in the nature of a substitute. Without written 
report.
    Apr. 16, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 381.
    Apr. 16, 2018. By Senator Johnson from Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs filed written 
report. Report No. 115-351.

                                Reported


                Border Security for America Act of 2017


       REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY (H.R. 3548)

Summary

    Authorizes Border Wall--Provides $10 billion for the 
deployment and construction of tactical infrastructure and 
technology to achieve full operational control and situational 
awareness. This deployment includes wall, fencing, technology, 
air assets, and other barriers.
    Secures Ports of Entry--Provides $5 billion to improve, 
modernize, and enhance our ports of entry. It targets illegal 
immigration and drug trafficking at our ports while increasing 
lawful trade and travel.
    Puts More Boots on the Ground--Adds 5,000 Border Patrol 
Agents and 5,000 CBP Officers and streamlines the way that 
veterans and existing law enforcement officers can be hired.
    More Air and Marine Flight Hours--Increases the number of 
annual flight hours of CBP's Air and Marine Operations and 
prioritizes requests for support from the Chief of the Border 
Patrol to secure the southern border.
    Use of the National Guard--Authorizes use of the National 
Guard along the southern border to help with aviation and 
intelligence support and provides $35 million in reimbursement 
for states, like Texas, that have called out the National Guard 
to help secure the border.
    Targets Visa Overstays--Identifies visa overstays through 
full deployment of the Biometric Entry-Exit System at all air, 
land, and sea ports of entry.
    Border Patrol Access to Federal Lands--Prohibits federal 
agencies from impeding, prohibiting, or restricting CBP 
activities on federal land located within 100 miles of the 
southern border to execute search and rescue operations, and to 
prevent all unlawful entries into the United States.
    Supports Local Law Enforcement--Doubles the Stonegarden 
grant program at $110 million for state and local law 
enforcement to aggressively fight drug trafficking, smuggling, 
and other crimes on the southern border.

Legislative History

    July 24, 2017. Referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committees on Armed Services, 
Foreign Affairs, Natural Resources, Agriculture, Transportation 
and Infrastructure, Ways and Means, and Oversight and 
Government Reform, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned.
    July 31, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    July 31, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    July 31, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    July 31, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    July 31, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, 
Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials.
    July 31, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Oct. 4, 2017. Ordered reported (amended) by the Committee 
on Homeland Security by recorded vote 18-12.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Homeland Security. H. Rept. 115-505, Part I.
    Jan. 10, 2018. House Committee on Armed Services Granted an 
extension for further consideration ending not later than March 
23, 2018.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Committee on Natural Resources discharged.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Committee on Agriculture discharged.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Committee on Oversight and Government 
discharged.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Jan. 10, 2018. Committee on Ways and Means discharged.
    Mar. 23, 2018. Committee on Armed Services discharged.
    Mar. 23, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
471.

                         Organizational Meeting

    On January 31, 2017, the Committee formally met to 
officially organize for the 115th Congress. The Committee 
adopted the rules of the Committee for the 115th Congress. 
Additionally, subcommittee chairmen and ranking members were 
approved, and the members of each subcommittee were appointed. 
Lastly, the oversight plan for the 115th Congress was adopted.

                         Full Committee Markups


                FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, FEBRUARY 28, 2017

    Considered and ordered reported:
           Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Views and Estimates 
        of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
           H.R. 1214, Disaster Simplified Assistance 
        Value Enhancement Act
           H.R. 654, To direct the Administrator of the 
        Federal Emergency Management Agency to carry out a plan 
        for the purchase and installation of an earthquake 
        early warning system for the Cascadia Subduction Zone, 
        and for other purposes
           H.R. 1174, To provide a lactation room in 
        public buildings
           H.R. 1117, To require the Administrator of 
        the Federal Emergency Management Agency to submit a 
        report regarding certain plans regarding assistance to 
        applicants and grantees during the response to an 
        emergency or disaster
           H.R. 375, To designate the Federal building 
        and United States courthouse located at 719 Church 
        Street in Nashville, Tennessee, as the ``Fred D. 
        Thompson Federal Building and United States 
        Courthouse''
           General Services Administration Capital 
        Investment and Leasing Program Resolution

                 FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, MARCH 29, 2017

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 1346, To repeal the rule issued by the 
        Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Transit 
        Administration entitled ``Metropolitan Planning 
        Organization Coordination and Planning Area Reform''
           H.R. 1093, To require the Federal Railroad 
        Administration and the Federal Transit Authority to 
        provide appropriate Congressional notice of safety 
        audits conducted with respect to railroads and rail 
        transit agencies
           H.R. 1665, To ensure that Administrator of 
        the Federal Emergency Management Agency considers 
        severe local impact in making a recommendation to the 
        President for a major disaster declaration
           H.R. 1678, To amend the Robert T. Stafford 
        Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act concerning 
        the statute of limitations for actions to recover 
        disaster or emergency assistance payments, and for 
        other purposes
           H.R. 1679, To ensure that the Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency's current efforts to 
        modernize its grant management system includes 
        applicant accessibility and transparency, and for other 
        purposes
           H. Con. Res. 35, Authorizing the use of the 
        Capitol Grounds for the National Peace Officers 
        Memorial Service and the National Honor Guard and Pipe 
        Band Exhibition
           H. Con. Res. 36, Authorizing the use of the 
        Capitol Grounds for the Greater Washington Soap Box 
        Derby
           H.R. 455, To designate the United States 
        courthouse located at 501 East Court Street in Jackson, 
        Mississippi, as the ``R. Jess Brown United States 
        Courthouse''

                  FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, MAY 24, 2017

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 1684, To direct the Administrator of 
        the Federal Emergency Management Agency to provide 
        technical assistance to common interest communities 
        regarding eligibility for disaster assistance, and for 
        other purposes
           H.R. 2258, To require that certain standards 
        for commercial driver's licenses applicable to former 
        members of the armed services or reserves also apply to 
        current members of the armed services or reserves
           H.R. 2518, To authorize appropriations for 
        the Coast Guard for fiscal years 2018 and 2019, and for 
        other purposes;
           H.R. 2547, To expand the Department of 
        Veterans Affairs medical professionals who may qualify 
        to perform physical examinations on eligible veterans 
        and issue medical certificates required for operation 
        of a commercial motor vehicle, and for other purposes
           H.R. 2548, To reauthorize the programs and 
        activities of the Federal Emergency Management Agency
           H.R. 2593, To authorize appropriations for 
        the Federal Maritime Commission for fiscal years 2018 
        and 2019, and for other purposes

                  FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, JUNE 27, 2017

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 2997, To transfer operation of air 
        traffic services currently provided by the Federal 
        Aviation Administration to a separate not-for-profit 
        corporate entity, to reauthorize programs of the 
        Federal Aviation Administration, and for other purposes

                  FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, JULY 27, 2017

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H. Res. 437, Of inquiry requesting the 
        President to provide certain documents in the 
        President's possession
           H.R. 1735, Community Empowerment for 
        Mitigated Properties Act of 2017
           H.R. 3176, Disaster Assistance Fairness and 
        Accountability Act of 2017
           H. Con. Res. 69, Authorizing the use of the 
        Capitol Grounds for the District of Columbia Special 
        Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run
           H.R. 1758, Brownfields Reauthorization Act 
        of 2017

                FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, NOVEMBER 30, 2017

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 4460, To improve the provision of 
        disaster and mitigation assistance to eligible 
        individuals and households and to eligible State, 
        local, Tribal, and territorial governments and certain 
        private nonprofit organizations, and for other purposes
           H.R. 3814, To disqualify from operating a 
        commercial motor vehicle for life an individual who 
        uses a commercial motor vehicle in committing a felony 
        involving human trafficking
           H.R. 3813, To designate a human trafficking 
        prevention coordinator and to expand the scope of 
        activities authorized under the Federal Motor Carrier 
        Safety Administration's outreach and education program 
        to include human trafficking prevention activities, and 
        for other purposes

                FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, FEBRUARY 14, 2018

    Considered and ordered reported:
           Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Views and Estimates 
        of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure
           H.R. 4921, To require the Surface Board of 
        Transportation to implement certain recommendations of 
        the Inspector General of the Department of 
        Transportation
           H.R. 4925, To require the Administrator of 
        the Federal Railroad Administration to implement 
        certain recommendations for management and collection 
        of railroad safety data

                 FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, APRIL 12, 2018

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 5294, To amend title 40, United States 
        Code, to address the impact of drug abuse on economic 
        development in Appalachia, and for other purposes
           H.R. 3288, To amend title 40, United States 
        Code, to promote regional economic and infrastructure 
        development, and for other purposes
           H. Con. Res. 115, Authorizing the use of the 
        Capitol Grounds for the National Peace Officers 
        Memorial Service and the National Honor Guard and Pipe 
        Band Exhibition
           H. Con. Res. 113, Authorizing the use of 
        Capitol Grounds for the Greater Washington Soap Box 
        Derby
           General Services Administration Capital 
        Investment and Leasing Program Resolutions
           H.R. 4177, To enhance the Federal 
        Government's planning and preparation for extreme 
        weather and the Federal Government's dissemination of 
        best practices to respond to extreme weather, thereby 
        increasing resilience, improving regional coordination, 
        and mitigating the financial risk to the Federal 
        Government from such extreme weather, and for other 
        purposes
           H.R. 5319, To transfer Coast Guard property 
        in the Town of Jupiter Island, Florida, for inclusion 
        in Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge
           H.R. 5326, To amend titles 14 and 46, United 
        States Code, to make technical corrections with respect 
        to Coast Guard and shipping authorities, and for other 
        purposes
           H.R. 4673, To create opportunities for women 
        in the aviation industry

                  FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, MAY 23, 2018

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 8, To provide for improvements to the 
        rivers and harbors of the United States, to provide for 
        the conservation and development of water and related 
        resources, and for other purposes

                  FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, JUNE 27, 2018

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R.66, To establish the Route 66 Centennial 
        Commission, to direct the Secretary of Transportation 
        to prepare a plan on the preservation needs of Route 
        66, and for other purposes
           General Services Administration Capital 
        Investment and Leasing Program Resolutions
           H.R. 6194, To reduce costs of Federal real 
        estate, improve building security, and for other 
        purposes
           H.R. 5846, To require the Comptroller 
        General of the United States to conduct a study 
        regarding the buyout practices of the Federal Emergency 
        Management Agency, and for other purposes
           H.R. 5772--To designate the J. Marvin Jones 
        Federal Building and Courthouse in Amarillo, Texas, as 
        the ``J. Marvin Jones Federal Building and Mary Lou 
        Robinson United States Courthouse''
           H.R. 3460--To designate the United States 
        courthouse located at 323 East Chapel Hill Street in 
        Durham, North Carolina, as the ``John Hervey Wheeler 
        United States Courthouse''
           H.R. 6175, To enhance maritime safety, and 
        for other purposes
           H.R. 6206, To direct the Commandant of the 
        Coast Guard to establish a Blue Technology center of 
        expertise, and for other purposes
           S. 756, To reauthorize and amend the Marine 
        Debris Act to promote international action to reduce 
        marine debris, and for other purposes
           H.R. 3906, To establish centers of 
        excellence for innovative stormwater control 
        infrastructure, and for other purposes

               FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

    Considered and ordered reported:
           H.R. 5158, To direct the Secretary of 
        Transportation to request nominations for and make 
        determinations regarding roads to be designated under 
        the national scenic byways program, and for other 
        purposes
           H.R. 6622, To designate the Federal building 
        located at 2110 First Street in Fort Myers, Florida, as 
        the ``George W. Whitehurst Federal Building''
           General Services Administration Capital 
        Investment and Leasing Program Resolutions

                FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP, DECEMBER 12, 2018

    Considered and ordered reported:
           General Services Administration Capital 
        Investment and Leasing Program Resolutions

                          Exchange of Letters


                    Bills Referred to the Committee


                                 H.R. 4

    To reauthorize programs of the Federal Aviation 
Administration, and for other purposes.
    ``FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady occurred on 
April 17, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated April 26, 2018 on page H3591.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
April 17 and 18, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated April 26, 2018 on pages H3591 and H3592.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling 
occurred on April 23, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated April 26, 2018 on page H3591.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Science, Space and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith 
occurred on April 19, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated April 26, 2018 on page H3592.

                                H.R. 10

    H.R. 10, To create hope and opportunity for investors, 
consumers, and entrepreneurs by ending bailouts and Too Big to 
Fail, holding Washington and Wall Street accountable, 
eliminating red tape to increase access to capital and credit, 
and repealing the provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act that make 
America less prosperous, less stable, and less free, and for 
other purposes.
    ``Financial CHOICE Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling 
occurred on May 19, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
153, on pages 960 and 961.

                                H.R. 302

    ``FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on September 26, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated September 26, 2018 on pages H9034.

                                H.R. 654

    H.R. 654, To direct the Administrator of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency to carry out a plan for the 
purchase and installation of an earthquake early warning system 
for the Cascadia Subduction Zone, and for other purposes.
    ``Pacific Northwest Earthquake Preparedness Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Science, Space and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith 
occurred on March 27, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated March 27, 2017 on pages H2451.

                               H.R. 1372

    H.R. 1372, To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
ensure that the needs of children are considered in homeland 
security planning, and for other purposes.
    ``Homeland Security for Children Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on March 10 and 15, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-92, 
Part I on pages 12 and 13.

                               H.R. 1397

    H.R. 1397, To authorize, direct, facilitate, and expedite 
the transfer of administrative jurisdiction of certain Federal 
land, and for other purposes.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
July 5, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
206, Part I on pages 5 and 6.

                               H.R. 1644

    To enhance sanctions with respect to transactions relating 
to North Korea, and for other purposes.
    ``Korean Interdiction and Modernization of Sanctions Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce occurred on 
April 26, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-98, 
Part I on pages 27 and 28.

                               H.R. 1731

    To amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 
1977 to provide funds to States and Indian tribes for the 
purpose of promoting economic revitalization, diversification, 
and development in economically distressed communities through 
the reclamation and restoration of land and water resources 
adversely affected by coal mining carried out before August 3, 
1977, and for other purposes.
    ``RECLAIM Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
October 10 and 12, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
351, Part I on pages 39 and 40.

                               H.R. 2200

    To reauthorize the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 
2000, and for other purposes.
    ``Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and 
Protection Reauthorization Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce occurred on May 
19, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated July 12, 2017 on pages H5500.

                               H.R. 2548

    To reauthorize the programs and activities of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency.
    ``FEMA Reauthorization Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
June 13, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
191, Part I on pages 45 and 46.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling 
occurred on June 20, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
191, Part I on pages 47 and 48.

                               H.R. 2872

    To amend the Federal Power Act to promote hydropower 
development at existing nonpowered dams, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Promoting Hydropower Development at Existing Nonpowered 
Dams Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden occurred 
on December 12, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated December 12, 2017 on page H9810.

                               H.R. 2883

    To establish a more uniform, transparent, and modern 
process to authorize the construction, connection, operation, 
and maintenance of international border-crossing facilities for 
the import and export of oil and natural gas and the 
transmission of electricity.
    ``Promoting Cross-Border Energy Infrastructure Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden occurred 
on July 14 and 17, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
225, Part I on pages 25 and 26.

                               H.R. 2936

    To expedite under the National Environmental Policy Act of 
1969 and improve forest management activities on National 
Forest System lands, on public lands under the jurisdiction of 
the Bureau of Land Management, and on Tribal lands to return 
resilience to overgrown, fire-prone forested lands, and for 
other purposes.
    ``Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Agriculture Chairman K. Michael Conaway occurred 
on October 25, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated July 12, 2017 on pages H5500.

                               H.R. 2997

    To transfer operation of air traffic services currently 
provided by the Federal Aviation Administration to a separate 
not-for-profit corporate entity, to reauthorize programs of the 
Federal Aviation Administration, and for other purposes.
    ``21st Century Aviation Innovation, Reform, and 
Reauthorization Act.'' or the ``21st Century AIRR Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady occurred on 
July 11 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-296 
on pages 456 and 457.

                               H.R. 3017

    To amend the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 to reauthorize and 
improve the brownfields program, and for other purposes.
    ``Brownfields Enhancement, Economic Redevelopment, and 
Reauthorization Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden occurred 
on November 9 and 14, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
536, Part I on pages 15 and 16.

                               H.R. 3101

    To enhance cybersecurity information sharing and 
coordination at ports in the United States, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Strengthening Cybersecurity Information Sharing and 
Coordination in Our Ports Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on October 19, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
536, Part I on pages 15 and 16.

                               H.R. 3144

    To provide for operations of the Federal Columbia River 
Power System pursuant to a certain operation plan for a 
specified period of time, and for other purposes.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
April 12 and 16, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated October 23, 2017 on pages H8051.

                               H.R. 3186

    To establish an Every Kid Outdoors program, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Every Kid Outdoors Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
July 19 and August 1, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
880, Part I on pages 8 and 9.

                               H.R. 3328

    To require a study regarding security measures and 
equipment at Cuba's airports, require the standardization of 
Federal Air Marshal Service agreements, require efforts to 
raise international aviation security standards, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Cuban Airport Security Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on September 13, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated October 23, 2017 on pages H8051.

                               H.R. 3359

    To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the 
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency of the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
    ``Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency Act of 
2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on December 7, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated December 11, 2017 on page H9766.

                               H.R. 3548

    To make certain improvements to the security of the 
international borders of the United States, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Border Security for America Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on December 7, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
505, Part I on pages 98 and 99.

                               H.R. 3328

    To require a study regarding security measures and 
equipment at Cuba's airports, require the standardization of 
Federal Air Marshal Service agreements, require efforts to 
raise international aviation security standards, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Cuban Airport Security Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on September 13, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated October 23, 2017 on pages H8051.

                               H.R. 3668

    To provide for the preservation of sportsmen's heritage and 
enhance recreation opportunities on Federal land, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Sportsmen's Heritage And Recreational Enhancement Act.'' 
or the ``SHARE Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
September 13 and 15, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
314, Part I on pages 139 and 140.

                               H.R. 3906

    To establish centers of excellence for innovative 
stormwater control infrastructure, and for other purposes.
    ``Innovative Stormwater Infrastructure Act of 2018.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Science Space and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith 
occurred on July 12, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
828, Part I on pages 6 and 7.

                               H.R. 4009

    To provide for the preservation of sportsmen's heritage and 
enhance recreation opportunities on Federal land, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Smithsonian National Zoological Park Central Parking 
Facility Authorization Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on House Administration Chairman Gregg Harper 
occurred on April 24, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
314, Part I on pages 139 and 140.

                               H.R. 4460

    To improve the provision of disaster and mitigation 
assistance to eligible individuals and households and to 
eligible State, local, Tribal, and territorial governments and 
certain private nonprofit organizations, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Disaster Recovery Reform Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Financial Services Chairman Jeb Hensarling 
occurred on December 4, 2017.

                               H.R. 4986

    To amend the Communications Act of 1934 to reauthorize 
appropriations for the Federal Communications Commission, to 
provide for certain procedural changes to the rules of the 
Commission to maximize opportunities for public participation 
and efficient decision making, and for other purposes.
    ``Repack Airwaves Yielding Better Access for Users of 
Modern Services Act of 2018.'' or the ``RAY BAUM'S Act of 
2018.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden occurred 
on March 6, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated March 6 on page H1409.

                               H.R. 5319

    To transfer Coast Guard property in the Town of Jupiter 
Island, Florida, for inclusion in Hobe Sound National Wildlife 
Refuge.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
September 11 and 18, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed on page 5 of the 
Committee Report, H. Rept. 115-1016.

                               H.R. 5869

    To require the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a 
maritime border threat analysis, and for other purposes.
    ``Maritime Border Security Review Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on September 4, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated September 4, 2018 on page H7797.

                               H.R. 6620

    To require the Department of Homeland Security to prepare a 
threat assessment relating to unmanned aircraft systems, and 
for other purposes.
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on September 21, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated September 25, 2018 on pages H8750 and 8751.

                                 S. 756

    To reauthorize and amend the Marine Debris Act to promote 
international action to reduce marine debris, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Save Our Seas Act of 2018.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Natural Resources Chairman Rob Bishop occurred on 
July 10, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed on Page E1356 of the 
Congressional Record on October 2, 2018.

                  Bills Not Referred to the Committee


                                 H.R. 2

    To provide for the reform and continuation of agricultural 
and other programs of the Department of Agriculture through 
fiscal year 2023, and for other purposes.
    ``Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Agriculture Chairman Michael Conaway occurred on 
May 2, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated January 9, 2017 on pages H215.

                                H.R. 353

    To improve the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration's weather research through a focused program of 
investment on affordable and attainable advances in 
observational, computing, and modeling capabilities to support 
substantial improvement in weather forecasting and prediction 
of high impact weather events, to expand commercial 
opportunities for the provision of weather data, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 
2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Science, Space and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith 
occurred on January 9, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated January 9, 2017 on pages H215.

                                H.R 642

    To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to enhance the 
partnership between the Department of Homeland Security and the 
National Network of Fusion Centers, and for other purposes.
    ``Fusion Center Enhancement Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on January 31, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated January 31, 2017 on pages H779 and H780.

                               H.R. 1258

    To make technical corrections to the Homeland Security Act 
of 2002.
    ``HSA Technical Corrections Act''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on May 31, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was sent after the bill was 
reported by CHS.

                               H.R. 1302

    To require an exercise related to terrorist and foreign 
fighter travel, and for other purposes.
    ``Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel Exercise Act of 
2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on March 10 and 15, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated March 22, 2017 on pages H2303 and H2304.

                               H.R. 1309

    To streamline the office and term of the Administrator of 
the Transportation Security Administration, and for other 
purposes.
    ``TSA Administrator Modernization Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on March 10, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated March 20, 2017 on pages H2210.

                               H.R. 2182

    To require the Comptroller General of the United States to 
submit a report to Congress on the alternatives for the final 
disposition of Plum Island, including preservation of the 
island for conservation, education, and research, and for other 
purposes.
    ``Plum Island Preservation Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on July 25, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated July 25, 2017 on page H6240.

                               H.R. 2281

    To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to reauthorize 
the Border Enforcement Security Task Force program within the 
Department of Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
    ``Border Enforcement Security Task Force Reauthorization 
Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on May 15, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated May 17, 2017 on pages H4272.

                               H.R. 2809

    To amend title 51, United States Code, to provide for the 
authorization and supervision of nongovernmental space 
activities, and for other purposes.
    ``American Space Commerce Free Enterprise Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Science, Space and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith 
occurred on April 23 and 24, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated April 24, 2018 on pages H3485.

                               H.R. 2810

    To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2018 for 
military activities of the Department of Defense and for 
military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.
    ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2018.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Armed Services Chairman William M. ``Mac'' 
Thornberry occurred on July 5, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-200 
on page 548.

                               H.R. 2825

    To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to make certain 
improvements in the laws administered by the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, and for other purposes.
    ``Department of Homeland Security Authorization Act of 
2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Armed Services Chairman William M. ``Mac'' 
Thornberry occurred on June 27, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated July 20, 2017 on pages H6110.

                               H.R. 4661

    To reauthorize the United States Fire Administration, the 
Assistance to Firefighters Grants program, the Fire Prevention 
and Safety Grants program, and the Staffing for Adequate Fire 
and Emergency Response grant program, and for other purposes.
    ``United States Fire Administration, AFG, and SAFER Program 
Reauthorization Act of 2017.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Science, Space and Technology Chairman Lamar Smith 
occurred on December 18, 2017.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated December 18, 2017 on pages H10157.

                               H.R. 5105

    To establish the United States International Development 
Finance Corporation, and for other purposes.
    ``Better Utilization of Investments Leading to Development 
Act of 2018.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Foreign Affairs Chairman Ed Royce occurred on July 
16, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated July 17, 2018 on pages H6330 and H6331.

                               H.R. 5515

    To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2019 for 
military activities of the Department of Defense and for 
military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes.
    ``John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Armed Services Chairman William M. ``Mac'' 
Thornberry occurred on May 14, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in House Report 115-
676, on page 505 and 506.

                               H.R. 6438

    To amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish in 
the Department of Homeland Security an Unmanned Aircraft 
Systems Coordinator, and for other purposes.
    ``DHS Countering Unmanned Aircraft Systems Coordinator 
Act.''
    A jurisdictional exchange of letters between Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster and 
Committee on Homeland Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul 
occurred on September 4, 2018.
    The exchange of letters was printed in the Congressional 
Record dated September 4, 2018 on page H7811.

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                                Letters


                                Hearings


 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA (SERIAL NO. 115-1)

    On February 1, 2017, the Committee held an oversight 
hearing to explore the importance of infrastructure to 
America's job creators, and what sort of infrastructure 
investments must be made to prepare the Nation to take on the 
challenges of the 21st century. The hearing featured testimony 
from the following users of the Nation's transportation 
networks and infrastructure, as well as labor: FedEx 
Corporation, Cargill Incorporated, BMW of North America, 
Vermeer Corporation, and the AFL-CIO.

     OVERSIGHT OF U.S. AIRLINE CUSTOMER SERVICE (SERIAL NO. 115-13)

    On May 2, 2017, the Committee held an oversight hearing to 
examine U.S. airlines' customer service policies and issues, 
and what can be done to improve the flying experience for 
American travelers. The Committee heard testimony from United 
Airlines, American Airlines, Alaska Airlines, Southwest 
Airlines, and the Consumers Union.

THE NEED TO REFORM THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION AND AIR TRAFFIC 
CONTROL TO BUILD A 21ST-CENTURY AVIATION SYSTEM FOR AMERICA (SERIAL NO. 
                                115-15)

    On May 17, 2017, the Committee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing on Federal Aviation Administration reform, 
and in particular, the management of air traffic control 
services. The Committee heard testimony from the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Department of Transportation, National 
Air Traffic Controllers Association, the Reason Foundation, a 
former special assistant to President Clinton for economic 
policy, and Hartzell Propeller, Inc.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: FEDERAL AVIATION 
            ADMINISTRATION AUTHORIZATION (SERIAL NO. 115-18)

    On June 8, 2017, the Committee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing as part of a series of hearings held to 
prepare for the Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization 
bill. The Committee heard testimony from the Secretary of 
Transportation on the administration's priorities for FAA 
reform and authorization.

      EMERGENCY RESPONSE AND RECOVERY: CENTRAL TAKEAWAYS FROM THE 
        UNPRECEDENTED 2017 HURRICANE SEASON (SERIAL NO. 115-29)

    On November 2, 2017, the Committee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to review the lessons learned in the 
aftermath of the 2017 hurricane season, as well as the 
challenges and obstacles that may remain in the way of 
recovery. These discussions will inform long-term solutions and 
legislative proposals that will help speed smart recovery in 
the impacted communities. The Committee heard testimony from 
Members of Congress whose states and territories were impacted 
by these storms, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the 
U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, and the 
Environmental Protection Agency.

EXAMINING THE ADMINISTRATION'S INFRASTRUCTURE PROPOSAL (SERIAL NO. 115-
                                  37)

    On March 6, 2018, the Committee held a legislative hearing 
to examine the administration's infrastructure proposal, which 
encompassed a broad array of infrastructure sectors including 
highways, transit, aviation, rail, drinking and wastewater 
waterways, public buildings, brownfield and Superfund sites, 
energy, public lands, and veterans' hospitals. The Committee 
heard testimony from the Secretary of Transportation.
                        SUBCOMMITTEE ON AVIATION


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115th CONGRESS


  FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey, 
             Chairman
 RICK LARSEN, Washington, Ranking 
              Member

EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas         DON YOUNG, Alaska
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois            JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee
ANDRE CARSON, Indiana                SAM GRAVES, Missouri
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               BOB GIBBS, Ohio
ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON,               DANIEL WEBSTER, Florida
  District of Columbia               JEFF DENHAM, California
DINA TITUS, Nevada                   THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       MARK MEADOWS, North Carolina
JULIA BROWNLEY, California           SCOTT PERRY, Pennsylvania
DONALD M. PAYNE, Jr., New Jersey     RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
BRENDA L. LAWRENCE, Michigan         MARK SANFORD, South Carolina
MICHAEL E. CAPUANO, Massachusetts    ROB WOODALL, Georgia
GRACE F. NAPOLITANO, California      TODD ROKITA, Indiana
STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               BARBARA COMSTOCK, Virginia
HENRY C. ``HANK'' JOHNSON, Jr.,      DOUG LaMALFA, California
  Georgia                            BRUCE WESTERMAN, Arkansas
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          LLOYD SMUCKER, Pennsylvania
PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon (ex officio)PAUL MITCHELL, Michigan, Vice 
                                     Chair
                                     JASON LEWIS, Minnesota
                                     VACANCY
                                     BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania (ex 
                                     officio)

                         Legislative Activities


                              Public Laws


    Disaster Tax Relief and Airport and Airway Extension Act of 2017


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-63 (H.R. 3823)

Summary

                   TITLE I--FEDERAL AVIATION PROGRAMS

    (Sec. 101) This bill reauthorizes for the period October 1, 
2017, through March 31, 2018, the airport improvement program.
    (Sec. 102) The following expiring authorities are extended 
through March 31, 2018: the competition disclosure requirement 
under a development project grant for a large hub airport or a 
medium hub airport; the eligibility for small airport grants of 
sponsors of airports in the Republic of the Marshall Islands, 
Federated States of Micronesia, and Republic of Palau; the air 
traffic control contract program; state and local government 
compatible land use planning and projects; Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) operations; the essential air service 
program and small community air service development program; 
Department of Transportation (DOT) authority to appropriate 
funds to acquire, establish, and improve air navigation 
facilities; and civil aviation research and development.
    The DOT requirement to apportion amounts for airport 
planning and development and noise compatibility planning and 
programs to sponsors of primary airports based on the number of 
passenger boardings is extended through FY2018.
    The bill amends the Vision 100--Century of Aviation 
Reauthorization Act to extend through March 31, 2018: the 
authorization for airport development at Midway Island Airport, 
and the authority of any final order with respect to the 
eligibility for essential air service compensation.
    The bill amends the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 
2012 to extend through: FY2018, the requirement for an 
Inspector General report on participation in FAA programs by 
disadvantaged small business concerns; and March 31, 2018, the 
pilot program for the redevelopment of airport properties, and 
the advisory committee for aviation consumer protection.
    The bill amends the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act 
of 2016 to extend through March 31, 2018, the prohibition 
against the FAA discontinuing the contract weather observer 
program at any airport.

                 TITLE II--AVIATION REVENUE PROVISIONS

    (Sec. 201) The bill amends the Internal Revenue Code to 
extend through March 31, 2018, the expenditure authority from 
the Airport and Airway Trust Fund.
    (Sec. 202) The excise taxes on aviation fuels and the 
transportation of persons and property by air are extended 
through March 31, 2018.

                 TITLE III--EXPIRING HEALTH PROVISIONS

    (Sec. 301) This section amends the Public Health Service 
Act to extend through the first quarter of FY2018: (1) the 
Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education Program, and 
(2) the Special Diabetes Program for Indians.
    (The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education 
Program provides payments to outpatient facilities to support 
training in primary care for medical and dental residents. The 
Special Diabetes Program for Indians provides funding for the 
Indian Health Service to award grants for the prevention and 
treatment of diabetes for American Indians and Alaska Natives.)
    (Sec. 302) This section amends the Medicare IVIG Access and 
Strengthening Medicare and Repaying Taxpayers Act of 2012 to 
extend through 2020 the Medicare Patient Intravenous 
Immunoglobulin (IVIG) Demonstration Project. (The project 
provides payments to Medicare beneficiaries for items and 
services needed for the in-home administration of IVIG for the 
treatment of primary immune deficiency diseases. Immunoglobulin 
therapy is used to temporarily replace some of the antibodies 
that are missing or not working properly in people with the 
diseases.)
    (Sec. 303) This section amends title XVIII (Medicare) of 
the Social Security Act to reduce funding for the Medicare 
Improvement Fund during and after FY2021.

       TITLE V--TAX RELIEF FOR HURRICANES HARVEY, IRMA, AND MARIA

    This title amends the Internal Revenue Code to allow 
various tax credits, deductions, and modifications to existing 
rules for individuals and businesses affected by Hurricanes 
Harvey, Irma, and Maria.
    (Sec. 501) This section specifies the areas and zones that 
are eligible for the tax provisions included in this title 
based on Presidential declarations under the Robert T. Stafford 
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act for Hurricanes 
Harvey, Irma, and Maria before September 21, 2017.
    (Sec. 502) This section waives the 10% additional tax on 
early distributions from retirement plans for up to $100,000 in 
distributions made on or after August 23, 2017, and before 
January 1, 2019.
    The distributions must be made to an individual: (1) whose 
principal place of abode on specified dates was in a hurricane 
disaster area, and (2) who has sustained an economic loss by 
reason of Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, or Maria.
    A taxpayer who has received such a distribution may: (1) 
repay the distribution by making additional contributions to a 
retirement account within three years, and (2) include the 
distribution in gross income by dividing the amount over a 
three-year period.
    This section also: (1) permits individuals to recontribute 
funds to retirement plans if the funds were distributed for a 
home purchase in a hurricane disaster area that was cancelled 
on account of the hurricanes, and (2) increases the limit and 
extends the repayment deadline for loans from retirement plans.
    (Sec. 503) This section allow an employee retention tax 
credit for employers affected by the hurricanes. The credit is 
equal to 40% of the qualified wages (up to $6,000 per employee) 
paid to an employee whose principal place of employment on 
specified dates was in a hurricane disaster zone.
    ``Qualified wages''' include wages that: (1) are paid or 
incurred on or after August 23, 2017, and before January 1, 
2018; and (2) occurred during the period that begins when the 
trade or business became inoperable at the principal place of 
employment of the employee immediately before the hurricane and 
ends when the trade or business has resumed significant 
operations.
    (Sec. 504) The bill modifies the deduction for charitable 
contributions to temporarily suspend the limitations on 
charitable contributions made before December 31, 2017, for 
relief efforts in the hurricane disaster areas.
    The bill modifies the deduction for personal casualty 
losses in the hurricane disaster areas to eliminate: (1) the 
requirement for losses to exceed 10% of adjusted gross income 
to qualify for the deduction, and (2) the requirement to 
itemize.
    For the purposes of determining earned income for the 
earned income tax credit and the child tax credit, taxpayers in 
the hurricane disaster areas may use earned income from the 
immediately preceding years.
    The Department of the Treasury must pay: (1) to the U.S. 
Virgin Islands amounts equal to the loss in revenues to the 
U.S. Virgin Islands by reason of the provisions of this title, 
and (2) to Puerto Rico amounts equal to the aggregate benefits 
that would have been provided to residents of Puerto Rico by 
reason of the provisions of this title if a mirror code tax 
system had been in effect in Puerto Rico.
    (Sec. 505) The bill designates this title as an emergency 
requirement pursuant to the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 
(PAYGO) and the FY2010 congressional budget resolution.

Legislative History

    Sep. 25, 2017. Mr. Curbelo (FL) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    Sep. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    Sep. 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3823.
    Sep. 25, 2017. Considered as unfinished business.
    Sep. 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Failed by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 245-171 
(Roll no. 530).
    Sep. 26, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 538 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 3823 
with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be 
considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion 
to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be 
considered read. Bill is closed to amendments. The amendment 
printed in the report of the Committee on Rules shall be 
considered as adopted. The rule also provides for suspension 
authority on the legislative day of September 28, 2017.
    Sep. 27, 2017. Rule H. Res. 538 passed House.
    Sep. 27, 2017. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 538.
    Sep. 27, 2017. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 3823 
with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be 
considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion 
to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be 
considered read. Bill is closed to amendments. The amendment 
printed in the report of the Committee on Rules shall be 
considered as adopted. The rule also provides for suspension 
authority on the legislative day of September 28, 2017.
    Sep. 27, 2017. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on H.R. 3823.
    Sep. 27, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Sep. 27, 2017. Pursuant to clause 1(c) of rule 19, further 
consideration of H.R. 3823 is postponed.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Pursuant to clause 1(c) of rule 19, further 
consideration of H.R. 3823 resumed. (consideration: CR H7602-
7614)
    Sep. 28, 2017. Mr. Nadler moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Ways and Means. (text: CR 
H7603-7610)
    Sep. 28, 2017.--The House proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Nadler motion to recommit with instructions. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to report the same 
back to the House forthwith with an amendment to increase by $1 
billion the amount appropriated to Puerto Rico and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands.
    Sep. 28, 2017. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    Sep. 28, 2017. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 188-227 (Roll no. 541).
    Sep. 28, 2017. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 264-
155 (Roll no. 542). (text: CR 9/25/2017 H7457-7463)
    Sep. 28, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S6205)
    Sep. 28, 2017. S.AMDT.1108 Amendment SA 1108 proposed by 
Senator McConnell for Senator Cassidy. (consideration: CR 
S6232; text: CR S6205)
    To strike the provisions relating to development of a 
private flood insurance market.
    Sep. 28, 2017. S.AMDT.1108 Amendment SA 1108 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Passed Senate with an amendment by Voice 
Vote.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Mr. Smith (NE) asked unanimous consent to 
take from the Speaker's Table and agree to the Senate 
amendment.
    Sep. 28, 2017. On motion that the House agree to the Senate 
amendment Agreed to without objection. (consideration: CR 
H7633)
    Sep. 28, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 29, 2017. Presented to President.
    Sep. 29, 2017. Signed by President.
    Oct. 2, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-63.

        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-91 (H.R. 2810)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2018 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.
    The bill authorizes appropriations to DOD for: (1) 
Procurement, including aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked 
combat vehicles, ammunition, shipbuilding and conversion, space 
procurement, and other procurement; (2) Research, Development, 
Test, and Evaluation; (3) Operation and Maintenance; (4) 
Working Capital Funds; (5) the Joint Urgent Operational Needs 
Fund; (6) Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction; (7) Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities; (8) the Defense 
Inspector General; (9) the Defense Health Program; (10) the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home; (11) Overseas Contingency 
Operations; and (12) Military Construction.
    The bill also authorizes the fiscal year 2018 personnel 
strength for active duty and reserve forces and sets forth 
policies regarding compensation and other personnel benefits, 
the Ready Reserve Force and Military Sealift Command surge 
fleet, and matters relating to foreign nations.
    The Committee worked with the Committee on Armed Services 
to clear provisions in H.R. 2810 within the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure's jurisdiction.

Legislative History

    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H8004-8008, H8008-8009, H8009-
8010).
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Langevin moved that the House instruct 
conferees. (consideration: CR H8004-8008, H8008-8009, H8009-
8010; text as House agreed to Senate amendment: CR H8004)
    Oct. 12, 2017. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Langevin motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 2810. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to disagree with subsection 
(c) of section 336 of the Senate amendment, to recede from 
section 1064 of the House bill and to disagree with section 
1087 of the Senate amendment.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 184-237 (Roll no. 564).
    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Thornberry moved that the House to close 
portions of the conference.
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion to close portions of the 
conference Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 414-8 (Roll no. 
565).
    Oct. 12, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Franks (AZ), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, 
Wittman, Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Stefanik, 
Knight, Bacon, Smith (WA), Brady (PA), Davis (CA), Langevin, 
Larsen (WA), Cooper, Bordallo, Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, 
Speier, Veasey, and Gabbard.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for consideration of 
matters within the jurisdiction of that committee under clause 
11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and Schiff.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on the Budget for consideration of sec. 1262 of the 
House bill, and sec. 4 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Johnson (OH), Bergman, 
and Yarmuth.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce for consideration of 
secs. 221, 551, 555, and 3509 of the House bill, and secs. 236, 
551-53, 3116, 5508, and 6001 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx, Byrne, and Scott 
(VA).
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of secs. 
313, 314, 601, 723, 727, 729, 732, 3118, and 3122 of the House 
bill, and secs. 601, 701, 725, 732, 1089A, 1625, and 3114 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Barton, and Pallone.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of sec. 862 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Barr, Williams, and Waters, Maxine.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of secs. 864, 
1032, 1039, 1040, 1058, 1201, 1203-05, 1211, 1222, 1223, 1231, 
1232, 1234, 1243, 1246, 1247, 1265, 1270A, 1272, 1276, 1278, 
1280, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, 1687, 2841, and 3117 of the House 
bill, and secs. 111, 861, 867, 1011, 1203-05, 1212, 1213, 1231-
33, 1241-45, 1250, 1261-63, 1270B, 1270C, 1282, 1283, 1301, 
1302, 1531, and 1651 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Royce (CA), Donovan, and Engel.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 515, 
1062, 1063, 1067, 1080, 1695, 2843, and 3510 of the House bill, 
and secs. 520A, 529, 1035, 1081, 1083, 1217, 1264, and 14013 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Issa, and Conyers.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of secs. 601, 
1062, 1265, 2827, 2828, 2831, 2832, 2844, 2863, subtitle F of 
title XXVIII, and sec. 2863 of the House bill, and secs. 311, 
338, 601, 1263, 1264, 2850, and 12801 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Westerman, Cheney, 
and Grijalva.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for consideration 
of secs. 323, 501, 801, 803, 859-860A, 873, and 1101-09 of the 
House bill, and secs. 218, 544, 557, 801, 812, 821, 822, 829, 
852, 902, 931, 934, 938, 1045, 1093, 1094, 1101, 1102, 1104-06, 
1111-13, 2821, 2822, 6005, 6012, 10804, 11023-25, and 11603 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Meadows, Ross, and Lynch.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for consideration 
of sec. 223 of the House bill and secs. 897, 898, 1662-64, and 
6002 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and Johnson, E.B.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 801, 
860B, 867, 1701-04, 1711-13, 1721-23, 1731-37, and 1741 of the 
House bill, and secs. 854, 862, 897, 898, 899C, 10801, and 
10802 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Chabot, Kelly (MS), and Velazquez.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs 122, 311, 546, 601, 1082, 1617, 1695, 
3501, 3502, 3505, and 3507-10 of the House bill, and secs. 331, 
601, 1048, 6002, 13501, 13502, 13508, 13513, 13607, and 14013 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Graves (MO), Hunter, and Bustos.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of secs. 572, 
573, 576, 578, 1077, and 2841 of the House bill, and secs. 731, 
1084, 1088, 1264, 11001, 11008, and 14004 of the Senate 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), 
Bilirakis, and Walz.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 701 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Tiberi, Walorski, and Neal.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Conference held.
    Nov. 8, 2017. Conferees agreed to file conference report.
    Nov. 9, 2017. Conference report H. Rept. 115-404 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H8701-9136)
    Nov. 9, 2017. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    Nov. 13, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 616 
Reported to House. The resolution provides for one hour of 
general debate and closed rule for H.R. 2874. Also, the 
resolution provides for consideration of the conference report 
to accompany H.R. 2810.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Rule H. Res. 616 passed House.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-404 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 616. (consideration: CR H9200-9209)
    Nov. 14, 2017. The House proceeded with 1 hour of debate on 
the Conference report to accompany H.R. 2810.
    Nov. 14, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Nov. 14, 2017. The House proceeded to consider the 
conference report H. Rept. 115-404 as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H9238-9239)
    Nov. 14, 2017. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 356-70 (Roll no. 631).
    Nov. 14, 2017. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Conference report considered in Senate.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Senate agreed to conference report by Voice 
Vote.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Presented to President.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Signed by President.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-91.

 John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-232 (H.R. 5515)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2018 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.

Legislative History

    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H5782-5783; text: CR H5782)
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Carbajal moved that the House instruct 
conferees.
    June 27, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Carbajal motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 5515. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to agree to section 703 of 
the Senate bill.
    June 27, 2018. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 188-231 (Roll No. 300).
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry moved to close portions of 
the conference.
    June 27, 2018. On Closing Portions of the Conference Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 403-15 (Roll no. 301).
    June 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, Wittman, 
Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Byrne, Stefanik, Bacon, 
Banks (IN), Smith (WA), Davis (CA), Langevin, Cooper, Bordallo, 
Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, Speier, Veasey, Gabbard, 
O'Rourke, and Murphy (FL).
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of title 
XVII of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Latta, Johnson (OH), and Pallone.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of title XVII 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of title XVII of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Royce (CA), Kinzinger, and Engel.
    June 27, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House requests a conference.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for 
consideration of matters within the jurisdiction of that 
committee under clause 11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and 
Schiff.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Budget for consideration of secs. 
1252 and 1523 of the House bill, and secs. 4, 1002, 1032, and 
1721 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Womack and Yarmuth.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Education and the Workforce for 
consideration of secs. 228, 563, 564, 1094, and 3120C of the 
House bill, and secs. 561-63 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx and Scott (VA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of 
secs. 701, 712, 1083, 1096, 3111-13, 3118, 3119, 3132, and 4305 
of the House bill, and secs. 315, 601, 714, 3111-15, 5802, and 
7509 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Hudson, and Pallone.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Financial Services for consideration of 
1299O-2 and 1236 of the House bill, and modifications committed 
to conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 346, 1042, 1202-06, 1210, 1211, 1221-23, 1230A, 1230D, 
1230F, 1231, 1234, 1236, 1237, 1239, 1240, 1254-56, 1264, 1267, 
1268, 1271, 1274, 1276, 1278, 1280, 1282, 1288, 1299O-1, 1299O-
2, 1299O-3, 1299O-4, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, and 3116 of the 
House bill, and secs. 331, 1061, 1063, 1201-04, 1207, 1211, 
1213, 1221-23, 1231-33, 1241, 1244, 1245, 1261, 1262, 1264-66, 
1269, 1301, 1302, 1531, 1622, 1623, 1654, 3113, 3116, 6002, 
6202-04, 6701, and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Royce (CA), Mast, and 
Engel.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Homeland Security for consideration of 
sec. 1634 of the House bill, and modifications committed to 
conference: McCaul, Ratcliffe, and Thompson (MS).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 
826, 1043, 1050B, 1073, 1074, 1079, 1085, 1087, 1090, 1299O-2, 
4319, and 4710 of the House bill, and secs. 1025, 1035 and 1715 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Sensenbrenner, and Nadler.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of 
secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 
2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 4810, 4837, division E, and 
sec. 6101 of the House bill, and secs. 601, 2833, 2836, and 
7518 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Westerman and Grijalva.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for 
consideration of secs. 506, 511, 569, 822, 831, 832, 834, 835, 
860, 875, 880-84, 886, 917, 1101-11, 4711, and 4829 of the 
House bill, and secs. 568, 595, 607, 632, 702, 813, 902, 937, 
1101-05, 1122-25, 1254B, 1628, 1639, 1640, 1716, 1726, 2835, 
and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
to conference: Sanford, Ross, and Lynch.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for 
consideration of secs. 854, 858, and 1603 of the House bill, 
and secs. 893 and 1604 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and 
Johnson, E.B.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 
811, 851-58, 861, 863-68, and 2803 of the House bill, and secs. 
893, 1626, and 6006 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Chabot, Knight, and Velazquez.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs. 518, 554, 883, 1044, 1049, 1050B, 1075, 
1095, 1111, 2848, 3501, 3504, 3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division 
D of the House bill, and secs. 153, 556, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 
7501, 7502, 7507-09, 7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Comstock and 
Brownley (CA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 547, 552, 582, 1411, and 2844 of the House bill, and 
secs. 721, 726, and 1431 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), Poliquin, and 
Walz.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 
701 of the House bill, and sec. 6201 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Reichert, Roskam, 
and Neal.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 
1252, 1523, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 
4810, 4837, division E, and sec. 6101 of the House bill and 
secs. 4, 601, 1002, 1032, 1721, 2833, 2836, and 7518 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Bergman.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 228, 518, 554, 563, 564, 883, 1044, 
1049, 1050B, 1075, 1094, 1095, 1111, 2848, 3120C, 3501, 3504, 
3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division D of the House bill and secs. 
153, 556, 561-63, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 7501, 7502, 7507-09, 
7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Lewis (MN).
    July 10, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees agreed to in Senate by 
Yea-Nay Vote. 91-8. Record Vote Number: 147.
    July 10, 2018. Senate insists on its amendment, agrees to 
request for conference, and authorizes the Presiding Officer to 
appoint conferees.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees (Committee on Foreign Investment) agreed to in Senate 
by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. Record Vote Number: 148.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees (NATO) agreed to in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. 
Record Vote Number: 149.
    July 10, 2018. Senate appointed conferees. McCain; Inhofe; 
Wicker; Fischer; Cotton; Rounds; Ernst; Tillis; Sullivan; 
Perdue; Cruz; Graham; Sasse; Scott; Crapo; Reed; Nelson; 
McCaskill; Shaheen; Gillibrand; Blumenthal; Donnelly; Hirono; 
Kaine; King; Heinrich; Warren; Peters; Brown.
    July 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    July 23, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-863 filed.
    July 24, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019
    July 25, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-874 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H7202-7637)
    July 25, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1027 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of the 
conference report to H.R. 5515.
    July 25, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Rule H. Res. 1027 passed House.
    July 26, 2018. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-874 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 1027. (consideration: CR H7699-7709)
    July 26, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the conference report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The House resumed debate on the conference 
report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    July 26, 2018. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 359-54 (Roll no. 379). (consideration: 
CR H7708-7709)
    July 26, 2018. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2018. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5412-5417)
    July 26, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 presented in Senate. (CR S5412)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5538-5543)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 withdrawn by unanimous consent in Senate.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Senate agreed to conference report by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 87-10. Record Vote Number: 181.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Presented to President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Signed by President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-232.

 To Extend the Authorizations of Federal Aviation Programs, To Extend 
 the Funding and Expenditure Authority of the Airport and Airway Trust 
                      Fund, and for Other Purposes


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-250 (H.R. 6897)

Summary

    This bill extended the authorization of Federal aviation 
programs, including programs of the FAA, and authority to 
collect aviation taxes for deposit into the Airport and Airway 
Trust Fund by seven days to October 7, 2018. The bill also 
directed that the FAA calculate airport grant apportionments 
under the Airport Improvement Program for fiscal 2019 on 
October 8, 2018. The bill allowed additional time for the FAA 
Reauthorization Act of 2018, which passed the same day as the 
bill, to be considered in the Senate.

Legislative History

    Sep. 26, 2018. Mr. Shuster asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Committee on Ways and Means discharged.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9060)
    Sep. 26, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR H9060)
    Sep. 26, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Presented to President.
    Sep. 29, 2018. Signed by President.
    Sep. 29, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-250.

                    FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-254 (H.R. 302)

Summary

    Division B of this bill reauthorizes the FAA and Federal 
aviation programs through fiscal year 2023. It maintains 
reforms to programs that facilitate air service to small and 
rural airports and provides steady funding for the Airport 
Improvement Program. H.R. 302 removes unnecessary restrictions 
on the Passenger Facility Charge (PFC), allowing airports to 
more effectively finance projects that improve airport 
infrastructure and benefit the traveling public, and 
streamlines the PFC application process to increase airport 
flexibility in financing projects and reduce both airport and 
federal administrative costs. It directs the FAA to conduct a 
future aviation infrastructure and financing study to assess 
aviation infrastructure needs and potential funding sources.
    The bill provides the FAA with a number of tools, methods, 
and strategies to mitigate the impact of airport noise on 
communities neighboring airports. Among these tools, the bill 
requires the FAA to study the potential health impacts of 
overflight noise and consider the feasibility of amending 
existing departure procedures over noise sensitive areas.
    Under the bill, the Federal Contract Tower Program is 
continued and reformed to enable new towers to enter the 
program. H.R. 302 also updates the FAA's out of date cost 
benefit analysis for current contract towers. The bill creates 
a remote air traffic control tower pilot program, deploying new 
advanced technologies in a way that will lower the cost of air 
traffic control services. The bill includes a provision that 
gives the FAA authority to release airports from additional 
land restrictions without Congressional approval. It requires 
large and medium commercial airports to provide clean, private 
rooms in every terminal for nursing mothers.
    This bill reforms the FAA's aircraft certification 
processes in a number of ways. It directs the FAA to fully 
utilize its existing authority to delegate certain 
certification functions to approved persons and entities. The 
bill also improves the FAA workforce training and development 
for FAA inspectors and engineers, and provides for greater FAA 
collaboration with industry and labor stakeholders, as well as 
increased transparency and accountability for both the FAA and 
industry. H.R. 302 includes reforms to ensure consistency in 
regulatory interpretation among the FAA regional offices and 
headquarters, and addresses delays in foreign certification of 
U.S. products abroad. It requires the FAA to promote U.S. 
aerospace safety standards abroad. Additionally, the bill 
includes provisions to permit the reintroduction of civil 
supersonic aircraft.
    H.R. 302 improves aviation safety. The bill requires a 
review of runway safety programs; crash resistant fuel systems 
in newly manufactured rotorcraft; and pilot training on manual 
flying skills and how to monitor aircraft automation systems. 
It also provides a robust approach to address transportation of 
lithium batteries by air. The bill addresses general aviation 
safety by mandating an in-depth study of past general aviation 
(GA) accidents to evaluate lessons learned and develop 
recommendations to improve GA. It also streamlines the approval 
processes for the installation of safety-enhancing technologies 
on small GA airplanes. Finally, the bill imposes new flight 
attendant rest requirements; mandates a review of existing 
aircraft cabin evacuation certification processes; and 
addresses sexual misconduct on aircraft.
    The bill includes a number of provisions to address 
aviation consumer needs. It prohibits the involuntary bumping 
of passengers once they have been cleared to board the 
aircraft; prohibits the use of cell phones and mobile devices 
for voice communications during commercial flights; and directs 
the FAA to establish minimum seat size requirements, including 
width, length, and pitch, necessary for passenger safety. The 
bill requires airlines, in the event of a widespread disruption 
of their computer systems, to post via a prominent link on 
their website what services the airline will provide impacted 
passengers. H.R. 302 also extends the Advisory Committee for 
Aviation Consumer Protection that was created in the FAA 
Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 through the end of fiscal 
year 2023.
    H.R. 302 takes multiple steps to improve the travel 
experience for aviation consumers with disabilities. The bill 
requires DOT to address issues regarding restroom 
accessibility, service animals, and in-flight entertainment 
systems for passengers with disabilities, and mandates studies 
on airport accessibility, airline employee training, and in-
cabin wheelchair restraint systems. It also requires DOT to 
issue an Airline Passengers with Disabilities Bill of Rights 
and creates an advisory committee on issues related to the air 
travel needs of passengers with disabilities.
    H.R. 302 advances the safe integration of unmanned aircraft 
into the National Airspace System. The bill establishes for the 
FAA to accept consensus safety standards for the design and 
manufacture of small UAS. It creates a regulatory framework for 
authorizing the carriage of property using small UAS. The bill 
also creates a new framework for the safe recreational 
operations of UAS such as model aircraft. H.R. 302 also creates 
new penalties for unsafe or unlawful operations of UAS. The 
bill improves transparency in the regulatory process for 
approving certain advanced operations of small UAS. The bill 
also codifies the UAS integration pilot program established by 
the Department of Transportation. The bill also strengthens 
privacy protections related to UAS operations. Finally, H.R. 
302 creates a comprehensive framework for the deployment of UAS 
traffic management systems.
    Division C of this bill reauthorizes the National 
Transportation Safety Board through fiscal year 2022 and makes 
reforms to its operations. Specifically, the enhances public 
understanding of NTSB's safety recommendations by requiring a 
report on the ``Most Wanted List'' selection process and a 
methodology section to accompany each recommendation. Further, 
the bill promotes collaboration and communication among NTSB 
members by allowing, with robust disclosure requirements, a 
majority of members to meet privately and discuss official 
business. In addition, it expands access to assistance for 
families of rail and aviation accident victims. The bill also 
Increases transparency of the Board by created a multimodal 
accident database management system for investigations and by 
adding still images to the items the NTSB may disclose during 
the course of an investigation.

Legislative History

    Sep. 26, 2018. House agreed to Senate amendment with an 
amendment pursuant to H.Res. 1082.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendment to Senate amendment.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion to proceed to consideration of 
measure agreed to in Senate by Voice Vote.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by motion.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 made in 
Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 
presented in Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 with an 
amendment (SA 4026) made in Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Amendment SA 4026 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. To change the enactment date.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Amendment SA 4027 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4026. Of a perfecting nature.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation the 
House message to accompany H.R. 302 with instructions to report 
back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4028) made in 
Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4028 Amendment SA 4028 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. To change the enactment date.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4029 Amendment SA 4029 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4028 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer). Of a perfecting nature.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4030 Amendment SA 4030 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4029. Of a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4028 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4029 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4030 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6408-6416)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 invoked in Senate 
by Yea-Nay Vote. 90-7. Record Vote Number: 219. (CR S6409)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation the 
House message to accompany H.R. 302 with instructions to report 
back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4028) fell when 
cloture was invoked on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 in Senate.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4028 SA 4028 fell when cloture was 
invoked on the motion to concur in the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 302.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4029 SA 4029 fell when SA 4028 fell.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4030 SA 4030 fell when SA 4029 fell.
    Oct. 2, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6417)
    Oct. 2, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6417)
    Oct. 2, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6417-6428; S6428-6451)
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered).
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered).
    Oct. 3, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered).
    Oct. 3, 2018. Senate agreed to the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 302 by Yea-Nay Vote. 93-6. Record Vote 
Number: 220.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 with an 
amendment (SA 4026) was rendered moot when the motion to concur 
in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 was 
agreed to in Senate.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 SA 4026 fell when the motion to 
concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 
302 with an amendment (SA 4026) was rendered moot.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 SA 4027 fell when SA 4026 fell.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 4, 2018. Presented to the President.
    Oct. 5, 2018. Signed by the President.
    Oct. 5, 2018. Became Public Law No. 114-254.

                         Pending in the Senate


                    FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018


                     PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 4)

Summary

    H.R. 4, the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018, reauthorizes 
Federal aviation programs, including those of the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) through fiscal year 2023. H.R. 4 
provides five years of stable funding for the Airport 
Improvement Program (AIP) which issues grants to public use 
airports for planning and development purposes and is an 
essential part of maintaining long-term sustainability of 
airports of all sizes. The bill removes unnecessary 
restrictions on the Passenger Facility Charge allowing airports 
to more effectively finance projects that improve airport 
infrastructure and benefit the traveling public, and 
streamlines the PFC application process. H.R. 4 restores 
funding for three years to unclassified airports without a 
classified status in the National Plan of Integrated Airport 
Systems (NPIAS).
    The bill addresses airport noise and environmental issues, 
two of the largest issues for communities around airports. The 
bill provides the FAA with a number of tools, methods, and 
strategies to mitigate the impact of airport noise and the 
communities neighboring airports. Among these tools, the bill 
requires the FAA to study the potential health impacts of 
overflight noise and consider the feasibility of amending 
existing departure procedures over noise sensitive areas.
    Under the bill, the critically important Federal Contract 
Tower Program is continued and reformed to enable new towers to 
enter the program and updates the FAA's out of date cost 
benefit analysis for current contract towers. The bill creates 
a remote air traffic control tower pilot program, deploying new 
advanced technologies in a way that will lower the cost of air 
traffic control services. The bill includes a provision that 
gives the FAA authority to release airports from additional 
land restrictions without Congressional approval. It requires 
large and medium commercial airports to provide clean, private 
rooms in every terminal for nursing mothers.
    The bill reforms the FAA's safety certification programs by 
ensuring collaboration between the FAA and stakeholders to 
streamline certification and regulatory processes. H.R. 4 
allows manufacturers to benefit from consistent regulatory 
interpretation among FAA offices, enables manufacturers to 
fully utilize delegated certification authorities, and 
addresses delays in foreign certification of U.S. products.
    H.R. 4 enhances aviation safety by furthering the FAA's 
safety mission, ensuring efficient utilization of safety 
workforce, and enhancing safety workforce training. It 
strengthens voluntary safety reporting programs for pilots, 
addresses alternative methods of tracking aircraft over oceans, 
streamlines approval process for safety-enhancing technologies 
on small GA airplanes, and provides a robust approach to 
address transportation of lithium batteries by air.
    The bill includes a number of provisions to address 
aviation consumer needs. It prohibits the involuntary bumping 
of passengers once they have already boarded the plane; 
prohibits the use of cell phones and mobile devices for voice 
communications during commercial flights; and directs the FAA 
to establish minimum seat size requirements, including width, 
length, and pitch, necessary for passenger health and safety. 
H.R. 4 ensures airlines are transparent with respect to 
government-imposed taxes and fees that will be added to the 
base fare of a ticket, so the consumer knows exactly what they 
will be paying, and ensures consumers can voice complaints 
through the consumer complaints hot-line and by using new 
technologies, such as smart phone applications, to facilitate 
these complaints. It requires airlines, in the event of a 
widespread disruption of their computer systems, to post via a 
prominent link on their website what services the airline will 
provide impacted passengers. H.R. 4 also extends the Advisory 
Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection that was created in 
the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 through the end of 
Fiscal Year 2023.
    H.R. 4 takes multiple steps to improve the travel 
experience for aviation consumers with disabilities. The bill 
requires DOT to address issues regarding restroom 
accessibility, service animals onboard planes, and in-flight 
entertainment systems for passengers with disabilities, and 
mandates studies on airport accessibility, airline employee 
training, and in-cabin wheelchair restraint systems. Finally, 
it establishes the Select Subcommittee for Aviation Consumers 
with Disabilities to advise the Secretary and the Advisory 
Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection on issues related to 
the air travel needs of passengers with disabilities.
    H.R. 4 addresses the unique needs of the fast-growing 
unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) segment. It establishes 
processes to accelerate implementation of low-altitude unmanned 
aircraft system traffic management (UTM) system. It also 
establishes an air carrier certificate for operators of small 
unmanned aircraft, expedites the safe deployment of commercial 
UAS by creating a risk-based permitting process, fosters the 
development of sense-and-avoid technology at UAS test ranges, 
and establishes a streamlined process for the FAA to permit the 
operation of small UAS for certain uses. The bill requires a 
DOT study on the privacy implications of UAS operations, 
directs the DOT Inspector General (IG) to assess the FAA's 
small UAS registration system and to study the potential roles 
of state and local governments in regulating low-altitude UAS 
operations, and requires the FAA to develop and track metrics 
to assess compliance with and effectiveness of the agency's UAS 
registration system. Finally, the bill tasks FAA with 
streamlining regulations for the safe operation of micro-
drones, requires the Comptroller General to study financing 
options related to the regulation and oversight of UAS, and 
increases transparency by requiring the FAA to publish 
information on approved small UAS waivers and airspace 
authorizations, and to provide real time data on the status of 
applications for small UAS waivers and airspace authorizations.
    Lastly, the bill expedites the safe deployment of 
commercial UAS by creating a risk-based permitting process for 
commercial operations. H.R. 4 fosters the development of sense-
and-avoid and beyond line of sight systems at UAS test ranges 
and establishes a streamlined process for the FAA to permit the 
operation of small UAS for certain uses. The bill also creates 
improvements and transparency in the regulatory process for 
operating small UAS and establishes a review of interagency 
coordination related to use of counter UAS systems in the 
National Airspace System. H.R. 4 creates a comprehensive 
framework for the deployment of UAS traffic management systems.
    The bill also codified the UAS integration pilot program 
established by the Department of Transportation.

Legislative History

    April 16, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 839.
    Apr. 26, 2018. The rule provides for consideration of H.R. 
4, under a structured rule, and H.R. 3144, under a closed rule. 
The rule makes in order only those amendments printed in Part A 
of the committee report for H.R. 4. The rule provides for 1 
hour of general debate for both H.R. 4 and H.R. 3144. The rule 
provides for one motion to recommit for both bills. And, the 
rule provides that on any legislative day during the period 
from April 30, 2018 through May 4, 2018, the Journal of the 
proceedings of the previous day shall be considered as 
approved.
    Apr. 26, 2018. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
839 and Rule XVIII.
    Apr. 26, 2018. The Speaker designated the Honorable Daniel 
M. Donovan, Jr. to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    Apr. 26, 2018. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with 
one hour of general debate on H.R. 4.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.546 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Shuster. Amendment numbered 1 printed in Part A of House Report 
115-650 to improve aviation safety by addressing issues such as 
airline engines, air ambulances, FAA certification processes, 
and airspace operations. Adjusts FAA authorization levels to 
conform with updated CBO baseline for FY 2018. Makes counter-
UAS systems AIP eligible. Continues the contract weather 
observer program and requires the Secretary to define the roles 
and responsibilities of the FAA Tech Center. Reforms and 
provides transparency to the FAA organization and programs. 
Addresses consumer concerns, including sexual misconduct on 
flights, treatment of passengers with disabilities, and 
harmonization of service animal standards. Improves the Airport 
Investment Partnership Program.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Shuster amendment No. 1.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.546 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendment (A001) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. The Committee rose informally to receive a 
message from the Senate.
    Apr. 26, 2018. The Committee resumed its sitting.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.547 Amendments en bloc (A002) offered 
by Mr. Shuster. Printed in Part A of House Report 115-650 
consisting of amendments numbered 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 
11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, as 
modified, 26, 27, 28, 29, and 30.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 20 minutes of debate 
on the Shuster En bloc amendment No. 1, as modified.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.547 Shuster amendment (A002) modified 
by unanimous consent.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.547 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendments (A002) as modified Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.548 Amendment (A003) offered by Mr. 
Roskam. Page 46, after line 22, insert the following: SEC. XX. 
AIRPORT NOISE MITIGATION AND SAFETY STUDY. (a) Study--Not later 
than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall 
initiate a study to review and evaluate existing studies and 
analyses of the relationship between jet aircraft approach and 
takeoff speeds and corresponding noise impacts on communities 
surrounding airports. ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Roskam amendment No. 13.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.548 On agreeing to the Roskam 
amendment (A003) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.549 Amendment (A004) offered by Mr. 
Denham. At the end of title I, insert the following: SEC. 1XX. 
JUDICIAL REVIEW FOR PROPOSED ALTERNATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW 
AND APPROVAL PROCEDURES. Section 330(e) of title 23, United 
States Code, is amended-- ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Denham amendment No. 17.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.549 On agreeing to the Denham 
amendment (A004) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.550 Amendments en bloc (A005) offered 
by Mr. Shuster. Amendments en bloc printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 consisting of amendments numbered 31, 32, 33, 
34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 43, 45, 48, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 56, 
57, 58, 59, 61, 62, 64, and 65.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 20 minutes of debate 
on the Shuster En bloc amendment No. 2.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.550 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendments (A005) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.551 Amendment (A006) offered by Mr. 
Higgins (LA). At the end of title IV, insert the following: 
SEC. 6XX. AUTHORIZATION OF CERTAIN FLIGHTS BY STAGE 2 
AIRPLANES. (a) In General--Notwithstanding section 47534 of 
title 49, United States Code, not late than 180 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the 
Federal Aviation Administration shall initiate a pilot program 
to permit the operator of a Stage 2 airplane to operate that 
airplane in revenue and nonrevenue service into medium hub 
airports or non-hub airports if-- ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Higgins (LA) amendment No. 41.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.551 On agreeing to the Higgins (LA) 
amendment (A006) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.552 Amendment (A007) offered by Mr. 
DeFazio. Page 214, strike lines 11 through 15. Page 215, 
beginning on line 13, strike ``Pursuant to section 828 of the 
FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (49 U.S.C. 44701 
note), not'' and insert ``Not''. Page 216, strike lines 1 
through 5 and insert the following: ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the DeFazio amendment No. 42.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.553 Amendment (A008) offered by Mr. 
Cohen.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.553 Cohen amendment (A008) modified 
by unanimous consent.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Cohen amendment No. 46, as modified.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.553 On agreeing to the Cohen 
amendment (A008) as modified Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.554 Amendment (A009) offered by Mr. 
Burgess. Add at the end of title V the following: SEC. 543. 
PROHIBITION REGARDING WEAPONS. (a) In General--Unless 
authorized by the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration, a person may not operate an unmanned aircraft 
or unmanned aircraft system that is equipped or armed with a 
dangerous weapon.***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Burgess amendment No. 47.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.554 On agreeing to the Burgess 
amendment (A009) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.555 Amendment (A010) offered by Mr. 
Perlmutter. At the end of title V, insert the following: SEC. 
5XX. HELICOPTER FUEL SYSTEM SAFETY. (a) In General--Chapter 447 
of title 49, United States Code, is further amended by adding 
at the end the following: ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Perlmutter amendment No. 49.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.555 On agreeing to the Perlmutter 
amendment (A010) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.556 Amendment (A011) offered by Mr. 
Rohrabacher. At the end of title V of the bill, add the 
following: SEC. 5XX. COASTAL OVERFLIGHT. The Administrator of 
the Federal Aviation Administration shall ensure that all 
aircraft transitioning from flight over ocean to flight over 
land shall fly at a safe altitude. Such altitude shall not be 
lower than specific flight operations require.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Rohrabacher amendment No. 60.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.557 Amendment (A012) offered by Mr. 
King (IA). At the end of title V of the bill, add the 
following: SEC. XX. PREVAILING RATE OF WAGE REQUIREMENTS. None 
of the funds made available by this Act, including the 
amendments made by this Act, may be used to implement, 
administer, or enforce the prevailing rate of wage requirements 
in subchapter IV of chapter 31 of title 40, United States Code 
(commonly referred to as the Davis-Bacon Act).
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the King (IA) amendment No. 63.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.558 Amendments en bloc (A013) offered 
by Mr. Shuster. Amendments en bloc printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 consisting of amendments numbered 66, 69, 70, 
71, 72, 73, 74, 76, 77, 80, 82, 83, 85, 86, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 
94, 95, 98, 99, 100, and 101.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 20 minutes of debate 
on the Shuster En bloc amendment No. 3.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.558 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendments (A013) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.559 Amendment (A014) offered by Mr. 
Beyer. At the end of title V, add the following: SEC. XX. 
NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION HELICOPTER FLIGHT PATHS. (a) In 
General--With respect to the National Capital Region, the 
Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration shall 
review and revise helicopter flight paths, including those used 
by the Department of Defense and all military helicopters, 
identifying and issuing new official paths for areas in which 
helicopters may be able to fly at higher altitudes. ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Beyer amendment No. 67.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.560 Amendment (A015) offered by Mr. 
Smith (NE). At the end of title V, add the following: SEC. XX. 
GAO STUDY ON AVIATION WORKFORCE. (a) In General--Not later than 
180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Comptroller General of the United States shall initiate a 
study, based on previous studies, that looks at the current and 
future supply of individuals in the aviation workforce. ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Smith (NE) amendment No. 68.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.560 On agreeing to the Smith (NE) 
amendment (A015) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.561 Amendment (A016) offered by Mr. 
Lewis (MN).
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Lewis (MN) amendment No. 75.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.561 On agreeing to the Lewis (MN) 
amendment (A016) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.562 Amendment (A017) offered by Mr. 
Lipinski. Add at the end of title V of the bill, the following: 
SEC. 5XX. INTERLINING. Not later than 1 year after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Transportation shall 
issue a final rule ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Lipinski amendment No. 78.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.563 Amendment (A018) offered by Mr. 
Denham. At the end of title V, insert the following: SEC. 5XX. 
FEDERAL AUTHORITY. (a) In General--Section 14501(c) of title 
49, United States Code, is amended-- ***.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Denham amendment No. 79.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Mr. Shuster asked unanimous consent to 
vacate the proceedings on Beyer amendment No. 67 of House 
Report 115-650, which was postponed, to the end that the Chair 
put the question de novo. Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.559 On agreeing to the Beyer 
amendment (A014) Failed by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.564 Amendment (A019) offered by Miss 
Gonzalez-Colon (PR). An amendment numbered 81 printed in Part A 
of House Report 115-650 to require a study/assessment and data 
collection of the air cargo traffic in the Caribbean region.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Gonzalez-Colon amendment No. 81.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.564 On agreeing to the Gonzalez-Colon 
(PR) amendment (A019) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.565 Amendment (A020) offered by Mrs. 
Comstock. An amendment numbered 84 printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 to require a study on possible funding options 
for a potential federal grant program for spaceport activities. 
Requires a report on a National Spaceports Policy which 
evaluates the national security and civil space launch demands; 
proposes policies designed to ensure a robust and resilient 
orbital and suborbital spaceport infrastructure; reviews the 
development and investments made by international competitors; 
and other aspects. Establishes an Office of Spaceports within 
the FAA to support, promote, and enable infrastructure 
improvements at FAA-licensed spaceports in the U.S.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.565 Comstock amendment (A020) 
modified by unanimous consent.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Comstock amendment No. 84, as modified.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.565 On agreeing to the Comstock 
amendment (A020) as modified Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.566 Amendment (A021) offered by Mr. 
Lynch. An amendment numbered 87 printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 to direct the FAA Administrator to engage and 
cooperate with air carriers to identify and facilitate 
opportunities for air carriers to retrofit aircraft with 
devices that mitigate noise, including vortex generators.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Lynch amendment No. 87.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.567 Amendment (A022) offered by Ms. 
Meng. An amendment numbered 88 printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 to require the FAA to develop global-scale 
probabilistic convection guidance capability so that aircraft 
can avoid encounters with convection that causes turbulence.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Meng amendment No. 88.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.567 On agreeing to the Meng amendment 
(A022) Failed by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.568 Amendment (A023) offered by Mr. 
Zeldin. An amendment numbered 96 printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 to require the FAA administrator to review the 
North Shore Helicopter Route to address the noise impact on 
affected communities, to improve altitude enforcement, and to 
assess alternatives including an all water route over the 
Atlantic Ocean.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Zeldin amendment No. 96.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.568 On agreeing to the Zeldin 
amendment (A023) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.569 Amendment (A024) offered by Mrs. 
Lawrence. An amendment numbered 97 printed in Part A of House 
Report 115-650 to require the FAA Administrator to conduct a 
study on the diversity of the cybersecurity workforce of the 
FAA in order to develop recommendations to increase the size, 
quality and diversity of such workforce.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Lawrence amendment No. 97.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.569 On agreeing to the Lawrence 
amendment (A024) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.552 On agreeing to the DeFazio 
amendment (A007) Failed by recorded vote: 192-223 (Roll no. 
155).
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.556 On agreeing to the Rohrabacher 
amendment (A011) Failed by recorded vote: 37-375 (Roll no. 
156).
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.557 On agreeing to the King (IA) 
amendment (A012) Failed by recorded vote: 172-243 (Roll no. 
157).
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.562 On agreeing to the Lipinski 
amendment (A017) Failed by recorded vote: 92-323 (Roll no. 
158).
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.563 On agreeing to the Denham 
amendment (A018) Agreed to by recorded vote: 222-193 (Roll no. 
159).
    Apr. 26, 2018. H.AMDT.566 On agreeing to the Lynch 
amendment (A021) Failed by recorded vote: 187-227 (Roll no. 
160).
    Apr. 26, 2018. Mr. Shuster moved that the committee rise.
    Apr. 26, 2018. On motion that the committee rise Agreed to 
by voice vote.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Committee of the Whole House on the state of 
the Union rises leaving H.R. 4 as unfinished business.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H3710-3722)
    Apr. 27, 2018. The House resolved into Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for further 
consideration.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.570 Amendments en bloc (A025) offered 
by Mr. Shuster. (consideration: CR H3710-3715; text: CR H3710-
3714) Amendments en bloc printed in Part A of House Report 115-
650 consisting of amendments numbered 102, 103, 105, 106, 109, 
111, 113 and 116.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 20 minutes of debate 
on the Shuster En bloc amendment No. 4.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.570 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendments (A025) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.571 Amendment (A026) offered by Mr. 
Graves (LA). (consideration: CR H3715-3716; text: CR H3715) An 
amendment numbered 104 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
650 to allow for an arbitration process for those disputing 
their eligibility for assistance, or repayment of assistance, 
following a disaster.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Graves (LA) amendment No. 104.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.571 On agreeing to the Graves (LA) 
amendment (A026) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.572 Amendment (A027) offered by Mr. 
Graves (LA). (consideration: CR H3716-3717; text: CR H3716) An 
amendment numbered 107 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
650 to provide for reimbursement to state and local units of 
government for housing that produces cost-savings to comparable 
FEMA solutions.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Graves (LA) amendment No. 107.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.572 On agreeing to the Graves (LA) 
amendment (A027) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.573 Amendment (A028) offered by Mr. 
Graves (LA). (consideration: CR H3717-3718; text: CR H3717) An 
amendment numbered 108 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
650 to limit reductions in assistance for more than one 
building in a multi-structure educational, law enforcement, 
correctional, fire, or medical campus.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Graves (LA) amendment No. 108.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.573 On agreeing to the Graves (LA) 
amendment (A028) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.574 Amendment (A029) offered by Mr. 
Babin. (consideration: CR H3718-3719; text: CR H3718) An 
amendment numbered 110 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
650 to prevent FEMA from recouping disaster relief funds that 
were previously certified by a FEMA Technical Assistance 
Contractor (TAC) as eligible, reasonable and reimbursable. 
Requires confirmation of the TAC determination through an audit 
by the DHS Inspector General.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Babin amendment No. 110.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.574 On agreeing to the Babin 
amendment (A029) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.575 Amendment (A030) offered by Mr. 
McClintock. (consideration: CR H3719-3720, H3722-3723; text: CR 
H3719) Amendment sought to strike section 451 from the bill, 
which authorizes the Essential Air Service.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the McClintock amendment No. 112.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.576 Amendment (A031) offered by Mr. 
Duncan (TN). (consideration: CR H3720-3723; text: CR H3720) 
Amendment establishes a national standard for hiring motor 
carriers.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 839, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Duncan (TN) amendment No. 114.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Mr. Shuster moved that the committee rise.
    Apr. 27, 2018. On motion that the committee rise Agreed to 
by voice vote.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Committee of the Whole House on the state of 
the Union rises leaving H.R. 4 as unfinished business.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H3722-3726)
    Apr. 27, 2018. The House resolved into Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for further 
consideration.
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.575 On agreeing to the McClintock 
amendment (A030) Failed by recorded vote: 113-293 (Roll no. 
162).
    Apr. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.576 On agreeing to the Duncan (TN) 
amendment (A031) Agreed to by recorded vote: 212-191 (Roll no. 
163).
    Apr. 27, 2018. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 4.
    Apr. 27, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Apr. 27, 2018. The House adopted the amendments en gross as 
agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of 
the Union.
    Apr. 27, 2018. Ms. Velazquez moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure. (text: CR H3723-3724)
    Apr. 27, 2018. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    Apr. 27, 2018. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by recorded vote: 182-223 (Roll no. 164).
    Apr. 27, 2018. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 393-
13 (Roll no. 165).
    Apr. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 27, 2018. The Clerk was authorized to correct section 
numbers, punctuation, and cross references, and to make other 
necessary technical and conforming corrections in the 
engrossment of H.R. 4.
    May 7, 2018. Received in the Senate. Read the first time. 
Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under Read the First 
Time.
    May 8, 2017. Read the second time. Placed on Senate 
Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 401.
    See Public Law 115-254 (H.R. 302) for further action.

 To Amend Title 49, United States Code, To Ensure Reliable Air Service 
                           in American Samoa


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 276)

Summary

    H.R. 276 permits the Department of Transportation to renew 
a foreign air carrier's emergency air transportation exemption 
every 180 days (instead of the current 30-day renewal period) 
if the air transportation is between the islands of Tutuila and 
Manu'a in American Samoa.

Legislative History

    Jan. 5, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Congressman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ) moved 
to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H771-772)
    Jan. 31, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 276.
    Jan. 31, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Jan. 31, 2017. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Mr. LoBiondo asked unanimous consent to 
amend the title to H.R. 276. Agreed to without objection.
    Feb. 1, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

              TSA Administrator Modernization Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1309)

Summary

    H.R. 1309 codifies the transfer of the Transportation 
Security Administration (TSA) from the Department of 
Transportation to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). 
The bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to: (1) 
decrease from 12 to 11 the maximum number of Assistant 
Secretary positions in DHS, and (2) include the Administrator 
of the TSA among the DHS officers to be appointed by the 
President. The Administrator shall be appointed as the head of 
the TSA for a five-year term as a Level IV position in the 
Executive Schedule.

Legislative History

    Mar. 8, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    Mar. 15, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-37.
    Mar. 15, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar (Calendar No. 
19).
    Mar. 20, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2210-2212)
    Mar. 20, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1309.
    Mar. 20, 2017. An Exchange of Letter was printed on Page 
H2210 of the Congressional Record.
    Mar. 20, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text of measure as passed: CR 
H2210)
    Mar. 20, 2017. An Exchange of Letters between Committee on 
Transportation Chairman Bill Shuster and Committee on Homeland 
Security Chairman Michael T. McCaul was printed in the 
Congressional Record on Page H 2210.
    Mar. 20, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Mar. 21, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

   Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection 
                      Reauthorization Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2200)

Summary

    H.R. 2200 reauthorizes the Trafficking Victims Protection 
Act of 2000. This bill addresses human trafficking in a number 
of ways involving multiple departments and agencies. It 
authorizes local educational agencies to establish programs to 
educate children on the dangers of severe forms of trafficking 
in persons. It also directs diplomatic or consular posts to 
designate an employee to receive information from any person 
who was a victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons 
while in the United States. Additionally, it permits the 
Department of Health and Human Services to carry out a Human 
Trafficking Victims Reintegration Through Employment Program. 
H.R. 2200 allows Department of Justice (DOJ) victim services 
grants to be used for programs that provide trauma-informed 
care or long-term housing for: (1) youth transitioning from 
foster care, and (2) women or girls in underserved populations. 
The bill directs airlines that contract with the federal 
government to provide personnel with training to recognize 
human trafficking incidents. The bill mandates that Federal 
Acquisition Institute curricula include a course on the law 
relating to human trafficking and government contracting. It 
also extends the United States Advisory Council on Human 
Trafficking Council through September 30, 2020. The bill sets 
forth agency actions to prevent funding of human trafficking. 
H.R. 2200 permits DOJ law enforcement grants to be used to 
designate at least one prosecutor for cases of severe forms of 
trafficking in persons. The bill excludes civil damages awarded 
in an action brought for slavery or trafficking in persons from 
``gross income''. It adds the Secretary of the Treasury and the 
United States Trade Representative to the Interagency Task 
Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking. The bill provides for 
transparency in U.S. Agency for International Development anti-
trafficking expenditures. Lastly, H.R. 2200 authorizes 
appropriations through FY2021: (1) for specified anti-
trafficking programs and entities, and (2) to U.S. Customs and 
Border Protection for on-site anti-trafficking training for 
airport and airline personnel.

Legislative History

    Apr. 28, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    May 3, 2017. Sponsor introductory remarks on measure. (CR 
E590)
    May 3, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs.
    May 3, 2017. Sponsor introductory remarks on measure. (CR 
E590)
    July 12, 2017. Congressman Edward R. Royce (R-CA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    July 12, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5492-5503)
    July 12, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2200.
    July 12, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H5492-5497)
    July 12, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 13, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Committee on Foreign Relations. Ordered to 
be reported with an amendment in the nature of a substitute 
favorably. (Markup report: CQ)
    Oct. 10, 2018. Committee on Foreign Relations. Reported by 
Senator Corker with an amendment in the nature of a substitute. 
Without written report.
    Oct. 10, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 628.
    Dec. 17, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S7631-7636; text as reported in 
Senate: CR S7631-7636)
    Dec. 17, 2018. The committee substitute as amended agreed 
to by Unanimous Consent. (CR S7631-7636)

                   Cuban Airport Security Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 3328)

Summary

    H.R. 3328 prohibits a U.S. air carrier that has entered 
into a covered agreement from employing a Cuban national 
beginning 30 days after enactment of this bill unless such 
carrier has publicly disclosed the full text of the agreement, 
and such nationals have not been recruited, hired, or trained 
by entities that are owned, operated, or controlled by Cuba's 
Council of State, Council of Ministers, Communist Party, 
Ministry of the Revolutionary Armed Forces, Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs, or Ministry of the Interior.
    The bill defines the term ``covered agreemement'' to mean a 
formal agreement between a U.S. air carrier with passenger air 
service between any location in Cuba and any location in the 
United States and the Empresa Cubana de Aeropuertos y Servicios 
Aeronauticos or any other entity associated with the Cuban 
government.
    H.R. 3328 directs the TSA to develop a standard working 
document for all negotiations and agreements between the United 
States and foreign governments or partners regarding Federal 
Air Marshal coverage of flights to and from the United States. 
All such agreements must be in writing and signed by the DHS 
Secretary. DHS is directed to notify Congress of any such 
agreement within 30 days of it being signed.
    Finally, the bill directs the U.S. Ambassador or the Charge 
d'Affaires to the U.S. Mission to the International Civil 
Aviation Organization to pursue improvements to airport 
security, including introducing a resolution to raise minimum 
airport security standards.

Legislative History

    July 25, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    July 26, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on 
Homeland Security.
    Sep. 13, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-308, Part I.
    Sep. 13, 2017. Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged.
    Sep. 13, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Sep. 13, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
220.
    Oct. 23, 2017. Mr. Katko moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Oct. 23, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H8049-8052)
    Oct. 23, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3328.
    Oct. 23, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H8049-8050)
    Oct. 23, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on page 
H8051 of the Congressional Record dated October 23, 2017.
    Oct. 23, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

        DHS Countering Unmanned Aircraft Systems Coordinator Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 6438)

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
direct the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to designate a 
DHS official as the Countering Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) 
Coordinator to coordinate with relevant DHS offices and 
components on the development of policies and plans to counter 
threats associated with UAS, including:
           countering UAS that may be used in a 
        terrorist attack;
           promoting research and development of 
        counter UAS technologies;
           ensuring the dissemination of information 
        and guidance related to countering such threats; and
           serving as the DHS point of contact for 
        federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement 
        entities and the private sector regarding DHS 
        activities to counter UAS.
    The coordinator shall: (1) ensure that activities for 
identifying, assessing, or defeating a UAS are carried out in 
accordance with applicable federal laws; and (2) serve as the 
principal DHS official for disseminating information regarding 
counter-UAS technology to the private sector.

Legislative History

    July 19, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    July 24, 2018. Ordered Reported by Unanimous Consent.
    Aug. 28, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-908.
    Aug. 28, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
704.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Mr. Perry moved to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill, as amended.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR S7810-7811)
    Sep. 4, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 6438.
    Sep. 4, 2018. An Exchange of Letters was printed in the 
Congressional Record on page H7811.
    Sep. 4, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H7810)
    Sep. 4, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

  To Require the Department of Homeland Security To Prepare a Threat 
    Assessment Relating to Unmanned Aircraft Systems, and for Other 
                                Purposes


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 6620)

Summary

    This bill requires the Under Secretary for Intelligence and 
Analysis of the Department of Homeland Security to consult with 
other Department officials and request information from other 
federal, state and local agencies and the private sector about 
threats from unmanned aircraft and other emerging threats. It 
also requires the development of a threat assessment regarding 
unmanned aircraft and other emerging threats. It also requires 
the creation of a technology infrastructure for the receive and 
analyze data related to threats described in this bill. 
Finally, it requires the Under Secretary for Intelligence and 
Analysis to submit a threat assessment and report to certain 
Committees of Congress.

Legislative History

    July 26, 2018. Referred to the Committee on Homeland 
Security, and in addition to the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held by the Committee on Homeland Security.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Ordered to be Reported by the Committee on 
Homeland Security by Unanimous Consent.
    July 26, 2018. Referred to House Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    July 27, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held by the Committee on Homeland Security.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Ordered to be Reported by the Committee on 
Homeland Security by Unanimous Consent.
    Sep. 25, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-960, Part I.
    Sep. 25, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Sep. 25, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
748.
    Sep. 25, 2018. Mr. McCaul moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Sep. 25, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H8750-8752)
    Sep. 25, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 6620.
    Sep. 25, 2018. An exchange of letters was printed in the 
Congressional Record dated September 25, 2018 on pages H8750 
and 8751.
    Sep. 25, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H8750)
    Sep. 25, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

                         Reported by Committee


                         21st Century AIRR Act


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 2997)

Summary

    H.R. 2997, the 21st Century AIRR Act, provides 
comprehensive reform and reauthorization of the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA). H.R. 2997 provides six years of 
robust funding for the Airport Improvement Program (AIP) which 
issues grants to public use airports for planning and 
development purposes and is an essential part of maintaining 
long-term sustainability of airports of all sizes. The bill 
removes unnecessary restrictions on the Passenger Facility 
Charge allowing airports to more effectively finance projects 
that improve airport infrastructure and benefit the traveling 
public, and streamlines the PFC application process. H.R. 2997 
restores funding for three years to unclassified airports 
without a classified status in the National Plan of Integrated 
Airport Systems (NPIAS).
    The bill addresses airport noise and environmental issues. 
H.R. 2997 provides the FAA with a number of tools, methods, and 
strategies to mitigate the impact of airport noise to 
communities neighboring airports. Among these tools, the bill 
requires the FAA to study the potential health impacts of 
overflight noise and consider the feasibility of amending 
existing departure procedures over noise sensitive areas.
    The bill continues the critically important Federal 
Contract Tower Program and reforms the program to enable new 
towers to enter the program. H.R. 2997 also updates the FAA's 
out of date cost benefit analysis for current contract towers. 
The bill creates a remote air traffic control tower pilot 
program, deploying new advanced technologies in a way that will 
lower the cost of air traffic control services. The bill 
includes a provision that gives the FAA authority to release 
airports from additional land restrictions without 
Congressional approval. It also requires large and medium 
commercial airports to provide clean, private rooms in every 
terminal for nursing mothers.
    H.R. 2997 reforms the provision of air traffic control 
(ATC) services by establishing a not-for-profit corporation to 
provide ATC services. The not-for-profit will be independent 
from the government and receive no federal appropriations. H.R. 
2997 provides for the transfer of ATC services from the FAA to 
the new not-for-profit corporation, establishes the corporate 
governance with a balanced board of directors nominated by 
aviation system users, and provides the framework and standards 
for the corporation to be funded by user fees. The bill 
clarifies that the Department of Transportation (DOT), FAA, and 
Congress will oversee the nation's airspace and ATC, and only 
the FAA and DOT will regulate the airspace and the aviation 
system. H.R. 2997 upholds the Department of Defense's role and 
use of air traffic services.
    The bill reforms the FAA's safety certification programs by 
ensuring collaboration between the FAA and stakeholders to 
streamline certification and regulatory processes. H.R. 2997 
allows manufacturers to benefit from consistent regulatory 
interpretation among FAA offices, enables manufacturers to 
fully utilize delegated certification authorities, and 
addresses delays in foreign certification of U.S. products.
    H.R. 2997 enhances aviation safety by refocusing the FAA on 
its safety mission, ensuring efficient utilization of safety 
workforce, and enhancing safety workforce training. It 
strengthens voluntary safety reporting programs for pilots, 
addresses alternative methods of tracking aircraft over oceans, 
streamlines approval process for safety-enhancing technologies 
on small GA airplanes, and provides a robust approach to 
address transportation of lithium batteries by air.
    The bill includes a number of provisions to address 
aviation consumer needs. It prohibits the involuntary bumping 
of passengers once they have already boarded the plane; 
prohibits the use of cell phones and mobile devices for voice 
communications during commercial flights, and directs the FAA 
to establish minimum seat size requirements, including width, 
length, and pitch, necessary for passenger health and safety. 
H.R. 2997 ensures airlines are transparent with respect to 
government-imposed taxes and fees that will be added to the 
base fare of a ticket, so the consumer knows exactly what they 
will be paying, and ensures consumers can voice complaints 
through the consumer complaints hot-line and by using new 
technologies, such as smart phone applications, to facilitate 
these complaints. It requires airlines, in the event of a 
widespread disruption of their computer systems, to post via a 
prominent link on their website what services the airline will 
provide impacted passengers. H.R. 2997 also extends the 
Advisory Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection that was 
created in the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 through 
the end of Fiscal Year 2023.
    H.R. 2997 takes multiple steps to improve the travel 
experience for aviation consumers with disabilities. The bill 
requires DOT to address issues regarding restroom 
accessibility, service animals onboard planes, and in-flight 
entertainment systems for passengers with disabilities, and 
mandates studies on airport accessibility, airline employee 
training, and in-cabin wheelchair restraint systems. Finally, 
it establishes the Select Subcommittee for Aviation Consumers 
with Disabilities to advise the Secretary and the Advisory 
Committee for Aviation Consumer Protection on issues related to 
the air travel needs of passengers with disabilities.
    H.R. 2997 addresses the unique needs of the fast growing 
unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) segment. It establishes 
processes to accelerate implementation of low-altitude unmanned 
aircraft system traffic management (UTM) system. It also 
establishes an air carrier certificate for operators of small 
unmanned aircraft, expedites the safe deployment of commercial 
UAS by creating a risk-based permitting process, fosters the 
development of sense-and-avoid technology at UAS test ranges, 
and establishes a streamlined process for the FAA to permit the 
operation of small UAS for certain uses. The bill requires a 
DOT study on the privacy implications of UAS operations, 
directs the DOT Inspector General (IG) to assess the FAA's 
small UAS registration system and to study the potential roles 
of state and local governments related to low-altitude UAS 
operations, and requires the FAA to develop and track metrics 
to assess compliance with and effectiveness of the agency's 
small UAS registration system. Finally, the bill tasks the FAA 
with streamlining regulations for the safe operation of micro-
drones, requires the Comptroller General to study financing 
options related to regulation and oversight of UAS, and 
increases transparency by requiring FAA to publish information 
on approved small UAS waivers and airspace authorizations, and 
to provide real time data on the status of applications for 
small UAS waivers and airspace authorizations.

Legislative History

    June 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    June 27, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by recorded 
vote, 32-25.
    Sep. 6, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-296.
    Sep. 6, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
213.
    See Public Law 115-254 (H.R. 302) for further action.

             Promoting Women in the Aviation Workforce Act


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 4673)

Summary

    H.R. 4673 directs the Federal Aviation Administration to 
create and facilitate the Women in Aviation Advisory Board to 
promote organizations and programs that provide education, 
training, mentorship, outreach, and recruitment of women into 
the aviation industry.

Legislative History

    Dec. 19, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-1018.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
797.

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                      Letters (Majority/Minority)


                                Hearings


 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: STATE OF AMERICAN 
               AVIATION MANUFACTURING (SERIAL NO. 115-2)

    On February 15, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
and oversight hearing to examine the current state of civil 
aviation manufacturing in the United States, including the 
economic, regulatory, and general health of American civil 
aviation manufacturing, as well as challenges facing this 
critical industry. The United States is the home of several 
major aviation manufacturers, including one of the two major 
global manufacturers of wide-body aircraft, and a number of the 
world's major general aviation manufacturers for business jets. 
While American aviation manufacturing is a critical sector of 
our economy, the industry faces a number of global and domestic 
challenges, including Federal Aviation Administration processes 
and compliance reviews that certify the design and production 
of aircraft and aircraft components. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Federal Aviation Administration, Pratt and 
Whitney, Boeing Commercial Airplanes, and Textron.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: STATE OF AMERICAN 
                      AIRPORTS (SERIAL NO. 115-3)

    On March 1, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to discuss the current state of commercial 
aviation service and general aviation airports across the 
Nation and the challenges and opportunities associated with 
building a globally competitive 21st-century aviation 
infrastructure. The Subcommittee heard testimony from Dallas/
Fort Worth International Airport, Seattle-Tacoma International 
Airport, the Allegheny County Airport Authority, the Greater 
Asheville Regional Airport Authority, and the County of Ventura 
Department of Airports.

BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: AIR TRANSPORTATION 
      IN THE UNITED STATES IN THE 21ST CENTURY (SERIAL NO. 115-4)

    On March 8, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to focus on the current state of the U.S. air 
transportation industry and continue its exploration of how the 
federal government should best direct its efforts to ensure the 
American aviation system remains competitive in an evolving 
global marketplace.The Subcommittee heard testimony from Alaska 
Air Group, Inc., SkyWest, Inc., Air Transport Services Group, 
Inc., the Association of Flight Attendants--CWA, and Travelers 
United.

BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: ENABLING INNOVATION 
              IN THE NATIONAL AIRSPACE (SERIAL NO. 115-8)

    On April 4, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to discuss new aviation and aerospace 
technologies, users, and business models; innovation and its 
role in building a 21st-century aviation transportation system; 
and any potential challenges operators may face when trying to 
integrate new technology into the National Airspace System. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the William J. Hughes 
Technical Center of the Federal Aviation Administration, 
AirMap, Amazon Prime Air, FlyGLO LLC, VDOS Global, and Virgin 
Galactic.

    UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS: EMERGING USES IN A CHANGING NATIONAL 
                      AIRSPACE (SERIAL NO. 115-30)

    On November 29, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
and oversight hearing to consider technological, legal, and 
policy issues related to the use and integration of unmanned 
aircraft systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from a Stanford University 
professor of aeronautics and astronautics, Southern Company, 
AirMap, the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems 
International, and the Federal Aviation Administration.

            THE STATE OF AVIATION SAFETY (SERIAL NO. 115-36)

    On February 27, 2018, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
and oversight hearing to receive an update on the safety of the 
National Airspace System and to address concerns such as runway 
safety, crash resistant fuel systems on helicopters, and 
unmanned aircraft system (UAS) collisions. The Subcommittee 
heard testimony from federal agencies, including the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA), the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration (NASA), the National Transportation Safety 
Board (NTSB), and the Department of Transportation Office of 
Inspector General (DOT IG), as well as from a representative 
from the airline pilot union Air Line Pilots Association, 
International.

    COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION REGULATORY REFORM: STAKEHOLDER 
                    PERSPECTIVES (SERIAL NO. 115-48)

    On June 26, 2018, the Subcommittee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to discuss issues related to the commercial 
space transportation industry, focusing on stakeholders' 
perspectives on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) 
ongoing regulatory reform efforts. The hearing examined 
potential areas of enhancement to the FAA's Office of 
Commercial Space Transportation (AST) regulatory process in 
order to facilitate the success of the commercial space 
transportation industry and the safety of the general public. 
The Subcommittee heard testimony from witnesses representing 
Blue Origin, SpaceX, United Launch Alliance, and Air Line 
Pilots Association, International.

        AIRSPACE INTEGRATION OF NEW AIRCRAFT (SERIAL NO. 115-53)

    On September 6, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to consider issues related to the integration of new 
aircraft types into the National Airspace System (NAS). Recent 
technological advances have led to the emergence of new types 
and categories of aircraft that are expected to fundamentally 
transform aviation and the use of the airspace. These new 
technologies will affect transportation as well as other 
sectors of the economy. The Subcommittee received testimony 
from representatives of the Federal Aviation Administration's 
William J. Hughes Technical Center and its Air Traffic 
Organization, and the following industry representatives: 
UberElevate, Joby Aviation, and Skyward.

                                Meetings


                           COUNTER UAS ISSUES

    On July 11, 2018, the Subcommittee held a roundtable 
discussion on the novel and complex technical, legal, and 
policy issues surrounding the use of c-UAS (counter unmanned 
aircraft systems). The interrelated nature of these issues make 
it imperative that deployment of c-UAS equipment and further 
expansion of c-UAS authority be carefully scoped and calibrated 
to ensure aviation safety, reliability of the air navigation 
infrastructure, and the protection of lawful uses of the 
National Airspace System. The participants were the Federal 
Aviation Administration, the Special Assistant to the Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense Integration 
and Defense Support of Civil Authorities, the Aerospace 
Industries Association, the Commercial Drone Alliance, and the 
Consumer Technology Association.

                           Oversight Letters


                      CRASH-RESISTANT FUEL SYSTEMS

    On February 7, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ), Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR), Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-
WA) and 4 United States Senators sent a letter to the 
Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) 
thanking the agency for its work to improve the crash 
resistance of helicopter fuel systems in accordance with the 
FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-190) 
by evaluating and updating safety standards for helicopter fuel 
systems. The letter asked that the FAA continue to work with 
the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee and the Rotorcraft 
Occupant Protection Working Group to update fuel system safety 
standards.

                         CONTRACT TOWER PROGRAM

    On March 16, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Senator John 
Cornyn (R-TX), Congressman Steve Scalise (R-LA), Congressman 
Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), and Congressman John Ratcliffe (R-TX) 
sent a letter to the Secretary of the Department of 
Transportation (DOT) calling their attention to the past 
bipartisan reforms regarding the contract tower program, as 
well as anticipated reforms to be considered. The letter 
requests that DOT review the state of the Federal Aviation 
Administration's (FAA) contract tower program to ensure its 
continued success.

                         NEXTGEN BENEFITS AUDIT

    On March 16, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ) sent a letter to the 
Inspector General (IG) of DOT requesting that they review FAA's 
business case for NextGen and analyze whether the benefits 
projected in the business case represent a realistic assessment 
and the appropriateness of the assumptions that drive the 
analysis. The goal of this letter was to understand how the FAA 
calculates the benefits and determines their value. On 
September 30, 2016, the IG issued a response letter entitled, 
``Letter Responding to Questions About the Cost and Schedule of 
FAA's NextGen'' (Project ID:CC2016013).

    NEXTGEN PERFORMANCE BASED NAVIGATION PROCEDURES AND METROPLEXES

    On April 3, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ) sent a letter to the 
IG of the DOT requesting a review on the status of FAA's 
progress in implementing the Performance Based Navigation (PBN) 
flight procedures, which were designed in the FAA ``metroplex'' 
program, across the air traffic control system. Specifically, 
the letter asked the IG determine whether FAA delivers new 
routes and procedures that yield tangible, measurable benefits 
to airspace users on a consistent and repeatable basis. The 
request is still pending.

                      CYBERSECURITY MANDATES STUDY

    On April 13, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ), Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR), and Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen 
(D-WA) sent a letter to the IG of the DOT requesting that they 
assess FAA's progress in addressing key components of section 
2111 of the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016, 
which requires FAA to work with stakeholders to enhance the 
cybersecurity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The 
request is still pending.

                    COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION

    On May 1, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ), Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR), and Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen 
(D-WA) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that 
the Government Accountability Office (GAO) review the current 
state of our Nation's commercial space transportation industry, 
spaceports, and FAA's oversight and regulatory activities 
related to the industry. The request is still pending.

        SMALL COMMUNITY AIR SERVICE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM (SCASDP)

    On May 1, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ), Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR), and Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen 
(D-WA) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that 
GAO conduct a review on SCASDP to ensure that it effectively 
fulfills its goal to ``improve air carrier service to airports 
not receiving sufficient air carrier service.'' The request is 
still pending.

                        FOREIGN REPAIR STATIONS

    On May 9, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ) sent a letter to the 
Administrator of the FAA requesting a review of the status of a 
notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) for alcohol and controlled 
substances testing programs at part 145 repair stations 
required in Section 2112 of the FAA Extension, Safety, and 
Security Act of 2016. The FAA missed the deadline for this NPRM 
in the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (P.L. 112-95).

                          CONSUMER PROTECTIONS

    On May 15, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ) sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting a review of various issues 
related to consumer protections. This letter was sent in light 
of recent high profile airline customer service events that 
occurred, and specifically addressed the effectiveness of DOT's 
enforcement of its consumer protection policies, trends in 
consumer complaints since 2007, and more. On November 20, 2018, 
the GAO issued a report entitled, ``Airline Consumer 
Protections: Additional Actions Could Enhance DOT's Compliance 
and Education Efforts'' (GAO-19-76).

                    OKLAHOMA CITY AIRCRAFT REGISTRY

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the IG of 
the DOT requesting a report on the current state of FAA's 
management of the Registry, their progress in implementing 
recommendations outlined in a 2013 IG report identifying 
systemic problems at the registry, and the specifics of FAA's 
process and terms for maintaining a presence at the Registry 
itself. This request is still pending.

                         CONTRACT TOWER PROGRAM

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the IG of 
the DOT requesting a review and update of prior work on the 
Federal Contract Tower Program, including an update on the 
safety and cost-effectiveness of the program, the effectiveness 
of FAA oversight of private air traffic control companies, and 
an update on FAA's efforts to review the program's benefit-cost 
calculations. This request is still pending.

                            NEXTGEN EQUIPAGE

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the IG of 
the DOT requesting information on equipage rates of Automatic 
Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) Out, a NextGen 
technology that FAA has required aircraft to equip with by 
January 1, 2020. The letter also asks for information on plans 
to ensure compliance with the 2020 deadline, as well as 
information on equipage rates of equipment other than ADS-B. 
This request is still pending.

                          THIRD CLASS MEDICAL

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the IG of 
the DOT requesting information related to the FAA's 
implementation of the third class medical requirements in 
section 2307 of the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 
2016, lessons learned from FAA's implementation of the 
provision, and the impact the new medical certification process 
is having on general aviation safety. This request is still 
pending.

                     FIXED-BASE OPERATOR (FBO) FEES

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting information on the controversy 
surrounding alleged price gouging and discrimination at certain 
FBOs. The letter was written in response to several Part 13 
complaints filed by general aviation pilots in August 2017. 
This request is still pending.

                 PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGE ALTERNATIVES

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting a report on alternative 
collection methods of PFCs without being included in the price 
of an airline ticket. The letter asks the Comptroller General 
to specifically review ways in which new technology can aid the 
alternative collection process since GAO-13-262R was released 
in accordance with section 112 of the FAA Modernization and 
Reform Act of 2012. The Comptroller General issued a report in 
December 2018.

                 UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS (UAS) SAFETY

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting a report on the FAA's safety 
oversight of UAS integration and operations in the NAS in light 
of both FAA initiatives in furtherance of integration as well 
as persisting safety concerns. On May 24, 2018, the GAO issued 
a report entitled, ``Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems: FAA 
Should Improve Its Management of Safety Risks'' (GAO-18-110).

              UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEMS (UAS) TEST RANGES

    On November 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting a report on the UAS test ranges 
designated in the Federal Aviation Administration Modernization 
and Reform Act of 2012, which were extended in the FAA 
Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016. Specifically, the 
letter requests information on test ranges' operations and 
contributions toward UAS integration. This request is still 
pending.

                  AIRPORT EMERGENCY CONTINGENCY PLANS

    On February 6, 2018, Subcommittee on Aviation Chairman 
Frank A. LoBiondo and Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member 
Rick Larsen sent a letter to the Secretary of the DOT 
requesting information on how DOT conducts its review and 
approval processes for airport emergency contingency plans and 
updates to those plans for compliance with statutory 
requirements. This letter was sent after incidents at three 
different airports in which, although for different reasons, 
emergency contingency plans were activated.

                     OCEANIC AIRSPACE SURVEILLANCE

    On February 7, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) sent a letter to 
the Comptroller General requesting a review of efforts by the 
FAA to improve surveillance of oceanic airspace through space-
based automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast or automatic 
dependent surveillance-contract technologies. This letter was 
in connection with the letter sent to the Comptroller General 
on January 9, 2018 by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR). This 
request is still pending.

                 AIRLINE ANIMAL TRANSPORTATION POLICIES

    On March 22, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Aviation Chairman Frank A. LoBiondo (R-NJ), Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR), Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-
WA), and other members of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure sent a letter to the Secretary of Transportation 
requesting information on existing regulations and policies 
related to the transportation of animals on airlines. This 
letter was sent after incidents where animals on aircraft 
reportedly died due to factors that were within the control of 
the airline.

                        FAA NEXTGEN PROCUREMENT

    On July 11, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) sent a letter to 
the sent a letter to the IG of the DOT requesting a review of 
FAA's NextGen procurement programs and processes. This request 
is still pending.

                       Minority Oversight Letters


                        FOREIGN REPAIR STATIONS

    On February 8, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) and 
Committee on Homeland Security Ranking Member Bennie Thompson 
(D-MS), and Subcommittee on Transportation and Protective 
Security Ranking Member Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Homeland Security to address the 
longstanding security loopholes of more than 700 overseas 
aircraft repair stations that perform work on U.S.-registered 
aircraft using a Federal Aviation (FAA) certificate.

                     BANNING IN-FLIGHT VOICE CALLS

    On February 10, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation urging DOT to issue a 
final rule in the current proceeding to ban in-flight voice 
calls.

                              OVERBOOKING

    On April 11, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) 
wrote a letter to the Secretary of Transportation to request 
the findings of the DOT investigation into the incident on 
April 9, 2017 aboard United Airlines Flight 3411 from Chicago, 
IL to Louisville, KY, including whether Federal laws or 
regulations were violated.

              CONSUMER PROTECTIONS FOR AIRLINE PASSENGERS

    On May 2, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent 
a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that GAO conduct 
a study to examine DOT consumer protection policies.

                   VIOLATION OF THE ANTI-LOBBYING ACT

    On August 2, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Appropriations Ranking Member Nita M. Lowey (D-
NY), and Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban 
Development Ranking Member David E. Price (D-NC) sent a letter 
to the Inspector General to request an investigation of DOT 
officials to determine whether they engaged in conduct that 
violates the Anti-Lobbying Act or other Federal law.

                 TRANSPARENCY IN THE COST OF AIR TRAVEL

    On October 25, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation to urge DOT to take 
action to improve transparency in the cost of U.S. travel, 
including finalizing its 2011 rulemaking requiring airlines to 
report all optional service fees and to update its 2009 
guidance on how airlines should report such fees to the agency.

           AUTOMATIC DEPENDENT SURVEILLANCE BROADCAST (ADS-B)

    On January 9, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General requesting a GAO study to 
assess the FAA's investment options regarding oceanic 
surveillance.

                       OBJECTS DROPPED IN-FLIGHT

    On February 5, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), along 
with Congresswoman Dina Titus (D-NV), Congresswoman Eleanor 
Holmes Norton (D-DC), and Congressman Richard M. Nolan (D-MN) 
sent a letter to FAA Administrator Roth regarding the cruel and 
unsafe tradition of dropping live turkeys from aircrafts in 
Yellville, Arkansas, and whether the FAA intends to promulgate 
a regulation to prohibit this practice.

                   NEAR MISSES AND RUNWAY INCURSIONS

    On February 21, 2018 Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA), and 
Congressman Mark DeSaulnier (D-CA) sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting a GAO study that both examines 
existing data on aviation safety to determine if they represent 
any emerging patterns and assess whether there are any gaps in 
in the collecting and reporting of critical safety information, 
including any updates to the 2008 report titled, ``Progress on 
Reducing Runway Incursions Impeded by Leadership, Technology, 
and Other Challenges,'' and the 2011 report titled, ``Enhanced 
Oversight and Improved Availability of Risk-Based Data, Could 
Further Improve Safety.''

                          OPEN SKIES AGREEMENT

    On February 23, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Transportation and the Secretary 
of State to ensure that any new open skies agreement between 
the United States and the United Kingdom contain an explicit 
and enforceable prohibition on the use of opportunities created 
by the agreement to undermine the labor standards of either the 
U.S. or U.K.

                 INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS AT U.S. AIRPORTS

    On February 28, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent 
a letter to the Comptroller General to request a study to 
determine the current and projected infrastructure needs at 
U.S. airports.

                     AIRCRAFT EVACUATION STANDARDS

    On March 8, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent a letter to 
the Inspector General to assess whether the FAA aircraft 
evacuation standards are up to date and what steps can be taken 
to improve post-accident survivability when an evacuation is 
required.

                     OVERSIGHT OF LOW COST CARRIERS

    On April 19, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Transportation requesting a 
detailed response in regards to the accident involving 
Southwest Airlines Flight 1380, a full report on the FAA's 
oversight of Allegiant, and a briefing by senior FAA officials.

                   OVERSEAS AIRCRAFT REPAIR STATIONS

    On June 28, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent 
a letter to the Secretary of Transportation to express concern 
regarding the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) oversight 
of overseas aircraft repair stations.
        SUBCOMMITTEE ON COAST GUARD AND MARITIME TRANSPORTATION


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115TH CONGRESS


 BRIAN J. MAST, Florida, Chairman
   JOHN GARAMENDI, California, 
          Ranking Member

ELIJAH E. CUMMINGS, Maryland         DON YOUNG, Alaska
RICK LARSEN, Washington              FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey
JARED HUFFMAN, California            GARRET GRAVES, Louisiana
ALAN S. LOWENTHAL, California        DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   RANDY K. WEBER, Sr., Texas
PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon (ex officio)JASON LEWIS, Minnesota, Vice Chair
                                     VACANCY
                                     BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania (ex 
                                     officio)

                         Legislative Activities


                              Public Laws


         Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-44 (H.R. 3364)

Summary

            Countering Iran's Destabilizing Activities Act of 2017
    This bill directs the President to impose sanctions 
against: (1) Iran's ballistic missile or weapons of mass 
destruction programs, (2) the sale or transfer to Iran of 
military equipment or the provision of related technical or 
financial assistance, and (3) Iran's Islamic Revolutionary 
Guard Corps and affiliated foreign persons. The President may 
impose sanctions against persons responsible for violations of 
internationally recognized human rights committed against 
individuals in Iran. The President may temporarily waive the 
imposition or continuation of sanctions under specified 
circumstances.
            Countering Russian Influence in Europe and Eurasia Act of 
                    2017
    The President must submit for congressional review certain 
proposed actions to terminate or waive sanctions with respect 
to the Russian Federation. Specified executive order sanctions 
against Russia shall remain in effect. The President may waive 
specified cyber- and Ukraine-related sanctions. The bill 
provides sanctions for activities concerning: (1) cyber 
security, (2) crude oil projects, (3) financial institutions, 
(4) corruption, (5) human rights abuses, (6) evasion of 
sanctions, (7) transactions with Russian defense or 
intelligence sectors, (8) export pipelines, (9) privatization 
of state-owned assets by government officials, and (10) arms 
transfers to Syria. The Department of State shall work with the 
government of Ukraine to increase Ukraine's energy security. 
The bill: (1) directs the Department of the Treasury to develop 
a national strategy for combating the financing of terrorism, 
and (2) includes the Secretary of the Treasury on the National 
Security Council.
            Korean Interdiction and Modernization of Sanctions Act
    The bill modifies and increases the President's authority 
to impose sanctions on persons in violation of certain United 
Nations Security Council resolutions regarding North Korea. 
U.S. financial institutions shall not establish or maintain 
correspondent accounts used by foreign financial institutions 
to provide indirect financial services to North Korea. A 
foreign government that provides to or receives from North 
Korea a defense article or service is prohibited from receiving 
certain types of U.S. foreign assistance. The bill provides 
sanctions against: (1) North Korean cargo and shipping, (2) 
goods produced in whole or part by North Korean convict or 
forced labor, and (3) foreign persons that employ North Korean 
forced laborers. The State Department shall submit a 
determination regarding whether North Korea meets the criteria 
for designation as a state sponsor of terrorism.
    H.R. 3364 contains provisions that fall within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure. Section 315 amends the Ports and Waterways 
Safety Act (33 U.S.C. 1221, et seq.) to prohibit vessels from 
entering U.S. waters if such vessels are registered (flagged), 
owned or operated by North Koreans, or on behalf of North Korea 
or North Korean persons. It also prohibits entry into U.S. 
waters for vessels registered in countries that have stopped in 
a port identified by the President and which cannot show 
adequate controls or assure that no material benefiting North 
Korea were shipped or transshipped there. Additionally, vessels 
of countries that have not complied with United Nations 
resolutions regarding North Korea would be barred entry. 
Section 315 also requires the Secretary of the Department in 
which the Coast Guard is operating to maintain information on 
all foreign vessel registries that register a vessel owned or 
operated by, or on behalf of, North Korea, or countries that 
have not complied with United Nations resolutions regarding 
North Korea.

Legislative History

    July 25, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Aviation.
    July 25, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    July 25, 2017. Mr. Royce (CA) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    July 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6241-6268)
    July 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3364.
    July 25, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H6278-6279)
    July 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 419-3 
(Roll no. 413). (text: CR H6241-6261)
    July 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2017. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    July 27, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 98-2. Record Vote Number: 175. (consideration: CR S4387-
4389)
    July 27, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    July 28, 2017. Presented to President.
    Aug. 2, 2017. Signed by President.
    Aug. 2, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-44.

                  Foreign Spill Protection Act of 2017


H.R. 468 WAS INCORPORATED INTO SECTION 3508 OF PUBLIC LAW 115-91 (H.R. 
                                 2810)

Summary

    This bill amends the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 to make 
foreign facilities that are located offshore and outside the 
exclusive economic zone (EEZ) liable for removal costs and 
damages that result from oil spills that reach (or threaten to 
reach) U.S. navigable waters, adjoining shorelines, or the EEZ. 
Specifically, the following parties may be held liable: (1) the 
owners or operators of the foreign facilities, including 
facilities located in, on, or under any land within foreign 
countries; and (2) the holders of a right of use and easement 
granted under applicable foreign law for the area in which the 
facility is located.

Legislative History

    Jan. 13, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    Jan. 13, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    See P.L. 115-91 (H.R. 2810) for further action.

        National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-91 (H.R. 2810)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2018 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.
    The bill authorizes appropriations to DOD for: (1) 
Procurement, including aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked 
combat vehicles, ammunition, shipbuilding and conversion, space 
procurement, and other procurement; (2) Research, Development, 
Test, and Evaluation; (3) Operation and Maintenance; (4) 
Working Capital Funds; (5) the Joint Urgent Operational Needs 
Fund; (6) Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction; (7) Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities; (8) the Defense 
Inspector General; (9) the Defense Health Program; (10) the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home; (11) Overseas Contingency 
Operations; and (12) Military Construction.
    The bill also authorizes the fiscal year 2018 personnel 
strength for active duty and reserve forces and sets forth 
policies regarding compensation and other personnel benefits, 
the Ready Reserve Force and Military Sealift Command surge 
fleet, and matters relating to foreign nations.
    The Committee worked with the Committee on Armed Services 
to clear provisions in H.R. 2810 within the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure's jurisdiction. The Committee 
was granted conferee status on sections 122, 311, 546, 601, 
1082, 1617, 1695, 3501, 3502, 3505, and 3507-10 of the House 
bill, and secs. 331, 601, 1048, 6002, 13501, 13502, 13508, 
13513, 13607, and 14013 of the Senate amendment.
    The Subcommittee worked with the Committee on Armed 
Services to clear the following sections within the 
Subcommittee's jurisdiction:
    Section 122 of the House bill and Section 1048 of the 
Senate bill authorizes the Secretary of the Navy to act as a 
general agent for the Secretary of the Department in which the 
Coast Guard is operating and to enter into a contract for not 
more than three heavy icebreakers and three medium icebreakers. 
The Senate receded with an amendment.
    Section 546 of the House bill would provide flexibility in 
the requirements for participation of service members in a 
program to help them obtain professional credentials. This 
provision was not included in final passage.
    Section 601 of the House bill and Senate bill authorizes a 
pay raise of 2.4 percent for all members of the uniformed 
services effective January 1, 2018. The Senate receded to the 
House language.
    Section 1617 of the House passed bill that would require, 
during fiscal year 2018, the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of Transportation, and the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to jointly develop a plan for carrying out a backup 
capability demonstration for the Global Positioning System. The 
Senate receded with an amendment.
    Section 3501 of the House passed bill and Sections 13501 
and 13502 of the Senate bill authorizes appropriations to the 
Department of Transportation for fiscal year 2018 for programs 
associated with maintaining the United States merchant marine.
    Section 3502 of the House passed bill that recodifies still 
relevant provisions of the Merchant Ship Sales Act of 1946. The 
Senate receded to the House language.
    Section 3507 of the House bill and Section 13508 authorizes 
the Secretary of Transportation to designate centers of 
excellence for domestic maritime workforce training and 
education. The Senate receded with an amendment.
    Section 3508 of the House bill authorizes the Foreign Spill 
Protection Act of 2017 (see H.R. 468). The Senate receded with 
an amendment.
    Section 3509 of the House bill clarified when a vessel can 
be determined to be a recreational vessel. This provision was 
not included in final passage.
    Section 3510 of the House bill clarifies that a foreign 
citizen mariner may file a personal injury lawsuit in a U.S. 
court under four circumstances: (1) if the accident occurred in 
U.S. waters; (2) if the accident occurred aboard a U.S. flagged 
vessel; (3) no matter where the accident occurred, if the 
claimant was a permanent resident alien of the United States at 
the time of the accident; or (4) no matter where the accident 
occurred, if the claimant does not have a right to bring suit 
in his country of residence or the flag state of the vessel 
from which the claim arose. This provision was not included in 
final passage.

Legislative History

    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H8004-8008, H8008-8009, H8009-
8010)
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Langevin moved that the House instruct 
conferees. (consideration: CR H8004-8008, H8008-8009, H8009-
8010; text as House agreed to Senate amendment: CR H8004)
    Oct. 12, 2017. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Langevin motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 2810. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to disagree with subsection 
(c) of section 336 of the Senate amendment, to recede from 
section 1064 of the House bill and to disagree with section 
1087 of the Senate amendment.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 184-237 (Roll no. 564).
    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Thornberry moved that the House to close 
portions of the conference.
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion to close portions of the 
conference Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 414-8 (Roll no. 
565).
    Oct. 12, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Franks (AZ), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, 
Wittman, Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Stefanik, 
Knight, Bacon, Smith (WA), Brady (PA), Davis (CA), Langevin, 
Larsen (WA), Cooper, Bordallo, Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, 
Speier, Veasey, and Gabbard.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for consideration of 
matters within the jurisdiction of that committee under clause 
11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and Schiff.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on the Budget for consideration of sec. 1262 of the 
House bill, and sec. 4 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Johnson (OH), Bergman, 
and Yarmuth.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce for consideration of 
secs. 221, 551, 555, and 3509 of the House bill, and secs. 236, 
551-53, 3116, 5508, and 6001 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx, Byrne, and Scott 
(VA).
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of secs. 
313, 314, 601, 723, 727, 729, 732, 3118, and 3122 of the House 
bill, and secs. 601, 701, 725, 732, 1089A, 1625, and 3114 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Barton, and Pallone.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of sec. 862 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Barr, Williams, and Waters, Maxine.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of secs. 864, 
1032, 1039, 1040, 1058, 1201, 1203-05, 1211, 1222, 1223, 1231, 
1232, 1234, 1243, 1246, 1247, 1265, 1270A, 1272, 1276, 1278, 
1280, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, 1687, 2841, and 3117 of the House 
bill, and secs. 111, 861, 867, 1011, 1203-05, 1212, 1213, 1231-
33, 1241-45, 1250, 1261-63, 1270B, 1270C, 1282, 1283, 1301, 
1302, 1531, and 1651 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Royce (CA), Donovan, and Engel.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 515, 
1062, 1063, 1067, 1080, 1695, 2843, and 3510 of the House bill, 
and secs. 520A, 529, 1035, 1081, 1083, 1217, 1264, and 14013 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Issa, and Conyers.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of secs. 601, 
1062, 1265, 2827, 2828, 2831, 2832, 2844, 2863, subtitle F of 
title XXVIII, and sec. 2863 of the House bill, and secs. 311, 
338, 601, 1263, 1264, 2850, and 12801 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Westerman, Cheney, 
and Grijalva.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for consideration 
of secs. 323, 501, 801, 803, 859-860A, 873, and 1101-09 of the 
House bill, and secs. 218, 544, 557, 801, 812, 821, 822, 829, 
852, 902, 931, 934, 938, 1045, 1093, 1094, 1101, 1102, 1104-06, 
1111-13, 2821, 2822, 6005, 6012, 10804, 11023-25, and 11603 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Meadows, Ross, and Lynch.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for consideration 
of sec. 223 of the House bill and secs. 897, 898, 1662-64, and 
6002 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and Johnson, E.B.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 801, 
860B, 867, 1701-04, 1711-13, 1721-23, 1731-37, and 1741 of the 
House bill, and secs. 854, 862, 897, 898, 899C, 10801, and 
10802 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Chabot, Kelly (MS), and Velazquez.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs 122, 311, 546, 601, 1082, 1617, 1695, 
3501, 3502, 3505, and 3507-10 of the House bill, and secs. 331, 
601, 1048, 6002, 13501, 13502, 13508, 13513, 13607, and 14013 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Graves (MO), Hunter, and Bustos.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of secs. 572, 
573, 576, 578, 1077, and 2841 of the House bill, and secs. 731, 
1084, 1088, 1264, 11001, 11008, and 14004 of the Senate 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), 
Bilirakis, and Walz.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 701 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Tiberi, Walorski, and Neal.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Conference held.
    Nov. 8, 2017. Conferees agreed to file conference report.
    Nov. 9, 2017. Conference report H. Rept. 115-404 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H8701-9136)
    Nov. 9, 2017. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    Nov. 13, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 616 
Reported to House. The resolution provides for one hour of 
general debate and closed rule for H.R. 2874. Also, the 
resolution provides for consideration of the conference report 
to accompany H.R. 2810.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Rule H. Res. 616 passed House.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-404 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 616. (consideration: CR H9200-9209)
    Nov. 14, 2017. The House proceeded with 1 hour of debate on 
the Conference report to accompany H.R. 2810.
    Nov. 14, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Nov. 14, 2017. The House proceeded to consider the 
conference report H. Rept. 115-404 as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H9238-9239)
    Nov. 14, 2017. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 356-70 (Roll no. 631).
    Nov. 14, 2017. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Conference report considered in Senate.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Senate agreed to conference report by Voice 
Vote.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Presented to President.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Signed by President.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-91.

         Federal Maritime Commission Authorization Act of 2017


  H.R. 2593 WAS INCORPORATED INTO TITLE VII OF PUBLIC LAW 115-282 (S. 
                                  140)

Summary

    H.R. 2593 is bipartisan legislation that authorizes funding 
for the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) for fiscal years 2018 
and 2019 at increased levels and includes reforms to Commission 
authorities regarding reviews of carrier agreements.
    The bill amends certain authorities in the Shipping Act to:
           Define port services, outline when ocean 
        carriers may negotiate with port service providers, and 
        allow the Commission to review any relevant competition 
        factors, including agreements, other than the one under 
        review.
           Update the entities required to provide 
        information to the Commission to include marine 
        terminal operators or ocean transportation 
        intermediaries and employees of these entities.
           Allow the Commission to request information 
        on ocean carrier agreements without the requirement 
        that it solely be for its determination process.
           Clarify that a person cannot advertise or 
        hold oneself out as an ocean transportation 
        intermediary without having a license as such an 
        intermediary.
           Allow any carrier in an agreement that would 
        be prohibited after enactment of this Act to 
        participate in other corollary agreements (i.e., rate 
        discussions, vessel sharing, slot-sharing, or space-
        sharing) to get an exemption or withdraw from such 
        agreement.

Legislative History

    May 24, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    See Public Law 115-232 (H.R. 5515) and P.L. 115-282 (S. 
140) for further action.

               Maritime Technical Corrections Act of 2018


  H.R. 5326 WAS INCORPORATED INTO CHAPTER 1 (SECTIONS 3531-3539) AND 
  CHAPTER 2 (SECTIONS 3541-3548) OF TITLE XXXV OF PUBLIC LAW 115-230 
                              (H.R. 5515)

Summary

    H.R. 5326 makes minor technical corrections to Title 14 and 
Title 46 of the United States Code. Title 14 pertains to the 
U.S. Coast Guard and was codified in 1949. Title 46 pertains to 
shipping in the U.S. and was codified in 1983.

Legislative History

    Mar. 20, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    See Public Law 115-232 (H.R. 5515) for further action.

 Transportation Worker Identification Credential Accountability Act of 
                                  2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-230 (H.R. 5729)

Summary

    This bill prohibits the U.S. Coast Guard from: (1) 
implementing the rule titled ``Transportation Worker 
Identification Credential (TWIC)-Reader Requirements,'' and (2) 
proposing or issuing a notice of proposed rulemaking for a rule 
that would require the use of biometric readers for biometric 
transportation security cards.
    These prohibitions end 60 days after the Department of 
Homeland Security submits to Congress an assessment of the 
transportation security card program.

Legislative History

    May 9, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    June 6, 2018. Ordered reported, amended, by the Committee 
on Homeland Security by Unanimous Consent.
    June 27, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-790, Part I.
    June 27, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    June 27, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
260.
    July 10, 2018. Mr. Katko moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    July 10, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    July 10, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3101.
    July 10, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 11, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.
    July 26, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S5437)
    July 30, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Presented to President.
    Aug. 2, 2018. Signed by President.
    Aug. 2, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-230.

        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-232 (H.R. 5515)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2018 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.
    The Subcommittee worked with the Committee on Armed 
Services to clear the following sections within the 
Subcommittee's jurisdiction:
    Section 153 of the Senate bill which included authority to 
procure additional Polar-Class icebreakers.
    Section 554 of the House bill and section 556 of the Senate 
bill which included authorities to assist members of the Armed 
Forces in obtaining professional credentials.
    Section 1075 of the House bill which deals with the 
transfer of aircraft to other federal Departments.
    Section 601 of the Senate bill dealing with pay increases 
for military basic pay.
    Section 3501 of the House bill and sections 3501 and 7502 
of the Senate bill which authorized appropriations for the 
Maritime Administration.
    Section 3504 of the House bill and section 7515 of the 
Senate bill dealing with the permanent authority of the 
Secretary of Transportation to issue vessel war risk insurance.
    Section 3522 of the House bill which deals with the 
notification of safety concerns of Coast Guard assets.
    Section 3523 of the House bill which deals with actions the 
Coast Guard shall take with regard to contract termination.
    Section 3524 of the House bill dealing with reimbursement 
of travel expenses.
    Section 3525 of the House bill addressing the Coast Guard's 
Capital Investment Plan.
    Section 3526 of the House bill regarding Coast Guard risk 
assessment for major acquisitions.
    Section 3527 of the House bill dealing with implementation 
of marine safety measures.
    Section 3528 of the House bill which amends authorities 
pertaining to retirement of the Vice Commandant.
    Section 3529 of the House bill dealing with large 
recreational vessel regulations.
    Section 3531-3548 (H.R. 5326) which make technical 
corrections to sections of title 46 of the United States Code.
    Section 7507 of the Senate bill dealing with electronic 
records of available mariners.
    Section 7508 of the Senate bill on small shipyard grants 
(was included in title II of H.R. 2593).
    Sections 7509 on ship recycling facilities and section 7517 
miscellaneous provision.

Legislative History

    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H5782-5783; text: CR H5782)
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Carbajal moved that the House instruct 
conferees.
    June 27, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Carbajal motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 5515. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to agree to section 703 of 
the Senate bill.
    June 27, 2018. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 188-231 (Roll No. 300).
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry moved to close portions of 
the conference.
    June 27, 2018. On Closing Portions of the Conference Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 403-15 (Roll no. 301).
    June 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, Wittman, 
Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Byrne, Stefanik, Bacon, 
Banks (IN), Smith (WA), Davis (CA), Langevin, Cooper, Bordallo, 
Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, Speier, Veasey, Gabbard, 
O'Rourke, and Murphy (FL).
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of title 
XVII of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Latta, Johnson (OH), and Pallone.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of title XVII 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of title XVII of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Royce (CA), Kinzinger, and Engel.
    June 27, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House requests a conference.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for 
consideration of matters within the jurisdiction of that 
committee under clause 11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and 
Schiff.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Budget for consideration of secs. 
1252 and 1523 of the House bill, and secs. 4, 1002, 1032, and 
1721 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Womack and Yarmuth.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Education and the Workforce for 
consideration of secs. 228, 563, 564, 1094, and 3120C of the 
House bill, and secs. 561-63 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx and Scott (VA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of 
secs. 701, 712, 1083, 1096, 3111-13, 3118, 3119, 3132, and 4305 
of the House bill, and secs. 315, 601, 714, 3111-15, 5802, and 
7509 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Hudson, and Pallone.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Financial Services for consideration of 
1299O-2 and 1236 of the House bill, and modifications committed 
to conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 346, 1042, 1202-06, 1210, 1211, 1221-23, 1230A, 1230D, 
1230F, 1231, 1234, 1236, 1237, 1239, 1240, 1254-56, 1264, 1267, 
1268, 1271, 1274, 1276, 1278, 1280, 1282, 1288, 1299O-1, 1299O-
2, 1299O-3, 1299O-4, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, and 3116 of the 
House bill, and secs. 331, 1061, 1063, 1201-04, 1207, 1211, 
1213, 1221-23, 1231-33, 1241, 1244, 1245, 1261, 1262, 1264-66, 
1269, 1301, 1302, 1531, 1622, 1623, 1654, 3113, 3116, 6002, 
6202-04, 6701, and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Royce (CA), Mast, and 
Engel.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Homeland Security for consideration of 
sec. 1634 of the House bill, and modifications committed to 
conference: McCaul, Ratcliffe, and Thompson (MS).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 
826, 1043, 1050B, 1073, 1074, 1079, 1085, 1087, 1090, 1299O-2, 
4319, and 4710 of the House bill, and secs. 1025, 1035 and 1715 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Sensenbrenner, and Nadler.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of 
secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 
2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 4810, 4837, division E, and 
sec. 6101 of the House bill, and secs. 601, 2833, 2836, and 
7518 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Westerman and Grijalva.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for 
consideration of secs. 506, 511, 569, 822, 831, 832, 834, 835, 
860, 875, 880-84, 886, 917, 1101-11, 4711, and 4829 of the 
House bill, and secs. 568, 595, 607, 632, 702, 813, 902, 937, 
1101-05, 1122-25, 1254B, 1628, 1639, 1640, 1716, 1726, 2835, 
and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
to conference: Sanford, Ross, and Lynch.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for 
consideration of secs. 854, 858, and 1603 of the House bill, 
and secs. 893 and 1604 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and 
Johnson, E.B.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 
811, 851-58, 861, 863-68, and 2803 of the House bill, and secs. 
893, 1626, and 6006 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Chabot, Knight, and Velazquez.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs. 518, 554, 883, 1044, 1049, 1050B, 1075, 
1095, 1111, 2848, 3501, 3504, 3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division 
D of the House bill, and secs. 153, 556, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 
7501, 7502, 7507-09, 7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Comstock and 
Brownley (CA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 547, 552, 582, 1411, and 2844 of the House bill, and 
secs. 721, 726, and 1431 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), Poliquin, and 
Walz.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 
701 of the House bill, and sec. 6201 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Reichert, Roskam, 
and Neal.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 
1252, 1523, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 
4810, 4837, division E, and sec. 6101 of the House bill and 
secs. 4, 601, 1002, 1032, 1721, 2833, 2836, and 7518 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Bergman.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 228, 518, 554, 563, 564, 883, 1044, 
1049, 1050B, 1075, 1094, 1095, 1111, 2848, 3120C, 3501, 3504, 
3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division D of the House bill and secs. 
153, 556, 561-63, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 7501, 7502, 7507-09, 
7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Lewis (MN).
    July 10, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees agreed to in Senate by 
Yea-Nay Vote. 91-8. Record Vote Number: 147.
    July 10, 2018. Senate insists on its amendment, agrees to 
request for conference, and authorizes the Presiding Officer to 
appoint conferees.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees (Committee on Foreign Investment) agreed to in Senate 
by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. Record Vote Number: 148.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees (NATO) agreed to in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. 
Record Vote Number: 149.
    July 10, 2018. Senate appointed conferees. McCain; Inhofe; 
Wicker; Fischer; Cotton; Rounds; Ernst; Tillis; Sullivan; 
Perdue; Cruz; Graham; Sasse; Scott; Crapo; Reed; Nelson; 
McCaskill; Shaheen; Gillibrand; Blumenthal; Donnelly; Hirono; 
Kaine; King; Heinrich; Warren; Peters; Brown.
    July 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    July 23, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-863 filed.
    July 24, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019
    July 25, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-874 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H7202-7637)
    July 25, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1027 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of the 
conference report to H.R. 5515.
    July 25, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Rule H. Res. 1027 passed House.
    July 26, 2018. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-874 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 1027. (consideration: CR H7699-7709)
    July 26, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the conference report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The House resumed debate on the conference 
report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    July 26, 2018. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 359-54 (Roll no. 379). (consideration: 
CR H7708-7709)
    July 26, 2018. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2018. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5412-5417)
    July 26, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 presented in Senate. (CR S5412)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5538-5543)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 withdrawn by unanimous consent in Senate.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Senate agreed to conference report by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 87-10. Record Vote Number: 181.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Presented to President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Signed by President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-232.

            Save Our Seas Act of 2017 or the SOS Act of 2017


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-265 (S. 3508)

Summary

    Title I of this bill amends the Marine Debris Act to revise 
the Marine Debris Program to require the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to work with: (1) other 
agencies to address both land- and sea-based sources of marine 
debris, and (2) the Department of State and other agencies to 
promote international action to reduce the incidence of marine 
debris. The bill also revises the program by allowing NOAA to 
make sums available for assisting in the cleanup and response 
required by severe marine debris events.
    The bill urges the President to:
           support funding for research and development 
        of bio-based and other alternatives or environmentally 
        feasible improvements to materials that reduce 
        municipal solid waste;
           work with foreign countries that contribute 
        the most to the global marine debris problem in order 
        to find a solution to the problem;
           study issues related to marine debris, 
        including the economic impacts of marine debris; and
           encourage the Office of the U.S. Trade 
        Representative to consider the impact of marine debris 
        in relevant future trade agreements.
    The bill acknowledges the importance of the Great Lakes 
Land-Based Marine Debris Action Plan in addressing marine 
debris in the region.
    The Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee must 
expand to include a senior official from the State Department 
and from the Department of the Interior.
    This bill reauthorizes funding for FY 2018-FY 2022: (1) the 
Marine Debris Program administered by the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration and (2) Coast Guard marine debris 
activities. (S. 756)
    Title II of the bill includes several maritime safety 
provisions based on recommendations submitted by the Coast 
Guard and National Transportation Safety Board in their 
separate reviews of the sinking of the U.S. flag commercial 
container vessel M/V EL FARO. (H.R. 6175)
    Title III of the bill authorizes the Coast Guard to create 
a Blue Technology Center of Expertise to improve the Coast 
Guard's awareness and access to these ocean-related 
technologies. (H.R. 6206).

Legislative History

    Sep. 26, 2018. Introduced in the Senate, read twice, 
considered, read the third time, and passed without amendment 
by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S6330-6334; text: CR 
S6331-6334)
    Sep. 27, 2018. Received in the House.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Held at the desk.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Mr. Denham asked unanimous consent to take 
from the Speaker's table and consider.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9135-9138)
    Sep. 27, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR H9135-9138)
    Sep. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 2, 2018. Presented to President.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Signed by President.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-265.

        The Frank LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-282 (S. 140)

Summary

    This bill authorizes: (1) appropriations for the Coast 
Guard for FY2018-FY2019, and (2) a specified level of 44,500 
for end-of-year strength for active duty personnel and military 
training student loads for such fiscal years.
    The bill executes a reorganization of title 14 United 
States Code to clarify chapters and remove errors or obsolete 
language but makes no substantive changes to law (H.R. 1726).
    The bill addresses: (1) training for public safety 
personnel, (2) service member benefits for Coast Guard 
personnel, (3) contracts to procure three National Security 
Cutters, and (4) the Coast Guard Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps Program.
    The bill authorizes appropriations for the Federal Maritime 
Commission and updates its authorities pertaining to certain 
covered services and vessel agreements. (H.R. 2593)
    The bill revises or sets forth policies relating to the 
Coast Guard, including Coast Guard advisory committees, 
numbering for undocumented barges, aids to navigation, 
requirements for personal flotation devices, Global Positioning 
System back-up timing signal, the alternate safety compliance 
program, vessel certification, the installation and use of 
engine cut-off switches on recreational vessels, visual 
distress signals for recreational boats, auxiliary craft 
requirements, the Coast Guard's inland waterway and river 
tenders fleet, arctic planning, maritime security, acquisition 
workforce expedited hiring authority, drawbridges, incentive 
contracts for Coast Guard Yard or Coast Guard industrial 
establishments, Coast Guard health care professionals, land 
exchanges, shipyards, and waivers for certain contracts.
    The bill includes amendments to section 312 of the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act to address ballast water discharge 
from vessels operating in United States waters.
    The bill includes an authorization of appropriations for 
the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act of 1998. The National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is required to track and 
report its costs of hydrographic surveys.

Legislative History

    Apr. 16, 2018. S.AMDT.2232 Amendment SA 2232 proposed by 
Senator McConnell for Senator Thune. (consideration: CR S2137) 
In the nature of a substitute.
    Apr. 16, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to S. 140 with an amendment (SA 2232) 
presented in Senate. (CR S2137)
    Apr. 16, 2018. S.AMDT.2233 Amendment SA 2233 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 2232. (consideration: CR 
S2137; text: CR S2137) To change the enactment date.
    Apr. 16, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation the 
House message to accompany S. 140 with instructions to report 
back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 2234) made in 
Senate. (CR S2137)
    Apr. 16, 2018. S.AMDT.2234 Amendment SA 2234 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S2137; text: CR S2137) To 
change the enactment date.
    Apr. 16, 2018. S.AMDT.2235 Amendment SA 2235 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 2234 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer). (consideration: CR S2137-2138; text: CR 
S2138) Of a perfecting nature.
    Apr. 16, 2018. S.AMDT.2236 Amendment SA 2236 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 2235. (consideration: CR 
S2138; text: CR S2138) Of a perfecting nature.
    Apr. 18, 2018. S.AMDT.2232 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S2240-2241)
    Apr. 18, 2018. S.AMDT.2233 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S2240-2241)
    Apr. 18, 2018. S.AMDT.2234 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S2240-2241)
    Apr. 18, 2018. S.AMDT.2235 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S2240-2241)
    Apr. 18, 2018. S.AMDT.2236 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S2240-2241)
    Apr. 18, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S2240-2241)
    Apr. 18, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to S. 140 with an amendment (SA 2232) not invoked in 
Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 56-42. Record Vote Number: 77. (CR 
S2240)
    Apr. 18, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to reconsider 
the vote by which cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to S. 140 with an amendment (SA 2232) was not invoked 
(Record Vote No. 77) entered in Senate. (CR S2240)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2232 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2233 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2234 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2235 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2236 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation the 
House message to accompany S. 140 with instructions to report 
back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 2234) withdrawn 
in Senate.
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2234 Proposed amendment SA 2234 
withdrawn in Senate. (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2235 SA 2235 fell when SA 2234 
withdrawn.
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2236 SA 2236 fell when SA 2235 fell.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 140 with the following amendment (SA 
2232) withdrawn in Senate.
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2232 Proposed amendment SA 2232 
withdrawn in Senate. (consideration: CR S6803)
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.2233 SA 2233 fell when SA 2232 
withdrawn.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 140 withdrawn in Senate.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 140 with the following amendment (SA 
4054) made in Senate.
    Oct. 11, 2018. S.AMDT.4054 Amendment SA 4054 proposed by 
Senator McConnell for Senator Thune. (consideration: CR S6803; 
text: CR S6826-6872) In the nature of a substitute.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to S. 140 with the following amendment (SA 
4054) presented in Senate. (CR S6803)
    Nov. 13, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6904-6909)
    Nov. 13, 2018. S.AMDT.4054 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6904)
    Nov. 13, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to S. 140 with the following amendment (SA 4054 as 
modified) invoked in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 93-5. Record Vote 
Number: 240. (CR S6908)
    Nov. 14, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6940)
    Nov. 14, 2018. S.AMDT.4054 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6940)
    Nov. 14, 2018. Senate concurred in the House amendment to 
S. 140 with an amendment (SA 4054 as modified) by Yea-Nay Vote. 
94-6. Record Vote Number: 241.
    Nov. 14, 2018. S.AMDT.4054 Amendment SA 4054 as modified 
agreed to in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 94-6. Record Vote Number: 
241.
    Nov. 15, 2018. S.AMDT.4054 Notwithstanding the adoption of 
the motion to concur in the House amendment to S. 140 with 
further amendment (SA 4054 as modified), amendment SA 4054 is 
further modified by Unanimous Consent.
    Nov. 16, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of S. Con. Res. 
51, enrollment corrections on S. 140 have been made.
    Nov. 16, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Mr. Shuster moved that the House suspend the 
rules and agree to the Senate amendment to the House amendment. 
(consideration: CR H9581-95869604--9653; text: CR H9604-9648)
    Nov. 27, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on the motion to suspend the rules and agree to the 
Senate amendment to the House amendment to S. 140.
    Nov. 27, 2018. On motion that the House suspend the rules 
and agree to the Senate amendment to the House amendment Agreed 
to by voice vote.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection. Provisions of the following 
measures were included in S. 140 as signed into Law: H.R. 
2518--Titles II, III, IV, V, and VIII; H.R. 2593--Title VII; 
H.R. 1726--Titles I and VI; H.R. 5319--Section 837; H.R. 619--
Section 834; and H.R. 1154--Title IX.

                         Pending in the Senate


         Korean Interdiction and Modernization of Sanctions Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1644)

Summary

    This bill amends the North Korea Sanctions and Policy 
Enhancement Act of 2016 to modify and increase the President's 
authority to impose sanctions on persons in violation of 
certain U.N. Security Council resolutions regarding North 
Korea.

Legislative History

    Mar. 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs. H. Rept. 115-98, Part I.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Committee on Ways and Means discharged.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Committee on Financial Services discharged.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure discharged.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Committee on Oversight and Government Reform 
discharged.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Apr. 28, 2017. Committee on the Judiciary 
discharged.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
55.
    May 2, 2017. Congressman Edward R. Royce (R-CA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    May 2, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H3026-3038)
    May 2, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1644.
    May 4, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H4172)
    May 4, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 419-1 (Roll no. 257). (text: CR 5/2/2017 H3026-3031)
    May 4, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection. (text: CR H3026-3031)
    May 4, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations.

             Coast Guard Improvement and Reform Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1726)

Summary

    H.R. 1726 reorganizes and modernizes title 14 of the United 
States Code, the section of the code pertaining to the U.S. 
Coast Guard. Title 14 was codified in 1949. H.R. 1726 better 
organizes the code by transferring and renumbering existing 
provisions, co-locating similar authorities, and creating more 
space in the title.
    Title I of the bill reorganizes title 14, Coast Guard, 
United State Code, but makes no substantive change to law.
    Title II amends title 14, United States Code, to create 
uniformity and better organize the Coast Guard's authorities.
    Section 202 amends the primary duties of the Coast Guard to 
clarify its state of defense readiness.
    Section 203 transfers provisions governing regattas and 
marine parades from title 33, Navigation, United States Code, 
to co-locate them with similar authorities in title 14. No 
substantive changes to the transferred text are made.
    Section 204 transfers provisions governing the anchorage 
and movement of vessels, including the seizure and forfeiture 
of such vessels during national emergency, from title 50, War 
and National Defense, United States Code, to title 14 to co-
locate them with similar authorities. No substantive changes to 
the transferred text are made.
    Section 205 transfers Coast Guard advisory committees from 
title 46 to title 14, and establishes consistent administrative 
rules governing the advisory committees. In two cases, the 
section establishes statutory authority for two Coast Guard 
National Advisory Committees that created by the Coast Guard 
under the Federal Advisory Committee Act. The Coast Guard 
requested this conformity among the advisory committees in its 
2017 legislative proposal to Congress.
    Section 206 repeals the outdated and unused authority for 
the Commandant of the Coast Guard to buy a new overcoat for 
recently separated members of the Service.

Legislative History

    Mar. 28, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    May 18, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-132.
    May 18, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
81.
    June 26, 2017. Mr. Hunter moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    June 26, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5147-5164)
    June 26, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1726.
    June 26, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H5147-5163)
    June 26, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.
    See Public Law 115-282 (S. 140) for further action.

Strengthening Cybersecurity Information Sharing and Coordination in Our 
                           Ports Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 3101)

Summary

    H.R. 3101 requires the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) to facilitate increased information sharing about 
cybersecurity among maritime interests. Additionally, this bill 
clarifies that the Coast Guard is the appropriate lead agency 
for reviewing cybersecurity in the maritime domain in order to 
prevent, manage, and respond to cyber threats and 
vulnerabilities.
    DHS must:
           develop, implement, and continually review a 
        maritime cybersecurity risk assessment model to 
        evaluate current and future cybersecurity risks;
           seek input from at least one information 
        sharing and analysis organization representing maritime 
        interests in the National Cybersecurity and 
        Communications Integration Center;
           establish voluntary reporting guidelines for 
        maritime-related cybersecurity risks and incidents;
           request that the National Maritime Security 
        Advisory Committee report and make recommendations to 
        DHS about methods to enhance cybersecurity and 
        information sharing among security stakeholders from 
        federal, state, local, and tribal governments; public 
        safety and emergency response agencies; law enforcement 
        and security organizations; maritime industry 
        participants; port owners and operators; and maritime 
        terminal owners and operators; and
           ensure that maritime security risk 
        assessments include cybersecurity risks to ports and 
        the maritime border of the United States.
    Through the Coast Guard, DHS must also:
           direct each Area Maritime Security Advisory 
        Committee to facilitate the sharing of information 
        about, and development of plans to address, port-
        specific cybersecurity vulnerabilities; and
           require that area maritime security plans 
        and facility security plans approved after enactment of 
        this Act include mitigation measures to prevent, 
        manage, and respond to cyber threats and 
        vulnerabilities.

Legislative History

    June 29, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    Sep. 7, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security by voice vote.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-356, Part I.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
260.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Mr. McCaul moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    Oct. 24, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3101.
    Oct. 24, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

                  Maritime Border Security Review Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 5869)

Summary

    The bill defines ``appropriate congressional committees'', 
``maritime border'' and ``transit zone''. It requires the 
Secretary of Homeland Security submit a maritime border threat 
analysis to Congress.

Legislative History

    May 17, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    July 24, 2018. Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by 
Unanimous Consent.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Homeland Security. H. Rept. 115-918.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
713.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Mr. Katko moved to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill, as amended.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR S7796-7799)
    Sep. 4, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 5869.
    Sep. 4, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H7796)
    Sep. 4, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

            Save Our Seas Act of 2017 or the SOS Act of 2017


                     PENDING IN THE SENATE (S. 756)

Summary

    This bill amends the Marine Debris Act to revise the Marine 
Debris Program to require the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA) to work with: (1) other agencies to 
address both land- and sea-based sources of marine debris, and 
(2) the Department of State and other agencies to promote 
international action to reduce the incidence of marine debris.
    The bill also revises the program by allowing NOAA to make 
sums available for assisting in the cleanup and response 
required by severe marine debris events.
    The bill urges the President to:
           support funding for research and development 
        of bio-based and other alternatives or environmentally 
        feasible improvements to materials that reduce 
        municipal solid waste;
           work with foreign countries that contribute 
        the most to the global marine debris problem in order 
        to find a solution to the problem;
           study issues related to marine debris, 
        including the economic impacts of marine debris; and
           encourage the Office of the U.S. Trade 
        Representative to consider the impact of marine debris 
        in relevant future trade agreements.
    The Interagency Marine Debris Coordinating Committee must 
expand to include a senior official from the State Department 
and from the Department of the Interior.
    The bill acknowledges the importance of the Great Lakes 
Land-Based Marine Debris Action Plan in addressing marine 
debris in the region.
    This bill authorizes appropriations for Fiscal Years 2018-
2022 for the Marine Debris Program, and for the Coast Guard for 
Fiscal Years 2018-2019.
    Title II of the bill includes maritime safety provisions as 
a result of Coast Guard and National Transportation Safety 
Board reviews of the sinking of the M/V EL FARO. (H.R. 6175)
    Title III of the bill requires the Coast Guard to create a 
Blue Technology Center of Expertise. (H.R. 6206).

Legislative History

    Mar. 29, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    Apr. 5, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported without amendment 
favorably.
    July 24, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune without amendment. 
With written report No. 115-135.
    July 24, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 181.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S4895)
    Aug. 3, 2017. S.AMDT.773 Amendment SA 773 proposed by 
Senator Murkowski for Senator Sullivan. (consideration: CR 
S4895; text: CR S4895) To improve the bill.
    Aug. 3, 2017. S.AMDT.773 Amendment SA 773 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Passed Senate with amendments by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Received in the House.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Referred to the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure, and in addition to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, for a period to be subsequently determined by the 
Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as 
fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
    Aug. 7, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    July 25, 2018. Mr. Young (AK) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, as amended.
    July 25, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H7640-7645)
    July 25, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 756.
    July 25, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H7640-7642)
    July 25, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendment to Senate bill.
    Dec. 13, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    Dec. 13, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 756 with an amendment (SA 4108) made in 
Senate Amendment SA 4108 proposed by Senator McConnell for 
Senator Grassley. To provide for programs to help reduce the 
risk that prisoners will recidivate upon release from prison, 
and for other purposes. Amendment SA 4109 proposed by Senator 
McConnell for Senator Kennedy to Amendment SA 4108. To require 
the Director of the Bureau of Prisons to notify each victim of 
the offense for which the prisoner is imprisoned the date on 
which the prisoner will be released.
    Dec. 13, 2018. Amendment SA 4109 was divided into Divisions 
I, II, and III.
    Dec. 13, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to S. 756 with an amendment (SA 4108) 
presented in Senate.
    Dec. 17, 2018. S.Amdt.4108 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S7639)
    Dec. 17, 2018. S.Amdt.4109 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S7639)
    Dec. 17, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S7639)
    Dec. 17, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to S. 756 with an amendment (SA 4108) invoked in 
Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 82-12. Record Vote Number: 267. (text: 
CR S7650)
    Dec. 18, 2018. Senate concurred in the House amendment to 
S. 756 with an amendment (SA 4108) by Yea-Nay Vote. 87-12. 
Record Vote Number: 271. The amendment struck the text of the 
measure relating to Marine Debris Act.
    See Public Law 115-265 (S. 3508) for further action.

        Coast Guard Authorization of 2017 Technical Corrections


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 7329)

Summary

    H.R. 7329 makes technical corrections to the Frank LoBiondo 
Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018 to correct certain dates 
and update membership on a Coast Guard Advisory Committee.

Legislative History

    Dec. 20, 2018. Expected to be considered in the House under 
Suspension of the Rules.

                         Reported by Committee


                   Coast Guard Authorization of 2017


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 2518)

Summary

    H.R. 2518 is bipartisan legislation that supports and 
strengthens the United States Coast Guard, one of our Nation's 
five armed services, in its critical missions to save lives, 
safeguard our shores, and protect living marine resources.
    The bill authorizes funding for the Coast Guard for fiscal 
years 2018 and 2019 at robust levels and includes reforms to 
Coast Guard authorities and regulations governing certain 
maritime industries.
    Title II amends certain Coast Guard authorities in title 
14, United States Code, to:
           Provide the Commandant with a variety of 
        acquisition contracting authorities, to lower costs for 
        the Service and the taxpayer;
           Require the Commandant to establish a land-
        based unmanned aircraft system program to support and 
        assist its assets and personnel;
           Eliminate redundant training requirements;
           Allow portability of healthcare 
        professionals working for the Coast Guard, which 
        provides the Coast Guard parity with other armed 
        services; and
           Align the commissioned service retirement 
        structure of the Coast Guard with that of the other 
        armed services.
    Title III transfers the Ports and Waterways Safety Act to a 
new chapter 700, Port Safety, in title 46, United States Code. 
This transfer better organizes Coast Guard's port safety 
authorities.
    Title IV amends certain sections of titles 33 (Navigation 
and Navigable Waters) and 46 (Shipping), United States Code, 
to:
           Require the development of a backup Global 
        Positioning System;
           Clarify vessel logbook requirements, 
        providing savings for taxpayers and regulatory 
        flexibility for vessel operators;
           Promote maritime transit lane safety through 
        funding for Coast Guard marine debris activities;
           Create performance-based requirements and 
        promote innovation for distress signal technology;
           Promote safety by requiring notice to the 
        fishing industry when the Secretary prescribes 
        alternative safety compliance measures for certain 
        fishing and associated vessels; and
           Promote common sense regulations by updating 
        public notice requirements for bridge work and simplify 
        references for merchant mariner documents, licenses, 
        and certifications of registry.
    Title V includes provisions to:
           Require the National Academy of Sciences to 
        review existing and emerging unmanned, autonomous, or 
        remotely controlled maritime domain awareness 
        technologies and make recommendations on how these 
        technologies can be used by the Coast Guard to perform 
        its missions and efficiently allocate its vessels, 
        aircraft, and personnel;
           Ensure fees or charges issued by the 
        Commandant for certain inspections match government 
        costs; and
           Correct provisions enacted in previous Coast 
        Guard authorizations, allow for reimbursement of non-
        federally constructed aids-to-navigation, and repeal 
        expired or unused authorities.

Legislative History

    May 19, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    June 26, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-194.
    June 26, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
133.
    See Public Law 115-282 (S. 140) for further action.

    To Transfer Coast Guard Property in the Town of Jupiter Island, 
     Florida, for Inclusion in Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 5319)

Summary

    H.R. 5319 transfers Coast Guard property in Jupiter Island, 
Florida to the Secretary of the Interior for inclusion in the 
Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge.

Legislative History

    Mar. 16, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-1016, Part I.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Committee on Natural Resources discharged.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
795.
    See Section 837 of Public Law 115-282 (S. 140) for further 
action.

                     Ordered Reported by Committee


         Federal Maritime Commission Authorization Act of 2017


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 2593)

Summary

    H.R. 2593 is bipartisan legislation that authorizes funding 
for the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) for fiscal years 2018 
and 2019 at increased levels and includes reforms to Commission 
authorities regarding reviews of carrier agreements. The bill 
also reauthorizes expired programs, clarifies fishing permit 
association with vessels, and provides a designation process 
for Centers of Excellence.
    Title I (incorporated in Title VII of Public Law 115-282 
(S. 140)) amends certain authorities in the Shipping Act to:
           Define port services, outline when ocean 
        carriers may negotiate with port service providers, and 
        allow the Commission to review any relevant competition 
        factors, including agreements, other than the one under 
        review.
           Update the entities required to provide 
        information to the Commission to include marine 
        terminal operators or ocean transportation 
        intermediaries and employees of these entities.
           Allow the Commission to request information 
        on ocean carrier agreements without the requirement 
        that it solely be for its determination process.
           Clarify that a person cannot advertise or 
        hold oneself out as an ocean transportation 
        intermediary without having a license as such an 
        intermediary.
           Allow any carrier in an agreement that would 
        be prohibited after enactment of this Act to get an 
        exemption or withdraw from such agreement.
    Title II amends certain sections of title 46, United States 
Code, to:
           Extend the existing authorization levels for 
        fiscal year 2018 and 2019 for two fishery grant 
        programs, while moving the programs to the Department 
        of Commerce and reducing the federal cost share from 75 
        percent to 50 percent. . See section 506 of Public Law 
        115-282 (S. 140)
           Clarify that funding for training provided 
        under the Assistance for Small Shipyards grant program 
        can only be for training related to shipbuilding, ship 
        repair, and associated industries. It also extends the 
        existing authorized level of funding for fiscal years 
        2018 and 2019. See section 3501 of Public Law 115-282 
        for authorization level.
           Add clarifying language to chapter 313 of 
        title 46, United States Code, to state that the chapter 
        does not establish a maritime lien or authorize any 
        civil action to enforce a maritime lien on a fishing 
        permit. It also states that a fishing permit shall be 
        governed by the state or federal law under which it was 
        issued and shall not be treated as part of a vessel, or 
        as an appurtenance, or intangible of a vessel for any 
        purpose under federal law.
           Allow the Secretary of Transportation to 
        designate Centers of Excellence for domestic workforce 
        training and education and provide assistance through 
        cooperative agreements for a covered training entity 
        located in a State that borders the Gulf of Mexico, 
        Atlantic Ocean, Long Island Sound, Pacific Ocean, Great 
        Lakes, or the Mississippi River System.

Legislative History

    May 19, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    See P.L. 115-230 (H.R. 5515) and P.L. 115-282 (S. 140) for 
further action.

                      Maritime Safety Act of 2018


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 6175)

Summary

    H.R. 6175 is maritime safety legislation developed in 
response to the sinking of the U.S.-flagged cargo ship, the El 
FARO, in October 2015, and the Commandant of the Coast Guard's 
final action memo on the incident.
    The legislation requires the Commandant of the Coast Guard 
to annually publish information regarding domestic vessel 
compliance with subtitle II of title 46, United States Code. 
The Commandant is also required to:
           Enter into negotiations with the 
        International Maritime Organization regarding free-
        floating voyage data recorders that contain integrated 
        emergency position indicating radio beacon and timely 
        weather forecasts for vessels;
           Submit a cost-benefit analysis on the 
        possibility of capturing communications on the internal 
        telephone systems with the bridge onboard commercial 
        vessels;
           Procure equipment that will allow for search 
        and rescue units to attach a radio, strobe, or beacon 
        to an object that is not immediately retrievable;
           Establish certain training programs for 
        Coast Guard personnel;
           Update Coast Guard policy to utilize risk 
        analysis to target the attendance of Coast Guard 
        personnel during safety management certificate and 
        document of compliance audits;
           Review policies and procedures for 
        documenting major conversion determinations and policy 
        regarding ventilators, openings, and stability 
        standards;
           Conduct an assessment of the effectiveness 
        of the Coast Guard's oversight of recognized 
        organizations to ensure compliance and safety of 
        vessels inspected by such organizations;
           Create an office within the Coast Guard to 
        conduct comprehensive and targeted oversight of all 
        recognized organizations that act on behalf of the 
        Coast Guard; and
           Provide updates on implementation of the 
        actions directed in the final action memo on the El 
        FARO sinking.
    The Government Accountability Office is directed to conduct 
an audit of the implementation and effectiveness of safety 
management plans required under chapter 32 of title 46, United 
States Code.
           Title 46, United States Code, is amended to 
        require:
           Inspected freight vessels to carry distress 
        signaling and locating technology;
           Inspected freight vessels to maintain 
        records of all the weight changes made to a vessel and 
        track such weight changes over time; and
           That the Coast Guard have full access to 
        voyage data recorder data and audio held by any federal 
        agency in all marine casualty investigations.

Legislative History

    June 22, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    See Public Law 115-265 (S. 3508) for further action.

          Coast Guard Blue Technology Center of Expertise Act


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 6206)

Summary

    H.R. 6206, authorizes the Commandant of the Coast Guard to 
establish a Blue Technology Center of Expertise. The Commandant 
is required to use the authorities provided in section 58 of 
title 14, United States Code, and establish it not later than a 
year after enactment of the Act.
    The missions of the Center of Expertise are to:
           Promote awareness within the Coast Guard of 
        the range and diversity of Blue Technologies and how 
        those technologies could enhance Coast Guard mission 
        readiness, operational performance, and regulation of 
        such technologies.
           Function as an interactive conduit to enable 
        the sharing and dissemination of Blue Technology 
        information between the private sector, academia, 
        nonprofits and the Coast Guard.
           Increase awareness among Blue Technology 
        manufacturers, entrepreneurs, and vendors of Coast 
        Guard acquisition policies, procedures, and business 
        practices.
    The bill also requires the Commandant of the Coast Guard to 
provide a brief on the costs and benefits of hosting a biennial 
Coast Guard Blue Technology exposition.

Legislative History

    June 26, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Order reported by voice vote.
    See Public Law 115-265 (S. 3508) for further action.

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                      Letters (Minority/Majority)


                                Hearings


   AUTHORIZATION OF COAST GUARD AND MARITIME TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS 
                           (SERIAL NO. 115-9)

    On April 4, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine Coast Guard and federal maritime 
transportation programs, in preparation for an authorization 
bill. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the Commandant and 
Master Chief Petty Officer of the U.S. Coast Guard, the 
Executive Director (in lieu of the Administrator) of the 
Maritime Administration, and the Acting Chairman of the Federal 
Maritime Commission.

     MARITIME TRANSPORTATION REGULATORY ISSUES (SERIAL NO. 115-14)

    On May 3, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing 
to examine a number of maritime transportation regulatory 
programs that have a significant impact on the vitality and 
competitiveness of the maritime transportation industry. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. Coast Guard, Federal 
Maritime Commission, American Salvage Association, the former 
president and CEO of National Response Corporation, Rapid Ocean 
Response Corporation, Alaska Maritime Prevention and Response 
Network, American Waterways Operators, and the World Shipping 
Council.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: COAST GUARD SEA, 
         LAND, AND AIR CAPABILITIES, PART 1 (SERIAL NO. 115-17)

    On June 7, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing 
to review the status of the Coast Guard's recapitalization 
program, new technologies that could assist the Coast Guard, 
maintenance requirements of the Coast Guard's aging vessels, 
operating costs for the new vessels, and shoreside 
infrastructure needs. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the 
U.S. Coast Guard, Government Accountability Office, and the 
Navy League of the United States.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: COAST GUARD SEA, 
         LAND, AND AIR CAPABILITIES, PART 2 (SERIAL NO. 115-23)

    On July 25, 2017, the Subcommittee held the second of two 
oversight hearings examining the status of Coast Guard 
infrastructure and the ability of the infrastructure to meet 
the Service's mission needs in the 21st century. At the 
hearing, the Subcommittee received an update on the Coast 
Guard's progress toward developing and implementing an unfunded 
priority list (UPL), five-year Capital Investment Plan (CIP), 
and 20-year Major Acquisition Plan. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, the 
Government Accountability Office, the Committee on Polar 
Icebreaker Cost Assessment of the National Academies of 
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, and the Congressional 
Research Service.

    BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: COAST GUARD 
STAKEHOLDERS' PERSPECTIVES AND JONES ACT FLEET CAPABILITIES (SERIAL NO. 
                                115-26)

    On October 3, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the status of the U.S. Coast Guard's 
military and civilian workforce and extensive real property 
infrastructure, and to review the capabilities of the Jones Act 
Fleet. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. Coast 
Guard, Seafarers International Union, TOTE, Crowley Maritime 
Corporation, and the Shipbuilders Council of America.

    THE STATE OF THE U.S.-FLAG MARITIME INDUSTRY (SERIAL NO. 115-32)

    On January 17, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the state of the U.S.-flag maritime 
industry. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. Coast 
Guard, the Maritime Administration, the American Maritime 
Partnership, USA Maritime, the Offshore Marine Service 
Association, the Shipbuilders Council of America, and a witness 
testifying on behalf of the following organizations: American 
Maritime Officers; Masters, Mates, and Pilots; and the 
Seafarers International Union.

  EXAMINATION OF REPORTS ON THE ``EL FARO'' MARINE CASUALTY AND COAST 
         GUARD'S ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORDS (SERIAL NO. 115-34)

    On January 30, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the results of investigations on two issues: 
the October 1, 2015, sinking of the El Faro, and the failed 
efforts by U.S. Coast Guard to implement an electronic health 
records (EHR) system. The hearing's first panel of witnesses 
will focus on the sinking of the El Faro and the results of 
investigations and recommendations by the Coast Guard Marine 
Board of Investigation and the National Transportation Safety 
Board. The second panel will focus on a Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) investigation of a cancelled 
project to modernize the Coast Guard's EHR system. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from three representatives of the 
U.S. Coast Guard, the National Transportation Safety Board, and 
the GAO.

       IMPLEMENTATION OF COAST GUARD PROGRAMS (SERIAL NO. 115-39)

    On March 7, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the implementation of Coast Guard programs, 
and to examine a recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
report investigating commercial fishing vessel safety and 
vessel construction standards. This hearing builds upon the 
Subcommittee's previous oversight hearings focused on the 
Service's mission performance and long-term planning for the 
acquisition of major systems. The Subcommittee heard testimony 
from the U.S. Coast Guard and the GAO.

 REVIEW OF THE FISCAL YEAR 2019 BUDGET REQUEST FOR THE COAST GUARD AND 
          MARITIME TRANSPORTATION PROGRAMS (SERIAL NO. 115-40)

    On March 14, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the fiscal year 2019budget requests for the 
U.S. Coast Guard, the Federal Maritime Commission, and the 
Maritime Administration. The Subcommittee heard testimony from 
the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, the Administrator of 
the Maritime Administration, and the Acting Chairman of the 
Federal Maritime Commission.

    BLUE TECHNOLOGIES: USE OF NEW MARITIME TECHNOLOGIES TO IMPROVE 
         EFFICIENCY AND MISSION PERFORMANCE (SERIAL NO. 115-44)

    On May 8, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing 
to explore how the integration of blue technologies 
(technologies and systems that support, sustain, and integrate 
the U.S. and global ocean economy) may contribute to enhanced 
operational flexibility, improved understanding of the maritime 
environment, and maximized best use of Coast Guard assets. 
Among the topics the hearing addressed were: search and rescue, 
navigation services, unmanned systems, integrated 
communications, and data analytics. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the U.S. Coast Guard, Scripps Institution of 
Oceanography, The Maritime Alliance, ASV Global, International 
Ocean Science and Technology Industry Association, the College 
of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State 
University, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership.

 MARITIME TRANSPORTATION IN THE ARCTIC: THE U.S. ROLE (SERIAL NO. 115-
                                  46)

    On June 7, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing 
to examine U.S. infrastructure needed to facilitate safe and 
efficient maritime transportation in the Arctic. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. Coast Guard, the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Center for 
Strategic and International Studies, the International Arctic 
Research Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska 
Ocean Observing System, and the Center for Solutions to Weather 
and Climate Risk at Pennsylvania State University.

  UPDATE ON COAST GUARD ACQUISITION PROGRAMS AND MISSION BALANCE AND 
                   EFFECTIVENESS (SERIAL NO. 115-50)

    On July 24, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to review the U.S. Coast Guard's integration of their 
acquisition, manpower, and maintenance plans with their mission 
needs to ensure the Service has the equipment, talent, and 
manpower necessary to accomplish its critical missions for the 
American people. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. 
Coast Guard and Government Accountability Office.

   COAST GUARD MODERNIZATION AND RECAPITALIZATION: STATUS AND FUTURE 
                          (SERIAL NO. 115-56)

    On September 26, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to review the status of U.S. Coast Guard's efforts to 
modernize the Service and recapitalize its fleet of ships, 
aircraft, and shore infrastructure. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard.

REVIEW OF RECENT GAO REPORTS ON ICEBREAKER ACQUISITION AND THE NEED FOR 
            A NATIONAL MARITIME STRATEGY (SERIAL NO. 115-57)

    On November 29, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to review recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
reports on icebreaker acquisition and the need for a National 
Maritime Strategy. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the 
U.S. Coast Guard, Maritime Administration, GAO, and 
Congressional Research Service.

                                Meetings


   LISTENING SESSION ON THE AVAILABILITY TO PUERTO RICAN CITIZENS OF 
 SUPPLIES, FUEL, AND FOOD BEING SHIPPED TO PUERTO RICO AFTER HURRICANE 
                                 MARIA

    On September 28, 2017, the Subcommittee held a listening 
session to examine the status of the U.S.-flag fleet's capacity 
to respond to the emergency relief efforts for Puerto Rico 
after Hurricanes Irma and Maria. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from Crowley and TOTE, two of the major carriers that 
service Puerto Rico, as well as the Seafarers International 
Union.

  LISTENING SESSION ON IMPROVING THE PROCESS FOR MILITARY MEMBERS AND 
            VETERANS TO TRANSITION TO PROFESSIONAL MARINERS

    On July 17, 2018, the Subcommittee held a listening session 
to examine the process for former military service members to 
obtain Coast Guard mariner credentials once they leave military 
service. This listening session was Part III of a series held 
by the Subcommittee (Part I on March 1, 2016 and Part II on 
September 22, 2016). The participants were representatives from 
the Maritime Administration, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Navy, 
Department of Defense, Navy League, Transportation Institute, 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific, American Maritime Officers and 
Crowley Maritime Corporation.

       IMPACT OF THE JONES ACT ON CONSUMER PRICES IN PUERTO RICO

    On July 25, 2018, the Subcommittee held a roundtable 
discussion on the report entitled ``Impact of the U.S. Jones 
Act on Puerto Rico'' prepared by Reeves & Associates and 
Estudios Tecnicos, Inc. The participants were representatives 
from Reeves & Associates, Crowley Maritime, Seafarers 
International Union, and the Navy League of the United States.

                           Oversight Letters


                  HYDROGRAPHIC SURVEY DATA ACQUISITION

    On January 12, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), sent a letter to 
the Comptroller General requesting to be added as a co-
requester of a U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
report on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's 
acquisition of hydrographic survey data; comparing the costs 
associated with producing the data in-house versus obtaining 
data from private sector contractors. This request is a follow 
up to a prior request for the report made by Senators John 
Thune (R-SD) and Dan Sullivan (R-AK). On June 15, 2017, GAO 
released report GAO-17-510 titled ``Hydrographic Surveying: 
NOAA Needs Better Cost Data and a Strategy for Expanding 
Private Sector Involvement in Data Collection.''

                  COAST GUARD UNFUNDED PRIORITIES LIST

    On February 10, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a 
letter to the Commandant of the Coast Guard requesting a list 
of unfunded priorities for the Coast Guard. On July 20, 2017, 
the Subcommittee received the Acquisition, Construction, and 
Improvements Fiscal Year 2018 Unfunded Priorities List.

                   COAST GUARD PRIORITIES AND ISSUES

    On February 21, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a 
letter to President Donald Trump to discuss priorities and 
issues facing the Coast Guard. The issues mentioned include the 
mission readiness shortfall the Coast Guard currently faces due 
to an underfunded budget, icebreaker acquisition challenges and 
threats posed by Russia in the Arctic, and the Coast Guard's 
need for unmanned aerial systems.

    FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION OVERSIGHT OF OCEAN CARRIER ALLIANCES

    On April 27, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter 
(R-CA), along with Ranking Members Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
John Garamendi (D-CA) sent a letter to the Acting Chairman of 
the Federal Maritime Commission raising concerns with an 
amendment to the WWL/EUKOR/ARC/GLOVIS Cooperative Working 
Agreement that permits an alliance of ocean carriers to bargain 
as a unit with port services businesses. The letter raised 
concerns that maritime service providers (i.e. tugboats and 
barge operators, stevedores, chassis providers, among others) 
have no counterbalancing authority to take collective action, 
which will lead to anticompetitive market conditions in U.S. 
ports and harbors. The letter also adds the Committee's 
expectation that the Commission will make decisions in line 
with fostering a fair, efficient and reliable international 
ocean transportation system as well as protecting the public 
from unfair and deceptive practices. The Subcommittee received 
a response on May 11, 2017.

 FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF COOPERATIVE WORKING 
                               AGREEMENT

    On May 10, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), wrote a letter 
to the Acting Chairman of the FMC requesting an economic 
analysis pertaining to the WWL/EUKOR/ARC/GLOVIS Cooperative 
Working Agreement voted on by the Commission in January 2017. 
On June 8, 2017, the FMC provided the Subcommittee with a 
report titled ``WWL/EUKOR/ARC/GLOVIS Cooperative Working 
Agreement: Overview of the Economic Analysis.''

                    COAST GUARD SHORE INFRASTRUCTURE

    On June 12, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), and Ranking 
Member, John Garamendi (D-CA), wrote a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting that U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) complete a study on the Coast 
Guard's facility recapitalization, retirement, deaccession, and 
repair. Specifically, the letter inquires about the current 
status of the Coast Guard shore infrastructure, the level of 
investment by the Coast Guard in its shore facilities' 
maintenance and the extent a risk-based approach was used in 
making shore infrastructure investment decisions, the actions 
taken by the Coast Guard to improve the resiliency of its shore 
side infrastructure, and the decision-making process when 
choosing to move, consolidate, retire or deaccession facilities 
in order to achieve efficiencies, cost savings or mission 
execution improvements. The GAO report is expected to be 
released in 2018.

                       COAST GUARD APPROPRIATIONS

    On June 29, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a letter to 
Committee on Appropriations Chairman, Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-
NJ), and Subcommittee on Homeland Security Chairman, John 
Carter (R-TX), urging an increase in funding for the Coast 
Guard Operating Expense and Acquisition, Construction and 
Improvement accounts to the levels provided in H.R. 2518, the 
Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2017. Specifically, the bill 
provides a funding level $575 million above the fiscal year 
2017 appropriated level and $742 million above the 
Administration fiscal year 2018 request in order to help fund 
two additional Fast Response Cutters (FRCs), three additional 
FRCs to replace ISLAND class cutters in Patrol Forces Southwest 
Asia, shore side construction, a ship life extension program 
for 270 foot Medium Endurance Cutters, an unmanned aircraft 
system, and development of a program for improvements to the 
MH-65 aircraft.

U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION CLARIFICATION OF PROPOSED REVOCATION

    On July 19, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), sent a letter to 
the Acting Commissioner of U.S. Customs & Border Protection 
(CBP) asking to help clarify unanswered questions regarding 
CBP's Proposed Modification and Revocation of Ruling Letters 
Relating to the Customs Application of the Jones Act to the 
Transportation of Certain Merchandise and Equipment Between 
Coastwise Points (Proposed Revocation). The letter inquires 
about the Proposed Revocation's effect on CBP's current 
positions on ``paid out and not unladen'' analysis associated 
with the transportation and installation of pipelines, 
umbilicals, and cables on the outer continental shelf of the 
United States and on incidental movements associated with heavy 
lift operations.

                            JONES ACT WAIVER

    On September 22, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter 
(R-CA), and Ranking Members Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and John 
Garamendi (D-CA) along with Committee on Homeland Security 
Ranking Member, Bennie Thompson (D-MS), and Congresswoman 
Pramila Jayapal (D-WA), sent a letter to the Department of 
Homeland Security Acting Secretary Elaine Duke expressing 
concerns with a waiver of the Jones Act issued for affected 
regions in the aftermath of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. The 
Committee and Congresswomen expressed their sense of 
uncertainty in the necessity for the initial waiver and 
submitted several questions inquiring as to whether the 
Maritime Administration performed a survey of coastwise tonnage 
available to transport cargo to the affected regions and what 
were the reasons for issuing the waiver. The letter also 
requested the Administration to not issue an extension of the 
waiver.

                 LIFEBOAT AND FIRE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS

    On November 3, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), and 
Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces Chairman, Robert 
Wittman (R-VA), along with Ranking Members John Garamendi (D-
CA) and Joe Courtney (D-CT) sent a letter to the Administrator 
of the Maritime Administration (MARAD) asking that MARAD submit 
a cost analysis for upgrading lifeboat and fire suppression 
systems across the Ready Reserve Fleet to comply with the 
International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS 
2000) requirements as well as submit an assessment as to the 
validity of maintaining the SOLAS 2000 exemption for these 
vessels.

                  DISASTER SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS

    On December 4, 2017, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a 
letter to Committee on Appropriations Chairman, Rodney 
Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), and Ranking Member, Nita Lowey (D-NY), 
requesting that the Appropriations Committee fully fund the 
Administration's request of $424.6 million in disaster 
supplemental appropriations for the Coast Guard due to impacts 
from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria. In addition, the 
letter urged that the Committee on Appropriations consider the 
Coast Guard's need for an additional $650 million to ensure the 
resiliency of its infrastructure and address other critical 
storm-related needs.

                            CARGO PREFERENCE

    On January 19, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and 
Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA) and 
Ranking Member, John Garamendi (D-CA), sent a letter to the 
Commander of the U.S. Transportation Command General Darren 
McDew, requesting comments on the impact on U.S.-flag sealift 
capabilities that would result from a significant reduction in 
U.S. government international food aid shipments, or the 
reduction or elimination of cargo preference as applied to such 
international food aid cargoes.

  TRANSPORTATION WORKER IDENTIFICATION CREDENTIAL READER REQUIREMENTS

    On March 12, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a letter to 
the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security 
Kirstjen Nielsen, requesting that the Secretary clarify the 
discrepancy between the proposed and final rule for 
Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) Reader 
Requirements. In August 2016, the Department of Homeland 
Security and Coast Guard issued a final rule regarding TWIC 
Reader Requirements. The final rule mandated that certain 
Maritime Transportation Security Act (MTSA)-regulated 
facilities perform electronic TWIC inspections by TWIC readers 
for personnel requiring unescorted access to secure areas at 
Certain Danger Cargo (CDC) facilities. That final rule differed 
from what was proposed and commented on by industry and 
expanded the geographic areas subject to the TWIC reader 
requirement beyond what was included in the proposed rule and 
regulatory analysis accompanying the proposal.

     POSTHUMOUS MEDALS FOR PILOT AND CREW OF U.S. NAVY PLANE #63917

    On April 4, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter 
(R-CA), Subcommittee on Aviation Chairman, Frank A. LoBiondo 
(R-NJ), Subcommittee on Highways and Transit Chairman, Sam 
Graves (R-MO) and Ranking Members Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and John 
Garamendi (D-CA), sent a letter to the Department of the Navy 
Secretary Richard V. Spencer proposing that the pilot and crew 
of the U.S. Navy Plane #63917 be posthumously awarded medals 
for their heroic actions in the part of the sinking of a German 
U-boat on August 7, 1943.

                 SEAFARER ACCESS TO MARITIME FACILITIES

    On April 25, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a letter to 
the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security 
Kirstjen Nielsen, requesting that the Secretary issue a final 
rule to implement the requirements of Section 811 of the Coast 
Guard Authorization Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-281) to ensure that 
each facility security plan approved under Section 70103(c) of 
title 46, U.S. Code, provides ``a system for seamen assigned to 
a vessel at that facility, pilots, and representatives of 
seamen's welfare and labor organizations to board and depart 
the vessel through the facility in a timely manner at no cost 
to the individual.'' In December 2014, the Department of 
Homeland Security and the Coast Guard published a notice of 
proposed rulemaking regarding Seafarer's Access to Maritime 
Facilities and no final rule has yet been issued. Without a 
final rule, seafarers are unable to cross maritime facilities 
to access vessels and the shore in a timely manner.

                       COAST GUARD APPROPRIATIONS

    On May 30, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter 
(R-CA) and Ranking Members Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and John 
Garamendi (D-CA), sent a letter to Committee on Appropriations 
Chairman, Rodney Frelinghuysen (R-NJ), and Subcommittee on 
Homeland Security Chairman, Kevin Yoder (R-KS), urging the 
appropriators to fund the Coast Guard at levels authorized in 
the Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2017, which was passed by 
the House of Representatives on May 24, 2018, as part of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (H.R. 
5515). Specifically, the bill provides a funding level $118 
million above the fiscal year 2018 appropriated level and $808 
million above the Administration fiscal year 2019 request in 
order to help fund three additional Fast Response Cutters 
(FRCs), shore side construction, and development of a program 
for improvements to the Service's rotary-wing aircraft.

                    JONES ACT WAIVERS IN PUERTO RICO

    On June 5, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Subcommittee 
on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Chairman, Duncan 
Hunter (R-CA), sent a letter to the Secretary of the U.S. 
Department of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, requesting 
information on foreign ships that utilized a Jones Act waiver 
to deliver goods from an American port to Puerto Rico in the 
fall of 2017.

                          COAST GUARD DATABASE

    On June 25, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), and Ranking 
Member, John Garamendi (D-CA), wrote a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting that U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) complete a study on the state of 
the U.S. Coast Guard's Marine Information for Safety and Law 
Enforcement (MISLE) database. The database was created in 2002 
and is a steady-state system designed to capture information 
required to support the Coast Guard's marine safety, security, 
environmental protection and law enforcement programs. 
Specifically, the letter requests an independent review of the 
Coast Guard's MISLE database to assist the Coast Guard and 
Congress in making informed decisions about whether and how the 
Coast Guard should maintain, upgrade, or retire and replace the 
MISLE database.

                      COAST GUARD INNOVATION EXPO

    On June 25, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), sent a letter to 
the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, Admiral Karl L. 
Schultz, urging the Coast Guard to reestablish the annual 
Innovation Expo, which was suspended in 2012. The Coast Guard 
held an annual Innovation Expo for more than 10 years to bring 
together government, industry, and academia representatives to 
discuss new technologies, examine mission needs, and establish 
professional networks to tackle future challenges.

                            ARCTIC SHIPPING

    On July 12, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), and Ranking 
Member, John Garamendi (D-CA), wrote a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting that U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) complete an evaluation of the 
preparations for maritime Arctic shipping within the United 
States and globally, including the role of the U.S. government 
and private industry. Specifically, the evaluation should 
include the actions other countries have taken in preparing for 
Arctic maritime shipping, identifying the roles of the U.S. 
government and domestic private industry in planning and 
preparing for Arctic maritime shipping, and identifying the 
infrastructure and response capabilities currently available in 
the U.S. Arctic.

                      COAST GUARD WORKFORCE NEEDS

    On July 12, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), and Ranking 
Member, John Garamendi (D-CA), wrote a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting that U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) complete a follow-up review of the 
Coast Guard's status in assessing its manpower needs against 
its stated mission goals. In May 2016, GAO reported that 
actions were needed by the Coast Guard to improve allocation of 
strategic assets to determine workforce requirements (GAO-16-
379). In that report, GAO recommended actions the Coast Guard 
should take to better understand its manpower needs. The Coast 
Guard supported the recommendations, but stated it did not have 
an established process to help analyze its manpower 
requirements assessment workload. The ability of the Coast 
Guard to fully understand its manpower needs to support its 
modernized organizational structure is an ongoing concern. This 
letter requests another review of the Coast Guard's 
organizational structure and any Coast Guard assessment of 
mission requirements and mission performance gaps due to 
deficiencies in available personnel.

                   COAST GUARD INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

    On July 12, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA), and Ranking 
Member, John Garamendi (D-CA), wrote a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting that U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) conduct a study to review the Coast 
Guard's information technology (IT) acquisition standards and 
practices. Specifically, the study should assess the ongoing 
and planned non-major IT investments and their oversight, 
process to decide whether to develop a new IT system or procure 
a commercial-off-the-shelf system, and steps to regulate 
technology upgrades throughout the life of an IT investment.

                   COAST GUARD OFFSHORE PATROL CUTTER

    On July 12, 2018, Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime 
Transportation Chairman, Duncan Hunter (R-CA) wrote a letter to 
the Comptroller General requesting that U.S. Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) identify the lessons learned in 
recent Coast Guard major acquisition programs, such as the 
National Security Cutter and the Fast Response Cutter, to help 
inform the Coast Guard's Offshore Patrol Cutter (OPC) 
acquisition program. It is projected that the acquisition of 
the OPC, a program expected to cost about $12 billion over its 
30-year life cycle and critical to the Coast Guard's mission 
success, will consume up to two-thirds of the Coast Guard's 
available acquisition funding from 2018 through 2032. 
Specifically, the study should assess the current status of the 
OPC acquisition program, including steps taken to manage the 
program within cost and schedule commitments, oversight to 
ensure that the detail design is ready to transition into 
construction, and steps to address the potential gap in 
operations if the Medium Endurance Cutters were to reach the 
end of the service life before the delivery of the OPC.

                       Minority Oversight Letters


                         POTOMAC RIVER CLOSURES

    On July 17, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Ranking 
Member John Garamendi (D-CA) sent a letter to the Commandant of 
the United States Coast Guard requesting information on the 
policy that the Coast Guard intends to periodically close down 
a roughly two-mile section of the Potomac River when President 
Trump and ``high-ranking government officials'' are golfing at 
the Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, VA.

                              BUY AMERICA

    On December 18, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA), 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Ranking 
Member John Garamendi (D-CA), Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management Ranking 
Member Hank Johnson (D-GA), Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit Ranking Member Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA), and Subcommittee on 
Water Resources and Environment Ranking Member Grace Napolitano 
(D-CA) sent a letter to the Secretary of Commerce and the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget requesting the 
assessments and reports submitted to the President pursuant to 
the Executive Order (EO) issued on April 18, 2017, entitled 
``President Executive Order on Buy American and Hire 
American''.

     PROVISIONS OF THE FY2019 HOMELAND SECURITY APPROPRIATIONS ACT

    On July 23, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Ranking 
Member John Garamendi (D-CA), Member of Congress Rick Larsen 
(D-WA), Member of Congress Alan S. Lowenthal (D-CA), Member of 
Congress Donald Norcross (D-NJ), Member of Congress Carol Shea-
Porter (D-NH), Member of Congress Stacey Plaskett (D-VI), and 
Member of Congress Joe Courtney (D-CT) sent a letter to 
Committee on Appropriations Chairman Frelinghuysen (R-NJ) and 
Subcommittee on Homeland Security Chairman expressing serious 
concerns over the Fiscal Year 2019 Homeland Security 
Appropriations Act draft that fails to provide $750 million 
requested by the Administration for a heavy polar ice breaker.

                             FUNDING SHIFT

    On June 29, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Ranking 
Member John Garamendi (D-CA), Congressional Coast Guard Caucus 
Co-Chair Joe Courtney (D-CT), and Congressional Coast Guard Co-
Chair Rick Larsen (D-WA) sent a letter to the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget expressing concern with the 
June 22, 2018 Washington Post report that the Trump 
administration intends to shift $77 million from the U.S. Coast 
Guard's budget to pay for U.S. Immigration and Customs 
Enforcement (ICE) operations.

                      Oversight Within Legislation


  H.R. 2810--The ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
                                 2018''


                         ICEBREAKER ACQUISITION

    Section 122 of NDAA 2018 (Public Law 115-91) required the 
Comptroller General of the United States to develop a report 
assessing the cost of, and schedule for, the procurement of a 
new icebreaker vessels for the federal government and submit it 
to the Committees of jurisdiction in the House of 
Representatives and the Senate.

            SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION AND RESPONSE POLICIES

    Section 3506 of NDAA 2018 (Public Law 115-91) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard to review and report to the 
Committees of jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and 
the Senate on sexual assault prevention and response policies 
of the Coast Guard and strategic goals related to sexual 
assault victim recovery.

  H.R. 5515--The ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
                                 2019''


                        CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT

    Section 3501 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires the 
Maritime Administrator to submit a report to the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate on 
the status of unexpended appropriations for capital asset 
management at the United States Merchant Marine Academy, and 
the plan for expending such appropriations.

                        SEXUAL ASSAULT POLICIES

    Section 3508 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires the 
Maritime Administrator to submit a report to the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate 
describing the progress of MARAD in implementing and closing 
each of the recommendations made in the Office of Inspector 
General's Report issued March 28, 2018 (ST-2018-039) 
identifying gaps in the United States Merchant Marine Academy's 
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program.

                    UNIFORM CODE OF MILITARY JUSTICE

    Section 3509 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires the 
Maritime Administrator to submit a report to the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate 
describing on the impediments to the application of the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice at the United States Merchant Marine 
Academy.

                       NATIONAL MARITIME STRATEGY

    Section 3513 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires 
Comptroller General of the United States to complete a study 
and submit to the Committees of jurisdiction in the House of 
Representatives and the Senate a national maritime strategy.

                         TITLE XI LOAN PROGRAM

    Section 3516 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires 
Comptroller General of the United States to complete an audit 
of the financial controls and protections included in the 
policies and procedures of the Department of Transportation for 
approving loan applications for the loan guarantee program 
authorized under chapter 537 of title 46, United States Code 
and submit a report containing the audit results to the 
Committees of jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and 
the Senate.

             ALIGNMENT WITH DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE POLICIES

    Section 3521 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard to notify the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate if 
there is not in effect a general order or regulation 
prohibiting sexual harassment by members of the Coast Guard.

                      MARINE SAFETY IMPLEMENTATION

    Section 3527 of NDAA 2019 (Public Law 115-232) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard to report to the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure of the House of 
Representatives and Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate on the status of implementation of 
each action outlined in the Commandant's final action memo 
dated December 9, 2017.

               S. 3508--The ``Save Our Seas Act of 2018''


                        SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Section 204 of SOS (Public Law 115-265) directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct an audit of 
the implementation and effectiveness of safety management plans 
required under chapter 32 of title 46, United States Code, and 
submit the audit to the Committees of jurisdiction in the House 
of Representatives and the Senate.

                          VOYAGE DATA RECORDER

    Section 207 of SOS (Public Law. 115-265) requires the 
Commandant submit a cost-benefit analysis on the possibility of 
capturing communications on the internal telephone systems with 
the bridge onboard commercial vessels to the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate.

                             VESSEL SAFETY

    Section 211 of SOS (Public Law 115-265) requires the 
Commandant to provide a briefing to the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and the Senate on: 
a review policies and procedures for documenting major 
conversion determinations; policies regarding ventilators, 
openings, and stability standards: and on the reliability of 
self-locating datum marker buoys and other similar technology. 
In addition, the section requires the Commandant to conduct an 
assessment of the effectiveness of the Coast Guard's oversight 
of recognized organizations and its impact on compliance by and 
safety of vessels inspected by such organizations, and to 
submit the results of the assessment to the Committees of 
jurisdiction in the House of Representative and Senate.

                  FLAG-STATE GUIDANCE AND SUPPLEMENTS

    Section 212 of SOS (Public Law 115-265) requires the 
Commandant to work with recognized organizations to create a 
single U.S. supplement to class rules and to provide a briefing 
on the costs and benefits of revising the Code of Federal 
Regulations to authorize only one such supplement to the 
Committees of jurisdiction in the House of Representatives and 
Senate.

S. 140--The ``Frank A. LoBiondo Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2018''


                             AIR FACILITIES

    Section 319 of the ``Frank A. Lobiondo Coast Guard 
Authorization Act of 2018'' (CGAA) (Public Law 115-282) 
requires the Coast Guard to notify Congress regarding the 
closing any Air Facility.

   DEADLINE FOR COMPLIANCE WITH ALTERNATIVE SAFETY COMPLIANCE PROGRAM

    Section 508 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Secretary to provide a report not later than January 1, 2020, 
detailing the status of the implementation of an alternative 
safety compliance program.

                              TRANSPARENCY

    Section 516 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Government Accountability Office to conduct an audit of the 
NVDC and publish its results.

            REPORTING ON IMPACT OF ALLIANCES AND COMPETITION

    Section 703 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires an 
analysis of the impacts on competition for the purchase of 
certain covered services by alliances of ocean carriers 
pursuant to an agreement made under this part.

                              TRANSPARENCY

    Section 712 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commission to submit biannual reports to the House of 
Representatives Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
and the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation regarding unfinished regulatory proceedings.

                        NATIONAL SECURITY CUTTER

    Section 818 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard, before certifying an eighth 
National Security Cutter as Ready for Operation, to provide a 
notification of a new standard method for tracking operational 
employment of Coast Guard major cutters that does not include 
time during which such cutter is away from its homeport for 
maintenance or repair, and a report analyzing cost and 
performance for different approaches to achieving varied levels 
of operational tempos to the House Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation.

 ACQUISITION PLAN FOR INLAND WATERWAYS AND RIVER TENDERS AND BAY-CLASS 
                              ICEBREAKERS

    Section 819 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard to submit a plan to replace or 
extend the life of the Coast Guard fleet of inland waterway and 
river tenders, and the Bay-class icebreakers.

                   GREAT LAKES ICEBREAKER ACQUISITION

    Section 820 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard submit a plan for acquiring such 
an icebreaker, including the details and schedule of 
acquisition activities and a description of how funding 
appropriated under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2017 
(Public Law 115-31) will be allocated to support the 
acquisition activities.

                           POLAR ICEBREAKERS

    Section 821 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard issue a report describing a plan 
to implement such an enhanced maintenance program on the Coast 
Guard Cutter POLAR STAR to extend its service life.

                     STRATEGIC ASSETS IN THE ARCTIC

    Section 822 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
submission of a report on the progress toward implementing the 
strategic objectives described in the United States Coast Guard 
Arctic Strategy dated May 2013.

                        ARCTIC PLANNING CRITERIA

    Section 823 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commandant to submit a report on the assets available for a 
response and the location of the equipment in the Alaska 
Captain of the Port zone that includes the Arctic.

                       VESSEL RESPONSE PLAN AUDIT

    Section 824 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Government Accountability Office to submit a study, including 
an audit, of the processes the Coast Guard uses to approve 
vessel response plans required under section 311 of the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act, to verify compliance with those 
vessel response plans, and approve alternate planning criteria 
to be used in lieu of National Planning Criteria for purposes 
of approving those vessel response plans.
    The section also requires GAO to review the resources used 
by the Coast Guard in carrying out the processes described 
above. Following that review, GAO shall conduct an analysis of 
existing processes. GAO shall then provide a determination 
regarding whether asset and equipment mobilization times 
required pursuant to section 311 of the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act can be met by vessels with approved vessel response 
plans. GAO shall also make recommendations for improving 
existing processes and regarding the sufficiency of existing 
resources.

         ATLANTIC COAST PORT ACCESS ROUTE STUDY RECOMMENDATION

    Section 831 of CGAA (Public Law 115-282) requires the 
Commandant of the Coast Guard to notify the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation of action taken to carry 
out the recommendation contained in the final report Atlantic 
Coast Port Access Route Study published March 14, 2016.
 SUBCOMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, AND EMERGENCY 
                               MANAGEMENT


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115TH CONGRESS


   LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania, 
             Chairman
DINA TITUS, Nevada, Ranking Member

HENRY C. ``HANK'' JOHNSON, Jr.,      ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
  Georgia                            Arkansas
ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON,               BARBARA COMSTOCK, Virginia
  District of Columbia               MIKE BOST, Illinois
ALBIO SIRES, New Jersey              JOHN J. FASO, New York
STACEY E. PLASKETT, Virgin Islands   A. DREW FERGUSON IV, Georgia,
PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon (ex officio)  Vice Chair
                                     BRIAN J. MAST, Florida
                                     MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
                                     BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania (ex 
                                     officio)

                         Legislative Activities


                              Public Laws


        Weather Research and Forecasting Innovation Act of 2017


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-25 (H.R. 353)

Summary

    To improve the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration's weather research through a focused program of 
investment on affordable and attainable advances in 
observational, computing, and modeling capabilities to support 
substantial improvement in weather forecasting and prediction 
of high impact weather events, to expand commercial 
opportunities for the provision of weather data, and for other 
purposes.

Legislative History

    Jan. 6, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology.
    Jan. 9, 2017. Mr. Lucas moved to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill.
    Jan. 9, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H208-217)
    Jan. 9, 2017. House proceeded with forty minutes of debate 
on H.R. 353.
    Jan. 9, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on Page 
H215 of the Congressional Record.
    Jan. 9, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H208-214)
    Jan. 9, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Jan. 10, 2017. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    Mar. 29, 2017. S.AMDT.204 Amendment SA 204 proposed by 
Senator McConnell for Senator Thune. In the nature of a 
substitute.
    Mar. 29, 2017. S.AMDT.205 Amendment SA 205 proposed by 
Senator McConnell for Senator Cantwell to Amendment SA 204.
    To authorize and strengthen the tsunami detection, 
forecast, warning, research, and mitigation program of the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. S.AMDT.205 Amendment SA 205 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Mar. 29, 2017. S.AMDT.204 Amendment SA 204 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Mar. 30, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Apr. 4, 2017. Mr. Smith (TX) moved that the House suspend 
the rules and agree to the Senate amendment.
    Apr. 4, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on the Senate amendment to H.R. 353.
    Apr. 4, 2017. On motion that the House suspend the rules 
and agree to the Senate amendment Agreed to by voice vote. 
(consideration: CR H2653-2667; text as House agreed to Senate 
amendment: CR H2653-2663)
    Apr. 4, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Presented to President.
    Apr. 18, 2017. Signed by President.
    Apr. 18, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-25.

To Designate the Federal Building and United States Courthouse Located 
at 719 Church Street in Nashville, Tennessee, as the ``Fred D. Thompson 
            Federal Building and United States Courthouse''


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-39 (H.R. 375)

Summary

    This bill designates the federal building and United States 
courthouse located at 719 Church Street in Nashville, 
Tennessee, as the ``Fred D. Thompson Federal Building and 
United States Courthouse''.

Legislative History

    Jan. 10, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-23.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
15.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H1547-1550)
    Mar. 7, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 375.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H1574)
    Mar. 7, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H1547)
    Mar. 7, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table. 
Agreed to without objection.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Received in the Senate.
    May 24, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S3111)
    May 24, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    May 25, 2017: Presented to President.
    June 6, 2017. Signed by President.
    June 6, 2017. Became Public Law 115-39.

 A Bill To Facilitate Construction of a Bridge on Certain Property in 
           Christian County, Missouri, and for Other Purposes


                       PUBLIC LAW 115-67 (S. 810)

    Summary This bill authorizes the Riverside Bridge Project, 
to construct, maintain, and operate a bridge on certain 
property conveyed to Christian County, Missouri, by the 
Riverside Inn, Inc.

Legislative History

    Apr. 4, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works.
    July 12, 2017. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute favorably.
    Aug. 2, 2017. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Reported by Senator Barrasso with an amendment in the nature of 
a substitute. With written report No. 115-142.
    Aug. 2, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 192.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S4892; text: CR S4892)
    Aug. 4, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Received in the House.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Aug. 7, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Sep. 25, 2017. Mr. Ferguson moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Sep. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    Sep. 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 810.
    Sep. 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote.
    Sep. 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 28, 2017. Presented to President.
    Oct. 6, 2017. Signed by President.
    Oct. 6, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-67.

To Require the Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
  To Submit a Report Regarding Certain Plans Regarding Assistance to 
Applicants and Grantees During the Response to an Emergency or Disaster


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-69 (H.R. 1117)

Summary

    H.R. 1117 requires the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) to submit a report on the agency's plans to provide 
consistent guidance to applicants on FEMA disaster funding 
procedures, document maintenance and transfer during staff 
transitions, and assistance to ease the administrative burden 
on assistance applicants and grantees. The report shall also 
include a plan for implementing operating procedures and 
document retention requirements to ensure the maintenance of 
appropriate records throughout the lifecycle of an emergency or 
disaster.

Legislative History

    Feb. 17, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-31.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
13.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2448-2450)
    Mar. 27, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1117.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H2452-2453)
    Mar. 27, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 408--0 (Roll no. 195). (text: CR H2448)
    Mar. 27, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Mar. 28, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
    July 26, 2017. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Ordered to be reported without amendment 
favorably.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Reported by Senator Johnson without 
amendment. With written report No. 115-158.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 222.
    Oct. 4, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S6324)
    Oct. 5, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 6, 2017. Presented to President.
    Oct. 18, 2017. Signed by President.
    Oct. 18, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-69.

Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements 
                              Act of 2017


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-72 (H.R. 2266)

Summary

    The bill provides $36.5 billion in emergency funding for 
hurricane and wildfire relief and recovery. Additionally, this 
bill authorizes the transfer of $4.9 billion for Community 
Disaster Loans (CDL), as authorized under section 417 of the 
Stafford Act (42 U.S.C 5184), to help local governments 
impacted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma or Maria provide essential 
services, such as police and fire protection, trash collection 
and the operation of local schools and included changes to the 
CDL program for the specified hurricanes, including allowing 
for the loans to be cancelled at the discretion of the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, in consultation with the 
Secretary of the Treasury.

Legislative History

    Oct. 12, 2017. House agreed to Senate amendment with 
amendment pursuant to H.Res. 569. (consideration: CR H7989-
7992; text as House agreed to Senate amendment: CR H7989-7992)
    Oct. 12, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Con. Res. 
85, enrollment corrections on H.R. 2266 have been made.
    Oct. 16, 2017. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendment to Senate amendment.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S6630)
    Oct. 19, 2017. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment made in Senate. (CR 
S6630)
    Oct. 19, 2017. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to the Senate amendment presented in 
Senate. (CR S6630)
    Oct. 19, 2017. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment with an amendment (SA 
1568) made in Senate. (CR S6630)
    Oct. 19, 2017. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Appropriations the House message to 
accompany H.R. 2266 with instructions to report back forthwith 
with amendment SA 1570 made in Senate. (consideration: CR 
S6630)
    Oct. 23, 2017. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6703-6711)
    Oct. 23, 2017. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to the Senate amendment invoked in Senate by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 79--16. Record Vote Number: 246. (consideration: CR 
S6703, S6709-6710)
    Oct. 23, 2017. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Appropriations the House message to 
accompany H.R. 2266 with instructions to report back forthwith 
with amendment SA 1570 fell when cloture invoked on the motion 
to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment in 
Senate. (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 24, 2017. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6721-6738)
    Oct. 24, 2017. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment with an amendment (SA 
1568) withdrawn in Senate. (consideration: CR S6737)
    Oct. 24, 2017. Point of order that the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to the Senate amendment violates section 
314(e) of the CBA raised in Senate.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Motion to waive all applicable budgetary 
discipline with respect to the measure (the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to the Senate amendment) agreed to in 
Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 80--19. Record Vote Number: 247.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Senate agreed to the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 2266 by Yea-Nay Vote. 82--17. Record 
Vote Number: 248.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Presented to President.
    Oct. 26, 2017. Signed by President.
    Oct. 26, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-72.

                 Javier Vega, Jr. Memorial Act of 2017


                       PUBLIC LAW 115-81 (S.1617)

Summary

    S. 1617 designates the checkpoint of the U.S. Border Patrol 
located on U.S. Highway 77 North in Sarita, Texas, as the 
``Javier Vega, Jr. Border Patrol Checkpoint.''

Legislative History

    July 24, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (text of measure as 
introduced: CR S4137)
    Aug. 3, 2017. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent. 
(consideration: CR S4894)
    Aug. 3, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (text: CR S4894)
    Aug. 4, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Received in the House.
    Aug. 4, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Aug. 7, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Oct. 10, 2017. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Oct. 10, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H7900-7901)
    Oct. 10, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 1617.
    Oct. 10, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H7900)
    Oct. 10, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Oct. 24, 2017. Presented to President.
    Nov. 2, 2017. Signed by President.
    Nov. 2, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-81.

    FEMA Accountability, Modernization and Transparency Act of 2017


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-87 (H.R. 1679)

Summary

    H.R. 1679 modernizes the Federal Emergency Management 
Agencys (FEMA's) management of grant programs authorized under 
the Stafford Act to improve applicant accessibility and 
transparency. This bill reforms FEMA's grant systems to require 
an online interface for applicants to view, complete, submit, 
and check the status of assistance application forms, and 
includes mechanisms to avoid duplication of benefits.

Legislative History

    Mar. 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    May 2, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-107.
    May 2, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 63.
    May 2, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill.
    May 2, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H3022)
    May 2, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1679.
    May 2, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H3026)
    May 2, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 419-0 
(Roll no. 242). (text: CR H3022)
    May 2, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    May 3, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.
    July 26, 2017. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Ordered to be reported without amendment 
favorably.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Homeland Security and 
Governmental Affairs. Reported by Senator Johnson without 
amendment. With written report No. 115-159.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 223.
    Nov. 13, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 15, 2017. Presented to President.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Signed by President.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-87.

       United States Fire Administration, AFG, and Safer Program 
                      Reauthorization Act of 2017


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-98 (H.R. 1679)

Summary

    This bill amends the Federal Fire Prevention and Control 
Act of 1974 to: (1) reauthorize through FY2024 the Assistance 
to Firefighters Grants (AFG) Program, the Fire Prevention and 
Safety Grants (FPSG) Program, and the Staffing for Adequate 
Fire and Emergency Response Grant (SAFER) Program, and 
reauthorizes provisions regarding firefighting technology 
evaluation and standards development; and (2) authorize the use 
of AFG Program grants, instead of SAFER Program grants, to 
provide specialized training to first responders on how to 
recognize and properly intervene with individuals with mental 
illness.
    The SAFER Program is revised to permit the use of grants to 
change the status of part-time or paid-on-call firefighters to 
full-time firefighters.
    The United States Fire Administration (USFA) may develop 
and make widely available an electronic, online training course 
for members of the fire and emergency response community on 
matters related to the administration of AFG, FPSG, and SAFER 
grants. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) shall 
ensure that any such training is: (1) tailored to the financial 
and time constraints of members of the fire and emergency 
response community; and (2) accessible to all individuals in 
the career, combination, paid-on-call, and volunteer fire and 
emergency response community.
    The USFA shall develop and implement a grant monitoring and 
oversight framework to mitigate and minimize risks of fraud, 
waste, abuse, and mismanagement relating to such grants 
programs.

Legislative History

    December 15, 2017. Referred to the Committee on Science, 
Space, and Technology.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Mrs. Comstock moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    Dec. 18, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 4661.
    Dec. 18, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on Page 
H10157 of the Congressional Record.
    Dec. 18, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    Dec. 21, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S8280)
    Dec. 22, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Jan. 2, 2018. Presented to the President.
    Jan. 3, 2018. Signed by the President.
    Jan. 3, 2018. Became Public Law 115-98.

                     Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-123 (H.R. 1892)

 SEC. 20604--(A) DEFINITION OF PRIVATE NONPROFIT FACILITY AND SECTION 
  20606--FEDERAL COST-SHARE ADJUSTMENTS FOR REPAIR, RESTORATION, AND 
                   REPLACEMENT OF DAMAGED FACILITIES

Summary

    Section 20604 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 amends 
the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance 
Act to include houses of worship as an eligible private 
nonprofit facility and clarifies their eligibility for certain 
disaster assistance programs.
    Section 20606 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 allows 
for the adjustment of the federal cost share of disaster 
assistance for states that have made investments that 
``increase readiness for, and resilience from'' a major 
disaster. The provision gives some suggestions like mitigation 
plans, disaster relief, insurance and emergency management 
programs, encouraging the adoption of building codes and 
standards.

Legislative History

     Feb 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 727, 
Mr. Frelinghuysen brought up H.R. 1892 and offered a motion. 
(consideration: CR H834-896)
    Feb 6, 2018. Mr. Frelinghuysen moved that the House agree 
with an amendment to the Senate amendment.
    Feb 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 727, the 
House proceeded with 1 hour of debate on the motion that the 
House agree in the Senate amendment to H.R. 1892 with an 
amendment.
    Feb 6, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant to 
the rule.
    Feb 6, 2018. On motion that the House agree with an 
amendment to the Senate amendment Agreed to by the Yeas and 
Nays: 245-182 (Roll no. 60). (text of House amendment to Senate 
amendment: CR H834-888)
    Feb 6, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Feb 7, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate and 
at desk: House amendment to Senate amendment.
    Feb 7, 2018. Motion to proceed to consideration of the 
House message to accompany H.R. 1892 agreed to in Senate by 
Voice Vote.
    Feb 7, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by motion. 
(consideration: CR S699-700)
    Feb 7, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1892 with an 
amendment (SA 1930) made in Senate.
    Feb 7, 2018. S.AMDT.1930 Amendment SA 1930 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S699-700) In the nature 
of a substitute.
    Feb 7, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1892 with an 
amendment (SA 1930) presented in Senate. (CR S699)
    Feb 7, 2018. S.AMDT.1931 Amendment SA 1931 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 1930. (consideration: CR 
S699-700) To change the enactment date.
    Feb 7, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to Senate 
Committee on Appropriations the House message to accompany H.R. 
1892 with instructions to report back forthwith with the 
following amendment (SA 1932) made in Senate. (CR S699)
    Feb 7, 2018. S.AMDT.1932 Amendment SA 1932 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S700) To change the 
enactment date.
    Feb 7, 2018. S.AMDT.1933 Amendment SA 1933 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 1932 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer). (consideration: CR S700)
    Of a perfecting nature.
    Feb 7, 2018. S.AMDT.1934 Amendment SA 1934 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 1933. (consideration: CR 
S700) Of a perfecting nature.
    Feb 8, 2018. Motion to proceed to consideration of the 
House message to accompany H.R. 1892 agreed to in Senate by 
Voice Vote. (consideration: CR S799-838)
    Feb 8, 2018. S.AMDT.1930 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S799)
    Feb 8, 2018. S.AMDT.1931 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S799)
    Feb 8, 2018. S.AMDT.1932 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S799)
    Feb 8, 2018. S.AMDT.1933 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S799)
    Feb 8, 2018. S.AMDT.1934 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S799)
    Feb 8, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S799-838)
    Feb 8, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Con. Res. 
104, enrollment corrections on H.R. 1892 have been made.
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1930 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S847)
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1931 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S847)
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1932 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S847)
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1933 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S847)
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1934 Considered by Senate (Message from 
the House considered). (consideration: CR S847)
    Feb 9, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S847-849)
    Feb 9, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 1892 with an 
amendment (SA 1930) invoked in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 73--26. 
Record Vote Number: 30.
    Feb 9, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to Senate 
Committee on Appropriations the House message to accompany H.R. 
1892 with instructions to report back forthwith with the 
following amendment (SA 1932) fell when cloture invoked on the 
motion to concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment 
to H.R. 1892 with an amendment (SA 1930) in Senate.
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1932 SA 1932 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer) fell when cloture invoked on the motion to 
concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 
1892 with an amendment (SA 1930).
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1933 SA 1933 fell when SA 1932 fell.
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1934 SA 1934 fell when SA 1933 fell.
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1931 Proposed amendment SA 1931 
withdrawn in Senate. (consideration: CR S849)
    Feb 9, 2018. Senate concurred in the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 1892 with an amendment (SA 1930) by 
Yea-Nay Vote. 71-28. Record Vote Number: 31.
    Feb 9, 2018. S.AMDT.1930 Amendment SA 1930 agreed to in 
Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 71-28. Record Vote Number: 31.
    Feb 9, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Feb 9, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 734, Mr. 
Frelinghuysen brought up H.R. 1892 and offered a motion. 
(consideration: CR 2/8/2018 H1002-1071)
    Feb 9, 2018. Mr. Frelinghuysen moved that the House agree 
to the Senate amendment to the House amendment to the Senate 
amendment.
    Feb 9, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 734, the 
House proceeded with 1 hour of debate on the motion that the 
House agree in the Senate amendment to the House amendment to 
the Senate amendment to H.R. 1892.
    Feb 9, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant to 
the rule.
    Feb 9, 2018. On motion that the House agree to the Senate 
amendment to the House amendment to the Senate amendment Agreed 
to by recorded vote: 240-186 (Roll no. 69). (text of Senate 
amendment to the House amendment to the Senate Amendment: CR 
H1002-1066)
    Feb 9, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Feb 9, 2018. Presented to President.
    Feb 9, 2018. Signed by President.
    Feb 9, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-123.

     Smithsonian National Zoological Park Central Parking Facility 
                           Authorization Act


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-178 (H.R. 4009)

Summary

    This bill authorizes the Board of Regents of the 
Smithsonian Institution to plan, design, and construct a 
central parking facility on National Zoological Park property 
in Washington, DC to improve visitor experience and multi-modal 
access to the park.
    The bill requires the parking facility to be constructed 
with funds from non-appropriated sources.

Legislative History

    Oct. 12, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Dec. 13, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on House 
Administration.
    April 25, 2018. Committee on House Administration 
discharged.
    April 25, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    April 25, 2018. Mr. Harper asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    April 25, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H3520-3521)
    April 25, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR H3520-3521)
    April 25, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Rules and Administration.
    May 16, 2018. Senate Committee on Rules and Administration 
discharged by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2732-2733)
    May 16, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    May 17, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    May 21, 2018. Presented to President.
    June 1, 2018. Signed by President.
    June 1, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-178.

To Designate the Federal Building and United States Courthouse Located 
  at 1300 Victoria Street in Laredo, Texas, as the ``George P. Kazen 
            Federal Building and United States Courthouse''


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-221 (S. 2734)

Summary

    This bill designates the federal building and U.S. 
courthouse located at 1300 Victoria Street in Laredo, Texas, as 
the ``George P. Kazen Federal Building and United States 
Courthouse''.

Legislative History

    Apr. 24, 2018. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works. (text of measure as introduced: 
CR S2393)
    May 22, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    May 23, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Reported by Senator Barrasso without amendment. Without written 
report.
    May 23, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 430.
    June 7, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S3390; text: CR S3390)
    June 7, 2018. Received in the House.
    June 7, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    June 8, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    July 16, 2018. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    July 16, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6223-6224)
    July 16, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 2734.
    July 16, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6223)
    July 16, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 19, 2018. Presented to President.
    July 27, 2018. Signed by President.
    July 27, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-221.

  To Designate the J. Marvin Jones Federal Building and Courthouse In 
Amarillo, Texas, as the ``J. Marvin Jones Federal Building and Mary Lou 
                  Robinson United States Courthouse''


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-242 (H.R. 5772)

Summary

    Designates that the Federal Building and Courthouse located 
at 205 SE 5th Ave., Amarillo, Texas, shall be known and 
designated as the `J. Marvin Jones Federal Building and Mary 
Lou Robinson United States Courthouse'.

Legislative History

    May 11, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    July 16, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-819.
    July 16, 2018. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
167.
    July 16, 2018. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    July 16, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6221-6222)
    July 16, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 5772.
    July 16, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6221)
    July 16, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 17, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Reported by Senator Barrasso without amendment. Without written 
report.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 551.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S6032)
    Sep. 5, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 6, 2018. Presented to President.
    Sep. 18, 2018. Signed by President.
    Sep. 18, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-242.

                    FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-254 (H.R. 302)

            DIVISION D--DISASTER RECOVERY REFORM (H.R. 4460)

Summary

            DIVISION D--DISASTER RECOVERY REFORM ACT OF 2018

    Section 1201. Short title.
    This section establishes this division as the ``Disaster 
Recovery Reform Act of 2018''.
    Section 1202. Applicability.
    This section provides definitions for the subtitle.
    Section 1203. Definitions.
    This section provides definitions for the subtitle.
    Section 1204. Wildfire prevention.
    This section aids states affected by wildfires with hazard 
mitigation assistance.
    Section 1205. Additional activities.
    This section allows hazard mitigation assistance to be used 
for activities that help reduce the risk of future damage, 
hardship, loss, or suffering in any area affected by a wildfire 
or windstorm.
    Section 1206. Eligibility for code implementation and 
enforcement.
    This section amends the Stafford Act to provide assistance 
to state and local governments for building code and flood 
plain management.
    Section 1207. Program improvements.
    This section makes improvements to the Robert T. Stafford 
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act, 
Public Law 93-288) programs such as streamlining provisions to 
speed up recovery and improve facilitation of hazard 
mitigation.
    Section 1208. Prioritization of facilities.
    This section establishes guidance and training on 
responding to special needs facilities.
    Section 1209. Guidance on evacuation routes.
    This section requires the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) and the Federal Highway Administration to develop 
guidance on evacuation routes.
    Section 1210. Duplication of benefits.
    This section provides for waiver flexibility to incentivize 
recovery and ensure victims of disaster can receive disaster 
assistance faster. The section also clarifies the eligibility 
of projects under hazard mitigation assistance.
    Section 1211. State administration of assistance for direct 
temporary housing and permanent housing construction.
    This section authorizes states to use federal disaster 
assistance to directly administer temporary and permanent 
housing assistance for disaster victims.
    Section 1212. Assistance to individuals and households.
    This section amends the Stafford Act to account for 
necessary costs in the amount of assistance available to 
individuals with disabilities.
    Section 1213. Multifamily lease and repair assistance.
    This section amends the Stafford Act to allow greater 
flexibility and options for housing disaster victims.
    Section 1214. Private nonprofit facility.
    This section clarifies eligibility under the definition of 
``private non-profit facility.''
    Section 1215. Management costs.
    This section amends the Stafford Act to establish fixed 
rates to reimburse states and local governments for direct and 
indirect administrative costs incurred to implement disaster 
recovery projects.
    Section 1216. Flexibility.
    This section allows for certain waivers related to disaster 
assistance debts only if such assistance was distributed based 
on an error by FEMA, there was no fault on behalf of the 
debtor, and the collection of the debt would be against equity 
and good conscience. This section also clarifies a three-year 
statute of limitations for FEMA to recover household and 
individual assistance and implements a statute of limitations 
recovery of assistance from recipients after a disaster where 
there is no evidence of fraud, waste, or abuse.
    Section 1217. Additional disaster assistance.
    This section helps improve the economic recovery of regions 
affected by hurricanes and other disasters.
    Section 1218. National veterinary emergency teams.
    This section establishes a pilot program for veterinarians 
to accompany urban search and rescue teams to take care of the 
search and rescue of canines and to provide guidance to 
communities on pet care and sheltering during disasters.
    Section 1219. Right of arbitration.
    This section clarifies and extends FEMA's dispute 
resolution process.
    Section 1220. Unified Federal environmental and historic 
preservation review section requires the FEMA Administrator 
(Administrator) to review the expedited inter-agency 
environmental and historic preservation review process and 
survey other agencies' categorical exclusions and requires the 
Administrator to issue regulations to implement any 
recommendations, including categorical exclusions, identified 
in the report and survey.
    Section 1221. Closeout incentives.
    This section allows the Administrator to develop incentives 
that would encourage state, local, and tribal governments to 
closeout expenditures and activities on a timely basis related 
to disaster or emergency assistance.
    Section 1222. Performance of services.
    This section provides for the Administrator to appoint 
temporary FEMA employees, after serving continuously for one 
year.
    Section 1223. Study to streamline and consolidate 
information collection.
    This section directs the FEMA Administrator, along with 
other appropriate federal agencies, to conduct a study and 
develop a plan and an innovative means for sharing information 
among disaster assistance agencies.
    Section 1224. Agency accountability.
    This section directs FEMA to provide regular reports 
regarding disaster spending, disaster contracts, and other 
related disaster activities.
    Section 1225. Audit of contracts.
    This section prohibits FEMA from reimbursing any contract 
that prohibits oversight or auditing.
    Section 1226. Inspector general audit of FEMA contracts for 
tarps and plastic sheeting.
    This section requires the IG to audit FEMA contracts for 
tarps and plastic sheeting in response to Hurricanes Irma and 
Maria in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.
    Section 1227. Relief organizations.
    This section clarifies and ensures certain relief 
organizations may provide assistance in disaster response.
    Section 1228. Guidance on inundated and submerged roads.
    This section ensures guidance is developed to allow FEMA to 
more accurately evaluate damages to inundated roads.
    Section 1229. Extension of assistance.
    This section extends assistance authorized under the 
Stafford Act related to Hurricanes Irma and Maria.
    Section 1230. Guidance and recommendations.
    This section requires the FEMA Administrator to provide 
recommendations on how common areas of condominiums and housing 
cooperatives may be eligible for disaster assistance.
    Section 1231. Guidance on hazard mitigation assistance.
    This section requires guidance to localities on upkeep of 
properties bought out pursuant to FEMA's mitigation program.
    Section 1232. Local impact.
    This section directs FEMA to appropriately weigh and 
consider severe local impact when evaluating whether to 
recommend a major disaster declaration.
    Section 1233. Additional hazard mitigation activities.
    This section allows hazard mitigation assistance to be used 
for activities that help reduce the risk of future damage, 
hardship, loss, or suffering in any area affected by 
earthquakes.
    Section 1234. National public infrastructure predisaster 
hazard mitigation.
    This section amends the Stafford Act to modify the 
predisaster hazard mitigation program to ensure investments are 
made before disaster strikes to minimize loss of life and 
reduce disaster costs.
    Section 1235. Additional mitigation activities.
    This section clarifies the activities eligible for hazard 
mitigation assistance under the Stafford Act.
    Section 1236. Guidance and training by FEMA on coordination 
of emergency response plans.
    This section requires the Administrator to provide guidance 
and training related to the coordination of emergency response 
plans for facilities that store hazardous materials.
    Section 1237. Certain recoupment prohibited.
    This section establishes the conditions under which 
disaster funding may be recouped by the agency.
    Section 1238. Federal assistance to individuals and 
households and nonprofit facilities.
    This section allows for the waiver of passport replacement 
fees for disaster victims.
    Section 1239. Cost of assistance estimates.
    This section requires the Administrator to review the 
factors considered in making a recommendation to the President 
for a disaster declaration.
    Section 1240. Report on insurance shortfalls.
    This section requires the Administrator to report on self-
insurance.
    Section 1241. Post disaster building safety assessment.
    This section requires the Administrator to issue guidance 
for building safety assessments that includes both architects 
and engineers.
    Section 1242. FEMA updates on national preparedness 
assessment.
    This section requires the Administrator to report on the 
national preparedness assessment of capability gaps.
    Section 1243. FEMA report on duplication in non-natural 
disaster preparedness grant programs.
    This section requires the Administrator to report on 
duplicative grant programs.
    Section 1244. Study and report.
    This section requires the Administrator to secure a report 
through the National Academy of Medicine.
    Section 1245. Review of assistance for damaged underground 
water infrastructure.
    This section requires the Administrator to review the 
eligibility of underground water infrastructure for disaster 
assistance.
    Section 1246. Extension.
    This section extends the implementation deadlines for 
certain activities.

Legislative History

    Sep. 26, 2018. House agreed to Senate amendment with an 
amendment pursuant to H. Res. 1082.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendment to Senate amendment.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion to proceed to consideration of 
measure agreed to in Senate by Voice Vote.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by motion.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 made in 
Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in 
the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 
presented in Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 with an 
amendment (SA 4026) made in Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Amendment SA 4026 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. To change the enactment date.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Amendment SA 4027 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4026. Of a perfecting nature.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation the 
House message to accompany H.R. 302 with instructions to report 
back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4028) made in 
Senate.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4028 Amendment SA 4028 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. To change the enactment date.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4029 Amendment SA 4029 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4028 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer). Of a perfecting nature.
    Sep. 28, 2018. S.AMDT.4030 Amendment SA 4030 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4029. Of a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4028 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4029 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4030 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6408)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6408-6416)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 invoked in Senate 
by Yea-Nay Vote. 90-7. Record Vote Number: 219. (CR S6409)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation the 
House message to accompany H.R. 302 with instructions to report 
back forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4028) fell when 
cloture was invoked on the motion to concur in the House 
amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 in Senate.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4028 SA 4028 fell when cloture was 
invoked on the motion to concur in the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 302.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4029 SA 4029 fell when SA 4028 fell.
    Oct. 1, 2018. S.AMDT.4030 SA 4030 fell when SA 4029 fell.
    Oct. 2, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6417)
    Oct. 2, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6417)
    Oct. 2, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6417-6428; S6428-6451)
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered).
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered).
    Oct. 3, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered).
    Oct. 3, 2018. Senate agreed to the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 302 by Yea-Nay Vote. 93-6. Record Vote 
Number: 220.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 with an 
amendment (SA 4026) was rendered moot when the motion to concur 
in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 302 was 
agreed to in Senate.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4026 SA 4026 fell when the motion to 
concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 
302 with an amendment (SA 4026) was rendered moot.
    Oct. 3, 2018. S.AMDT.4027 SA 4027 fell when SA 4026 fell.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 4, 2018. Presented to the President.
    Oct. 5, 2018. Signed by the President.
    Oct. 5, 2018. Became Public Law No. 114-254.

 To Designate the United States Courthouse Located at 300 South Fourth 
   Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as the ``Diana E. Murphy United 
                          States Courthouse''


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-270 (S. 3021)

        SECTION 4315--DIANA E. MURPHY UNITED STATES COURTHOUSE.

Summary

    Section 4315 of S. 3021 designates the U.S. courthouse at 
300 South Fourth Street in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as the 
``Diana E. Murphy United States Courthouse.''

Legislative History

    June 7, 2018. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Reported by Senator Barrasso without amendment and without 
written report.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 550.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S6032; text: CR S6032)
    Sep. 5, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Received in the House.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Mr. Shuster moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H8184-8228)
    Sep. 13, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 3021.
    Sep. 13, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H8185-8221)
    Sep. 13, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 13, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    Sep. 17, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendments to Senate bill.
    Oct. 6, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S6697-6698)
    Oct. 6, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendments to S. 3021 made in Senate.
    Oct. 6, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in the 
House amendments to S. 3021 presented in Senate. (CR S6697-
6698)
    Oct. 6, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 3021 with an amendment (SA 4048) made in 
Senate.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Amendment SA 4048 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S6698; text: CR S6698) To 
change the enactment date.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 Amendment SA 4049 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4048. (consideration: CR 
S6698; text: CR S6698) Of a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 6, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works the House 
message to accompany S. 3021 with instructions to report back 
forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4050) made in 
Senate.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4050 Amendment SA 4050 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S6698; text: CR S6698) To 
change the enactment date.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4051 Amendment SA 4051 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4050 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer). (consideration: CR S6698; text: CR S6698) Of 
a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4052 Amendment SA 4052 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4051. (consideration: CR 
S6698; text: CR S6698) Of a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 9, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6703-6719)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4050 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4051 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4052 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendments to S. 3021 invoked in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 96-3. 
Record Vote Number: 224. (CR S6714-6715)
    Oct. 9, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works the House 
message to accompany S. 3021 with instructions to report back 
forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4050) fell when 
cloture was invoked on the motion to concur in the House 
amendments to S. 3021 in Senate.
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4050 SA 4050 fell when cloture invoked 
on the motion to concur in the House amendments to S. 3021.
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4051 SA 4051 fell when SA 4050 fell.
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4052 SA 4052 fell when SA 4051 fell.
    Oct. 10, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 3021 with an amendment (SA 4048) was 
withdrawn.
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Proposed amendment SA 4048 
withdrawn in Senate. (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 SA 4049 fell when SA 4048 
withdrawn.
    Oct. 10, 2018. Senate agreed to the House amendments to S. 
3021 by Yea-Nay Vote. 99-1. Record Vote Number: 225.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 12, 2018. Presented to President.
    Oct. 23, 2018. Signed by President.
    Oct. 23, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-270.

  Substance Use-Disorder Prevention That Promotes Opioid Recovery and 
               Treatment for Patients and Communities Act


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-271 (H.R. 6)

Summary

    H.R. 6 makes a variety of changes to law to address the 
opioid crisis, including changes to medicare, medicaid, and 
other health services and programs. This bill also incorporates 
the provisions of H.R. 5294, the Treating Barriers to 
Prosperity Act, which was referred to and reported out of the 
Committee. The Treating Barriers to Prosperity Act clarifies 
the role of the Appalachian Regional Commission in addressing 
the impact of opioids on economic development and job growth in 
distressed communities in Appalachia.

Legislative History

    June 7, 2018. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works.
    June 13, 2018. Referred to the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce, and in addition to the Committees on Ways and Means, 
and the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned.
    June 19, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 949 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6, 
H.R. 5797 and H.R. 6082. Rule provides for consideration of 
H.R. 6 and H.R. 5797 under structured rules; and provides for 
consideration of H.R. 6082 under a closed rule. Additionally, 
the rule directs the Clerk to, in the engrossment of H.R. 6, 
add the text of H.R. 2851, H.R. 5735, and H.R. 5797 as passed 
by the House as a new matter at the end of H.R. 6.
    June 21, 2018. Mr. Burgess asked unanimous consent that, 
notwithstanding H. Res. 949, during consideration of H.R. 6 
pursuant to such resolution, general debate shall not exceed 
one hour, with 40 minutes equally divided and controlled by the 
chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce and 20 minutes equally divided and controlled by 
the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Ways 
and Means.
    June 22, 2018. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 949. (consideration: CR H5511-5572)
    June 22, 2018. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6, 
H.R. 5797 and H.R. 6082. Rule provides for consideration of 
H.R. 6 and H.R. 5797 under structured rules; and provides for 
consideration of H.R. 6082 under a closed rule. Additionally, 
the rule directs the Clerk to, in the engrossment of H.R. 6, 
add the text of H.R. 2851, H.R. 5735, and H.R. 5797 as passed 
by the House as a new matter at the end of H.R. 6.
    June 22, 2018. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
949 and Rule XVIII.
    June 22, 2018. The Speaker designated the Honorable Don 
Bacon to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    June 22, 2018. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with 
one hour of general debate on H.R. 6.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.797 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Walden. (consideration: CR H5560-5561; text: CR H5560-5561) An 
amendment numbered 1 printed in Part B of House Report 115-766 
to call for Medicaid, Medicare, and public health reforms to 
help combat the opioid crisis.
    June 22, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 949, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Walden amendment No. 1.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.797 On agreeing to the Walden 
amendment (A001) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 22, 2018. The Committee resumed its sitting.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.798 Amendment (A002) offered by Mr. 
Dunn. (consideration: CR H5561-5562; text: CR H5561) An 
amendment numbered 2 printed in Part B of House Report 115-766 
to strike language expanding the classes of health care workers 
who are authorized to dispense narcotics for narcotic 
treatment.
    June 22, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 949, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Dunn amendment No. 2.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.798 By unanimous consent, the Dunn 
amendment was withdrawn.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.799 Amendment (A003) offered by Mr. 
Barton. (consideration: CR H5562-5563; text: CR H5562-5563) An 
amendment numbered 3 printed in Part B of House Report 115-766 
to direct the Commissioner of Food and Drugs to develop high-
quality, evidence-based opioid analgesic prescribing guidelines 
for the indication-specific treatment of acute pain. In 
developing such guidelines, it requires the Commissioner of 
Food and Drugs to gather input through a public workshop and 
comment period, and to provide a report to Congress on how such 
guidelines will be used to protect the public health.
    June 22, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 949, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Barton amendment No. 3.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.799 On agreeing to the Barton 
amendment (A003) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.800 Amendment (A004) offered by Mr. 
Curtis. (consideration: CR H5564; text: CR H5564) An amendment 
numbered 4 printed in Part B of House Report 115-766 to require 
a report from HHS on opioid prescribing practices and opioid 
misuse during pregnancy, and evaluating non-opiate pain 
management practices during pregnancy.
    June 22, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 949, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Curtis amendment No. 4.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.800 On agreeing to the Curtis 
amendment (A004) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.801 Amendment (A005) offered by Mr. 
Keating. (consideration: CR H5565; text: CR H5565) An amendment 
numbered 5 printed in Part B of House Report 115-766 to direct 
HHS to issue guidelines for prescribing naloxone in situations 
involving any type of prescription or illicit opioid use.
    June 22, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 949, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Keating amendment No. 5.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.801 On agreeing to the Keating 
amendment (A005) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.802 Amendment (A006) offered by Ms. 
Waters, Maxine. (consideration: CR H5566-5567; text: CR H5566) 
An amendment numbered 7 printed in Part B of House Report 115-
766 to direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) 
to conduct a survey of organizations that provide substance 
abuse treatment services. Under the amendment, HHS is required 
to develop, and submit to Congress, a plan to direct 
appropriate resources to address inadequacies in services or 
funding for specific types of drug addictions identified 
through the survey.
    June 22, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 949, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Maxine Waters amendment No. 7.
    June 22, 2018. H.AMDT.802 On agreeing to the Waters, Maxine 
amendment (A006) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 22, 2018. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 6.
    June 22, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    June 22, 2018. The House adopted the amendments en gross as 
agreed to by the Committee of the Whole House on the state of 
the Union.
    June 22, 2018. Mr. Tonko moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committees on Energy and Commerce and Ways 
and Means. (consideration: CR H5567-5572; text: CR H5567-5570)
    June 22, 2018. The House proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the motion to recommit with instructions. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill 
to be reported back to the House with an amendment to add 2 
sections to the bill titled ``Distribution of Additional 
Residency Positions to Help Combat Opioid Crisis'' and 
``Funding for Opioid Grant Program for State Response to Opioid 
Abuse Crisis''.
    June 22, 2018. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    June 22, 2018. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 185-226 (Roll no. 287).
    June 22, 2018. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 396-
14 (Roll no. 288). (text: CR H5522-5560)
    June 22, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 25, 2018. Received in the Senate. Read the first time. 
Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under Read the First 
Time.
    June 26, 2018. Read the second time. Placed on Senate 
Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 485.
    Sep. 17, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S6159-6180)
    Sep. 17, 2018. S.AMDT.4013 Amendment SA 4013 proposed by 
Senator Portman for Senator Alexander. (consideration: CR 
S6180; text: CR 9/6/2018 S6063-6099) In the nature of a 
substitute.
    Sep. 17, 2018. S.AMDT.4013 Amendment SA 4013 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Sep. 17, 2018. Passed Senate with an amendment by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 99-1. Record Vote Number: 210.
    Sep. 18, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 28, 2018. House agreed to Senate amendment with an 
amendment pursuant to H. Res. 1099.
    Oct. 1, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendment to Senate amendment.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Motion by Senator Thune to concur in the 
House amendment to the Senate amendment to H.R. 6 made in 
Senate.
    Oct. 3, 2018. Senate agreed to the House amendment to the 
Senate amendment to H.R. 6. by Yea-Nay Vote. 98-1. Record Vote 
Number: 221.
    Oct. 4, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 16, 2018. Presented to President.
    Oct. 24, 2018. Signed by President.
    Oct. 24, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-271.

 National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization Act of 
                                  2018


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-307 (S. 1768)

Summary

    This bill amends the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 
1977 to expand activities under the National Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Program to include: (1) gathering information on 
community resilience (i.e., the ability of a community to 
prepare for, recover from, and adapt to earthquakes); (2) 
publishing a systematic set of maps of active faults and folds, 
liquefaction susceptibility, susceptibility for earthquake-
induced landslides, and other seismically induced hazards; and 
(3) continuing the development of the Advanced National Seismic 
System, including earthquake early warning capabilities.
    With respect to earthquake hazard reduction activities, the 
bill revises or expands the duties of: (1) the Interagency 
Coordinating Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction, (2) the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), (3) the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), (4) the U.S. 
Geological Survey (USGS), and (5) the National Science 
Foundation.
    The Government Accountability Office shall complete a 
review of risks posed by earthquakes to the United States.
    NIST and FEMA must jointly convene a committee of experts 
to assess and recommend options for improving seismic safety 
standards for federal buildings. The USGS must submit to 
Congress a five-year management plan for the continued 
operation of the Advanced National Seismic System.

Legislative History

    Sep. 6, 2018. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    Dec. 13, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute favorably.
    Sep. 6, 2018. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune with an amendment in 
the nature of a substitute. With written report No. 115-336.
    Sep. 6, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 568.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S6364)
    Sep. 27, 2018. The committee substitute withdrawn by 
Unanimous Consent. (CR S6364)
    Sep. 27, 2018. S.AMDT.4025 Amendment SA 4025 proposed by 
Senator Perdue for Senator Feinstein. (consideration: CR S6365; 
text: CR S6364)
    In the nature of substitute.
    Sep. 27, 2018. S.AMDT.4025 Amendment SA 4025 agreed to in 
Senate by Unanimous Consent.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Received in the House.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Mr. Rohrabacher moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    Nov. 27, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 1768.
    Nov. 27, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 29, 2018. Presented to President.
    Dec. 11, 2018. Signed by the President, Public Law 115-307.

To Designate the Federal Building and United States Courthouse Located 
at 200 West 2nd Street in Dayton, Ohio, as the ``Walter H. Rice Federal 
                Building and United States Courthouse''


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-312 (S. 2377)

Summary

    This bill designates the federal building and U.S. 
courthouse located at 200 West 2nd Street in Dayton, Ohio, as 
the ``Walter H. Rice Federal Building and United States 
Courthouse.''

Legislative History

    Feb. 6, 2018. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works.
    May 22, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    05/23/2018 Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Reported by Senator Barrasso without amendment. Without written 
report.
    May 23, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 429.
    June 7, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (CR S3390; text: CR S3390).
    Jun. 7, 2018. Received in the House. Referred to the House 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Jun 8, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.
    Nov. 30, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged. 
Considered by unanimous consent. (consideration: CR H9748) On 
passage Passed without objection. (text: CR H9748) Motion to 
reconsider laid on the table Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 6, 2018. Presented to President.
    Dec. 13, 2018. Signed by the President, Public Law 115-312.

   Authorizing the Use of the Capitol Grounds for the National Peace 
 Officers Memorial Service and the National Honor Guard and Pipe Band 
                               Exhibition


                            H. CON. RES. 35

Summary

    Authorizes use of the Capitol Grounds on May 14, 2017 for 
the National Honor Guard and Pipe Band Exhibition, to allow law 
enforcement representatives to exhibit their ability to 
demonstrate Honor Guard programs and provide for a bag pipe 
exhibition and on May 15, 2017 for the 36th Annual National 
Peace Officers' Memorial Service, to honor the law enforcement 
officers who died in the line of duty during 2016.

Legislative History

    Mar. 21, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-87.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
38.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Congressman A. Drew Ferguson IV (R-GA) moved 
to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2820-2821)
    Apr. 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H. Con. Res. 35.
    Apr. 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and agree to 
the resolution Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H2820)
    Apr. 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table. 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2017. Received in the Senate.
    Apr. 27, 2017. Resolution agreed to in Senate without 
amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2630)
    Apr. 28, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.

 Authorizing the Use of the Capitol Grounds for the Greater Washington 
                             Soap Box Derby


                            H. CON. RES. 36

Summary

    H. Con. Res. 36 authorizes the use of the Capitol Grounds 
for the Greater Washington Soap Box Derby Association to 
sponsor the Greater Washington Soapbox Derby qualifying races 
on June 17, 2017. Participants range in age from eight to 17 
and come from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Under 
conditions prescribed by the Architect of the Capitol and the 
Capitol Police Board, the event will be free of admission 
charge, open to the public, and arranged not to interfere with 
the needs of Congress. The event sponsor assumes responsibility 
for all expenses and liabilities incident to all activities 
associated with the event.

Legislative History

    Mar. 21, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-86.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
37.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Congressman A. Drew Ferguson IV (R-GA) moved 
to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2821-2822)
    Apr. 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H. Con. Res. 36.
    Apr. 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and agree to 
the resolution Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H2821)
    Apr. 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table. 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2017. Received in the Senate.
    Apr. 27, 2017. Resolution agreed to in Senate without 
amendment by Unanimous Consent.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.

Authorizing the Use of the Capitol Grounds for the District of Columbia 
               Special Olympics Law Enforcement Torch Run


                            H. CON. RES. 69

Summary

    H. Con. Res. 69 authorizes the use of the Capitol Grounds 
for the District of Columbia Special Olympics Law Enforcement 
Torch Run on October 6, 2017. This annual event draws law 
enforcement personnel together to support the athletes and 
programs of Special Olympics DC. The support from federal, 
military, and metropolitan agencies showcases the loyalty and 
commitment to the athletes of the District of Columbia.

Legislative History

    July 20, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    July 27, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Sep. 1, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-285.
    Sep. 1, 2017. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
77.
    Sep. 5, 2017. Mr. Barletta asked unanimous consent to take 
from the Speaker's table and consider.
    Sep. 5, 2017. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H6644-6645)
    Sep. 5, 2017. On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to 
without objection. (text: CR H6645)
    Sep. 5, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Sep. 6, 2017. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    Sep. 7, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S5077)
    Sep. 7, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.

 Authorizing the Use of the Capitol Grounds for the Greater Washington 
                             Soap Box Derby


                            H. CON. RES. 113

Summary

    H. Con. Res. 113 authorizes the use of the Capitol Grounds 
for the Greater Washington Soap Box Derby Association to 
sponsor the Greater Washington Soapbox Derby qualifying races 
on June 16, 2018. Participants range in age from eight to 17 
and come from the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. Under 
conditions prescribed by the Architect of the Capitol and the 
Capitol Police Board, the event will be free of admission 
charge, open to the public, and arranged not to interfere with 
the needs of Congress. The event sponsor assumes responsibility 
for all expenses and liabilities incident to all activities 
associated with the event.

Legislative History

    Mar. 9, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    May 22, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-701.
    May 22, 2018. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
147.
    May 22, 2018. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
agree to the resolution.
    May 22, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H4319-4320)
    May 22, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H. Con. Res. 113.
    May 22, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and agree to 
the resolution Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H4319-4320)
    May 22, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    May 23, 2018. Received in the Senate.
    June 5, 2018. Resolution agreed to in Senate without 
amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2997)
    June 6, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.

   Authorizing the Use of the Capitol Grounds for the National Peace 
 Officers Memorial Service and the National Honor Guard and Pipe Band 
                               Exhibition


                            H. CON. RES. 115

Summary

    Authorizes use of the Capitol Grounds on May 15, 2018 for 
the National Honor Guard and Pipe Band Exhibition, to allow law 
enforcement representatives to exhibit their ability to 
demonstrate Honor Guard programs and provide for a bag pipe 
exhibition and on May 15, 2017 for the 36th Annual National 
Peace Officers' Memorial Service, to honor the law enforcement 
officers who died in the line of duty during 2016.

Legislative History

    Mar. 16, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 17, 2018. Mr. Barletta asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    Apr. 17, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Apr. 17, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H3381)
    Apr. 17, 2018. On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to 
without objection. (text: CR H3381)
    Apr. 17, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Received in the Senate.
    Apr. 19, 2018. Resolution agreed to in Senate without 
amendment by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: CR S2330)
    Apr. 23, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.

   Designating the Democratic Cloakroom in the Hall of the House of 
  Representatives as the ``Gabrielle Giffords-Leo J. Ryan Cloakroom''


                              H. RES. 615

Summary

    Honors: (1) the work and public service of Congresswoman 
Gabrielle Giffords, and (2) the legacy of Congressman Leo J. 
Ryan and the bravery of Congressman Ryan and his team members 
for undertaking a dangerous fact-finding mission in Guyana. 
Extends condolences to those affected by the mass shooting in 
Tucson, Arizona, on January 8, 2011, and by the tragedy in 
Jonestown, Guyana, on November 18, 1978. Designates the 
Democratic Cloakroom in the Hall of the House of 
Representatives in the U.S. Capitol as the ``Gabrielle 
Giffords-Leo J. Ryan Cloakroom.''

Legislative History

    Nov. 14, 2017. Mr. Shuster asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Committee on House Administration 
discharged.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Committee on Foreign Affairs discharged.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9199-9200)
    Nov. 14, 2017. On agreeing to the resolution Agreed to 
without objection. (text: CR H9199-9200)
    Nov. 14, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.

 Designating Room H-226 of the United States Capitol as the ``Lincoln 
                                 Room''


                              H. RES. 1063

Summary

    Honors the service of President Abraham Lincoln and his 
service to the Country including his time in the House of 
Representatives representing the 7th District of Illinois. 
Designates room H-226 as the ``Lincoln Room''.

Legislative History

    Sep 14, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Expected to be considered in the House under 
Suspension of the Rules.

                         Pending in the Senate


                      Financial CHOICE Act of 2017


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 10)

Summary

    This bill amends the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and 
Consumer Protection Act, among other Acts, to: repeal Volcker 
Rule restrictions on certain speculative investments by banks; 
with respect to winding down failing banks, eliminate the 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation's orderly liquidation 
authority and establish new provisions regarding financial 
institution bankruptcy; and repeal Durbin Amendment limitations 
on fees that may be charged to retailers for debit card 
processing.
    Certain banks may exempt themselves from specified 
regulatory standards if they maintain a certain ratio of 
capital to total assets and meet other specified requirements.
    The bill removes the Financial Stability Oversight 
Council's authority to designate non-bank financial 
institutions and financial market utilities as ``systemically 
important'' (also known as ``too big to fail''). Under current 
law, entities so designated are subject to additional 
regulatory restrictions. Designations made previously are 
retroactively repealed.
    The bill also amends the Consumer Financial Protection Act 
of 2010 to: convert the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau 
into a consumer law enforcement agency; subject the agency to 
the congressional appropriations process, expanded judicial 
review, and additional congressional oversight; eliminate 
supervisory authority over financial institutions; and limit 
the agency's authority to take action against entities for 
abusive practices.
    In addition, the bill: modifies provisions related to the 
Securities and Exchange Commission's managerial structure and 
enforcement authority; eliminates the Office of Financial 
Research within the Department of the Treasury; and revises 
provisions related to capital formation, insurance regulation, 
civil penalties for securities laws violations, and community 
financial institutions.

Legislative History

    Apr. 27, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    May 2, 2017. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held.
    May 3, 2017. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held.
    May 4, 2017. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held, ordered reported (amended) by the Yeas and Nays: 34-26.
    May 25, 2017. Reported (amended) by the Committee on 
Financial Services. H. Rept. 115-153, Part I.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on Agriculture discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on Ways and Means discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on the Judiciary discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on Oversight and Government 
discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on Rules discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on the Budget discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Committee on Education and the Workforce 
discharged.
    May 25, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
100.
    June 2, 2017. Supplemental report filed by the Committee on 
Financial Services, H. Rept. 115-153, Part II.
    June 6, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 375 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 10 
with 1 hour and 30 minutes of general debate. Previous question 
shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions 
except motion to recommit with or without instructions. Measure 
will be considered read. Specified amendments are in order.
    June 7, 2016. Rule H. Res. 375 passed House.
    June 8, 2017. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 375. (consideration: CR H4716-4802)
    June 8, 2017. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 10 
with 1 hour and 30 minutes of general debate. Previous question 
shall be considered as ordered without intervening motions 
except motion to recommit with or without instructions. Measure 
will be considered read. Specified amendments are in order.
    June 8, 2017. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
375 and Rule XVIII.
    June 8, 2017. The Speaker designated the Honorable Steve 
Womack to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    June 8, 2017. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with 
ninety minutes of general debate on H.R. 10.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.128 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Hensarling. (consideration: CR H4789-4791, H4799; text: CR 
H4789) Amendment revises provisions subjecting certain FDIC and 
NCUA functions to congressional appropriations, relating to 
appointments of positions created by the Act, and providing 
congressional access to non-public FSOC information.
    June 8, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 375, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Hensarling Part B amendment No. 1.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.129 Amendment (A002) offered by Mr. 
Hollingsworth. (consideration: CR H4791-4793, H4799-4800; text: 
CR H4791) Amendment allows closed-end funds that are listed on 
a national securities exchange, and that meet certain 
requirements to be considered ``well-known seasoned issuers'' 
or ``WKSIs''.
    June 8, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 375, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Hollingsworth Part B amendment No. 2.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.130 Amendment (A003) offered by Mr. 
Smucker. (consideration: CR H4793-4794; text: CR H4793) An 
amendment numbered 3 printed in Part B of House Report 115-163 
to express the sense of Congress that consumer reporting 
agencies and their subsidiaries should implement stronger 
multi-factor authentication procedures when providing access to 
personal information files to more adequately protect consumer 
information from identity theft.
    June 8, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 375, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Smucker Part B amendment No. 3.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.130 On agreeing to the Smucker 
amendment (A003) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.131 Amendment (A004) offered by Mr. 
Faso. (consideration: CR H4794-4796, H4800-4801; text: CR 
H4794) Amendment allows Mutual Holding Companies to waive the 
receipt of dividends.
    June 8, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 375, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Faso Part B amendment No. 4.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.132 Amendment (A005) offered by Ms. 
McSally. (consideration: CR H4796-4797; text: CR H4796-4797) An 
amendment numbered 5 printed in Part B of House Report 115-163 
to require the Department of Treasury to submit a report to 
Congress regarding its efforts to work with Federal bank 
regulators, financial institutions, and money service 
businesses to ensure that legitimate financial transactions 
along the southern border move freely.
    June 8, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 375, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the McSally Part B amendment No. 5.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.132 On agreeing to the McSally 
amendment (A005) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.133 Amendment (A006) offered by Mr. 
Buck. (consideration: CR H4797-4799, H4801; text: CR H4797-
4798) Amendment requires the GSA to study CLEA's real estate 
needs due to changes in the Agency's structure. It then 
authorizes the GSA to sell the current CLEA building if CLEA's 
real estate needs have changed and there is no government 
department or agency that can utilize the building.
    June 8, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 375, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Buck Part B amendment No. 6.
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.128 On agreeing to the Hensarling 
amendment (A001) Agreed to by recorded vote: 232-185 (Roll no. 
295).
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.129 On agreeing to the Hollingsworth 
amendment (A002) Agreed to by recorded vote: 231-180 (Roll no. 
296).
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.131 On agreeing to the Faso amendment 
(A004) Agreed to by recorded vote: 235-184 (Roll no. 297).
    June 8, 2017. H.AMDT.133 On agreeing to the Buck amendment 
(A006) Agreed to by recorded vote: 233-185 (Roll no. 298).
    June 8, 2017. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 10.
    June 8, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant to 
the rule. (consideration: CR H4801)
    June 8, 2017. The House adopted the amendment in the nature 
of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole 
House on the state of the Union. (text of amendment in the 
nature of a substitute: CR H4731-4789)
    June 8, 2017. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 233-
186 (Roll no. 299).
    June 8, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    June 12, 2017. Received in the Senate.
    June 13, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.
    July 13, 2017. Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban 
Affairs. Hearings held.

     First Responder Identification of Emergency Needs in Disaster 
                               Situations


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 58)

Summary

    This bill directs the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) to submit a report that describes select state and local 
programs and policies related to the preparedness and 
protection of first responders, which may include information 
on: the degree to which such programs and policies include 
consideration of the presence of a first responder's family in 
an area impacted by a terrorist attack; the availability of 
personal protective equipment for first responders; and the 
availability of home Medkits for first responders and their 
families for biological incident response.
    The GAO may provide information: (1) in a format that 
delineates high risk urban areas from rural communities; and 
(2) on the degree to which the selected state and local 
programs and policies were developed or are being executed with 
funding from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), 
including grants from the State Homeland Security Grant Program 
or the Urban Area Security Initiative.
    DHS shall consider the report's findings and assess its 
applicability for federal first responders.

Legislative History

    Jan. 4, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H772-775)
    Jan. 31, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 58.
    Jan. 31, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Feb. 1, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

  To Designate the United States Courthouse Located at 501 East Court 
 Street in Jackson, Mississippi, as the ``R. Jess Brown United States 
                              Courthouse''


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 455)

Summary

    H.R. 455 designates the United States courthouse located at 
501 East Court Street in Jackson, Mississippi, as the ``R. Jess 
Brown United States Courthouse''. R. Jess Brown was a civil 
rights lawyer who worked against segregationist laws and is 
credited with filing the first civil rights suit in 
Mississippi. Mr. Brown, a native of Muskogee, Oklahoma, 
attended Illinois State University, Indiana University, and the 
Texas Southern University Law School. In 1962, he represented 
James Meredith, whose successful lawsuit allowed him to be the 
first African-American student to enroll at the University of 
Mississippi. In 1948, Mr. Brown sued on behalf of black 
teachers in Jackson seeking salaries that were equal to those 
of white teachers. He later worked with the NAACP Legal Defense 
and Educational Fund in fighting discrimination in 
transportation and other public accommodations. R. Jess Brown 
died on December 31, 1989, due to cancer.

Legislative History

    Jan. 12, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-84.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
36.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Congressman A. Drew Ferguson IV (R-GA) moved 
to suspend the rules and pass the bill.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2822-2823)
    Apr. 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 455.
    Apr. 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H2822)
    Apr. 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

              Securing Access to Networks in Disasters Act


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 588)

Summary

    This bill requires the Federal Communications Commission 
(FCC) to submit to Congress and publish on the FCC website a 
study on the public safety benefits, technical feasibility, and 
cost of providing the public with access to 9-1-1 services 
during times of emergency when mobile service is unavailable, 
through: telecommunications service provider-owned WiFi access 
points and other communications technologies operating on 
unlicensed spectrum, without requiring any login credentials; 
non-telecommunications service provider-owned WiFi access 
points; and other alternative means.
    The types of emergencies subject to this bill are: (1) 
occasions or instances under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
Relief and Emergency Assistance Act for which the President 
determines that federal assistance is needed to supplement 
state and local efforts and capabilities to save lives and to 
protect property and public health and safety, or to lessen or 
avert the threat of a catastrophe in any part of the United 
States; or (2) an emergency declared by the governor of a state 
or U.S. territory.
    The Stafford Act is amended to expand the categories of 
essential service providers that may access a disaster site to 
restore and repair essential services in an emergency or major 
disaster without being denied or impeded by a federal agency. 
Services to be considered essential are wireline or mobile 
telephone service, Internet access service, radio or television 
broadcasting, cable service, or direct broadcast satellite 
service.

Legislative History

    Jan. 18, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Jan. 23, 2017. Congressman Rodney Davis (R-IL) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill.
    Jan. 23, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H579-581)
    Jan. 23, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 588.
    Jan. 23, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text of measure as passed: CR 
H579)
    Jan. 23, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Jan. 24, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

                 Fusion Center Enhancement Act of 2017


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 642)

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to 
revise provisions concerning the Department of Homeland 
Security (DHS) State, Local, and Regional Fusion Center 
Initiative. The bill renames it as the Department of Homeland 
Security Fusion Center Partnership Initiative and changes 
references to ``participating state, local, or regional fusion 
centers''' to references to the ``National Network of Fusion 
Centers,'' which is defined as a decentralized arrangement of 
fusion centers intended to enhance individual state and urban 
area fusion centers' ability to leverage the capabilities and 
expertise of all fusion centers for the purpose of enhancing 
analysis and homeland security information sharing nationally.
    The duties of the Secretary of Homeland Security with 
respect to the Initiative are revised to include: supporting 
the maturation and sustainment of the Network; reducing 
inefficiencies and maximizing the effectiveness of federal 
resource support to the Network; ensuring that support for the 
Network is included as a national priority in applicable 
homeland security grant guidance; ensuring that each fusion 
center in the Network has a privacy policy and a civil rights 
and civil liberties policy approved by DHS; coordinating the 
nationwide suspicious activity report initiative to ensure that 
information gathered by the Network is incorporated; ensuring 
that fusion centers in the Network are the primary focal points 
for the sharing of homeland security information, terrorism 
information, and weapons of mass destruction information with 
state, local, tribal, and territorial entities; and 
disseminating best practices on the appropriate levels for 
staffing at Network fusion centers of qualified representatives 
from state, local, tribal, and territorial law enforcement and 
emergency services, public health disciplines, and the private 
sector.
    The Under Secretary for Intelligence and Analysis must 
ensure that fusion centers in the Network have access to 
homeland security information sharing systems and that DHS 
personnel are deployed to support fusion centers in the Network 
in a manner consistent with DHS's mission and existing 
statutory limits.
    The Under Secretary shall negotiate memoranda of 
understanding between DHS and a state or local government 
regarding the exchange of information between DHS and Network 
fusion centers.
    The Under Secretary shall: (1) coordinate with appropriate 
federal officials to ensure the deployment to Network fusion 
centers of representatives of other federal agencies; and (2) 
report to specified congressional committees annually through 
2024 on the efforts of DHS components to enhance support 
provided to Network fusion centers.

Legislative History

    Jan. 24, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Mr. King (NY) moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Jan. 31, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H778-781)
    Jan. 31, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 642.
    Jan. 31, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on pages 
H779 and H780 of the Congressional Record.
    Jan. 31, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H778-779)
    Jan. 31, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Feb. 1, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

         Pacific Northwest Earthquake Preparedness Act of 2017


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 654)

Summary

    H.R. 654 directs the Administrator of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA) to carry out a plan for the purchase 
and installation of an earthquake early warning system for the 
Cascadia Subduction Zone. The bill also directs the President 
to establish an Earthquake and Tsunami Task Force to develop a 
comprehensive strategy and recommendations on how to prepare 
and plan for, mitigate against, respond to, recover from, and 
more successfully adapt to a seismic event in the Cascadia 
Subduction Zone and amends the Stafford Act to make certain 
earthquake early warning activities eligible for hazard 
mitigation assistance.

Legislative History

    Jan. 24, 2017. Sponsor introductory remarks on measure. (CR 
E91)
    Jan. 25, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-30.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
12.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2450-2452)
    Mar. 27, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 654.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H2454-2455)
    Mar. 27, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 395-11 (Roll no. 196). (text: CR H2450-2451)
    Mar. 27, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Mar. 28, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

             Fairness for Breastfeeding Mothers Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1174)

Summary

    H.R. 1174 provides for lactation rooms in public buildings. 
The bill requires federally controlled buildings open to the 
public to provide a place, other than a bathroom, to be made 
available to the public as a lactation area, if the building 
has such an area for employees and it is not deemed unfeasible.

Legislative History

    Feb. 16, 2017. Sponsor introductory remarks on measure. (CR 
E212)
    Feb. 17, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-24.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
10.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Mar. 7, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H1550-1553)
    Mar. 7, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1174.
    Mar. 7, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H1550)
    Mar. 7, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

                           Disaster SAVE Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1214)

Summary

    H.R. 1214 requires the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) to temporarily increase the simplified projects 
threshold for disaster assistance to $500,000. This increase is 
intended to streamline the efficient and effective delivery of 
assistance for small projects (under $500,000) without reducing 
oversight. The increase would sunset on September 30, 2021. 
FEMA must submit a report to Congress following the sunset date 
of the temporary increase.

Legislative History

    Feb. 27, 2016. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 28, 2017. Ordered reported.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-32.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
14.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2449-2450)
    Mar. 27, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1214.
    Mar. 27, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H2449)
    Mar. 27, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Mar. 28, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

       Terrorist and Foreign Fighter Travel Exercise Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1302)

Summary

    This bill requires the Department of Homeland Security 
(DHS) to develop and conduct an exercise related to the 
terrorist and foreign fighter threat in order to enhance 
domestic preparedness for and the collective response to 
terrorism, promote the dissemination of homeland security 
information, and test the U.S. security posture.
    Such exercise shall include: (1) a scenario involving 
persons traveling from the United States to join or provide 
material support or resources to a terrorist organization 
abroad and terrorist infiltration into the United States, 
including by U.S. citizens and foreign nationals; and (2) 
coordination with relevant federal agencies, foreign 
governments, and state, local, tribal, territorial, and private 
sector stakeholders.
    DHS shall submit an after-action report, including any 
identified or potential vulnerabilities in U.S. defenses and 
requested legislative changes.
    The bill amends the Post-Katrina Emergency Management 
Reform Act of 2006 to require the national exercise program (a 
program to test and evaluate the national preparedness goal, 
National Incident Management System, National Response Plan, 
and other related plans and strategies) to be designed to 
include exercises addressing emerging terrorist threats, such 
as such a scenario.

Legislative History

    Mar. 2, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Ordered to be Reported by Voice Vote.
    Mar. 16, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Homeland 
Security. H. Rept. 115-40.
    Mar. 16, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
20.
    Mar. 22, 2017. Ms. McSally moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Mar. 22, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2303-2304)
    Mar. 22, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1302.
    Mar. 22, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on Pages 
H779 and H780 of the Congressional Record.
    Mar. 24, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H2441-2442)
    Mar. 24, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H2303)
    Mar. 24, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Mar. 27, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

                   Homeland Security for Children Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1372)

Summary

    This bill requires the Department of Homeland Security's 
(DHS's) Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans to lead, conduct, 
and coordinate DHS-wide identification and integration of the 
needs of children into DHS's policies, programs, and 
activities, in coordination with relevant outside organizations 
and experts. The bill directs FEMA to identify and integrate 
the needs of children into activities to prepare for, protect 
against, respond to, recover from, and mitigate against the 
risk of natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man-
made disasters, including by appointing a technical expert to 
coordinate such integration.

Legislative History

    Mar. 7, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by the Committee 
on Homeland Security.
    Apr. 24, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Homeland Security. H. Rept. 115-92, Part I.
    Apr. 24, 2017. Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure discharged.
    Apr. 24, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
52.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Congressman Daniel M. Donovan, Jr. (R-NY) 
moved to suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules.
    Apr. 25, 2017. House proceeded with forty minutes of debate 
on H.R. 1372.
    Apr. 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

                  Disaster Declaration Improvement Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1665)

Summary

    H.R. 1665 directs the Administrator of FEMA to give greater 
weight and consideration to severe local impact when evaluating 
whether to recommend a major disaster declaration. The bill 
ensures a more level playing field for smaller communities 
impacted by severe disasters.

Legislative History

    Mar. 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-99.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
56.
    May 2, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    May 2, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H3019-3022)
    May 2, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1665.
    May 3, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H3089)
    May 3, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by recorded vote (\2/3\ required): 
425-0 (Roll no. 248). (text: CR 5/02/2017 H3019)
    May 3, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    May 4, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

     To Amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
  Assistance Act Concerning the Statute of Limitations for Actions To 
   Recover Disaster or Emergency Assistance Payments, and for Other 
                                Purposes


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1678)

Summary

    H.R. 1678 implements a statute of limitations on actions to 
recover assistance funds granted in the aftermath of a declared 
disaster. The bill reinstates a three-year statute of 
limitations on the Federal Emergency Management Agency's 
ability to reclaim funds from a recipient when there is no 
evidence of fraud, waste or abuse.

Legislative History

    Mar. 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-100.
    Apr. 28, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
57.
    May 2, 2017. Congressman Lou Barletta (R-PA) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    May 2, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H3023-3024)
    May 2, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1678.
    May 3, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H3307-3308)
    May 3, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by recorded vote (\2/3\ required): 
423-0 (Roll no. 250). (text: CR 5/02/2017 H3023)
    May 3, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    May 4, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

 Disaster Assistance Support for Communities and Homeowners Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1684)

Summary

    H.R. 1684 directs the Administrator FEMA to provide 
technical assistance to common interest communities (such as a 
homeowners association) on actions the common interest 
community may take to be eligible for certain disaster 
assistance. This bill also requires the Administrator of FEMA 
to provide recommendations on how common areas of condominiums 
and housing cooperatives may be eligible for disaster 
assistance.

Legislative History

    Mar. 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    June 26, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-193.
    June 26, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
132.
    June 26, 2017. Congressman Sam Graves (R-MO) moved to 
suspend the rules and pass the bill, as amended.
    June 26, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5144-5146)
    June 26, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1684.
    June 26, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H5144)
    June 26, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2017. Received in the Senate and read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

   Border Enforcement Security Task Force Reauthorization Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2281)

Summary

    This bill amends the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to DHS, 
before establishing a Border Enforcement Security Task Force 
(BEST) unit, to apply risk-based criteria that takes into 
consideration specified factors, including: whether the area in 
which the unit would be established is significantly impacted 
by threats posed by transnational criminal organizations; the 
extent to which the unit would advance DHS's homeland and 
border security strategic priorities and related objectives; 
and whether departmental Joint Task Force operations would be 
enhanced, improved, or otherwise assisted by the unit.
    The bill requires DHS to submit an annual report on the 
BEST program for the next five years, and such report must 
include: a description of the effectiveness of BEST in 
disrupting and dismantling transnational criminal 
organizations; an assessment of how BEST enhances information-
sharing, including the dissemination of homeland security 
information, among federal, state, local, tribal, and foreign 
law enforcement agencies; a description of how BEST advances 
DHS's homeland and border security strategic priorities and 
effectiveness of BEST in achieving related objectives; and an 
assessment of BEST's joint operational efforts with 
departmental Joint Task Force operations.

Legislative History

    May 2, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    May 3, 2017. Ordered Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Homeland Security by Voice Vote.
    May 16, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Homeland Security. H. Rept. 115-122.
    May 16, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
75.
    May 17, 2017. Mr. Katko moved to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill, as amended.
    May 17, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H4271-4273)
    May 17, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2281.
    May 17, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on Page 
H4272 of the Congressional Record.
    May 17, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H4271)
    May 17, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    May 18, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

                      Plum Island Preservation Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2182)

Summary

    This bill requires the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) to submit to Congress a report on alternatives for the 
final disposition of Plum Island, New York, including transfer 
to another government or nonprofit entity for education, 
research, or conservation purposes.
    This report must contain, for each alternative, an analysis 
of:
           the effect it would have on the island's 
        resources;
           remediation responsibilities under it;
           legislation necessary to implement it;
           possible implications and issues of 
        implementing it;
           potential costs, including costs of the 
        transition, hazard mitigation, and cleanup of property 
        that would be incurred by a recipient; and
           potential revenue.
    No action, including any pre-sale marketing activity, may 
be taken to carry out the requirement under current law for the 
General Services Administration to sell the property and assets 
that support Plum Island operations until at least 180 days 
after such report has been submitted.

Legislative History

    April 26, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Homeland 
Security.
    July 25, 2017. Mr. Donovan moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    July 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6239-6241)
    July 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2182.
    July 25, 2017. An Exchange of Letters was printed on Page 
H6240 of the Congressional Record.
    July 25, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6239)
    July 25, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2017. Received in the Senate.

                 Resilient Federal Forests Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2936)

Summary

    This bill shall apply whenever the Department concerned, 
either the Department of Agriculture for National Forest System 
(NFS) lands or the Department of the Interior for public lands, 
prepares an environmental assessment or an environmental impact 
statement pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 
1969 (NEPA) for specified forest management activities, 
including those that:
           will occur on lands identified as suitable 
        for timber production; or
           will occur on a landscape-scale area 
        designated by the Department concerned as part of an 
        insect and disease treatment program on NSF land 
        pursuant to the Healthy Forests Restoration Act of 
        2003, notwithstanding whether such activity is 
        initiated before September 30, 2018.
    In such an environmental assessment or environmental impact 
statement, the Department concerned shall study, develop, and 
describe only these two alternatives:
           the forest management activity, and
           the alternative of no action.
    In the case of the alternative of no action, the Department 
concerned shall evaluate:
           the effect of no action on forest health, 
        habitat diversity, wildfire potential, insect and 
        disease potential, and timber production; and
           the implications of a resulting decline in 
        forest health, loss of habitat diversity, wildfire, or 
        insect or disease infestation on domestic water supply 
        in the project area, wildlife habitat loss, and other 
        economic and social factors.
    The bill establishes categorical exclusions regarding 
certain other forest management actions.
    A process is established for declaration of a major 
disaster for wildfire on federal lands managed by specified 
federal land management agencies.

Legislative History

    June 21, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    June 27, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by the 
Committee on Natural Resources by a vote of 23-12.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Agriculture. H. Rept. 115-370, Part I.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Natural Resources. H. Rept. 115-370, Part II.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Committee on Education and the Workforce 
discharged.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
271.
    Oct. 31, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 595 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 2936 
with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be 
considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion 
to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be 
considered read. Specified amendments are in order.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Rule H. Res. 595 passed House.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 595.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 2936 
with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be 
considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion 
to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be 
considered read. Specified amendments are in order.
    Nov. 1, 2017. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
595 and Rule XVIII.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The Speaker designated the Honorable David 
Young to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one 
hour of general debate on H.R. 2936.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.468 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Schrader.
    An amendment numbered 1 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
strike ``produce timber'' as a forest management activity 
designated for Categorical Exclusion.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Schrader amendment No. 1.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.468 On agreeing to the Schrader 
amendment (A001) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.469 Amendment (A002) offered by Mr. 
Khanna.
    An amendment numbered 2 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
strike Subtitle B of Title III, the Forest Management Activity 
Arbitration Pilot Program, from the bill.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Khanna amendment No. 2.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.470 Amendment (A003) offered by Mr. 
O'Halleran.
    An amendment numbered 3 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
strike sections 801, pertaining to forest plans not considered 
major Federal actions for purposes of section 102 of the 
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, and 903, revision of 
extraordinary circumstances regulations in the bill.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the O'Halleran amendment No. 3.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.471 Amendment (A004) offered by Mr. 
Cardenas.
    An amendment numbered 4 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
require the Secretary of Agriculture, in consultation with 
other relevant Departments, to conduct a study to evaluate the 
feasibility, safety and cost effectiveness of using unmanned 
aerial vehicles for the purposes of supporting wildfire 
response and suppression as well as forest restoration and 
management.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Cardenas amendment No. 4.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.471 On agreeing to the Cardenas 
amendment (A004) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.472 Amendment (A005) offered by Mr. 
DeFazio.
    An amendment numbered 5 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
add land exclusions to Sec. 913, including Yaquina Head 
Outstanding Natural Area, Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, 
Wilderness Act, lands managed under the National Trails System.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the DeFazio amendment No. 5.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.472 On agreeing to the DeFazio 
amendment (A005) Agreed to by voice vote.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.473 Amendment (A006) offered by Mr. 
LaMalfa.
    An amendment numbered 6 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
direct OPM to create a ``wildland firefighter'' occupational 
series.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the LaMalfa amendment No. 6.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.473 By unanimous consent, the LaMalfa 
amendment was withdrawn.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.474 Amendment (A007) offered by Mr. 
Pearce.
    An amendment numbered 7 printed in House Report 115-378 to 
establish a pilot program to demonstrate effective tools and 
techniques for safeguarding natural resources.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 595, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Pearce amendment No. 7.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Mr. Westerman moved that the committee rise.
    Nov. 1, 2017. On motion that the committee rise Agreed to 
by voice vote.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Committee of the Whole House on the state of 
the Union rises leaving H.R. 2936 as unfinished business.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Considered as unfinished business.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The House resolved into Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for further 
consideration.
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.469 On agreeing to the Khanna 
amendment (A002) Failed by recorded vote: 189-232 (Roll no. 
594).
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.470 On agreeing to the O'Halleran 
amendment (A003) Failed by recorded vote: 194-226 (Roll no. 
595).
    Nov. 1, 2017. H.AMDT.474 On agreeing to the Pearce 
amendment (A007) Agreed to by recorded vote: 236-184 (Roll no. 
596).
    Nov. 1, 2017. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 2936.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant to 
the rule.
    Nov. 1, 2017. Mr. O'Halleran moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Natural Resources.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the O'Halleran motion to recommit with instructions. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill 
to be reported back to the House with an amendment adding a new 
section pertaining to Extension of Secure Rural Schools and 
Community Self-Determination Act of 2000.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    Nov. 1, 2017. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by recorded vote: 189-230 (Roll no. 597).
    Nov. 1, 2017. On passage Passed by recorded vote: 232-188 
(Roll no. 598).
    Nov. 1, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Nov. 1, 2017. The Clerk was authorized to correct section 
numbers, punctuation, and cross references, and to make other 
necessary technical and conforming corrections in the 
engrossment of H.R. 2936.
    Nov. 2, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and 
Forestry.

 To Designate the United States Courthouse Located at 323 East Chapel 
  Hill Street in Durham, North Carolina, as the ``John Hervey Wheeler 
                       United States Courthouse''


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 3460)

Summary

    This bill designates the U.S. courthouse located at 323 
Chapel Hill Street in Durham, North Carolina, as the ``John 
Hervey Wheeler United States Courthouse.''

Legislative History

    July 28, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    July 16, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-818.
    July 16, 2018. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
166.
    July 16, 2018. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    July 16, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6222-6223)
    July 16, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3460.
    July 16, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6222)
    July 16, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 17, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs.

 Making Further Supplemental Appropriations for the Fiscal Year Ending 
  September 30, 2018, for Disaster Assistance for Hurricanes Harvey, 
   Irma, and Maria, and Calendar Year 2017 Wildfires, and for Other 
                                Purposes


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 4667)

                 DIVISIONS A AND B--DISASTER ASSISTANCE

Summary

                    DIVISION A--DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    Further Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster 
Relief Requirements, 2017
    This division provides $81 billion in FY2018 emergency 
appropriations to several federal agencies for disaster 
assistance related to Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria; and 
wildfires that occurred in 2017. (Emergency spending is exempt 
from discretionary spending limits and other budget enforcement 
rules.)

                DIVISION B--DISASTER RECOVERY REFORM ACT

    This division amends the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief 
and Emergency Assistance Act to modify the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency disaster response and recovery programs.

Legislative History

    Dec. 18, 2017. Referred to the Committee on Appropriations, 
and in addition to the Committee on Budget, for a period to be 
subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for 
consideration of such provisions as fall within the 
jurisdiction of the committee concerned.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 670. (consideration: CR H10364-10394)
    Dec. 21, 2018. The Chair announced that the bill contained 
an emergency designation pursuant to section 4(g)(1) of the 
Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 and accordingly, the Chair 
would put the question of consideration under section 4(g)(2) 
of the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010.
    Dec. 21, 2018. On question of consideration of the bill 
Agreed to by voice vote.
    Dec. 21, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on H.R. 4667.
    Dec. 21, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H10403-10404)
    Dec. 21, 2018. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 251-
169 (Roll no. 709). (text: CR H10364-10385)
    Dec. 21, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Received in the Senate.
    Jan. 3, 2018. Read the first time. Placed on Senate 
Legislative Calendar under Read the First Time.
    Jan. 4, 2018. Read the second time. Placed on Senate 
Legislative Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 291.

Repack Airwaves Yielding Better Access for Users of Modern Services Act 
                 of 2018 or the RAY BAUM'S Act of 2018


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 4986)

Summary

    H.R. 4986 amends the Communications Act of 1934 to 
reauthorize appropriations for the Federal Communications 
Commission, to provide for certain procedural changes to the 
rules of the Commission to maximize opportunities for public 
participation and efficient decision making, and for other 
purposes. This legislation included amendments to the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to 
provide for access to disaster areas by telecommunication 
service providers.

Legislative History

    Feb. 9, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 6, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on Energy 
and Commerce. H. Rept. 115-587, Part I.
    Mar. 6, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Mar. 6, 2018. Committee on Oversight and Government 
discharged.
    Mar. 6, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
445.
    Mar. 6, 2018. Mr. Walden moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Mar. 6, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H1398-1414)
    Mar. 6, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 4986.
    Mar. 6, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H1399-1408)
    Mar. 6, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    Mar. 6, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    Mar. 7, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

              Treating Barriers to Prosperity Act of 2018


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 5294)

Summary

    This bill allows the Appalachian Regional Commission to 
support projects and activities addressing drug abuse, 
including opioid abuse.
    Such projects and activities may include those that:
           facilitate the sharing of best practices 
        among states, counties, and other experts in the region 
        with respect to reducing drug abuse;
           initiate or expand programs designed to 
        eliminate or reduce the harm to the workforce and 
        economic growth of the region that results from drug 
        abuse;
           attract and retain relevant health care 
        services, businesses, and workers; and
           develop relevant infrastructure, including 
        broadband infrastructure that supports the use of 
        telemedicine.

Legislative History

    Mar. 16, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Apr. 12, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    June 12, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-749.
    June 12, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
583.
    June 13, 2018. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    June 13, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5115-5117)
    June 13, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 5294.
    June 13, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H5115-5116)
    June 13, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 14, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.
    See Section 8061-8062 of Public Law 115-271 (H.R. 6) for 
further action.

                  Promoting Flood Risk Mitigation Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 5846)

Summary

    This bill directs the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) to conduct a study to assess: (1) the efficacy of 
practices or programs under which the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA) provides assistance to state and local 
governments to acquire flood-damaged properties (buyout 
practices), and (2) ways to streamline the buyout practices. 
The study must consider and analyze certain factors, such as 
current and future trends regarding repetitive loss structures 
that are insured under the National Flood Insurance Program and 
constraints on buyout practices.
    The GAO shall submit to specified congressional committees 
and FEMA a report on the buyout practices study and the 
feasibility of FEMA establishing an alternative buyout program.

Legislative History

    May 17, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    July 16, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-820.
    July 16, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
634.
    July 16, 2018. Mr. Barletta moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    July 16, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6224-6226)
    July 16, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 5846.
    July 16, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6224-6225)
    July 16, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 17, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban 
Affairs.

To Designate the Federal Building Located at 2110 First Street in Fort 
    Myers, Florida, as the ``George W. Whitehurst Federal Building''


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 6622)

Summary

    Designates the Federal building located at 2110 First 
Street in Fort Myers, Florida, as the George W. Whitehurst 
Federal Building.

Legislative History

    July 26, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    July 27, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings and Emergency Management Discharged.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Committee Consideration and Mark-up Session 
Held. (Markup report: CQ)9/27/2018:Ordered to be Reported 
(Amended) by Voice Vote.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-1021.
    Nov. 13, 2018. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
190.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Mr. Mast asked unanimous consent to take 
from the Speaker's table and consider.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9656)
    Nov. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.981 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Mast.
    An amendment to strike all after the enacting clause and 
insert new text.
    Nov. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.981 On agreeing to the Mast amendment 
(A001) Agreed to without objection. 11/27/2018 7:36pm:On 
passage Passed without objection. (text: CR H9656)
    Nov. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 27, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.

  To Amend the Federal Assets Sale and Transfer Act of 2016 To Ensure 
 That the Public Buildings Reform Board has Adequate Time To Carry Out 
       the Responsibilities of the Board, and for Other Purposes


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 7318)

Summary

    H.R. 7318 makes technical corrections to the Federal Assets 
Sale and Transfer Act of 2016 to align the timeline for the 
sale of unneeded properties with the appointment of the Public 
Building Reform Board.

Legislative History

    Dec. 18, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Expected to be considered in the House under 
Suspension of the Rules.

 To Amend the Federal Assets Sale and Transfer Act of 2016 To Provide 
   Flexibility With Respect to the Leaseback of Certain Federal Real 
                    Property, and for Other Purposes


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 7319)

Summary

    @[email protected]

Legislative History

    Dec. 18, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.

                       Reported by the Committee


   Revitalizing the Economy of Coal Communities by Leveraging Local 
  Activities and Investing More Act of 2017 or the RECLAIM Act of 2017


       REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES (H.R. 1731)

Summary

    H.R. 1731 amends the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation 
Act of 1977 (SMCRA) to make funds available to the Department 
of the Interior through FY2021 for distribution to states and 
Indian tribes to promote economic revitalization, 
diversification, and development in economically distressed 
communities through the reclamation and restoration of land and 
water resources adversely affected by coal mining carried out 
before August 3, 1977. This legislation specifically authorizes 
the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) to use such funds to 
make grants for projects that have been or that are eligible to 
be reclaimed or restored under SMCRA and would require the ARC 
to relocate its headquarters from Washington, DC, to the 
Appalachian region.

Legislative History

    Mar. 28, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Mar. 28, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on
    Apr. 5, 2017. Hearing held by the Committee on Natural 
Resources.
    June 27, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by the 
Committee on Natural Resources by voice vote.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Natural Resources. H. Rept. 115-351, Part I.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Oct. 19, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
255.

       Community Empowerment for Mitigated Properties Act of 2017


                 REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE (H.R. 1735)

Summary

    H.R. 1735 directs the Administrator of FEMA to issue 
guidance regarding implementation of certain buy-outs or the 
acquisition of property for open space as a flood mitigation 
measure. This legislation would give municipal officials the 
information and notice they need to maintain open lots up to 
community standards. This legislation would ensure that a state 
provides notice to municipal land maintenance authorities that 
a flood mitigation purchase has been made inside their 
jurisdiction and how disagreements between local government's 
competing land maintenance standards can be mediated.

Legislative History

    Mar. 27, 2017. Sponsor introductory remarks on measure. (CR 
E390)
    Mar. 28, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    July 27, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-417.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
309.

                    FEMA Reauthorization Act of 2017


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 2548)

Summary

    The bipartisan FEMA Reauthorization Act of 2017 provides 
the first ever reauthorization of the agency to ensure 
accountability and strong Congressional oversight. FEMA 
(Federal Emergency Management Agency) is reauthorized through 
fiscal year 2020 consistent with current funding levels. The 
legislation also establishes a comprehensive study to assess 
and make recommendations to reduce disaster costs and losses; 
better prepares America to address 21st century challenges to 
disaster preparedness and response; improves our Nation's 
emergency management capabilities; strengthens critical 
components of our preparedness and response system; and 
supports emergency response personnel. H.R. 2548 reauthorizes 
the National Domestic Preparedness Consortium and the Center 
for Domestic Preparedness through Fiscal Year 2020, consistent 
with current funding levels. These entities focus on all-
hazards preparedness training. The legislation states that the 
FEMA Administrator is responsible for the Nation's efforts to 
reduce the loss of life and property from an earthquake, 
tsunami or combined event.

Legislative History

    May 22, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    June 23, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-191, Part I.
    June 23, 2017. Committee on Natural Resources discharged.
    June 23, 2017. Committee on Financial Services discharged.
    June 23, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
130.

      Disaster Assistance Fairness and Accountability Act of 2017


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 3176)

Summary

    H.R. 3176 prohibits FEMA from rescinding disaster 
assistance payments to individuals 3 years after being notified 
of the assistance they are to receive. The bill ensures that 
individuals are not penalized for receiving inaccurate disaster 
assistance from FEMA.

Legislative History

    July 12, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    July 27, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    July 27, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-418.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
310.

 Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act or the SHARE Act


       REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES (H.R. 3668)

Summary

    H.R. 3668, the Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational 
Enhancement Act (SHARE Act), includes provisions that increase 
opportunities for hunters, anglers, and recreational shooters; 
eliminate regulatory impediments and safeguard against new 
regulations that impede outdoor sporting activities; and 
protect Second Amendment rights. H.R. 3668, among other things, 
defined crop destruction as a normal agricultural practice 
during disasters declared pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford 
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act and provided 
certain real estate authorities to the Department of the 
Interior to facilitate federal land transactions.

Legislative History

    Sep. 5, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Sep. 5, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Sep. 12, 2017. Subcommittee on Federal Lands, Committee on 
Natural Resources hearing held.
    Sep. 13, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by the 
Committee on Natural Resources, by the Yeas and Nays: 22-13.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Natural Resources. H. Rept. 115-314, Part I.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Agriculture discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on the Judiciary discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Energy and Commerce discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Ways and Means discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
224.

Of Inquiry Requesting the President To Provide Certain Documents in the 
                         President's Possession


                  REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H. RES. 437)

Summary

    H. Res. 437 is a resolution of inquiry that requests the 
President to provide certain documents in the President's 
possession. The request instructs the President to transmit any 
correspondence of any type relating to the following: Guidance 
to the Acting Administrator of GSA regarding the responses to 
requests from Members of Congress and Ranking Members of 
Committees; all records pertaining to ground lease No. GS-LS-
11-11307, the lease agreement between the Trump Old Post Office 
LLC and the Government. Legal memoranda or opinions generated 
by the Government related to the above ground lease.

Legislative History

    July 13, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    July 27, 2017. Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings and Emergency Management discharged.
    July 27, 2017. Ordered to be reported unfavorably by the 
yeas and nays: 31-24.
    July 28, 2017. Reported adversely by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-269.
    July 28, 2017. Placed on the House Calendar, Calendar No. 
73.

                     Ordered Reported by Committee


                      Disaster Recovery Reform Act


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 4460)

Summary

    H.R. 4460 makes critical reforms to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency's disaster response and recovery program that 
will help our communities better prepare for, respond to, 
recover from, and mitigate against disasters of all kinds. H.R. 
4460 ensures communities are more resilient to disasters at 
their outset by ensuring disaster prone communities are built 
better and built smarter. This bill will place greater emphasis 
on pre-disaster mitigation, helping to ensure that our 
communities are better equipped to prepare for and withstand 
disasters, reduce future loss of life and property and lower 
the costs of disasters. This bill also deals with other 
critical issues such as wildfire prevention, building code 
enforcement, eligibility for disaster assistance, and agency 
efficiency and accountability.

Legislative History

    Nov. 29, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    Dec. 21, 2018. Report filed in the House.
    See Public Law 115-254 (H.R. 302) for further action.

           Real Estate Assets and Leasing Reform Act of 2018


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 6194)

Summary

    H.R. 6194 provides reforms and improvements to both the 
agency that operates as the landlord for the civilian federal 
government, the General Services Administration (GSA), and the 
federal agency charged with providing security at thousands of 
public buildings and facilities, the Federal Protective 
Service.
     With a significant amount of GSA's inventory of 
leased space expiring in the next few years, providing GSA with 
authorities to act expeditiously and take advantage of the 
current markets, while rental rates remain below their peaks, 
will result in significant savings to taxpayers.
     The legislation establishes a Streamlined Leasing 
Pilot Program that would simplify most GSA leases and allow for 
and encourage office space consolidations.
     The legislation ensures the acquisition and 
construction of new federal buildings are effectively overseen 
and managed by clarifying congressional oversight of property 
exchanges and ensuring federal construction projects remain 
within or under budget.
     The legislation improves building security by 
ensuring personnel responsible for protecting public buildings 
are appropriately trained, managed, and accountable.

Legislative History

    June 25, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.

Committee Resolutions (Authorizing the General Services Administration 
                Capital Investment and Leasing Program)


                        FY 2017 GSA Resolutions


                       APPROVED FEBRUARY 28, 2017

    On February 28, 2017, the Committee approved eight GSA 
lease resolutions. The lease resolutions were comprised of nine 
Department of Veterans Affairs facilities around the 
continental United States--from Arizona to Florida--and the 
territory of Puerto Rico. The proposed lease term for all of 
the resolutions was 20 years.

Department of Veterans Affairs--New Richey, FL--PFL-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 114,000
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $3,876,000

Department of Veterans Affairs--Oahu, HI--PHI-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 66,000
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $3,392,400

Department of Veterans Affairs--Phoenix, AZ--PAZ-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 203,000
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $6,353,900

Department of Veterans Affairs--Ponce, PR--PPR-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 114,300
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $5,436,000

Department of Veterans Affairs--Redding, CA--PCA-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 114,300
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $5,436,108

Department of Veterans Affairs--San Antonio, TX--PTX-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 109,800
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $5,519,844

Department of Veterans Affairs--San Diego, CA--PCA-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 99,986
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $4,049,433

Department of Veterans Affairs--Tulsa, OK--POK-01-VA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 140,000
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $4,634,000

                        APPROVED APRIL 12, 2018

    On April 12, 2018, the Committee approved sixteen GSA 
resolutions. Eleven of these resolutions were leases: four from 
FY 2017 and seven from FY 2018. Five of the resolutions were 
Alterations: one from FY 2016 and four from FY 2018.

Alterations:

2016:
Robert T. Stafford U.S. Post Office & Courthouse--Rutland, VT--
PVT-BPS-RU16
        Rentable Square Feet: 71,919
        Estimated Total Cost of Project: $12,631,000

2018:
        Consolidation Activities Program--Various Buildings--
        PCA-0001-MU18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriation Request: $100,000,000

Fire Protection Life Safety Projects--Various Buildings--PFP-
0001-MU18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriation Request: $45,000,000

Judiciary Capital Security Program--Various Buildings--PJCS-
0001-MU18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriation Request: $20,000,000

Seismic Mitigation Program--Various Buildings--PSE-0001-MU18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $40,000,000

Leases:

2018:
Department of Defense--Army Corps of Engineers--Sacramento, 
CA--PCA-01-SA18
        Rentable Square Feet: 227,025
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $10,019,000

Social Security Administration--Salinas, CA--PCA-02-SA18
        Rentable Square Feet: 66,664
        Lease Term: 15 years
        Annual Rent: $3,534,300

Department of the Treasury--Internal Revenue Service Treasury 
Inspector General for Tax Administration--Denver, CO--PCO-01-
DE18
        Rentable Square Feet: 212,237
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $5,125,000

Department of the Treasury--Internal Revenue Service--
Plantation, FL--PFL-01-PL18
        Rentable Square Feet: 135,819
        Lease Term: 2 years
        Annual Rent: $5,025,303

Department of Justice Drug Enforcement Administration--Weston, 
FL--PFL-04-WE18
        Rentable Square Feet: 133,503
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $4,410,723

Department of Defense--Defense Intelligence Agency--Prince 
Georges County, MD--PMD-01-WA18
        Rentable Square Feet: 266,000
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Rent: $4,860,413

Department of Agriculture--Kansas City, MO--PMO-02-KC18
        Rentable Square Feet: 374,000
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Annual Cost: $11,751,080

2017:
Securities and Exchange Commission--Washington, DC--PDC-11-WA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 1,274,000
        Lease Term: 15 years
        Annual Cost: 63,700,000

Department of State--Washington, DC--PDC-06-WA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 101,000
        Lease Term: 15 years
        Annual Cost: $5,050,000

Department of State--Washington, DC--PDC-07-WA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 198,000
        Lease Term: 15
        Annual Cost: $9,900,000

U.S. Patent and Trademark Office--Arlington, VA--PVA-04-WA17
        Rentable Square Feet: 191,000
        Lease Term: 15 years
        Annual Cost: $7,449,000

                         APPROVED JUNE 27, 2018

    On June 27, 2018, the Committee approved twenty GSA 
resolutions. Thirteen of these resolutions were Alterations, 
three were Construction, two were Leases, and one was a Design.

Alterations:

2016:
American Red Cross Building Purchase--Washington, DC--PDC-DCRC-
WA16
        FY2016 Committee/Appropriations Request: $160,000,000

2018:
James C. Corman Federal Building--Van Nuys, CA--PCA-007-LA18
        FY2018 Committee /Appropriations Request: $12,690,000

Harry S. Truman Federal Building--Washington, DC--PDC-0046-WA18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $4,200,000

Maj. General Emmett J. Bean Federal Center--Indianapolis, IN--
PIN-1703-IN18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $45,950,000

Alexander Hamilton U.S. Customs House--New York, NY--PNY-0131-
NY18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $7,493,000

Jacob K. Javits Federal Building--New York, NY--PNY-0282-NY18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $65,712,000

Anthony Celebreezze Federal Building--Cleveland, OH--POH-0192-
CL18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $74,224,000

911 Federal Building--Portland, OR--POR-0033-PO18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $714,000

Federal Office Building--Seattle, WA--PWA-0036-SE18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $3,384,000

IRS Service Center--Ogden, UT--PUT-0036-OG18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $51,241,000

Lewis F. Powell, Jr. U.S. Courthouse and U.S. Courthouse 
Annex--Richmond, VA--PVA-0063-RI18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $11,677,000

Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse--Milwaukee, WI--PWI-
0044MI18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $12,991,000

John W. McCormack U.S. Post Office and Courthouse--Boston, MA--
PMA-0013-BO18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $10,751,000

Design:

Lyndon Baines Johnson Federal Building--Washington, DC
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $4,200,000

Construction:

Otay Mesa U.S. Land Port of Entry--San Diego, CA--PCA-BSC-SA18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $121,848,000

New Orleans FBI Field Office Building Purchase--New Orleans, 
LA--PLA-1370-NO18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $28,982,000

U.S. Land Port of Entry--Alexandria Bay, NY--PNY-BSC-AB18
        FY2018 Committee/Appropriations Request: $32,538,000

Lease:

Social Security Administration--Baltimore County, MD
        Rentable Square Feet: 824,563
        Lease Term: Up to 10 years
        Annual Rent: $15,287,398

Department of Justice Federal Bureau of Investigation--Seattle, 
WA--PWA-01-SE18
        Rentable Square Feet: 130,876
        Lease Term: 15 years
        Annual Cost: $6,282,048

                      APPROVED SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

    On September 27, 2018, the Committee approved 19 GSA 
resolutions, including 11 alteration projects, two construction 
projects, five leases, and one acquisition. 18 of these 
prospectuses are from FY 2019 with the Brooklyn, New York 
Secret Service Prospectus from FY 2018.

2018:

Leases:

Department of Homeland Security--Secret Service--Brooklyn, NY--
PNY-04-BR18
        Rentable Square Feet: 92,210
        Lease Term: 5 years
        Estimated Total Cost of Project: $5,593,459

2019:

Consolidation Activities Program--Various Buildings--PCA-0001-
MU19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $70,000,000

Fire Protection Life Safety Projects--Various Buildings--PFP-
0001-MU19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $30,000,000

Judiciary Capital Security Program--Various Buildings--PJCS-
0001-MU19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $11,500,000

Alterations:

Denver Federal Center Building 48--Lakewood, CO--PCO-0522-LA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $47,035,000

Denver Federal Center Building 53--Lakewood, CO--PCO-0530-LA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $44,527,000

Lyndon Baines Johnson Federal Building--Washington, DC--PDC-
0010-WA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $32,522,000

Minton-Capehart Federal Building--Indianapolis, IN--PIN-0133-
IN19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $17,098,000

Potter Stewart U.S. Courthouse--Cincinnati, OH--POH-0028-CN19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $32,885,000

Carl B. Stokes U.S. Courthouse--Cleveland, OH--POH-0301-CL19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $24,404,000

U.S. Customs House--Philadelphia, PA--PPA-0144-PH19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $95,470,000

Austin Finance Center--Austin, TX--PTX-1618-AU19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $34,663,000

Denver Federal Center Building 53--Lakewood, CO--PCO-0530-LA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $44,527,000

Construction:

U.S. Land Port of Entry--Calexico, CA--PCA-BSC-CA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $290,092,000

Food and Drug Administration Laboratory--Lakewood, CA--PCO-LAB-
LA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $29,319,000

Building Acquisition:

Department of Transportation Headquarters--Washington, DC--PDC-
0689-WA19
        FY2019 Committee/Appropriation Request: $767,900,000

Leases:

Securities and Exchange Commission--New York, NY--PNY-05-NY19
        Rentable Square Feet: 270,431
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Estimated Total Annual Cost: $14,332,680

Department of Health and Human Services--Food and Drug 
Administration--Jamaica, NY--PNY-02-QU19
        Rentable Square Feet: 224,000
        Lease Term: 10 years
        Estimated Total Annual Cost: $6,944,000

Department of Labor--Seattle, WA--PWA-01-SE19
        Rentable Square Feet: 84,937
        Lease Term: 3 years
        Estimated Total Annual Cost: $3,958,914

Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency, Pretrial 
Services Agency, and Public Defender Service--Washington, DC--
PDC-12-WA19
        Rentable Square Feet: 209,012
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Estimated Total Annual Cost: $10,002,095

                       APPROVED DECEMBER 12, 2018

    On December 12, 2018, the Committee approved 4 GSA 
resolutions, including one alteration project, one lease, and 
two acquisitions.

2018:

Leases:

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs--San Diego, CA--PCA-01-VA19
        Rentable Square Feet: 99,986
        Lease Term: 20 years
        Estimated Total Cost of Project: $5,844,182

Acquisitions:
        New U.S. Courthouse--Huntsville, AL--PAL-CTC-HU18
        Square Feet: 123,100
        Estimated Total Cost of Project: $86,463,000

New U.S. Courthouse--Fort Lauderdale, FL--PFL-CTC-FL18
        Square Feet: 255,000
        Estimated Total Cost of Project: $190,000,000

Alteration:
        Frank E. Moss U.S. Courthouse--Salt Lake City, UT--PUT-
        0017-SL19
        Estimated Total Cost of Project: $116,893,000

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                      Letters (Majority/Minority)


                                Hearings


   BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: THE NATIONAL 
                 PREPAREDNESS SYSTEM (SERIAL NO. 115-6)

    On March 16, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to assess the development, successes, and challenges of 
the National Preparedness System and to examine national 
preparedness capabilities. The Subcommittee heard testimony 
from the mayor of Baltimore, MD, the National Emergency 
Management Association, a representative of the International 
Association of Emergency Managers and the National Association 
of Counties, the American Association of Port Authorities, the 
International Association of Fire Fighters, the Las Vegas 
Metropolitan Police Department, The Jewish Federations of North 
America, and the Bender Jewish Community Center of Greater 
Washington.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: MITIGATING DAMAGE 
       AND RECOVERING QUICKLY FROM DISASTERS (SERIAL NO. 115-12)

    On April 27, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to examine how to protect infrastructure against future 
disaster damage, lower overall disaster costs, and identify 
challenges facing the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) in responding to, recovering from, and mitigating 
against natural and man-made disasters. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, the 
International Association of Fire Chiefs, the BuildStrong 
Coalition, and two former FEMA Administrators.

    IMPLEMENTING THE FEDERAL ASSETS SALE AND TRANSFER ACT (FASTA): 
 MAXIMIZING TAXPAYER RETURNS AND REDUCING WASTE IN REAL ESTATE (SERIAL 
                              NO. 115-20)

    On July 12, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the implementation of the Federal Assets 
Sale and Transfer Act (FASTA) and how it will address 
impediments in the normal property disposal process that impact 
the return to the taxpayer. The purpose of FASTA, which was 
sponsored by Transportation and Infrastructure Committee member 
Congressman Jeff Denham (R-CA), is to streamline the sale or 
redevelopment of high-value assets that are underutilized to 
obtain the best return for the taxpayer through consolidating 
the Federal footprint. The Subcommittee heard testimony from 
the General Services Administration, U.S. Department of 
Veterans Affairs, the Office of the Mayor of the city of 
Pittsburgh, PA, and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in 
Washington.

     BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: ECONOMIC 
       DEVELOPMENT STAKEHOLDERS' PERSPECTIVES (SERIAL NO. 115-24)

    On September 13, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing focused on proposals to strengthen economic development 
programs and to address the building and rebuilding of 
disaster-resistant infrastructure to reduce disaster costs. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from SEDA-Council of Governments, 
the National Association of Development Organizations, the 
International Economic Development Council, the BuildStrong 
Coalition, and the Georgetown Climate Center.

   THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC IN APPALACHIA: ADDRESSING HURDLES TO ECONOMIC 
             DEVELOPMENT IN THE REGION (SERIAL NO. 115-31)

    On December 12, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
and oversight hearing to examine the impact of the opioid 
crisis on efforts in Appalachia to spur economic development 
and growth in distressed communities, possible solutions, and 
the role of federal economic development programs, such as the 
Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), in addressing this 
epidemic. The Subcommittee has jurisdiction over various 
regional economic development agencies, including the ARC. 
These economic development entities provide federal assistance 
to economically distressed areas for the creation of long-term 
employment opportunities and economic growth. Support under 
these programs can assist in planning, technical assistance, 
job training, and the physical infrastructure needed to attract 
employers and jobs in communities to spur economic growth. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from Congressman Harold Rogers (R-
KY), the ARC, the Center for Rural Pennsylvania, Operation 
UNITE, and a former attorney for the Drug Enforcement 
Administration.

 IMPACTS OF THE 2017 WILDFIRES IN THE UNITED STATES (SERIAL NO. 115-42)

    On March 20, 2018, the Subcommittee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to explore the lessons learned from the 
catastrophic 2017 wildfires, inform long-term policy solutions, 
and highlight the importance of mitigation, including 
provisions contained in the Disaster Recovery Reform Act. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, the International Association of Fire 
Chiefs, the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services, 
the Deputy Fire Warden/Deputy Director of Emergency Services of 
Stanislaus County, California, and the First District 
Supervisor of Sonoma County, California.

ARE WE READY? RECOVERING FROM 2017 DISASTERS AND PREPARING FOR THE 2018 
                  HURRICANE SEASON (SERIAL NO. 115-49)

    On July 18, 2018, the Subcommittee held a legislative and 
oversight hearing to better understand the status of the 
recovery from the 2017 disaster season, including hurricanes, 
wildfires, and floods, as well as efforts to prepare for the 
2018 hurricane season which began on June 1st. More than 25 
million Americans (almost eight percent of the U.S. population) 
were affected by unprecedented disasters in 2017. Ten major 
hurricanes were recorded in the Atlantic alone. In addition to 
damaging storms, the U.S. experienced one of the most active 
and destructive wildfire seasons in its history. By the end of 
2017, 59 major disasters were declared under the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. These 
disasters demonstrate the importance of mitigating risks and 
preparing for the next disaster. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, National Emergency Management 
Association, U.S. Council of the International Association of 
Emergency Managers, and BuildStrong Coalition.

                                Meetings


     SAVING TAXPAYER DOLLARS AND THE FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY DATABASE

    On April 11, 2018, the Subcommittee held a roundtable 
discussion about how the correct use of the Federal Real 
Property Profile (FRPP) database can be an effective tool in 
facilitating better management of federal real property and 
saving taxpayer dollars. The roundtable focused on how the FRPP 
database can help improve management of federal real estate, 
including identifying properties for sale and redevelopment, 
opportunities to consolidate and reduce lease costs, and what 
improvements can be made to facilitate its use and 
effectiveness. The participants were the General Services 
Administration, Government Accountability Office, Congressional 
Research Service, Savills Studley, CBRE Global Workplace 
Solutions, Jones Lang LaSalle (JLL), RSM US LLP, and Sodexo.

 TREATING BARRIERS TO PROSPERITY: ADDRESSING THE IMPACT OF OPIOIDS ON 
                   ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN APPALACHIA

    On July 31, 2018, the Subcommittee held a field roundtable 
discussion in Somerset, PA, about the barriers to economic 
growth in Appalachia created by opioids, possible solutions, 
and how federal economic development agencies can help states 
and communities thrive. The participants were the Appalachian 
Regional Commission, U.S. Department of Commerce, a 
Pennsylvania state senator and state representative, Somerset 
County commissioner, Southern Alleghenies Planning and 
Development Commission, Somerset Hospital and Somerset Health 
Services, J.C. Blair Memorial Health System, Somerset County 
Chamber of Commerce, and Riggs Industries.

                           Oversight Letters


        PROHIBITION OF PRINCIPAL FEDERAL OFFICIAL FOR DISASTERS

    On April 3, 2017, Subcommittee on Economic Development, 
Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Chairman Lou 
Barletta (R-PA) and Ranking Member Hank Johnson (D-GA) sent a 
letter to the Subcommittee on Homeland Security of the 
Committee on Appropriations Chairman John Carter (R-TX) and 
Ranking Member Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA) asking that as they 
develop the FY2018 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
Appropriations bill, they continue a provision that prohibits 
any expenditure of funds to support the Principle Federal 
Officer (PFO) position during a Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act) declaration.
    The Stafford Act, which governs federal disaster response, 
requires the President to appoint a Federal Coordinating 
Officer (FCO) when a major disaster or emergency is declared. 
Under section 302 of the Stafford Act, the FCO is designated to 
be the federal official responsible for directing all federal 
response activities during a disaster declaration, not any 
other federal official.

                EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS PERFORMANCE GRANT

    On April 3, 2017, Subcommittee on Economic Development, 
Public Buildings, and Emergency Management Chairman Lou 
Barletta (R-PA) and Ranking Member Hank Johnson (D-GA) sent a 
letter to the Subcommittee on Homeland Security of the 
Committee on Appropriations Chairman John Carter (R-TX) and 
Ranking Member Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-CA) asking that as they 
develop the FY2018 Department of Homeland Security (DHS) 
Appropriations bill, they continue funding the Emergency 
Management Performance Grant (EMPG) as a separate program at 
sufficient levels. EMPG is the only preparedness program 
dedicated to building core emergency management functions at 
the state and local level, which are essential to saving lives 
and lowering response costs when large disasters strike.

                        GSA-RELATED GAO REQUESTS

    On March 1, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA) wrote a letter to 
the Comptroller General of the U.S. Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) requesting engagements related to Saving Money 
Through Real Property Reforms, Publicly Available Real Property 
Data, GSA Leasing Requirements, the Prospectus Planning 
Process, and GSA Major Construction.

                 EVALUATION OF THE 2017 DISASTER SEASON

    On May 9, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), and Ranking 
Member, Peter DeFazio (D-OR), wrote a letter to the Comptroller 
General requesting that the U.S. Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) conduct a comprehensive evaluation of the federal 
government's preparedness, response, and recovery efforts 
related to the unprecedented 2017 disaster season, which 
included Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria--as well as 
catastrophic wildfires that impacted the western United States. 
GAO is developing and will be conducting a large body of work 
on these issues across a range of federal agencies and 
programs. This request asked that the Committee be included on 
the results of these efforts.

             NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM

    On May 9, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), and Ranking 
Member, Peter DeFazio (D-OR), wrote a letter to the Comptroller 
General requesting that U.S. Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) assess the extent to which the National Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) has resulted in real-world 
mitigation efforts intended to reduce the risks of future 
earthquakes. This is a follow up to a GAO report released in 
September of 2016 (Earthquakes: Additional Actions Need to 
Identify and Mitigate Risks to Federal Buildings and Implement 
and Early Warning System, GAO-16-680 (Sept. 22, 2016)), where 
GAO reported on the magnitude of the earthquake hazards facing 
our nation.

          COMMUNITY DISASTER LOANS IN THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

    On July 13, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Ranking 
Member, Peter DeFazio (D-OR), and Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management 
Chairman Lou Barletta (R-PA) and Ranking Member Dina Titus (D-
NV) sent a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury regarding 
the administration of the Community Disaster Loan (CDL) program 
in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The express purpose of the CDL 
program is to provide funding for essential governmental 
functions due to disaster-related lost tax and other revenues. 
But in implementing these loans in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the 
Department of the Treasury and FEMA requested collateral from 
the U.S. Virgin Islands to secure CDLs to the Territory and the 
Territory's two publicly-owned hospitals. The CDL program 
should be applied in the U.S. Virgin Islands in a manner that 
provides the most relief and the greatest flexibility to 
expedite recovery, as provided in the Continuing Appropriations 
Act, 2018 and Supplemental Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 
2017 (P.L. 115-56), Additional Supplemental Appropriations for 
Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 (P.L. 115-72), and 
Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-123).

              CORPS CONSIDERATIONS IN MITIGATION PROJECTS

    On November 1, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman, Bill Shuster (R-PA), and Ranking 
Member, Peter DeFazio (D-OR), wrote a letter to the Comptroller 
General requesting that U.S. Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) complete a review of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' 
consideration of natural features and nature-based features, as 
defined by section 1184 of the Water Resources Development Act 
of 2016 (33 U.S.C. 2289a), in the study of the feasibility of 
projects for flood risk management, hurricane and storm damage 
reduction, and ecosystem restoration. The letter also requested 
a review on efforts to relocate Alaska Native villages due to 
flooding and erosion threats that updates the report of the 
Comptroller General titled `Alaska Native Villages: Limited 
Progress Has Been Made on Relocating Villages Threatened by 
Flooding and Erosion', dated June 2009.

                       Minority Oversight Letters


                   OLD POST OFFICE BUILDING OVERSIGHT

    On January 23, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Ranking Member 
Elijah Cummings (D-MD), Congressman Andre Carson (D-IN), and 
Congressman Gerald Connolly (D-VA) sent a letter to Acting 
Administrator Timothy Horne requesting information regarding 
how the GSA is addressing President Donald Trump's apparent 
breach of the Old Post Office lease agreement his company 
entered into with the U.S. Government for the Trump 
International Hotel in Washington, D.C.

                   OLD POST OFFICE BUILDING OVERSIGHT

    On March 7, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and 
Emergency Management Ranking Member Hank Johnson (D-GA) sent a 
letter to the Inspector General requesting an investigation and 
report on GSA's management and administration of the Old Post 
Office Building lease agreement with President Donald Trump.

                   OLD POST OFFICE BUILDING OVERSIGHT

    On April 6, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Environment and Public Works Ranking Member Tom 
Carper (D-DE), Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings, and Emergency Management Ranking Member Hank Johnson 
(D-GA), and Subcommittee on Transportation and Infrastructure 
Ranking Member Ben Cardin (D-MD) sent a letter to Acting 
Administrator Timothy Horne requesting information regarding 
the new policy to no longer respond to requests for information 
by Ranking Members of the Congressional committees with 
legislative and oversight jurisdiction over GSA and its 
programs.

                         GSA OUTLEASING PROGRAM

    On June 6, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and 
Emergency Management Ranking Member Hank Johnson (D-GA) sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General requesting information on 
GSA's leasing program for non-federal entities, known as the 
outleasing program.

                         GSA OUTLEASING PROGRAM

    On June 13, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and 
Emergency Management Ranking Member Hank Johnson (D-GA) sent a 
follow-up letter to GSA Administrator Timothy Horne regarding 
potential conflict of interest issues with the U.S. 
government's lease with the Trump International Hotel in 
Washington, D.C. and requesting additional information.

                     PUERTO RICO POWER RESTORATION

    On October 27, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Committee on Natural Resources Ranking Member Raul Grijalva (D-
AZ) sent a letter DHS Inspector General John Roth requesting an 
audit and investigation into the contract between Puerto Rico 
Electric Power Association (PREPA) and Whitefish Energy 
Holdings, LLC, to restore energy to Puerto Rico after Hurricane 
Maria.

                           FEDERAL COST SHARE

    On March 13, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Committee on Homeland Security Ranking Member Bennie G. 
Thompson (D-MS) sent a letter to President Donald J. Trump 
requesting extension of the Federal cost share for debris 
removal and emergency protective measures, including direct 
Federal assistance, for the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) for 
damage caused by Hurricane Irma and Maria.

                  FEDERAL RESPONSE TO HURRICANE MARIA

    On March 20, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Homeland Security Ranking Member Bennie G. 
Thompson (D-MS, and Committee on Energy and Commerce Ranking 
Member Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ) sent a letter to the FEMA 
Administrator requesting information regarding the Federal 
response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Maria in Puerto 
Rico.

         U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS ASSIGNMENT IN PUERTO RICO

    On June 13, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Energy and Commerce Ranking Member Frank Pallone, 
Jr. (D-NJ), Committee on Homeland Security Ranking Member 
Bennie G. Thompson (D-MS), and Committee on Natural Resources 
Ranking Member Raul Grijalva (D-AZ) sent a letter the FEMA 
Administrator requesting information regarding the decision to 
end the United States Army Corps of Engineers' (USACE) mission 
assignment for power line restoration work in Puerto Rico from 
damage that resulted from Hurricane Maria.

                    NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE PROGRAM

    On July 11, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), Member 
of Congress Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Member of Congress Sean 
Duffy (R-WI), and Member of Congress Mark Sanford (R-SC) sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General requesting a GAO study on the 
existing buyout practices for repetitive loss properties under 
the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP), which is managed 
by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

            PUERTO RICO POWER RESTORATION MISSION EXTENSION

    On July 24, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and 
Emergency Management Ranking Dina Titus (D-NV) sent a letter to 
the FEMA Administrator requesting an extension for the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) mission assignment for 
emergency power restoration in Puerto Rico.

                             FEMA STAFFING

    On July 17, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and 
Emergency Management Ranking Dina Titus (D-NV) sent a letter to 
the FEMA Administrator requesting staffing information, 
including vacant positions, hiring practices, and authorized 
positions that remain vacant.

                     INDIVIDUAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    On October 4, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Natural Resources Ranking Member Raul M. Grijalva 
(D-AZ), and Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings, and Emergency Management Ranking Dina Titus (D-NV) 
sent a letter to the FEMA Administrator requesting information 
regarding the implementation of the Individual Assistance 
program in Puerto Rico, specifically the training and 
qualification of staff to evaluate damage and determine the 
amount of assistance.

                            FBI HEADQUARTERS

    On October 18, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Ranking Member 
Elijah E. Cummings (D-MD), Subcommittee on Government 
Operations Ranking Member Gerald E. Connolly (D-VA), 
Subcommittee on Financial Services Ranking Member Mike Quigley 
(D-IL), and Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings, and Emergency Management Ranking Dina Titus (D-NV) 
sent a letter to the GSA Administrator requesting information 
and documents regarding President Donald J. Trump's decision to 
abandon the long-term plan to move the FBI Headquarters from 
its current site in Washington, D.C. to a suburban location, 
and replace it with a more costly plan to keep it in its 
current location.

                      FBI HEADQUARTERS RELOCATION

    On November 2, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Ranking Member 
Elijah E. Cummings (D-MD), Subcommittee on Government 
Operations Ranking Member Gerald E. Connolly (D-VA), 
Subcommittee on Financial Services Ranking Member Mike Quigley 
(D-IL), and Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings, and Emergency Management Ranking Dina Titus (D-NV) 
sent a letter to the White House Chief of Staff requesting 
documents and information regarding President Donald J. Trump's 
direct involvement with in the Administration's decision to 
reverse longstanding plans to relocate the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) headquarters to a new suburban campus 
outside of Washington, D.C.

                         DISASTER RELIEF FUNDS

    On November 15, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), Senator 
Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Senator Robert Menendez (D-NJ), Member 
of Congress Raul Grijalva (D-AZ), Member of Congress Nydia M. 
Velazquez (D-NY), Member of Congress Luis V. Gutierrez (D-IL), 
Member of Congress Bennie G. Thompson (D-MS), and Member of 
Congress Adriano Espaillat (D-NY) sent a letter to President 
Donald J. Trump expressing serious concerns over the call to 
end disaster relief funds for Puerto Rico from the damage 
caused by Hurricane Maria.

                      OVERSIGHT WITHIN LEGISLATION

               H.R. 302--FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018


                          WILDFIRE PREVENTION

    Section 1204 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires a report from 
the FEMA Administrator containing a summary of any projects 
carried out, and any funding provided to those projects through 
the hazard mitigation grant program under Section 420 of the 
Stafford Act, as amended.

                           EVACUATION ROUTES

    Section 1209 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) instructed the FEMA 
Administrator, in coordination with the Administrator of the 
Federal Highway Administration and State, local, territorial, 
and Indian tribal governments, to conduct a study of the 
adequacy of available evacuation routes to accommodate the flow 
of evacuees, and to submit recommendations on how to help with 
anticipated evacuation route flow, based on that study to the 
Federal Highway Administration, FEMA, State, local, 
territorial, and Indian tribal governments, and Congress.

                        DUPLICATION OF BENEFITS

    Section 1210 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires a report from 
the FEMA Administrator, in coordination with other relevant 
Federal agencies, to improve the comprehensive delivery of 
disaster assistance to individuals following a major disaster 
or emergency declaration under the Stafford Act. The report is 
to include efforts to improve coordination between the Agency 
and other relevant Federal agencies when delivering disaster 
assistance to individuals, clarifications to the sequence of 
delivery of disaster assistance to individuals by FEMA and 
other relevant Federal agencies, clarification of the 
interpretation and implementation of section 312 of the 
Stafford Act (42 U.S.C. 5155) related to duplication of 
benefits when providing disaster assistance to individuals, and 
recommendations for how to increase the effectiveness of 
communication to applicants for assistance programs for 
individuals after a disaster declaration, including the breadth 
of programs available and the potential impacts of utilizing 
one program versus another.

               STATE ADMINISTRATION OF HOUSING ASSISTANCE

    Section 1211 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) authorizes State and 
Indian tribal governments to use federal disaster assistance to 
directly administer temporary and permanent housing assistance 
for disaster victims following requirements established by the 
President. The Inspector General of the Department of Homeland 
Security is required by this statute to audit the programs 
administered by the State and Indian governments, while 
providing a report to the committees of jurisdiction containing 
an assessment of the programs the State and Indian governments 
provided.

                MULTIFAMILY LEASE AND REPAIR ASSISTANCE

    Section 1213 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) amends section 408 of 
the Robert T. Stafford Act (42 U.S.C. 5174) to allow greater 
flexibility and options for housing disaster victims who may 
reside in multifamily rental properties impacted by a major 
disaster to be eligible for assistance under the aforementioned 
section. The sections also directed the Inspector General of 
the Department of Homeland Security to submit an assessment of 
the benefit-cost analysis of the program to the committees of 
jurisdiction in Congress.

                              FLEXIBILITY

    Section 1216 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) allows for certain 
waivers related to disaster assistance debts only if such 
assistance was distributed based on an error by FEMA, no fault 
on behalf of the debtor, and the collection of the debt would 
be against equity and good conscience, all while establishing a 
three-year statute of limitations of FEMA to recover household 
and individual assistance. The Inspector General of the 
Department of Homeland Security shall monitor the distribution 
of covered assistance to the entities to determine the 
percentage of assistance distributed in error.

     UNIFIED FEDERAL ENVIRONMENTAL AND HISTORIC PRESERVATION REVIEW

    Section 1220 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires the 
administrator to review the expedited inter-agency 
environmental and historic preservation review process and 
survey other agencies' categorical exclusions and requires the 
Administrator to issue regulations to implement any 
recommendations, including categorical exclusions, identified 
in the report and survey. The section also requires the 
Administrator to submit a report to the committees of 
jurisdiction in Congress to ensure compliance of the section.

       STUDY TO STREAMLINE AND CONSOLIDATE INFORMATION COLLECTION

    Section 1223 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) directs the 
Administrator, along with other appropriate federal agencies, 
to conduct a study and develop a plan to innovative means for 
sharing information among disaster assistance agencies and 
submit the plans to the committees of jurisdiction in Congress.

                         AGENCY ACCOUNTABILITY

    Section 1224 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) directs the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency to provide regular reports 
regarding disaster spending, disaster contracts, and other 
related disaster activities to the committees of jurisdiction 
in Congress summarizing the information for the preceding 
fiscal year.

    INSPECTOR GENERAL AUDIT OF FEMA CONTRACTS FOR TARPS AND PLASTIC 
                                SHEETING

    Section 1226 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires the Inspector 
General of the Department of Homeland Security audit FEMA 
contracts for tarps and plastic sheeting in response to 
Hurricanes Irma and Maria in Puerto Rico and the United States 
Virgin Islands.

                      GUIDANCE AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Section 1230 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires the 
Administrator to provide recommendations on how common areas of 
condominiums and housing cooperatives may be eligible for 
disaster assistance while providing the committees of 
jurisdiction a legislative proposal on how to provide 
eligibility for disaster assistance to those areas.

                    ADDITIONAL MITIGATION ACTIVITIES

    Section 1235 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) clarifies the 
activities eligible for hazard mitigation assistance under the 
Stafford Act. It also requires the Administrator to submit a 
report to the committees of jurisdiction in Congress 
summarizing the regulations and guidance issued under this 
section.

    FEDERAL ASSISTANCE TO INDIVIDUALS AND HOUSEHOLDS AND NONPROFIT 
                               FACILITIES

    Section 1238 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) allows for the waiver 
of passport replacement fees for any victim affected by a major 
disaster. The section also directs the Administrator and the 
head of any other agency given critical document fee waiver 
authority shall submit a report to the committees of 
jurisdiction in Congress on the costs associated with providing 
such waivers.

            FEMA UPDATES ON NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS ASSESSMENT

    Section 1242 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires the 
Administrator to submit a report to the committees of 
jurisdiction in Congress on the completion of a national 
preparedness assessment of capability gaps at each level based 
on tiered performance objectives to enable prioritization of 
grant funding.

 FEMA REPORT ON DUPLICATION IN NON-NATURAL DISASTER PREPAREDNESS GRANT 
                                PROGRAMS

    Section 1243 of DRRA (P.L. 115-254) requires the 
Administrator to submit a report to the committees of 
jurisdiction in Congress identifying and preventing the 
unnecessary duplication within and across the non-natural 
disaster preparedness grant programs within the Agency.

   H.R. 1117--To Require the Administrator of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency To Submit a Report Regarding Certain Plans Regarding 
    Assistance to Applicants and Grantees During the Response to an 
                         Emergency or Disaster


         REVIEW OF CERTAIN PLANS RELATED TO DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    H.R. 1117 requires the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA) to report to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs within 90 days of enactment of the Act 
regarding plans to improve consistent guidance to applicants on 
FEMA disaster funding procedures; appropriate records 
maintenance and transfer of documents to new teams during 
staffing transitions; and accurate assistance to applicants to 
ease administrative burdens.

S. 1768--National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Reauthorization 
                              Act of 2018


       REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARD REDUCTION PROGRAM

    Section 1243 of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Program Reauthorization Act of 2018 (Public Law 115-307) 
requires the Comptroller General to submit to the committees of 
jurisdiction in Congress a report to the findings of its 
assessment of the Federal earthquake hazard risk reduction 
efforts.

 John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019


 REVIEW OF THE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL BROKER CONTRACT

    Section 877 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 requires the Comptroller 
General of the United States to conduct biennial audits of the 
General Services Administration National Broker Contract to 
determine whether brokers selected under the program provide 
lower lease rental rates negotiated by GSA staff, the impact of 
the program on the length of time of lease procurements, and 
whether the application of Section 863 of Public Law 110-417 
resulted in rental cost savings.
                  SUBCOMMITTEE ON HIGHWAYS AND TRANSIT


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115TH CONGRESS


  SAM GRAVES, Missouri, Chairman
ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON, District of 
     Columbia, Ranking Member

STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               DON YOUNG, Alaska
ALBIO SIRES, New Jersey              JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          FRANK A. LoBIONDO, New Jersey
DINA TITUS, Nevada                   ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       Arkansas
ELIZABETH H. ESTY, Connecticut       LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania
JARED HUFFMAN, California            BOB GIBBS, Ohio
JULIA BROWNLEY, California           JEFF DENHAM, California
ALAN S. LOWENTHAL, California        THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky
BRENDA L. LAWRENCE, Michigan         MARK MEADOWS, North Carolina
MARK DeSAULNIER, California          SCOTT PERRY, Pennsylvania
EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas         RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
MICHAEL E. CAPUANO, Massachusetts    ROB WOODALL, Georgia
GRACE F. NAPOLITANO, California      JOHN KATKO, New York
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois            BRIAN BABIN, Texas
HENRY C. ``HANK'' JOHNSON, Jr.,      GARRET GRAVES, Louisiana
  Georgia                            BARBARA COMSTOCK, Virginia
LOIS FRANKEL, Florida                DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               MIKE BOST, Illinois
FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida         DOUG LaMALFA, California
DONALD M. PAYNE, Jr., New Jersey     BRUCE WESTERMAN, Arkansas
PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon (ex officio)LLOYD SMUCKER, Pennsylvania,
                                       Vice Chair
                                     PAUL MITCHELL, Michigan
                                     JOHN J. FASO, New York
                                     A. DREW FERGUSON IV, Georgia
                                     MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
                                     VACANCY
                                     BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania (ex 
                                     officio)

                         Legislative Activities


                              Public Laws


A Bill To Repeal the Rule Issued by the Federal Highway Administration 
and the Federal Transit Administration Entitled ``Metropolitan Planning 
          Organization Coordination and Planning Area Reform''


                       PUBLIC LAW 115-33 (S. 496)

Summary

    S. 496 repeals a rule that was issued by the Federal 
Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration 
on December 20, 2016. The rule required Metropolitan Planning 
Organizations in the same urbanized area to merge, adjust their 
boundaries, or produce a single, unified set of plans to guide 
transportation investments.

Legislative History

    Mar. 2, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and 
Urban Affairs discharged by Unanimous Consent.
    Mar. 8, 2017. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S1695; text: CR S1695)
    Mar. 9, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Received in the House.
    Mar. 9, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Mar. 10, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Mr. Lewis (MN) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    Apr. 25, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H2823-2825)
    Apr. 25, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 496.
    Apr. 27, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H2919-2920)
    Apr. 27, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 417-3 
(Roll no. 231).
    Apr. 27, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    May 2, 2017. Presented to President.
    May 12, 2017. Signed by President.
    May 12, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-33.

         Combating Human Trafficking in Commercial Vehicles Act


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-99 (S. 1536)

Summary

    S. 1536 directs the Secretary of Transportation to 
designate a human trafficking prevention coordinator from 
within the Department. The bill expands the scope of activities 
authorized under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration's outreach and education program and commercial 
driver's license program implementation grants to include human 
trafficking prevention activities. S. 1536 also directs the 
Secretary to establish an advisory committee on human 
trafficking.

Legislative History

    July 12, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    Aug. 2, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute favorably.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune with an amendment in 
the nature of a substitute. Without written report.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 204.
    Sep. 14, 2017. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S5771-5772; text: CR S5771-5772)
    Sep. 18, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Received in the House.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Sep. 19, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Oct. 23, 2017. By Senator Thune from Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 
115-177.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Mr. Graves (MO) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H10218-10220)
    Dec. 19, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 1536.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H10229-10230)
    Dec. 19, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 418-1 
(Roll no. 695). (text: CR H10218-10219)
    Dec. 19, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 22, 2017. Presented to President.
    Jan. 3, 2018. Signed by President.
    Jan. 3, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-99.

                        Jobs for Our Heroes Act


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-105 (S. 1393)

Summary

    S. 1393 enhances employment opportunities for U.S. military 
personnel and veterans by exempting current members of the 
armed services or reserve components from certain testing 
requirements for a commercial driver's license if they had 
qualifying experience while serving in the armed services or 
reserve components. The bill also expands the types of medical 
professionals at the Department of Veterans Affairs who could 
certify that veterans meet the physical standards required to 
operate commercial motor vehicles.

Legislative History

    June 21, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as 
introduced: CR S3688)
    June 29, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported without amendment 
favorably.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune without amendment. 
Without written report.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 202.
    Sep. 14, 2017.
    Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous Consent. 
(consideration: CR S5771; text: CR S5771)
    Sep. 18, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Received in the House.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Held at the desk.
    Sep. 19, 2017. By Senator Thune from Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 
115-161.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Mr. Graves (MO) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H10215-10217)
    Dec. 19, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 1393.
    Dec. 19, 2017. At the conclusion of debate, the Yeas and 
Nays were demanded and ordered. Pursuant to the provisions of 
clause 8, rule XX, the Chair announced that further proceedings 
on the motion would be postponed.
    Dec. 21, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H10360-10361)
    Dec. 21, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 418-0 
(Roll no. 706). (text: CR 12/19/2017 H10215-10216)
    Dec. 21, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 29, 2017. Presented to President.
    Jan. 8, 2018. Signed by President.
    Jan. 8, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-105.

                 No Human Trafficking on Our Roads Act


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-106 (S. 1532)

Summary

    S. 1532 disqualifies individuals from operating a 
commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for their lifetime if they used 
a CMV to commit a felony involving human trafficking.

Legislative History

    Aug. 2, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported with an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute favorably.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune with an amendment in 
the nature of a substitute. Without written report.
    Aug. 3, 2017. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 204.
    Sep. 14, 2017. Passed Senate with an amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S5771-5772; text: CR S5771-5772)
    Sep. 18, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Received in the House.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Sep. 19, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Nov. 30, 2017. By Senator Thune from Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation filed written report. Report No. 
115-188.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Mr. Graves (MO) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    Dec. 19, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H10217-10218)
    Dec. 19, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 1532.
    Dec. 21, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H10404-10405)
    Dec. 21, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 393-0 
(Roll no. 710). (text: CR 12/19/2017 H10217)
    Dec. 21, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 29, 2017. Presented to President.
    Jan. 8, 2018. Signed by President.
    Jan. 8, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-106.

    To Authorize, Direct, Facilitate, and Expedite the Transfer of 
  Administrative Jurisdiction of Certain Federal Land, and for Other 
                                Purposes


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-190 (H.R. 1397)

Summary

    H.R. 1397 authorizes the exchange of National Park Service 
land located within the boundaries of the George Washington 
Memorial Parkway (GWMP) for FHWA land located adjacent to the 
GWMP. The land exchange addresses security issues at the 
entrance to the Federal Highway Administration's Turner 
Fairbanks Research Center and the Central Intelligence Agency's 
George Bush Center for Intelligence in Fairfax County, VA.

Legislative History

    Mar. 8, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    June 27, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on Natural 
Resources.
    July 11, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Natural 
Resources. H. Rept. 115-206, Part I.
    July 11, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    July 11, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
143.
    July 11, 2017. Mr. LaHood moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    July 11, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5404)
    July 11, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 1397.
    July 11, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ required): 406-0 
(Roll no. 345). (text: CR H5404)
    July 11, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 12, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.
    Feb. 14, 2018. Committee on Energy and Natural Resources 
Subcommittee on National Parks. Hearings held.
    Mar. 8, 2018. Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    May 24, 2108. Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. 
Reported by Senator Murkowski without amendment. With written 
report No. 115-257.
    May 24, 2108. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 434.
    June 6, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Voice 
Vote. (consideration: CR S3264)
    June 7, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    June 11, 2018. Presented to President.
    June 22, 2018. Signed by President.
    June 22, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-190.

        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-232 (H.R. 5515)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2019 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.
    The bill includes a provision that amends the Defense 
Access Roads Program, which is administered by the Secretary of 
Transportation, to address roads that are impacted by sea level 
fluctuations and flooding.

Legislative History

    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H5782-5783; text: CR H5782)
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Carbajal moved that the House instruct 
conferees.
    June 27, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Carbajal motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 5515. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to agree to section 703 of 
the Senate bill.
    June 27, 2018. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 188-231 (Roll No. 300).
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry moved to close portions of 
the conference.
    June 27, 2018. On Closing Portions of the Conference Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 403-15 (Roll no. 301).
    June 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, Wittman, 
Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Byrne, Stefanik, Bacon, 
Banks (IN), Smith (WA), Davis (CA), Langevin, Cooper, Bordallo, 
Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, Speier, Veasey, Gabbard, 
O'Rourke, and Murphy (FL).
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of title 
XVII of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Latta, Johnson (OH), and Pallone.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of title XVII 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of title XVII of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Royce (CA), Kinzinger, and Engel.
    June 27, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House requests a conference.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for 
consideration of matters within the jurisdiction of that 
committee under clause 11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and 
Schiff.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Budget for consideration of secs. 
1252 and 1523 of the House bill, and secs. 4, 1002, 1032, and 
1721 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Womack and Yarmuth.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Education and the Workforce for 
consideration of secs. 228, 563, 564, 1094, and 3120C of the 
House bill, and secs. 561-63 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx and Scott (VA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of 
secs. 701, 712, 1083, 1096, 3111-13, 3118, 3119, 3132, and 4305 
of the House bill, and secs. 315, 601, 714, 3111-15, 5802, and 
7509 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Hudson, and Pallone.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Financial Services for consideration of 
1299O-2 and 1236 of the House bill, and modifications committed 
to conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 346, 1042, 1202-06, 1210, 1211, 1221-23, 1230A, 1230D, 
1230F, 1231, 1234, 1236, 1237, 1239, 1240, 1254-56, 1264, 1267, 
1268, 1271, 1274, 1276, 1278, 1280, 1282, 1288, 1299O-1, 1299O-
2, 1299O-3, 1299O-4, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, and 3116 of the 
House bill, and secs. 331, 1061, 1063, 1201-04, 1207, 1211, 
1213, 1221-23, 1231-33, 1241, 1244, 1245, 1261, 1262, 1264-66, 
1269, 1301, 1302, 1531, 1622, 1623, 1654, 3113, 3116, 6002, 
6202-04, 6701, and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Royce (CA), Mast, and 
Engel.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Homeland Security for consideration of 
sec. 1634 of the House bill, and modifications committed to 
conference: McCaul, Ratcliffe, and Thompson (MS).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 
826, 1043, 1050B, 1073, 1074, 1079, 1085, 1087, 1090, 1299O-2, 
4319, and 4710 of the House bill, and secs. 1025, 1035 and 1715 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Sensenbrenner, and Nadler.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of 
secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 
2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 4810, 4837, division E, and 
sec. 6101 of the House bill, and secs. 601, 2833, 2836, and 
7518 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Westerman and Grijalva.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for 
consideration of secs. 506, 511, 569, 822, 831, 832, 834, 835, 
860, 875, 880-84, 886, 917, 1101-11, 4711, and 4829 of the 
House bill, and secs. 568, 595, 607, 632, 702, 813, 902, 937, 
1101-05, 1122-25, 1254B, 1628, 1639, 1640, 1716, 1726, 2835, 
and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
to conference: Sanford, Ross, and Lynch.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for 
consideration of secs. 854, 858, and 1603 of the House bill, 
and secs. 893 and 1604 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and 
Johnson, E.B.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 
811, 851-58, 861, 863-68, and 2803 of the House bill, and secs. 
893, 1626, and 6006 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Chabot, Knight, and Velazquez.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs. 518, 554, 883, 1044, 1049, 1050B, 1075, 
1095, 1111, 2848, 3501, 3504, 3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division 
D of the House bill, and secs. 153, 556, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 
7501, 7502, 7507-09, 7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Comstock and 
Brownley (CA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 547, 552, 582, 1411, and 2844 of the House bill, and 
secs. 721, 726, and 1431 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), Poliquin, and 
Walz.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 
701 of the House bill, and sec. 6201 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Reichert, Roskam, 
and Neal.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 
1252, 1523, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 
4810, 4837, division E, and sec. 6101 of the House bill and 
secs. 4, 601, 1002, 1032, 1721, 2833, 2836, and 7518 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Bergman.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 228, 518, 554, 563, 564, 883, 1044, 
1049, 1050B, 1075, 1094, 1095, 1111, 2848, 3120C, 3501, 3504, 
3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division D of the House bill and secs. 
153, 556, 561-63, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 7501, 7502, 7507-09, 
7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Lewis (MN).
    July 10, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees agreed to in Senate by 
Yea-Nay Vote. 91-8. Record Vote Number: 147.
    July 10, 2018. Senate insists on its amendment, agrees to 
request for conference, and authorizes the Presiding Officer to 
appoint conferees.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees (Committee on Foreign Investment) agreed to in Senate 
by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. Record Vote Number: 148.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees (NATO) agreed to in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. 
Record Vote Number: 149.
    July 10, 2018. Senate appointed conferees. McCain; Inhofe; 
Wicker; Fischer; Cotton; Rounds; Ernst; Tillis; Sullivan; 
Perdue; Cruz; Graham; Sasse; Scott; Crapo; Reed; Nelson; 
McCaskill; Shaheen; Gillibrand; Blumenthal; Donnelly; Hirono; 
Kaine; King; Heinrich; Warren; Peters; Brown.
    July 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    July 23, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-863 filed.
    July 24, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019.
    July 25, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-874 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H7202-7637)
    July 25, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1027 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of the 
conference report to H.R. 5515.
    July 25, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Rule H. Res. 1027 passed House.
    July 26, 2018. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-874 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 1027. (consideration: CR H7699-7709)
    July 26, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the conference report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The House resumed debate on the conference 
report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    July 26, 2018. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 359-54 (Roll no. 379). (consideration: 
CR H7708-7709)
    July 26, 2018. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2018. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5412-5417)
    July 26, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 presented in Senate. (CR S5412)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5538-5543)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 withdrawn by unanimous consent in Senate.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Senate agreed to conference report by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 87-10. Record Vote Number: 181.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Presented to President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Signed by President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-232.

   To Amend Title 23, United States Code, To Extend the Deadline for 
   Promulgation of Regulations Under the Tribal Transportation Self-
                           Governance Program


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-235 (H.R. 6414)

Summary

    This bill extends the deadline for and the authority of the 
Secretary of Transportation to issue regulations to implement 
the Tribal Self-Governance Program, which was established by 
the Fixing America's Surface Transportation (P.L. 114-94; FAST 
Act).

Legislative History

    July 19, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    July 25, 2018. Mr. Young (AK) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill.
    July 25, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(Consideration: CR H7639-7640)
    July 25, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 6414.
    July 25, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H7639)
    July 25, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2018. Received in the Senate, read twice.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S5560)
    Aug. 2, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Presented to President.
    Aug. 14, 2018. Signed by President.
    Aug. 14, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-235.

                         Pending in the Senate


                   Route 66 Centennial Commission Act


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 66)

Summary

    This bill establishes a commission to study and make 
recommendations to Congress on how to best commemorate Route 66 
on its 100-year anniversary in 2026. The bill also directs the 
commission to host a conference with certain partners on the 
U.S. Numbered Highway System. Finally, the bill requires the 
Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with certain 
Governors, to prepare a plan on the preservation needs of Route 
66. The Secretary must then submit a report on the plan to 
Congress.

Legislative History

    Jan. 4, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    July 16, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-821.
    July 16, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
635.
    July 16, 2018. Mr. Davis, Rodney moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, as amended.
    July 16, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6215-6219)
    July 16, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 66.
    July 16, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6215-6216)
    July 16, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 17, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    Active Duty Voluntary Acquisition of Necessary Credentials for 
                   Employment Act or the Advance Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2258)

Summary

    H.R. 2258 enhances employment opportunities for U.S. 
military personnel and veterans by exempting current members of 
the armed services or reserve components from certain testing 
requirements for a commercial driver's license if they had 
qualifying experience while serving in the armed services or 
reserve components.

Legislative History

    May 2, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    June 23, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-189.
    June 23, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
128.
    June 26, 2017. Mr. Graves (MO) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, as amended.
    June 26, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5146-5147)
    June 26, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2258.
    June 26, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 409-0 (Roll no. 324). (text: CR H5146)
    June 26, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.
    See Public Law 115-105 (S. 1393) for further action.

          Veterans Expanded Trucking Opportunities Act of 2017


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2547)

Summary

    H.R. 2547 expands the types of medical professionals at the 
Department of Veterans Affairs who could certify that veterans 
meet the physical standards required to operate commercial 
motor vehicles.

Legislative History

    May 19, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    May 24, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 24, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    June 23, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-190.
    June 23, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
129.
    June 26, 2017. Mr. Graves (MO) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, as amended.
    June 26, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H5143-5144)
    June 26, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2547.
    June 26, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 409-0 (Roll no. 323). (text: CR H5143)
    June 26, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.
    See Public Law 115-105 (S. 1393) for further action.

                   Restore the Harmony Way Bridge Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 6793)

Summary

    H.R. 6793 transfer a bridge over the Wabash River to the 
States of Illinois and Indiana.

Legislative History

    Sep. 14, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Mr. Mast asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Nov. 27, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9655-9656)
    Nov. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.980 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Mast.
    Nov. 27, 2018. H.AMDT.980 On agreeing to the Mast amendment 
(A001) Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 27, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR 9655-9656)
    Nov. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.

                         Reported by Committee


To Repeal the Rule Issued by the Federal Highway Administration and the 
    Federal Transit Administration Entitled ``Metropolitan Planning 
          Organization Coordination and Planning Area Reform''


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 1346)

Summary

    H.R. 1346 repeals a rule that was issued by the Federal 
Highway Administration and the Federal Transit Administration 
on December 20, 2016. The rule required Metropolitan Planning 
Organizations in the same urbanized area to merge, adjust their 
boundaries, or produce a single, unified set of plans to guide 
transportation investments.

Legislative History

    Mar. 3, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-85.
    Apr. 6, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
49.
    See P.L. 115-33 (S. 496) for further action.

         Combating Human Trafficking in Commercial Vehicles Act


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 3813)

Summary

    H.R. 3813 directs the Secretary of Transportation to 
designate a human trafficking prevention coordinator from 
within the Department. The bill expands the scope of activities 
authorized under the Federal Motor Carrier Safety 
Administration's outreach and education program and commercial 
driver's license financial assistance program to include human 
trafficking prevention activities. H.R. 3813 also directs the 
Secretary to establish an advisory committee on human 
trafficking.

Legislative History

    Sep 22, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-467.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
346.
    See Public Law 115-99 (S. 1536) for further action.

                 No Human Trafficking on Our Roads Act


                   REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 3814)

Summary

    H.R. 3814 disqualifies individuals from operating a 
commercial motor vehicle (CMV) for their lifetime if they used 
a CMV to commit a felony involving human trafficking.

Legislative History

    Sep. 22, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-468.
    Dec. 18, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
347.
    See Public Law 115-106 (S. 1532) for further action.

                     Ordered Reported By Committee


                      Disaster Recovery Reform Act


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 4460)

Summary

    H.R. 4460 makes critical reforms to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency's disaster response and recovery program that 
will help our communities better prepare for, respond to, 
recover from, and mitigate against disasters of all kinds. H.R. 
4460 ensures communities are more resilient to disasters at 
their outset by ensuring disaster prone communities are built 
better and built smarter. This bill will place greater emphasis 
on pre-disaster mitigation, helping to ensure that our 
communities are better equipped to prepare for and withstand 
disasters, reduce future loss of life and property and lower 
the costs of disasters. This bill also deals with other 
critical issues such as wildfire prevention, building code 
enforcement, eligibility for disaster assistance, and agency 
efficiency and accountability.
    H.R. 4460 also includes a provision that waives the funding 
cap for U.S. territories under the Federal Highway 
Administration's Emergency Relief Program for fiscal years 2018 
and 2019.

Legislative History

    Nov. 29, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    See Section 1209 of Public Law 115-254 (H.R. 302) for 
further action

    H.R. 5158, To Direct the Secretary of Transportation To Request 
     Nominations for and Make Determinations Regarding Roads to be 
  Designated Under the National Scenic Byways Program, and for Other 
                                Purposes


               ORDERED REPORTED BY COMMITTEE (H.R. 5158)

Summary

    H.R. 5158 directs the Secretary to request nominations for 
roads to be designated under the National Scenic Byways Program 
within 90 days of enactment. The bill further directs the 
Secretary to determine whether any nominated roads should be 
designated and publish a list of designated roads not later 
than one year after the solicitation occurs.

Legislative History

    3/6/2018: Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    9/27/2018: Subcommittee Discharged from further 
consideration.
    9/27/2018: Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Voice Vote.

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                      Letters (Majority/Minority)


                                Hearings


 FAST ACT IMPLEMENTATION: STATE AND LOCAL PERSPECTIVES (SERIAL NO. 115-
                                  10)

    On April 5, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to receive testimony from state and local authorities 
concerning the implementation of the Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation (FAST) Act. The Subcommittee heard testimony 
from the American Association of State Highway Transportation 
Officials, the American Public Transportation Association, and 
the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

  FAST ACT IMPLEMENTATION: IMPROVING THE SAFETY OF THE NATION'S ROADS 
                          (SERIAL NO. 115-21)

    On July 18, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to receive testimony related to how policy provisions 
of the FAST) Act are improving the safety and reliability of 
the Nation's roads. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the 
administrations within the Department of Transportation 
responsible for implementing these provisions of the FAST Act 
the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Motor Carrier 
Safety Administration, and the National Highway Traffic Safety 
Administration as well as the National Transportation Safety 
Board.

   BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: HIGHWAYS AND 
         TRANSIT STAKEHOLDERS' PERSPECTIVES (SERIAL NO. 115-28)

    On October 11, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to receive testimony from highways and transit 
stakeholders regarding a 21st-century infrastructure for 
America. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the American 
Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the 
Transportation Construction Coalition, North America's Building 
Trades Unions, the National Association of Manufacturers, and 
Sound Transit.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: LONG-TERM FUNDING 
         FOR HIGHWAYS AND TRANSIT PROGRAMS (SERIAL NO. 115-38)

    On March 7, 2018, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to receive testimony from highways and transit 
stakeholders regarding the benefits to the Nation of long-term 
funding for highways and transit programs, and the 
sustainability of current methods of providing funding. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the American Association of 
State Highway and Transportation Officials, Western Road Use 
Charge Consortium (RUC West), American Trucking Associations, 
U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and the Economic Policy Institute.

 FAST ACT IMPLEMENTATION: MOTOR CARRIER PROVISIONS (SERIAL NO. 115-45)

    On May 22, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing 
to receive testimony from the Administration and stakeholders 
regarding the implementation of the motor carrier provisions in 
the Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST Act, P.L. 
114-94). The Subcommittee received testimony from the Federal 
Motor Carrier Safety Administration, Krapf Transportation, 
Livestock Marketing Association, Commercial Vehicle Safety 
Alliance, and Truck Safety Coalition.

        INNOVATION IN SURFACE TRANSPORTATION (SERIAL NO. 115-52)

    On September 5, 2018, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to receive testimony from highways and transit 
stakeholders regarding the various kinds of innovations used in 
surface transportation. The Subcommittee received testimony 
from the DriveOhio, Community Transportation Association of 
America, Intelligent Transportation Society of America, and 
Contra Costa Transportation Authority.

                                Meetings


             EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY

    On December 7, 2017, the Subcommittee held a roundtable 
discussion on emerging technologies being utilized or explored 
in the trucking industry, many of which have the potential to 
improve the safety and productivity of the industry. The 
participants were the American Trucking Associations, Volvo 
Group North America, the National Safety Council, and the 
Transportation Trades Department, AFL-CIO.

                           Oversight Letters


      NATIONALLY SIGNIFICANT FREIGHT AND HIGHWAYS PROJECTS PROGRAM

    On November 2, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Ranking Member 
Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), along with Subcommittee on Highways 
and Transit Chairman Sam Graves (R-MO) and Ranking Member 
Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), wrote a letter to the Comptroller 
General requesting that GAO continue to conduct reviews of 
Nationally Significant Freight and Highways Projects Program 
grants each time they are awarded by the Department.

        MEAL AND REST BREAK REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL DRIVERS

    On September 25, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) along with 11 
Senate and House Members wrote a letter to the DOT to express 
their support of a review of state meal and rest break 
requirements on interstate commerce.

             METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION COMPLIANCE

    On October 31, 2018, the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) wrote a letter to 
DOT expressing his support for the ongoing review of whether 
the Metropolitan Council's structure complies with federal 
requirements for the structure of a metropolitan planning 
organization.

                       Minority Oversight Letters


                     CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES TESTING

    On February 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Highways and Transit Ranking Member Eleanor 
Holmes Norton (D-DC) sent a letter to the Federal Motor Carrier 
Safety Administration (FMCSA) Deputy Administrator urging the 
denial of the petition submitted by several motor carriers 
requesting exemption from certain controlled substances testing 
requirements outlined in 49 CFR 382.105 and 49 CFR 382.301.

                              STREAMLINING

    On April 5, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Highways and Transit Ranking Member Eleanor 
Holmes Norton (D-DC) sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Transportation expressing concerns over streamlining 
requirements for infrastructure projects.

                            CARBON POLLUTION

    On June 27, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works Ranking Member 
Tom Carper (D-DE) sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Transportation requesting information regarding the decision by 
DOT to delay indefinitely the effective date of the national 
performance measures on carbon pollution produced from tailpipe 
emissions on National Highway Systems (NHS).

                              INFRA GRANTS

    On July 27, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Subcommittee on Highways and Transit Ranking Member Eleanor 
Holmes Norton (D-DC), Member of Congress Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), 
Member of Congress Michael Capuano (D-MA), Member of Congress 
Grace Napolitano (D-CA), Member of Congress Steve Cohen (D-TN), 
Member of Congress Albio Sires (D-NJ), Member of Congress Hank 
Johnson (D-GA), Member of Congress Andre Carson (D-IN), Member 
of Congress Richard Nolan (D-MN), Member of Congress Lois 
Frankel (D-FL), Member of Congress Julia Brownley (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Frederica Wilson (D-FL), Member of Congress 
Brenda Lawrence (D-MI), and Mark DeSaulnier (D-CA) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation expressing concern 
over DOT's Notice of Funding Opportunity (Notice) for $1.5 
billion in grants under the Nationally Significant Freight and 
Highway Projects, renamed INFRA grants by the Administration, 
authorized by Congress in Section 1105 of the FAST Act. The 
letter urges the Secretary to reconsider the revisions to the 
INFRA grant program, to remain true to Congressional intent,.

                          FEDERAL-AID BACKLOG

    On October 31, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation urging expeditious 
distribution of funding to reduce backlog under the Federal-aid 
Highway Emergency Relief (ER) program.

                           VEHICLE TECHNOLOGY

    On November 7, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Director of the Office of Management and Budget 
urging OMB to move forward with the 2016 National Highway 
Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Notice of Proposed 
Rulemaking to bring connected to vehicle technology, known as 
Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC), to all vehicles.

                    CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANT PROGRAM

    On July 17, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Highways and Transit Ranking Member Eleanor 
Holmes Norton (D-DC) sent a letter to the Secretary of 
Transportation expressing concern over a ``Dear Colleague'' 
letter sent by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to 
transit agencies that outlines new procedures under the Capital 
Investment Grant (CIG) program. The letter expresses concern 
with the new procedures, which that stand to increase project 
costs and add considerable uncertainty and delay to project 
approvals.

                       MEAL AND REST BREAK RULES

    On October 31, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), Senate 
Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Ranking 
Member Patty Murray (D-WA), Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit Ranking Member Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Committee 
on Education and the Workforce Ranking Member (Robert C. 
``Bobby'' Scott (D-VA), Senator Kamala D. Harris (D-CA), 
Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Senator Claire McCaskill (D-
MO), Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-OR), Senator Elizabeth 
Warren (D-MA), Senator Edward J. Markey (D-MA), Senator Cory 
Booker (D-NJ), Senator Margaret Wood Hassan (D-NH), Senator 
Robert P. Casey, Jr. (D-PA), Member of Congress Grace 
Napolitano (D-CA), Member of Congress Jared Huffman (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Julia Brownley (D-CA), Member of Congress 
Alan Lowenthal (D-CA), Member of Congress Mark DeSaulnier (D-
CA), and Member of Congress Mark Takano (D-CA) sent a letter to 
the Secretary of Transportation urging the denial of the 
petition submitted by the American Trucking Association (ATA) 
for a determination that the State of California's meal and 
rest break rules are preempted by Federal Law.

                      Oversight Within Legislation


                    CAPITAL INVESTMENT GRANT PROGRAM

    Section 20008 of MAP-21 (P.L. 112-141) required the 
Comptroller General to undertake a biennial review of FTA's 
implementation of the federal Capital Investment Grant Program. 
On May 31, 2018, the GAO publicly released its report (GAO-18-
462). The GAO found that FTA has yet to implement several 
statutory provisions contained in the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94).

      NATIONALLY SIGNIFICANT FREIGHT AND HIGHWAY PROJECTS PROGRAM

    Section 1105 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) directed the DOT 
OIG to complete an assessment of the process and criteria used 
to award competitive grants under the Nationally Significant 
Freight and Highway Projects program, known as FASTLANE 
program. On November 2, 2017, the GAO publicly released its 
report (GAO-18-38). The GAO found that while the DOT followed 
statutory criteria for the program, the grant selection needs 
improvement.

               ALIGNMENT OF FEDERAL ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEWS

    Section 1313 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) directed the DOT 
OIG to complete a report on progress made by DOT and other 
federal agencies on coordinating environmental reviews and the 
impact of coordination on accelerating the environmental review 
and permitting process. On November 6, 2018, the DOT OIG found 
that the DOT has completed implementation of all required 
statutory provisions with respect to aligning Federal reviews.

        ASSESSMENT OF PROGRESS ON ACCELERATING PROJECT DELIVERY

    Section 1318 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) directed the 
Comptroller General to complete an assessment of the progress 
made as a result of provisions in Safe, Accountable, Flexible, 
Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (P.L. 
109-59; SAFETEA-LU), MAP-21, and the FAST Act in accelerating 
project delivery by streamlining the environmental review and 
permitting process. On January 30, 2018, the GAO publicly 
released its report (GAO-18-222). The GAO found that while many 
of the statutory provisions have been implemented, the Federal 
Highway Administration should issue guidance on evaluation 
methodologies.

       EFFECTIVENESS OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION CHANGES AND FUNDING

    Section 3027 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) required the 
Comptroller General to examine and evaluate the impacts of MAP-
21 on federal funding for certain public transportation 
programs. On May 4, 2017, the GAO publicly released its report 
(GAO-17-483). The GAO found that the Federal Transit 
Administration had provided sufficient guidance and outreach to 
designated recipients.

           COMPLIANCE, SAFETY, ACCOUNTABILITY PROGRAM REFORM

    Section 5221 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) required the 
National Academy of Sciences' (Academies) to complete a study 
of the FMCSA's Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA) 
Program. On June 27, 2017, the Academies publicly released its 
study, ``Improving Motor Carrier Safety Measurement.'' On June 
25, 2018, the Administrator of FMCSA submitted to the Committee 
a corrective action plan addressing the Academies' six 
recommendations outlined in the study. The DOT OIG is required 
to review the extent to which the corrective action plan is 
responsive to recommendations in the study and report its 
findings. The report is expected in the 116th Congress.

                        DELAYS IN GOODS MOVEMENT

    Section 5501 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) required the DOT 
OIG to report on the average length of time that operators of 
commercial motor vehicles are delayed before the loading and 
unloading of such vehicles and at other points in the pick-up 
and delivery process. On January 31, 2018, the DOT OIG found 
that industry wide data on driver detention is not available, 
but that based on its estimates, commercial driver detention 
increases crash risks and is associated with reduced earnings.

  FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENTS

    Section 5504 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) requires the 
Comptroller General to conduct a study of the FMCSA's 
information technology and data collection and management 
systems. On July 13, 2017, the GAO publicly released its report 
(GAO-17-488). The GAO found that while FMCSA had developed an 
information technology (IT) strategic plan, FMCSA needed to 
improve its IT strategic planning, oversight, and operational 
analyses.

                      REVIEW OF SCHOOL BUS SAFETY

    Section 5511 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) requires the 
Comptroller General to report on the safety of school bus 
operations. On January 12, 2017, the GAO publicly released its 
report (GAO-17-209). The GAO found that federal laws and 
regulations set requirements for certain aspects of school bus 
safety, and state laws and regulations in many cases go beyond 
the federal requirements.

         STATUS OF AUTONOMOUS TRANSPORTATION TECHNOLOGY POLICY

    Section 6025 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) requires the 
Comptroller General to assess the status of autonomous 
transportation technology policies developed by public entities 
in the United States; assess the organizational readiness of 
DOT to address autonomous vehicle technology challenges; and 
make recommendations for implementation of such policies. On 
November 30, 2017, the GAO publicly released its report (GAO-
18-132). The GAO found that autonomous vehicles pose different 
challenges and that while the DOT had made some efforts to 
respond to these challenges, the DOT should develop a 
comprehensive plan to better manage departmental initiatives 
related to automated vehicles.

           REVIEW OF COMPLIANCE WITH APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS

    Section 9001 of the FAST Act (P.L. 114-94) requires the 
Comptroller General to review the compliance of the National 
Surface Transportation and Innovative Finance Bureau with the 
requirements for reviewing applications. The GAO is expected to 
release its report in early 2019.
     SUBCOMMITTEE ON RAILROADS, PIPELINES, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115TH CONGRESS


 JEFF DENHAM, California, Chairman
MICHAEL E. CAPUANO, Massachusetts, 
          Ranking Member

DONALD M. PAYNE, Jr., New Jersey     JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee
ELIJAH E. CUMMINGS, Maryland         SAM GRAVES, Missouri
STEVE COHEN, Tennessee               LOU BARLETTA, Pennsylvania
ALBIO SIRES, New Jersey              DANIEL WEBSTER, Florida
JOHN GARAMENDI, California           MARK MEADOWS, North Carolina
ANDRE CARSON, Indiana                SCOTT PERRY, Pennsylvania
RICHARD M. NOLAN, Minnesota          MARK SANFORD, South Carolina
ELIZABETH H. ESTY, Connecticut       TODD ROKITA, Indiana
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               JOHN KATKO, New York
FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida         BRIAN BABIN, Texas
MARK DeSAULNIER, California          RANDY K. WEBER, Sr., Texas
DANIEL LIPINSKI, Illinois            BRUCE WESTERMAN, Arkansas
GRACE F. NAPOLITANO, California      LLOYD SMUCKER, Pennsylvania
PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon (ex officio)PAUL MITCHELL, Michigan
                                     JOHN J. FASO, New York, Vice Chair
                                     JASON LEWIS, Minnesota
                                     MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
                                     BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania (ex 
                                     officio)

                         Legislative Activities


                STB Information Security Improvement Act


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-269 (H.R. 4921)

Summary

    This bill requires the Surface Transportation Board (STB) 
to develop a timeline and plan to implement the recommendations 
of the Inspector General of the Department of Transportation in 
Report No. FI2018002 concerning information security. The STB 
must report annually to the House Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure and the Senate Committee on Commerce on 
progress in implementing the recommendations until the 
implementation is complete. No additional funds are authorized 
to carry out the requirements of this bill.

Legislative History

    Feb. 6, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, 
Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials.
    Feb. 14, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 14, 2018. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Apr. 5, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-622.
    Apr. 5, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
475.
    Apr. 10, 2018. Mr. Mitchell moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Apr. 10, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H3068)
    Apr. 10, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 4921.
    Apr. 10, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H3083)
    Apr. 10, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H3068)
    Apr. 10, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 10, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    Apr. 11, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.
    Oct. 1, 2018. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation discharged by Unanimous Consent. (consideration: 
CR S6415)
    Oct. 1, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent.
    Oct. 2, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 4, 2018. Presented to President.
    Oct. 16, 2018. Signed by President.
    Oct. 16, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-269.

                         Pending in the Senate


 To Require the Federal Railroad Administration To Provide Appropriate 
Congressional Notice of Comprehensive Safety Assessments Conducted With 
     Respect to Intercity or Commuter Rail Passenger Transportation


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 1093)

Summary

    This bill requires the Federal Railroad Administration: (1) 
within 10 days after initiating a comprehensive safety 
assessment of an entity providing regularly scheduled intercity 
or commuter rail passenger transportation to notify specified 
congressional committees and each Member of Congress 
representing a state in which the service that is the subject 
of the assessment is being conducted is located; and (2) within 
90 days after completing such safety assessment, to report the 
results to such committees and Members.

Legislative History

    Feb. 16, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit.
    Feb. 16, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, 
Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Subcommittees discharged from further 
consideration.
    Mar. 29, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Mar. 13, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-594.
    Mar. 13, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
452.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
452.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9138-9139)
    Sep. 27, 2018. Mr. Denham asked unanimous consent to take 
from the Speaker's table and consider.
    Sep. 27, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR H9138; text of amendment in the nature of a substitute: CR 
H9138-9139)
    Sep. 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 27, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

            Promoting Cross-Border Energy Infrastructure Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 2883)

Summary

    This bill prohibits any person from constructing, 
connecting, operating, or maintaining a border-crossing 
facility for the import or export of oil, natural gas, or 
electricity across an international border of the United States 
without obtaining a certificate of crossing.
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), with 
respect to oil or natural gas pipelines, or the Department of 
Energy (DOE), with respect to electric transmission facilities, 
must issue a certificate of crossing for the border-crossing 
facility within 120 days after final action is taken under the 
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, unless it is not in 
the public interest.
    DOE, as a condition of issuing a certificate, must require 
that the border-crossing facility be constructed, connected, 
operated, or maintained consistent with specified policies and 
standards of: (1) the Electric Reliability Organization and 
applicable regional entity, and (2) the Regional Transmission 
Organization or Independent System Operator with operational or 
functional control over the border-crossing facility.
    The bill amends the Natural Gas Act to require FERC to 
approve within 30 days after receipt any application for the 
importation or exportation of natural gas to or from Canada or 
Mexico.
    No presidential permit as required under specified 
executive orders shall be necessary for the construction, 
connection, operation, or maintenance of an oil or natural gas 
pipeline or electric transmission facility, including any 
border-crossing facility.
    No certificate of crossing shall be required for a 
modification to an existing facility that is operating for the 
import or export of oil, natural gas, or electricity prior to 
the enactment of this bill.
    FERC and DOE must publish a final rule in the Federal 
Register within one year to carry out the requirements of this 
bill.

Legislative History

    June 13, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, 
Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials.
    June 22, 2017. Approved for Full Committee action by the 
Subcommittee on Energy, Committee on Energy and Commerce.
    June 28, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by a vote of 
31-20 by the Committee on Energy and Commerce.
    July 17, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Energy and Commerce. H. Rept. 115-225, Part I.
    July 17, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    July 17, 2017. Committee on Natural Resources discharged.
    July 17, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
160.
    July 18, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 454 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 
2910, H.R. 2883 and H.R. 218. The resolution makes in order at 
anytime on the legislative day of July 20, 2017, for the 
Speaker to entertain motions that the House suspend the rules, 
relating to the bill H.R. 2825. Also the rule provides that the 
Committee on Appropriations may at any time before 5 p.m. on 
Friday, July 21, 2017, file privileged reports to accompany 
measures making appropriations for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2018.
    July 19, 2017. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 454. (consideration: CR H6010-6023)
    July 19, 2017. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 
2910, H.R. 2883 and H.R. 218. The resolution makes in order at 
any time on the legislative day of July 20, 2017, for the 
Speaker to entertain motions that the House suspend the rules, 
relating to the bill H.R. 2825. Also the rule provides that the 
Committee on Appropriations may at any time before 5 p.m. on 
Friday, July 21, 2017, file privileged reports to accompany 
measures making appropriations for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2018.
    July 19, 2017. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
454 and Rule XVIII.
    July 19, 2017. The Speaker designated the Honorable John J. 
Duncan, Jr. to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    July 19, 2017. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with 
one hour of general debate on H.R. 2883.
    July 19, 2017. H.AMDT.207 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Engel. (consideration: CR H6018-6021; text: CR H6018) Amendment 
sought to ensure that permitting authority for cross-border 
pipelines remains with the Department of State.
    July 19, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 454, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Engel amendment No. 1.
    July 19, 2017. H.AMDT.208 Amendment (A002) offered by Ms. 
Tsongas. (consideration: CR H6019, H6021; text: CR H6019) 
Amendment sought to state FERC may not issue a certificate of 
crossing if any part of the oil or natural gas pipeline project 
is to be located on lands required under Federal, State, or 
local law to be managed for purposes of natural resource 
conservation or recreation.
    July 19, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 454, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Tsongas amendment No. 2.
    July 19, 2017. H.AMDT.209 Amendment (A003) offered by Mr. 
Green, Gene. (consideration: CR H6019-6020; text: CR H6019) An 
amendment numbered 3 printed in Part B of House Report 115-235 
to clarify the applicability of the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) to projects affected by the bill.
    July 19, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 454, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Gene Green (TX) amendment No. 3.
    July 19, 2017. H.AMDT.209 On agreeing to the Green, Gene 
amendment (A003) Agreed to by voice vote.
    July 19, 2017. H.AMDT.207 On agreeing to the Engel 
amendment (A001) Failed by recorded vote: 182-246 (Roll no. 
395).
    July 19, 2017. H.AMDT.208 On agreeing to the Tsongas 
amendment (A002) Failed by recorded vote: 179-247 (Roll no. 
396).
    July 19, 2017. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 2883.
    July 19, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    July 19, 2017. The House adopted the amendment in the 
nature of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union.
    July 19, 2017. Mr. O'Halleran moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Energy and Commerce. (text: CR 
H6021)
    July 19, 2017. The House proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the O'Halleran motion to recommit with instructions. 
The instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
bill to be reported back to the House with an amendment to a 
requirement that all iron and steel products used in 
construction, connection, operation, and maintenance of the 
border-crossing facility be produced in the United States.
    July 19, 2017. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    July 19, 2017. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by recorded vote: 193-232 (Roll no. 397).
    July 19, 2017. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 254-
175 (Roll no. 398). (text of amendment in the nature of a 
substitute: CR H6017-6018)
    July 19, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 20, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

                    FRA Safety Data Improvement Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 4925)

Summary

    This bill directs the Federal Railroad Administration to 
develop a plan, and a timeline to carry out such plan, to 
implement the recommendations from the Inspector General Report 
No. ST2017045 of the Department of Transportation to improve 
its management and collection of railroad safety data. No 
additional funds are authorized to carry out the requirements 
of this bill.

Legislative History

    Feb. 6, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, 
Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials.
    Feb. 14, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    Feb. 14, 2018. Ordered reported by voice vote.
    Apr. 5, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-623.
    Apr. 5, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
476.
    Apr. 10, 2018. Mr. Mitchell moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill.
    Apr. 10, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR3068-3069)
    Apr. 10, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 4925.
    Apr. 10, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H3068-3069)
    Apr. 10, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 11, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation.

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                      Letters (Majority/Minority)


                                Hearings


   BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: THE STATE OF 
   RAILROAD, PIPELINE, AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY REGULATION AND 
              OPPORTUNITIES FOR REFORM (SERIAL NO. 115-11)

    On April 26, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to review the state of railroad, pipeline, and 
hazardous materials safety regulation and explore opportunities 
for reform to ensure America's economic competitiveness in the 
21st century. The Subcommittee received testimony from the 
American Short Line and Regional Railroad Association, BNSF 
Railway, the Interested Parties for Hazardous Materials 
Transportation, the American Petroleum Institute, the 
Interstate Natural Gas Association of America, and the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen.

  BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: CHALLENGES AND 
 OPPORTUNITIES FOR INTERCITY PASSENGER RAIL SERVICE (SERIAL NO. 115-19)

    On June 22, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to examine challenges and opportunities related to 
intercity passenger rail service in the United States, 
including federal investments in passenger rail and the 
President's Fiscal Year 2018 Budget request, how funds provided 
under the 2009 stimulus legislation have been used and what has 
been accomplished, the private sector's investments in 
developing high-speed rail service, and Amtrak's rehabilitation 
work at New York's Penn Station. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Federal Railroad Administration, Amtrak, the 
Gateway Program Development Corporation, Florida East Coast 
Industries, LLC, and the California High-Speed Rail Authority.

BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: RAIL STAKEHOLDERS' 
                    PERSPECTIVES (SERIAL NO. 115-27)

    On October 4, 2017, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing to gather stakeholder perspectives from the railroad 
industry, suppliers, and labor on rail infrastructure 
investment. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the 
Association of American Railroads, Amtrak, the American Short 
Line and Regional Railroad Association, the Railway Supply 
Institute, and the AFL-CIO.

OVERSIGHT OF POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION IN THE UNITED STATES 
                          (SERIAL NO. 115-35)

    On February 15, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the implementation of Positive Train Control 
(PTC) on America's freight and passenger rail network. PTC 
technologies are designed to automatically stop or slow a train 
before certain accidents occur--specifically, train-to-train 
collisions, derailments caused by excessive speed, unauthorized 
incursions by trains onto sections of track where maintenance 
activities are taking place, and movements of trains through 
track switches left in the wrong position. The Subcommittee 
heard testimony from Congresssmen Derek Kilmer (D-WA) and Denny 
Heck (D-WA), as well as the Federal Railroad Administration, 
National Transportation Safety Board, Association of American 
Railroads, Amtrak, American Public Transportation Association, 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen.

 OVERSIGHT OF THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 
                        2015 (SERIAL NO. 115-43)

    On April 17, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the implementation of the Surface 
Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 2015. The Act 
focused on making the STB a more efficient, independent, and 
transparent agency and provided measures to resolve rail 
shipper and rail carrier disputes. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Chairman and Vice Chairman of the Surface 
Transportation Board.

PIPES ACT OF 2016 IMPLEMENTATION: OVERSIGHT OF PIPELINE SAFETY PROGRAMS 
                          (SERIAL NO. 115-47)

    On June 21, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the implementation of the Protecting our 
Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety (PIPES) Act of 
2016 and matters relating to oversight of the Pipeline and 
Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA). The PIPES 
Act, the most recent reauthorization of PHMSA, sought to 
enhance pipeline safety and increase transparency by requiring 
the agency to update Congress every 60 days on progress toward 
completion of statutory mandates on pipeline safety. The 
hearing examined the status of PHMSA's completion of mandates 
from the PIPES Act and the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory 
Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011. The Subcommittee heard 
testimony from the Administrator of PHMSA, Association of Oil 
Pipe Lines, American Petroleum Institute, Interstate Natural 
Gas Association, and Pipeline Safety Trust.

 CONTINUED OVERSIGHT OF THE CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL PROJECT (SERIAL 
                              NO. 115-51)

    On August 9, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight field 
hearing in Sacramento, CA, to review the status and recent 
changes to the California high-speed rail project, including 
the most recent modifications to the project's evolving 
business plan which was released in June 2018. The 
multibillion-dollar project is the largest in the federal High-
Speed Intercity Passenger Rail program administered by the 
Federal Railroad Administration. The Subcommittee received 
testimony from the Office of the Inspector General of the 
Department of Transportation, California High-Speed Rail 
Authority, California High-Speed Rail Peer Review Group, and 
State Building and Construction Trades Council of California.

THE STATE OF POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION IN THE UNITED STATES 
                          (SERIAL NO. 115-55)

    On September 13, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to review the status of implementing Positive Train 
Control (PTC) technologies on the Nation's rail network.
    The Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008 initially required 
that certain freight, commuter, and passenger rail lines in the 
United States install PTC by December 31, 2015. The development 
and installation of new, and in some cases non-existent, 
components of PTC technologies led to various challenges. 
Subsequently, after both the Federal Railroad Administration 
and the Government Accountability Office (GAO) identified the 
need for an extension of the 2015 deadline, Congress 
unanimously approved extending the deadline to December 31, 
2018, with the authority for the Secretary to provide each 
railroad, on a case-by-case basis, an additional extension of 
no more than 24 months. Congress has also provided for 
significant funding, through grants and loan programs, to 
further assist railroads in implementing PTC. The Subcommittee 
received testimony from the Federal Railroad Administration, 
National Transportation Safety Board, GAO, Amtrak, Association 
of American Railroads, American Public Transportation 
Association, and Altamont Corridor Express.

                                Meetings


                     EMERGING RAILROAD TECHNOLOGIES

    On March 21, 2017, the Subcommittee held a roundtable 
discussion on new and emerging technologies in the rail 
industry and the promise that they hold for safety, 
reliability, and efficiency. The Subcommittee heard from the 
panelists about ultrasound, laser, and other technologies to 
obtain information about the condition of equipment components 
and track; new locomotives that use data to maximize train 
performance, while reducing emissions and fuel consumption; the 
use of drones to inspect track and bridges; and other 
technology breakthroughs. Panel participants were GE 
Transportation, the Sheet Metal, Air, Rail, and Transportation 
Union, the Transportation Technology Center, Inc., and Union 
Pacific Railroad Company.

                           Oversight Letters


 REQUESTING AUDIT OF DOT'S OVERSIGHT OF THE CALIFORNIA HIGH SPEED RAIL 
                                PROJECT

    On December 11, 2017, the Subcommittee on Railroads, 
Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials, requested an audit of DOT's 
analysis of risk in reviewing HSR business plans and financial 
reports, which must occur to understand taxpayer vulnerability 
regarding this project.

                 GAO'S REPORTING ON PTC IMPLEMENTATION

    On June 26, 2018, the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, 
and Hazardous Materials, requested GAO to update elements of 
its March 2018 report on railroads' progress in implementing 
PTC. Updates include the progress of all railroads have made in 
implementing PTC and the challenges they've faced, and the 
extent to which FRA has adapted its management and oversight 
approach in recent months to assist railroads in either meeting 
the deadline or qualifying for an extension.

        CONCERN OVER C-49, THE TRANSPORTATION MODERNIZATION ACT

    On June 8, 2018, the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, 
and Hazardous Materials, requested the STB to continue its 
efforts in closely monitoring Bill C-49, enacted by the 
Canadian Parliament, the new law creates a potential conflict 
with US law by requiring certain US rail carriers that have 
only a few miles of operations or track in Canada to provide 
Transport Canada, monthly data for any of the carriers' freight 
traffic that originates or terminates in Canada, including 
information regarding the portion of the movement that is in 
the US.

                       Minority Oversight Letters


                          DANGEROUS GOOD PANEL

    On June 21, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation to oppose the 
proposal the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA) submitted to replace the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) as the lead United States 
representative on the Dangerous Goods Panel of the 
International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

                           OPIOIDS GUIDELINES

    On October 10, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Subcommittee on Aviation Ranking Member Rick Larsen (D-WA), 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Ranking 
Member John Garamendi (D-CA), Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management Ranking 
Member Hank Johnson (D-GA), Subcommittee on Highways and 
Transit Ranking Member Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA), and Subcommittee on 
Water Resources and Environment Ranking Member Grace Napolitano 
(D-CA) sent a letter to the Secretary of Transportation urging 
DOT to take action and finalize the Notice of Proposed 
Rulemaking (NPRM) issued on January 23, 2017, to adopt HHS 
guidelines on opioids.

                  DANGEROUS GOODS PANEL REPRESENTATION

    On October 19, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation expressing serious 
concern over the decision to replace the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) with the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials 
Safety Administration (PHMSA) as the Department of 
Transportation's (DOT) lead United States representative on the 
Dangerous Goods Panel (DGP) of the International Civil Aviation 
Organization (ICAO).

                           LONG TRAIN SAFETY

    On November 7, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA) sent a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting a GAO study on the safety and 
other impacts of longer trains, in response to a CSX train 
derailment that occurred on August 2, 2017 in Hyndman, 
Pennsylvania.

FAILURE OF PHMSA ADDRESS PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ISSUES

    On November 9, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation expressing serious 
concerns with the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration's (PHMSA) continued failure to implement 
congressionally mandates included in the Pipeline Safety, 
Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011 (2011 Act) 
(P.L. 112-90).

                 POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION

    On December 28, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA) sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Transportation requesting information and updates 
on the status of the railroads implementation of Positive Train 
Control (PTC) required on all freight, commuter, and intercity 
passenger railroads mandated in the Rail Safety Improvement Act 
of 2008 (P.L. 110-432).

                 SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD VACANCIES

    On January 3, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA) sent a letter to 
President Donald J. Trump expressing concern over the long-
standing vacancies on the Surface Transportation Board (STB).

                      PASSENGER TRAIN SPEED LIMITS

    On January 10, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), Member 
of Congress Rick Larsen (D-WA), Member of Congress Suzan 
DelBene (D-WA), Member of Congress Derek Kilmer (D-WA), Member 
of Congress Pramila Jayapal (D-WA), and Member of Congress Adam 
Smith (D-WA) sent a letter to the Secretary of Transportation 
requesting information from DOT regarding the status of the 
passenger railroad speed limit action plans required by the 
Fixing America's Surface Transportation (FAST) Act of 2015, in 
wake of the Amtrak train derailment in Washington.

              AMTRAK POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL IMPLEMENTATION

    On January 17, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA) sent a letter to the 
Amtrak President and Chief Executive Officer requesting 
information on the safety culture at Amtrak and the status of 
Positive Train Control (PTC) implementation.

                   DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS

    On February 18, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Secretary of Transportation, Secretary of Health 
and Human Services, and the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard 
requesting a review of DOT's drug and alcohol testing program 
to evaluate patterns of increased usage in each mode of 
transportation, including the United States Coast Guard (USCG), 
to determine if the program is effective or needs improvement.

                   POSITIVE TRAIN CONTROL EXEMPTIONS

    On June 21, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR), 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA), Member of Congress Steve 
Cohen (D-TN), and Member of Congress Jim Cooper (D-TN) sent a 
letter to the Administrator of the Federal Railroad 
Administration (FRA) requesting information regarding Positive 
Train Control (PTC) exemptions issued by the FRA.

                   SAFETY AND INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS

    On September 18, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter A. DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials 
Ranking Member Michael Capuano (D-MA), Member of Congress 
Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Member of Congress John Garamendi 
(D-CA), Member of Congress Grace Napolitano (D-CA), Member of 
Congress Daniel Lipinski (D-IL), Member of Congress Donald M. 
Payne (D-NJ), Member of Congress William Keating (D-MA), Member 
of Congress Tom O'Halleran (D-AZ), Member of Congress Albio 
Sires (D-NJ), Member of Congress Seth Moulton (D-MA), Member of 
Congress James P. McGovern (D-MA), Member of Congress Richard 
Nolan (D-MN), Member of Congress Brian Higgins (D-NY), Member 
of Congress Alan Lowenthal (D-CA), Member of Congress Zoe 
Lofgren (D-CA), Member of Congress Jacky Rosen (D-NV), Member 
of Congress Charlie Crist (D-FL), Member of Congress C.A. Dutch 
Ruppersberger (D-MD), Member of Congress Andre Carson (D-IN), 
Member of Congress Peter Welch (D-VT), Member of Congress 
Michael Doyle (D-PA), Member of Congress Gene Green (D-TX) 
Member of Congress David P. Joyce (R-OH) Member of Congress 
John Katko (R-NY), Member of Congress Brian Fitzpatrick (R-PA), 
and member of Congress Don Young (R-AK) sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Transportation expressing strong opposition and 
rejection of the May 31, 2018 petition for waiver of compliance 
(see 83 Fed. Reg. 35052 (July 24, 2018)), in which the Kansas 
City Southern Railway (KCSR) seeks relief from critical Federal 
safety and inspection requirements.

                      Oversight Within Legislation


           OVERSIGHT OF DOT FISCAL YEAR 2018 AND 2019 BUDGETS

    The Subcommittee reviewed and evaluated the fiscal year 
2018 and fiscal year 2019 budget proposals for the Federal 
Railroad Administration (FRA), Amtrak, the Surface 
Transportation Board (STB), the Railroad Retirement Board, the 
National Mediation Board, and the Pipelines and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA).

          OVERSIGHT OF RAIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND SAFETY PROGRAMS

    The Passenger Rail Reform and Investment Act of 2015 
(PRRIA), enacted as Title XI of the Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation Act (FAST Act), reauthorized Amtrak and programs 
administered by the FRA. The Act restructured and consolidated 
the grant programs administered by FRA to include: Consolidated 
Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvement Grants, authorizing 
grants for passenger and freight rail projects that improve 
safety, reliability or efficiency; Federal Partnership for 
State of Good Repair Grants, authorizing capital grants to 
reduce the state-of-good-repair backlog for assets used to 
provide intercity passenger rail service; and Restoration and 
Enhancement Grants, authorizing operating assistance grants to 
initiate, restore, or enhance intercity passenger rail service. 
PRRIA authorized a total of $2.2 billion for these programs for 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020. PRRIA also made several 
improvements to the Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement 
Financing (RRIF) program, which provides long-term, low-
interest loans and loan guarantees for railroad-related 
improvements. The Subcommittee provided oversight of the grant 
and loan programs and the ongoing construction of projects 
throughout the country as grantees built-out their projects.

                          OVERSIGHT OF AMTRAK

    PRRIA reauthorized Amtrak, Amtrak's Office of the Inspector 
General, and the Northeast Corridor Commission through fiscal 
year 2020. The Act fundamentally changed the authorization 
structure of Amtrak by providing funding by ``lines of 
business'', (specifically the Northeast Corridor and the 
National Network) rather than providing separate grants for 
operating and capital/debt service activities. All costs and 
revenues of the company must be allocated to the newly created 
accounts. The Act also reformed Amtrak's operations, budgeting, 
and planning processes to reflect the lines-of-business 
approach. Further, the Act allowed for more private sector 
participation in stations, rights-of-way, and operations. PRRIA 
established a State-Supported Route Advisory Committee to help 
remedy issues pertaining to cost allocation on state-supported 
routes, and required Amtrak to contract with a third party 
entity to develop and recommend objective methodologies for 
Amtrak to use in evaluating intercity passenger rail routes and 
services. The Subcommittee conducted oversight of Amtrak, 
Amtrak's Office of the Inspector General, and the Northeast 
Corridor Commission, as well as implementation of the 2008 and 
2015 Acts.

             OVERSIGHT OF THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION BOARD

    The Surface Transportation Board Reauthorization Act of 
2015 reauthorized the STB for the first time since the agency 
was created in 1995. The Act expanded the Board from three to 
five members; set expedited timetables for consideration of 
rate complaints; authorized the STB to initiate investigations 
on its own initiative; modified the voluntary arbitration 
process for small rate disputes; and made other changes to 
improve the STB's efficiency and responsiveness. The 
Subcommittee conducted oversight of the STB and its 
implementation of the reauthorization Act.

          OVERSIGHT OF THE CALIFORNIA HIGH-SPEED RAIL PROGRAM

    The California high-speed rail project involves the 
construction of a new high-speed rail line connecting the San 
Francisco Bay Area, Los Angeles, and San Diego. To date, 
federal funding for the project has totaled approximately $3.9 
billion, most of which was made available by the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The project is 
the largest recipient of FRA's High Speed and Intercity 
Passenger Rail Program and the Federal ARRA funds must be 
expended before September 2017. Construction has begun in the 
Central Valley, but funding to complete the project remains 
uncertain. The Subcommittee provided oversight of the project.

                 OVERSIGHT OF PIPELINE SAFETY PROGRAMS

    Congress reauthorized PHMSA's pipeline safety program in 
the 114th Congress by enacting the Protecting our 
Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety Act of 2016 
(PIPES). The PIPES Act ensures the agency completes its 
responsibilities under the Pipeline Safety, Regulatory 
Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011; provided for a number 
of assessments of the current safety program; included the 
establishment of minimum standards for underground natural gas 
storage systems and liquefied natural gas facilities; provided 
PHMSA with emergency order authority to impose emergency 
restrictions, prohibitions, and safety measures on owners and 
operators of pipeline facilities to abate imminent hazards; and 
reformed PHMSA to be a more dynamic, data-driven regulator. The 
Subcommittee conducted oversight of the Office of Pipeline 
Safety at PHMSA and its implementation of the Act.

        OVERSIGHT OF PIPELINE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY PROGRAM

    The Hazardous Material Transportation Safety Improvement 
Act of 2015, enacted as Title VII of the FAST Act, reauthorized 
the hazardous materials safety program administered by PHMSA. 
The Act included a number of provisions to enhance the safety 
of hazardous materials transportation, with a significant focus 
on the transportation of flammable liquids, including crude oil 
and ethanol, by rail. The Act requires all new tank cars to be 
equipped with thermal blankets and protection for top fittings; 
mandates that all DOT-111 tank cars in flammable liquids 
service be retrofitted in accordance with new DOT standards; 
requires railroads to provide states and local responders with 
advanced notification and information on high-hazard flammable 
trains; and authorizes grant funding for to assist communities 
in preparing for and responding to hazardous materials 
accidents. The Act also directs the Government Accountability 
Office to conduct an evaluation of Electronic Controlled 
Pneumatic (ECP) brake systems and directs the Department of 
Transportation, through the National Academy of Sciences, to 
conduct tests of ECP brake systems. The Subcommittee continued 
oversight of PHMSA's hazardous materials safety program.
            SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT


                     U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES


                             115TH CONGRESS


GARRET GRAVES, Louisiana, Chairman
 GRACE F. NAPOLITANO, California, 
          Ranking Member

LOIS FRANKEL, Florida                ERIC A. ``RICK'' CRAWFORD, 
FREDERICA S. WILSON, Florida         Arkansas
JARED HUFFMAN, California            BOB GIBBS, Ohio
ALAN S. LOWENTHAL, California        DANIEL WEBSTER, Florida
EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON, Texas         THOMAS MASSIE, Kentucky
JOHN GARAMENDI, California           RODNEY DAVIS, Illinois
DINA TITUS, Nevada                   MARK SANFORD, South Carolina
SEAN PATRICK MALONEY, New York       ROB WOODALL, Georgia
ELIZABETH H. ESTY, Connecticut       TODD ROKITA, Indiana
CHERI BUSTOS, Illinois               JOHN KATKO, New York
JULIA BROWNLEY, California           BRIAN BABIN, Texas
BRENDA L. LAWRENCE, Michigan         DAVID ROUZER, North Carolina
PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon (ex officio)MIKE BOST, Illinois
                                     RANDY K. WEBER, SR., Texas
                                     DOUG LaMALFA, California
                                     A. DREW FERGUSON IV, Georgia
                                     BRIAN J. MAST, Florida
                                     BILL SHUSTER, Pennsylvania (ex 
                                     officio)

                         Legislative Activities


                              Public Laws


        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-91 (H.R. 2810)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2018 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.
    The bill authorizes appropriations to DOD for: (1) 
Procurement, including aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked 
combat vehicles, ammunition, shipbuilding and conversion, space 
procurement, and other procurement; (2) Research, Development, 
Test, and Evaluation; (3) Operation and Maintenance; (4) 
Working Capital Funds; (5) the Joint Urgent Operational Needs 
Fund; (6) Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction; (7) Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities; (8) the Defense 
Inspector General; (9) the Defense Health Program; (10) the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home; (11) Overseas Contingency 
Operations; and (12) Military Construction.
    The bill also authorizes the fiscal year 2018 personnel 
strength for active duty and reserve forces and sets forth 
policies regarding compensation and other personnel benefits, 
the Ready Reserve Force and Military Sealift Command surge 
fleet, and matters relating to foreign nations.
    The Committee worked with the Committee on Armed Services 
to clear provisions in H.R. 2810 within the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure's jurisdiction.

Legislative History

    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H8004-8008, H8008-8009, H8009-
8010)
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Langevin moved that the House instruct 
conferees. (consideration: CR H8004-8008, H8008-8009, H8009-
8010; text as House agreed to Senate amendment: CR H8004)
    Oct. 12, 2017. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Langevin motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 2810. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to disagree with subsection 
(c) of section 336 of the Senate amendment, to recede from 
section 1064 of the House bill and to disagree with section 
1087 of the Senate amendment.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 184-237 (Roll no. 564).
    Oct. 12, 2017. Mr. Thornberry moved that the House to close 
portions of the conference.
    Oct. 12, 2017. On motion to close portions of the 
conference Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: 414-8 (Roll no. 
565).
    Oct. 12, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Franks (AZ), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, 
Wittman, Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Stefanik, 
Knight, Bacon, Smith (WA), Brady (PA), Davis (CA), Langevin, 
Larsen (WA), Cooper, Bordallo, Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, 
Speier, Veasey, and Gabbard.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for consideration of 
matters within the jurisdiction of that committee under clause 
11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and Schiff.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on the Budget for consideration of sec. 1262 of the 
House bill, and sec. 4 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Johnson (OH), Bergman, 
and Yarmuth.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce for consideration of 
secs. 221, 551, 555, and 3509 of the House bill, and secs. 236, 
551-53, 3116, 5508, and 6001 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx, Byrne, and Scott 
(VA).
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of secs. 
313, 314, 601, 723, 727, 729, 732, 3118, and 3122 of the House 
bill, and secs. 601, 701, 725, 732, 1089A, 1625, and 3114 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Barton, and Pallone.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of sec. 862 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Barr, Williams, and Waters, Maxine.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of secs. 864, 
1032, 1039, 1040, 1058, 1201, 1203-05, 1211, 1222, 1223, 1231, 
1232, 1234, 1243, 1246, 1247, 1265, 1270A, 1272, 1276, 1278, 
1280, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, 1687, 2841, and 3117 of the House 
bill, and secs. 111, 861, 867, 1011, 1203-05, 1212, 1213, 1231-
33, 1241-45, 1250, 1261-63, 1270B, 1270C, 1282, 1283, 1301, 
1302, 1531, and 1651 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Royce (CA), Donovan, and Engel.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 515, 
1062, 1063, 1067, 1080, 1695, 2843, and 3510 of the House bill, 
and secs. 520A, 529, 1035, 1081, 1083, 1217, 1264, and 14013 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Issa, and Conyers.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of secs. 601, 
1062, 1265, 2827, 2828, 2831, 2832, 2844, 2863, subtitle F of 
title XXVIII, and sec. 2863 of the House bill, and secs. 311, 
338, 601, 1263, 1264, 2850, and 12801 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Westerman, Cheney, 
and Grijalva.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for consideration 
of secs. 323, 501, 801, 803, 859-860A, 873, and 1101-09 of the 
House bill, and secs. 218, 544, 557, 801, 812, 821, 822, 829, 
852, 902, 931, 934, 938, 1045, 1093, 1094, 1101, 1102, 1104-06, 
1111-13, 2821, 2822, 6005, 6012, 10804, 11023-25, and 11603 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Meadows, Ross, and Lynch.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for consideration 
of sec. 223 of the House bill and secs. 897, 898, 1662-64, and 
6002 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and Johnson, E.B.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 801, 
860B, 867, 1701-04, 1711-13, 1721-23, 1731-37, and 1741 of the 
House bill, and secs. 854, 862, 897, 898, 899C, 10801, and 
10802 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Chabot, Kelly (MS), and Velazquez.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs. 122, 311, 546, 601, 1082, 1617, 1695, 
3501, 3502, 3505, and 3507-10 of the House bill, and secs. 331, 
601, 1048, 6002, 13501, 13502, 13508, 13513, 13607, and 14013 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Graves (MO), Hunter, and Bustos.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of secs. 572, 
573, 576, 578, 1077, and 2841 of the House bill, and secs. 731, 
1084, 1088, 1264, 11001, 11008, and 14004 of the Senate 
amendment, and modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), 
Bilirakis, and Walz.
    Oct. 12, 2017. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 701 of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Tiberi, Walorski, and Neal.
    Oct. 25, 2017. Conference held.
    Nov. 8, 2017. Conferees agreed to file conference report.
    Nov. 9, 2017. Conference report H. Rept. 115-404 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H8701-9136)
    Nov. 9, 2017. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    Nov. 13, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 616 
Reported to House. The resolution provides for one hour of 
general debate and closed rule for H.R. 2874. Also, the 
resolution provides for consideration of the conference report 
to accompany H.R. 2810.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Rule H. Res. 616 passed House.
    Nov. 14, 2017. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-404 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 616. (consideration: CR H9200-9209)
    Nov. 14, 2017. The House proceeded with 1 hour of debate on 
the Conference report to accompany H.R. 2810.
    Nov. 14, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Nov. 14, 2017. The House proceeded to consider the 
conference report H. Rept. 115-404 as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H9238-9239)
    Nov. 14, 2017. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 356-70 (Roll no. 631).
    Nov. 14, 2017. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Conference report considered in Senate.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Senate agreed to conference report by Voice 
Vote.
    Nov. 16, 2017. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Presented to President.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Signed by President.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Became Public Law No: 115-91.

 Brownfields Enhancement, Economic Redevelopment, and Reauthorization 
                              Act of 2017


         PUBLIC LAW 115-141 (DIVISION N) (H.R. 3017/H.R. 1625)

Summary

    The Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act (``the Brownfields Law''; P.L. 107-117) 
amended the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, 
and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund; P.L. 96-510) to 
authorize funding through EPA for brownfields assessment and 
cleanup grants, provide targeted liability protections, and 
increase support for state and tribal voluntary cleanup 
programs.
    H.R. 3017 makes targeted changes to the Brownfields Law to: 
increase funding limits for direct remediation grants; create a 
new multipurpose grant for entities to conduct assessment and 
remediation activities at one or more brownfield sites in a 
proposed area; expand eligibility for brownfields grants to 
certain nonprofit organizations; and expand grant eligibility 
to government entities that acquired brownfields property prior 
to the enactment of the Brownfields Law.
    The bill reauthorizes funding for brownfields grants and 
state voluntary cleanup programs for fiscal years 2018 to 2022.

Legislative History

    June 23, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    June 28, 2017. Ordered reported by voice vote by the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce.
    Sep. 11, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Energy and 
Commerce. H. Rept. 115-303, Part I.
    Sep. 11, 2017. House Committee on Transportation Granted an 
extension for further consideration ending not later than Oct. 
13, 2017.
    Oct. 12, 2017. House Committee on Transportation Granted an 
extension for further consideration ending not later than Nov. 
9, 2017.
    Nov. 9, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Nov. 9, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
298.
    Nov. 28, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 631 
Reported to House. The rules provides 1 hour of general debate 
on both bills. For H.R. 3017, the bill is closed to amendments. 
For H.R. 3905, the rule provides for specified amendments. The 
rule also provides for one motion to recommit with or without 
instructions on each bill.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 631. (consideration: CR H9538-9547)
    Nov. 30, 2018. The rules provides 1 hour of general debate 
on both bills. For H.R. 3017, the bill is closed to amendments. 
For H.R. 3905, the rule provides for a specified amendment. The 
rule also provides for one motion to recommit with or without 
instructions on each bill.
    Nov. 30, 2017. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on H.R. 3017.
    Nov. 30, 2017. The House resumed debate on H.R. 3017.
    Nov. 30, 2017. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Nov. 30, 2017. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H9559)
    Nov. 30, 2017. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 409-
8 (Roll no. 649). (text: CR H9539-9540)
    Nov. 30, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 1, 2017. Received in the Senate.
    See Division N of Public Law 115-141 (H.R. 1625) for 
further action.

    Promoting Hydropower Development at Existing Nonpowered Dams Act


         PUBLIC LAW 115-270 (SECTION 3003) (H.R. 2872/S. 3021)

Summary

    This bill amends the Federal Power Act to authorize the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to establish an 
expedited licensing process for issuing and amending licenses 
and preliminary permits for any qualifying facility as defined 
by this bill.

Legislative History

    June 12, 2017. Referred to the House Committee on Energy 
and Commerce.
    Dec. 6, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce by Voice Vote.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 115-
461, Part I.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Referred to the Committee on Natural 
Resources, and in addition to the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure, for a period to be subsequently determined 
by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such 
provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee 
concerned.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Referred to House Natural Resources.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Referred to House Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Committee on Natural Resources discharged.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
343.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Mr. Upton moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Dec. 12, 2017. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H9809-9812)
    Dec. 12, 2017. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 2872.
    Dec. 12, 2017. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H9809)
    Dec. 12, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Dec. 13, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.

            Innovative Stormwater Infrastructure Act of 2018


         PUBLIC LAW 115-270 (SECTION 4101) (H.R. 3906/S. 3021)

Summary

    This bill directs the Environmental Protection Agency to 
establish a stormwater infrastructure funding task force 
composed of representatives of Federal, State, and local 
governments and private (including nonprofit) entities to 
conduct a study on, and develop recommendations to improve, the 
availability of public and private sources of funding for the 
construction, rehabilitation, and operation and maintenance of 
stormwater infrastructure to meet the requirements of the 
Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

Legislative History

    Oct. 3, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    June 27, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    June 27, 2018. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    July 16, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-828, Part I.
    July 16, 2018. Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 
discharged.
    July 16, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
641.
    July 16, 2018. Mr. Graves (LA) moved to suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, as amended.
    July 16, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H6219-6221)
    July 16, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3906.
    July 16, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H6219)
    July 16, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 16, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    July 17, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018


                     PUBLIC LAW 115-232 (H.R. 5515)

Summary

    This bill authorizes fiscal year 2018 appropriations and 
sets forth policies for Department of Defense (DOD) programs 
and activities, including military personnel strengths. It does 
not provide budget authority, which is provided in subsequent 
appropriations legislation.

Legislative History

    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry asked unanimous consent that 
the House disagree to the Senate amendment, and request a 
conference. (consideration: CR H5782-5783; text: CR H5782)
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House disagree to the 
Senate amendment, and request a conference Agreed to without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Carbajal moved that the House instruct 
conferees.
    June 27, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the Carbajal motion to instruct conferees on H.R. 5515. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the 
managers on the part of the House to agree to section 703 of 
the Senate bill.
    June 27, 2018. The previous question was ordered without 
objection.
    June 27, 2018. On motion that the House instruct conferees 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 188-231 (Roll No. 300).
    June 27, 2018. Mr. Thornberry moved to close portions of 
the conference.
    June 27, 2018. On Closing Portions of the Conference Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 403-15 (Roll no. 301).
    June 27, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Armed Services for consideration of the House bill 
and the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Thornberry, Wilson (SC), LoBiondo, Bishop (UT), 
Turner, Rogers (AL), Shuster, Conaway, Lamborn, Wittman, 
Coffman, Hartzler, Scott, Austin, Cook, Byrne, Stefanik, Bacon, 
Banks (IN), Smith (WA), Davis (CA), Langevin, Cooper, Bordallo, 
Courtney, Tsongas, Garamendi, Speier, Veasey, Gabbard, 
O'Rourke, and Murphy (FL).
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of title 
XVII of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Latta, Johnson (OH), and Pallone.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Financial Services for consideration of title XVII 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    June 27, 2018. The Speaker appointed conferees--from the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of title XVII of 
the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Royce (CA), Kinzinger, and Engel.
    June 27, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House requests a conference.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence for 
consideration of matters within the jurisdiction of that 
committee under clause 11 of rule X: Nunes, Stewart, and 
Schiff.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Budget for consideration of secs. 
1252 and 1523 of the House bill, and secs. 4, 1002, 1032, and 
1721 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Womack and Yarmuth.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Education and the Workforce for 
consideration of secs. 228, 563, 564, 1094, and 3120C of the 
House bill, and secs. 561-63 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Foxx and Scott (VA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Energy and Commerce for consideration of 
secs. 701, 712, 1083, 1096, 3111-13, 3118, 3119, 3132, and 4305 
of the House bill, and secs. 315, 601, 714, 3111-15, 5802, and 
7509 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Walden, Hudson, and Pallone.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Financial Services for consideration of 
1299O-2 and 1236 of the House bill, and modifications committed 
to conference: Hensarling, Barr, and Waters, Maxine.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Foreign Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 346, 1042, 1202-06, 1210, 1211, 1221-23, 1230A, 1230D, 
1230F, 1231, 1234, 1236, 1237, 1239, 1240, 1254-56, 1264, 1267, 
1268, 1271, 1274, 1276, 1278, 1280, 1282, 1288, 1299O-1, 1299O-
2, 1299O-3, 1299O-4, 1301, 1302, 1521, 1522, and 3116 of the 
House bill, and secs. 331, 1061, 1063, 1201-04, 1207, 1211, 
1213, 1221-23, 1231-33, 1241, 1244, 1245, 1261, 1262, 1264-66, 
1269, 1301, 1302, 1531, 1622, 1623, 1654, 3113, 3116, 6002, 
6202-04, 6701, and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Royce (CA), Mast, and 
Engel.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Homeland Security for consideration of 
sec. 1634 of the House bill, and modifications committed to 
conference: McCaul, Ratcliffe, and Thompson (MS).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on the Judiciary for consideration of secs. 
826, 1043, 1050B, 1073, 1074, 1079, 1085, 1087, 1090, 1299O-2, 
4319, and 4710 of the House bill, and secs. 1025, 1035 and 1715 
of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Goodlatte, Sensenbrenner, and Nadler.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Natural Resources for consideration of 
secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 
2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 4810, 4837, division E, and 
sec. 6101 of the House bill, and secs. 601, 2833, 2836, and 
7518 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed to 
conference: Westerman and Grijalva.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform for 
consideration of secs. 506, 511, 569, 822, 831, 832, 834, 835, 
860, 875, 880-84, 886, 917, 1101-11, 4711, and 4829 of the 
House bill, and secs. 568, 595, 607, 632, 702, 813, 902, 937, 
1101-05, 1122-25, 1254B, 1628, 1639, 1640, 1716, 1726, 2835, 
and 6702 of the Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
to conference: Sanford, Ross, and Lynch.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology for 
consideration of secs. 854, 858, and 1603 of the House bill, 
and secs. 893 and 1604 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Smith (TX), Lucas, and 
Johnson, E.B.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Small Business for consideration of secs. 
811, 851-58, 861, 863-68, and 2803 of the House bill, and secs. 
893, 1626, and 6006 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Chabot, Knight, and Velazquez.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure for 
consideration of secs. 518, 554, 883, 1044, 1049, 1050B, 1075, 
1095, 1111, 2848, 3501, 3504, 3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division 
D of the House bill, and secs. 153, 556, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 
7501, 7502, 7507-09, 7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Comstock and 
Brownley (CA).
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Veterans' Affairs for consideration of 
secs. 547, 552, 582, 1411, and 2844 of the House bill, and 
secs. 721, 726, and 1431 of the Senate amendment, and 
modifications committed to conference: Roe (TN), Poliquin, and 
Walz.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed additional conferees--
from the Committee on Ways and Means for consideration of sec. 
701 of the House bill, and sec. 6201 of the Senate amendment, 
and modifications committed to conference: Reichert, Roskam, 
and Neal.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 313, 314, 316, 342, 1043, 1076, 1079, 
1252, 1523, 2822, 2830, 2830A, 2831, 2832, 2845-47, 3402, 3549, 
4810, 4837, division E, and sec. 6101 of the House bill and 
secs. 4, 601, 1002, 1032, 1721, 2833, 2836, and 7518 of the 
Senate amendment, and modifications committed to conference: 
Bergman.
    July 3, 2018. The Speaker appointed a conferee for 
consideration of secs. 228, 518, 554, 563, 564, 883, 1044, 
1049, 1050B, 1075, 1094, 1095, 1111, 2848, 3120C, 3501, 3504, 
3522-25, 3528, 3529, and division D of the House bill and secs. 
153, 556, 561-63, 601, 1604, 3501, 3502, 7501, 7502, 7507-09, 
7515, and 7517 of the Senate amendment, and modifications 
committed to conference: Lewis (MN).
    July 10, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion to insist on Senate amendment to 
House bill, agree to request for conference, and authorize the 
Presiding Officer to appoint conferees agreed to in Senate by 
Yea-Nay Vote. 91-8. Record Vote Number: 147.
    July 10, 2018. Senate insists on its amendment, agrees to 
request for conference, and authorizes the Presiding Officer to 
appoint conferees.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Cornyn to instruct Senate 
conferees (Committee on Foreign Investment) agreed to in Senate 
by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. Record Vote Number: 148.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees made in Senate.
    July 10, 2018. Motion by Senator Reed to instruct Senate 
conferees (NATO) agreed to in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 97-2. 
Record Vote Number: 149.
    July 10, 2018. Senate appointed conferees. McCain; Inhofe; 
Wicker; Fischer; Cotton; Rounds; Ernst; Tillis; Sullivan; 
Perdue; Cruz; Graham; Sasse; Scott; Crapo; Reed; Nelson; 
McCaskill; Shaheen; Gillibrand; Blumenthal; Donnelly; Hirono; 
Kaine; King; Heinrich; Warren; Peters; Brown.
    July 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    July 23, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-863 filed.
    July 24, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019.
    July 24, 2018. House recommitted the conference report 
pursuant to H. Res. 1019
    July 25, 2018. Conference report H. Rept. 115-874 filed. 
(text of conference report: CR H7202-7637)
    July 25, 2018. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 1027 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of the 
conference report to H.R. 5515.
    July 25, 2018. Conference papers: Senate report and 
manager's statement held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Rule H. Res. 1027 passed House.
    July 26, 2018. Mr. Thornberry brought up conference report 
H. Rept. 115-874 for consideration under the provisions of H. 
Res. 1027. (consideration: CR H7699-7709)
    July 26, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on the conference report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The House resumed debate on the conference 
report to accompany H.R. 5515.
    July 26, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    July 26, 2018. On agreeing to the conference report Agreed 
to by the Yeas and Nays: 359-54 (Roll no. 379). (consideration: 
CR H7708-7709)
    July 26, 2018. Motions to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    July 26, 2018. Conference papers: message on House action 
held at the desk in Senate.
    July 26, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5412-5417)
    July 26, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 presented in Senate. (CR S5412)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Conference report considered in Senate. 
(consideration: CR S5538-5543)
    Aug. 1, 2018. Cloture motion on the conference report to 
accompany H.R. 5515 withdrawn by unanimous consent in Senate.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Senate agreed to conference report by Yea-Nay 
Vote. 87-10. Record Vote Number: 181.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Presented to President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Signed by President.
    Aug. 13, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-232.

 A Bill To Rename a Waterway in the State of New York as the ``Joseph 
                         Sanford Jr. Channel''


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-260 (S. 1668)

Summary

    This bill redesignates the waterway in New York State known 
as the Negro Bar Channel as the ``Joseph Sanford Jr. Channel.''

Legislative History

    July 27, 2017. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation. (text of measure as 
introduced: CR S4331)
    Nov. 8, 2017. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Ordered to be reported without amendment 
favorably.
    Apr. 9, 2018. Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation. Reported by Senator Thune without amendment. 
With written report No. 115-221.
    Apr. 9, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 369.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S5560; text: CR S5560)
    Aug. 2, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Received in the House.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Mr. Shuster asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9060)
    Sep. 26, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR H9060)
    Sep. 26, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 28, 2018. Presented to President.
    Oct. 9, 2018. Signed by President.
    Oct. 9, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-260.

               America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018


                      PUBLIC LAW 115-270 (S. 3021)

Summary

    S. 3021, the America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018, 
contains four titles:
    Title I contains the Water Resources Development Act of 
2018, which authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to 
carry out water resources development activities for the 
Nation. These activities include navigation, flood damage 
reduction, shoreline protection, hydropower, dam safety, water 
supply, recreation, environmental restoration and protection, 
and disaster response and recovery. This title incorporates 
much of H.R. 8, the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 
2018, which passed the House in June 2018, as well as key 
provisions from S. 2800, the America's Water Infrastructure 
Act, that was unanimously approved by the Senate Environment 
and Public Works Committee in May 2018.
    Title II seeks to bring greater investment in and 
modernization of the country's aging drinking water 
infrastructure. It also helps facilitates compliance options 
for drinking water delivery systems.
    Title III encourages the use of clean, baseload hydropower 
by streamlining the burdensome regulatory approval process. The 
title also strengthens consumers' rights to challenge any 
energy rate change when the FERC fails to accept or deny a rate 
change.
    Title IV addresses stormwater and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements, and reauthorizes the Water Infrastructure Finance 
and Innovation Act (WIFIA) program.

Legislative History

    June 7, 2018. Read twice and referred to the Committee on 
Environment and Public Works.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Committee on Environment and Public Works. 
Reported by Senator Barrasso without amendment. Without written 
report.
    Aug. 1, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 550.
    Sep. 4, 2018. Passed Senate without amendment by Unanimous 
Consent. (consideration: CR S6032; text: CR S6032)
    Sep. 5, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Received in the House.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Referred to the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure.
    Sep. 5, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Mr. Shuster moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Sep. 13, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H8184-8228)
    Sep. 13, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on S. 3021.
    Sep. 13, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by voice vote. (text: CR H8185-8221)
    Sep. 13, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 13, 2018. The title of the measure was amended. Agreed 
to without objection.
    Sep. 17, 2018. Message on House action received in Senate 
and at desk: House amendments to Senate bill.
    Oct. 6, 2018. Measure laid before Senate by unanimous 
consent. (consideration: CR S6697-6698)
    Oct. 6, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendments to S. 3021 made in Senate.
    Oct. 6, 2018. Cloture motion on the motion to concur in the 
House amendments to S. 3021 presented in Senate. (CR S6697-
6698)
    Oct. 6, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 3021 with an amendment (SA 4048) made in 
Senate.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Amendment SA 4048 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S6698; text: CR S6698) To 
change the enactment date.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 Amendment SA 4049 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4048. (consideration: CR 
S6698; text: CR S6698) Of a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 6, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works the House 
message to accompany S. 3021 with instructions to report back 
forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4050) made in 
Senate.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4050 Amendment SA 4050 proposed by 
Senator McConnell. (consideration: CR S6698; text: CR S6698) To 
change the enactment date.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4051 Amendment SA 4051 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4050 (the instructions of the 
motion to refer). (consideration: CR S6698; text: CR S6698) Of 
a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 6, 2018. S.AMDT.4052 Amendment SA 4052 proposed by 
Senator McConnell to Amendment SA 4051. (consideration: CR 
S6698; text: CR S6698) Of a perfecting nature.
    Oct. 9, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6703-6719)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4050 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4051 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4052 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6703)
    Oct. 9, 2018. Cloture on the motion to concur in the House 
amendments to S. 3021 invoked in Senate by Yea-Nay Vote. 96-3. 
Record Vote Number: 224. (CR S6714-6715)
    Oct. 9, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to refer to 
Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works the House 
message to accompany S. 3021 with instructions to report back 
forthwith with the following amendment (SA 4050) fell when 
cloture was invoked on the motion to concur in the House 
amendments to S. 3021 in Senate.
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4050 SA 4050 fell when cloture invoked 
on the motion to concur in the House amendments to S. 3021.
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4051 SA 4051 fell when SA 4050 fell.
    Oct. 9, 2018. S.AMDT.4052 SA 4052 fell when SA 4051 fell.
    Oct. 10, 2018. Considered by Senate (Message from the House 
considered). (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 Considered by Senate (Message 
from the House considered). (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. Motion by Senator McConnell to concur in the 
House amendment to S. 3021 with an amendment (SA 4048) was 
withdrawn.
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4048 Proposed amendment SA 4048 
withdrawn in Senate. (consideration: CR S6747)
    Oct. 10, 2018. S.AMDT.4049 SA 4049 fell when SA 4048 
withdrawn.
    Oct. 10, 2018. Senate agreed in the House amendments to S. 
3021 by Yea-Nay Vote. 99-1. Record Vote Number: 225.
    Oct. 11, 2018. Message on Senate action sent to the House.
    Oct. 12, 2018. Presented to President.
    Oct. 23, 2018. Signed by President.
    Oct. 23, 2018. Became Public Law No: 115-270.

                         Pending In The Senate


                Water Resources Development Act of 2018


                     PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 8)

Summary

    This bill authorizes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to 
carry out water resources development activities for the 
Nation. These activities include navigation, flood damage 
reduction, shoreline protection, hydropower, dam safety, water 
supply, recreation, environmental restoration and protection, 
and disaster response and recovery. H.R. 8 also contains 
reforms to the Corps planning process, promotes timely project 
delivery, empowers non-Federal project sponsors, and 
strengthens congressional oversight.

Legislative History

    May 21, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    May 23, 2018. Subcommittee discharged from further 
consideration.
    May 23, 2018. Ordered reported, as amended, by voice vote.
    June 1, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-708.
    June 1, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
548.
    June 6, 2018. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 918. (consideration: CR H4798-4815; text: CR H4804-4813)
    June 6, 2018. Previous question shall be considered as 
ordered without intervening motions except motion to recommit 
with or without instructions. The resolution provides for 
consideration of the Senate amendment to H.R. 3249 in addition 
to providing for consideration of H.R. 8 and H.R. 5895. Each 
measure will be debatable for 1 hour. For H.R. 8, the 
resolution makes in order only those amendments printed in part 
A of the report. For H.R. 5895, the resolution makes in order 
only those amendments printed in part B of the report.
    June 6, 2018. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
918 and Rule XVIII.
    June 6, 2018. The Speaker designated the Honorable Gary J. 
Palmer to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    June 6, 2018. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one 
hour of general debate on H.R. 8.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.661 Amendment (A001) offered by Mr. 
Shuster. (consideration: CR H4813; text: CR H4813-4814) An 
amendment numbered 1 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to make technical changes to the bill, as well as additional 
provisions relating to Corps of Engineers projects and reports. 
Additionally, it addresses a direct spending issue in sec. 306.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded 10 with minutes of debate 
on the Shuster Part A Amendment No. 1.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.661 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendment (A001) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.662 Amendment (A002) offered by Mr. 
Shuster. (consideration: CR H4814-4815; text: CR H4815) An 
amendment numbered 6 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct the Secretary to provide technical assistance on 
construction to a state agency that is carrying out 
congressionally authorized projects.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Shuster Part A Amendment No. 6.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.662 On agreeing to the Shuster 
amendment (A002) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. Mr. Shuster moved that the Committee rise.
    June 6, 2018. On motion that the Committee rise Agreed to 
by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. Committee of the Whole House on the state of 
the Union rises leaving H.R. 8 as unfinished business.
    June 6, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H4815-4844)
    June 6, 2018. The House resolved into Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for further 
consideration.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.663 Amendment (A003) offered by Mr. 
Gibbs. (consideration: CR H4815-4816; text: CR H4815) An 
amendment numbered 3 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to amend language to ensure all factors are considered in order 
for the mitigation bank to provide sufficient financial 
assurances.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Gibbs Amendment No. 3.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.663 By unanimous consent, the Gibbs 
amendment was withdrawn.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.664 Amendment (A004) offered by Mr. 
Soto. (consideration: CR H4816; text: CR H4816) An amendment 
numbered 2 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to direct 
the Secretary to expand the areas of consideration to include 
water storage.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Soto Amendment No. 2.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.664 On agreeing to the Soto amendment 
(A004) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.665 Amendment (A005) offered by Mr. 
Royce (CA). (consideration: CR H4816; text: CR H4816) An 
amendment numbered 4 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to add flexibility in Section 120 so that future projects can 
also qualify for the pilot program.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Royce Amendment No. 4.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.665 On agreeing to the Royce (CA) 
amendment (A005) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.666 Amendment (A006) offered by Mr. 
Royce (CA). (consideration: CR H4816-4817; text: CR H4816-4817) 
An amendment numbered 5 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
711 to authorize Army Corps to give technical assistance to 
regional coalitions as they prepare for water resources 
development projects with potential connections to Army Corps 
projects or properties.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Royce Amendment No. 5.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.666 On agreeing to the Royce (CA) 
amendment (A006) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.667 Amendment (A007) offered by Mr. 
Denham. (consideration: CR H4817; text: CR H4817) An amendment 
numbered 7 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to extend 
authority of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to enter into 
cost recovery agreements for evaluation and processing of 
permits.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Denham Amendment No. 7.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.667 On agreeing to the Denham 
amendment (A007) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.668 Amendment (A008) offered by Ms. 
Esty (CT). (consideration: CR H4817-4818; text: CR H4817) An 
amendment numbered 8 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to add to a National Academy of Sciences report consideration 
of an analysis on whether the Corps considers cumulative 
benefits of locally developed projects, including Master Plans, 
and if the Corps uses these benefits for purposes of benefit-
cost analysis for potential projects within such Master Plans.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Esty Amendment No. 8.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.668 On agreeing to the Esty (CT) 
amendment (A008) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.669 Amendment (A009) offered by Mr. 
Soto. (consideration: CR H4818; text: CR H4818) An amendment 
numbered 9 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to add 
universities to the list of entities that the Secretary of the 
Army Corps should consider when submitting a report to Congress 
on the use of innovative materials in water resource 
development projects.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Soto Amendment No. 9.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.669 On agreeing to the Soto amendment 
(A009) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.670 Amendment (A010) offered by Mr. 
Krishnamoorthi. (consideration: CR H4818-4819; text: CR H4818) 
An amendment numbered 10 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
711 to require the Comptroller of the United States to provide 
recommendations to improve the capacity and preparedness of the 
Corp of Engineers workforce.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Krishnamoorthi Amendment No. 10.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.670 On agreeing to the Krishnamoorthi 
amendment (A010) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.671 Amendment (A011) offered by Ms. 
Jayapal. (consideration: CR H4819; text: CR H4819) An amendment 
numbered 11 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to add to 
a GAO study consideration of how changes to the navigation 
industry workforce with which the Army Corps of Engineers 
collaborates may affect safety and operations within the 
navigation industry.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Jayapal Amendment No. 11.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.671 On agreeing to the Jayapal 
amendment (A011) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.672 Amendment (A012) offered by Mr. 
Soto. (consideration: CR H4819-4820; text: CR H4819) An 
amendment numbered 12 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct the GAO to specifically consider trough bars, coastal 
wetlands and barrier coral reefs for their study on the 
feasibility of projects for flood risk management, hurricane 
and storm damage reduction, and ecosystem restoration.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Soto Amendment No. 12.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.672 On agreeing to the Soto amendment 
(A012) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.673 Amendment (A013) offered by Mr. 
Sanford. (consideration: CR H4820; text: CR H4820) An amendment 
numbered 13 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to ensure 
timely payback for advanced funds paid for by a non-federal 
sponsor.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Sanford Amendment No. 13.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.673 On agreeing to the Sanford 
amendment (A013) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.674 Amendment (A014) offered by Mr. 
Nolan. (consideration: CR H4820-4821; text: CR H4820) An 
amendment numbered 14 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to require the Secretary to conduct a study of the status of 
the project for flood damage reduction and environmental 
restoration for the Muddy River authorized by WRDA 2000. The 
Secretary is required to submit a report to Congress describing 
the study and reasons for deauthorizing the project.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Nolan Amendment No. 14.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.674 On agreeing to the Nolan amendment 
(A014) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.675 Amendment (A015) offered by Ms. 
Moore. (consideration: CR H4821; text: CR H4821) An amendment 
numbered 15 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to 
require the Corps to take steps to better engage with and 
meaningfully consult with communities of color, low-income 
communities, tribes, and rural communities.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Moore Amendment No. 15.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.675 On agreeing to the Moore amendment 
(A015) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.676 Amendment (A016) offered by Mr. 
Meadows. (consideration: CR H4821-4822; text: CR H4821) An 
amendment numbered 16 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to prioritize the operation, maintenance, and improvement of 
existing infrastructure.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Meadows Amendment No. 16.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.676 On agreeing to the Meadows 
amendment (A016) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.677 Amendment (A017) offered by Mr. 
Mast. (consideration: CR H4822; text: CR H4822) An amendment 
numbered 17 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to 
clarify the Secretary's authority under WRDA 2000 to provide 
credit for Comprehensive Everglades Restoration in-kind work 
completed during design or construction, including work after a 
partnership agreement is signed. The Secretary and non-Federal 
sponsor must agree to the terms and conditions for in-kind work 
not expressly defined in the partnership agreement and the 
Secretary must determine the work is integral to the project.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Mast Amendment No. 17.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.677 On agreeing to the Mast amendment 
(A017) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.678 Amendment (A018) offered by Mr. 
Pearce. (consideration: CR H4822-4823; text: CR H4822) An 
amendment numbered 18 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to require the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to pay back the 
Federal cost share for projects carried out under section 593 
of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999 in the next 
fiscal year.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Pearce Amendment No. 18.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.678 On agreeing to the Pearce 
amendment (A018) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.679 Amendment (A019) offered by Mr. 
Kelly (PA). (consideration: CR H4823; text: CR H4823) An 
amendment numbered 19 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to state that in regards to WRDA funding determinations, the 
Corps of Engineers may consider operation and maintenance of 
the locks on Allegheny River for purposes of recreational boat 
traffic levels and related economic benefits.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Kelly (PA) Amendment No. 19.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.679 On agreeing to the Kelly (PA) 
amendment (A019) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.680 Amendment (A020) offered by Mr. 
Schrader. (consideration: CR H4823; text: CR H4823) An 
amendment numbered 20 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to provide the Army Corps of Engineers with the authority to 
help mitigate any detrimental impacts to municipal water supply 
resulting from a Corps construction project.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Schrader Amendment No. 20.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.680 On agreeing to the Schrader 
amendment (A020) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.681 Amendment (A021) offered by Ms. 
Jayapal. (consideration: CR H4823-4824; text: CR H4823) An 
amendment numbered 21 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to request from the Army Corps of Engineers a report to 
Congress on the potential opportunity for integrating noise 
abatement and noise mitigation technologies and practices into 
improvements and operations in harbors and inland harbors.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Jayapal Amendment No. 21.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.681 On agreeing to the Jayapal 
amendment (A021) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.682 Amendment (A022) offered by Mr. 
Higgins (LA). (consideration: CR H4824; text: CR H4824) An 
amendment numbered 22 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct the Secretary to prefer acquiring the minimum 
interest necessary in real property needed to support a project 
or action. Requires consideration of the use of a temporary 
easement estate or other interests designed to reduce overall 
costs, reduce project time, and minimize conflict with property 
owners related to such project or action.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Higgins (LA) Amendment No. 22.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.682 On agreeing to the Higgins (LA) 
amendment (A022) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.683 Amendment (A023) offered by Mr. 
Babin. (consideration: CR H4824-4825; text: CR H4824) An 
amendment numbered 23 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to express the sense of Congress stating the importance and 
benefits of projects to improve 2-way traffic safety on high 
volume, deep draft navigation channels.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Babin Amendment No. 23.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.683 On agreeing to the Babin amendment 
(A023) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.684 Amendment (A024) offered by Mr. 
Bost. (consideration: CR H4825-4826; text: CR H4825) An 
amendment numbered 24 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to permit a non-federal flood control project sponsor to pay, 
or contribute to, the difference between the cost of repairing 
a damaged flood control project and its projected economic 
benefits.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Bost Amendment No. 24.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.684 On agreeing to the Bost amendment 
(A024) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.685 Amendment (A025) offered by Mr. 
Heck. (consideration: CR H4826-4827; text: CR H4826) An 
amendment numbered 25 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct GAO to conduct a study on USACE's ability to comply 
with Federal stormwater runoff requirements.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Heck Amendment No. 25.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.685 On agreeing to the Heck amendment 
(A025) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.686 Amendment (A026) offered by Miss 
Gonzalez-Colon (PR). (consideration: CR H4827; text: CR H4827) 
An amendment numbered 26 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
711 to express the sense of Congress that the Corps of 
Engineers should consider urgently and favorably projects and 
proposals pending before them for flood control, dam repair, 
beach erosion, harbor navigation in Puerto Rico, as well as for 
repair and mitigation required by natural disasters in 2017-
2018; and that the Secretary should advance the project for 
ecosystem restoration at Cano Martin Pena, San Juan, Puerto 
Rico.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Gonzalez-Colon (PR) Amendment No. 26.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.686 On agreeing to the Gonzalez-Colon 
(PR) amendment (A026) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.687 Amendment (A027) offered by Mr. 
Gibbs. (consideration: CR H4827-4828; text: CR H4827) An 
amendment numbered 27 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to instruct the Secretary to expedite the DMMP process in order 
that studies reach completion within two years of their 
initiation and shall make maximum use of existing information 
and studies and avoid all redundant information collection and 
studies for purposes of Dredged Material Management Plans 
initiated in fiscal year 2018 and afterward.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Gibbs Amendment No. 27.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.687 On agreeing to the Gibbs amendment 
(A027) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.688 Amendment (A028) offered by Mr. 
Davis, Rodney. (consideration: CR H4828-4829; text: CR H4828) 
An amendment numbered 29 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
711 to clarify that operation and maintenance of any project 
authorized under the Chief's Report for the Brandon Road Study 
is done at an 80/20 Federal/non-Federal cost share. Also 
requires the Corps, following construction of any project 
authorized under the Chief's Report for the Brandon Road Study, 
to consult with the governor of the state where the project is 
located and seek Congressional approval prior to implementing 
any additional technologies at the project. Also, it adds to 
the list of feasibility studies in the base bill the USACE must 
expedite completion of the Great Lakes Mississippi River 
Interbasin Study Brandon Road Study.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Rodney Davis Amendment No. 29.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.688 On agreeing to the Davis, Rodney 
amendment (A028) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.689 Amendment (A029) offered by Miss 
Gonzalez-Colon (PR). (consideration: CR H4829; text: CR H4829) 
An amendment numbered 30 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
711 to direct the secretary to expedite reports for the 
navigation project for San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico, per the 
study authorized by resolution of the House Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure on September 20, 2006.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Gonzalez-Colon Amendment No. 30.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.689 On agreeing to the Gonzalez-Colon 
(PR) amendment (A029) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.690 Amendment (A030) offered by Mr. 
Lance. (consideration: CR H4829-4830; text: CR H4829) An 
amendment numbered 31 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct the Secretary to expedite the completion of a 
feasibility study for the Warren Glen Dam Removal Project in 
the Musconetcong River, New Jersey.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Lance Amendment No. 31.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.690 On agreeing to the Lance amendment 
(A030) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.691 Amendment (A031) offered by Mr. 
Lujan, Ben Ray. (consideration: CR H4830; text: CR H4830) An 
amendment numbered 32 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to authorize the expansion of the Abiquiu Reservoir.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Ben Ray Lujan Amendment No. 32.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.691 On agreeing to the Lujan, Ben Ray 
amendment (A031) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.692 Amendment (A032) offered by Mr. 
Larsen (WA). (consideration: CR H4830-4831; text: CR H4830) An 
amendment numbered 33 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to increase the per project funding cap for Section 544 Puget 
Sound and Adjacent Waters Restoration (PSAW) to $10 million--
which is consistent with Section 206 Aquatic Ecosystem 
Restoration projects and raises the overall authorization level 
for PSAW.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Larsen (WA) Amendment No. 33.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.692 On agreeing to the Larsen (WA) 
amendment Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.693 Amendment (A033) offered by Mr. 
Keating. (consideration: CR H4831; text: CR H4831) An amendment 
numbered 34 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to direct 
the Army Corps to expedite and complete dredging in Plymouth 
Harbor, Massachusetts as authorized.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Keating Amendment No. 34.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.693 On agreeing to the Keating 
amendment (A033) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.694 Amendment (A034) offered by Mr. 
Joyce (OH). (consideration: CR H4831-4832; text: CR H4831) An 
amendment numbered 35 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to require the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to complete its 
Chief's Report for the Brandon Road Study by February 2019.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Joyce (OH) Amendment No. 35.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.694 On agreeing to the Joyce (OH) 
amendment (A034) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.695 Amendment (A035) offered by Mr. 
Bishop (GA). (consideration: CR H4832-4833; text: CR H4832) An 
amendment numbered 36 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to convey three parcels of land, known as the Earle May 
Recreational Area, from the Army Corps of Engineers to the City 
of Bainbridge.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Bishop (GA) Amendment No. 36.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.695 On agreeing to the Bishop (GA) 
amendment (A035) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.696 Amendment (A036) offered by Mr. 
Blum. (consideration: CR H4833; text: CR H4833) An amendment 
numbered 37 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to 
expedite the completion of the Cedar River flood risk 
management project authorized in 2014.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Blum Amendment No. 37.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.696 On agreeing to the Blum amendment 
(A036) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.697 Amendment (A037) offered by Mr. 
Keating. (consideration: CR H4833-4834; text: CR H4833) An 
amendment numbered 38 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to grant the Army Corps the authority to repair or replace 
bridges in New England that serve as emergency evacuation 
routes.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Keating Amendment No. 38.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.697 On agreeing to the Keating 
amendment (A037) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.698 Amendment (A038) offered by Mrs. 
McMorris Rodgers. (consideration: CR H4834; text: CR H4834) An 
amendment numbered 39 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to authorize a land transfer between the Port of Whitman and 
the Army Corps of Engineers.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the McMorris Rodgers Amendment No. 39.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.698 On agreeing to the McMorris 
Rodgers amendment (A038) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.699 Amendment (A039) offered by Ms. 
Shea-Porter. (consideration: CR H4834-4835; text: CR H4834) An 
amendment numbered 40 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct the Secretary to use existing authority to mitigate 
severe shoaling at Hampton Harbor, New Hampshire.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Shea-Porter Amendment No. 40.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.699 On agreeing to the Shea-Porter 
amendment (A039) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.700 Amendment (A040) offered by Ms. 
Shea-Porter. (consideration: CR H4835; text: CR H4835) An 
amendment numbered 41 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to direct the Secretary to expedite the navigation project for 
Portsmouth Harbor and the Piscataqua River.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Shea-Porter Amendment No. 41.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.700 On agreeing to the Shea-Porter 
amendment (A040) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.701 Amendment (A041) offered by Mr. 
Lewis (MN). (consideration: CR H4835-4836; text: CR H4835) An 
amendment numbered 41 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to encourage the Secretary to consider reasonable alternative 
agreements between state or local entities, private partners, 
and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineering to dispose of dredged 
material.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Lewis (MN) Amendment No. 42.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.701 On agreeing to the Lewis (MN) 
amendment (A041) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.702 Amendment (A042) offered by Mr. 
Olson. (consideration: CR H4836; text: CR H4836) An amendment 
numbered 43 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to look 
to expedite already authorized U.S. Army Corp of Engineers 
projects in the declared disaster areas of Texas, Florida, 
Georgia, Louisiana, South Carolina, Puerto Rico and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Olson Amendment No. 43.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.702 On agreeing to the Olson amendment 
(A042) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.703 Amendment (A043) offered by Mr. 
Culberson. (consideration: CR H4836-4837; text: CR H4836) An 
amendment numbered 44 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to require the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to carry out flood 
and storm damage reduction studies expeditiously in order to 
reduce the risk of damage from future floods and hurricanes in 
the Houston and Coastal Texas areas.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Culberson Amendment No. 44.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.703 On agreeing to the Culberson 
amendment Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.704 Amendment (A044) offered by Mr. 
Weber (TX). (consideration: CR H4837-4838; text: CR H4837) An 
amendment numbered 45 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to enhance the Levee Safety Action Classification (LSAC) risk 
categorization tool, developed internally by the U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers. It also supplements current duties by 
ensuring that individual levee system LSAC ratings are 
transparent.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Weber Amendment No. 45.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.704 By unanimous consent, the Weber 
(TX) amendment was withdrawn.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.705 Amendment (A045) offered by Mr. 
Meeks. (consideration: CR H4838; text: CR H4838) An amendment 
numbered 46 printed in Part A in House Report 115-711 to 
expedite the Army Corps of Engineers reformulation project in 
certain Sandy Superstorm affected areas of Queens, NY.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Meeks Amendment No. 46.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.705 On agreeing to the Meeks amendment 
(A045) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.706 Amendment (A046) offered by Mr. 
Schrader. (consideration: CR H4838-4839; text: CR H4838-4839) 
An amendment numbered 47 printed in Part A of House Report 115-
711 to require the Army Corps of Engineers to include in future 
workplans, to the maximum extent practicable, any project or 
facility for disposition for which the Corps has a final report 
from the Director of Civil Works.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Schrader Amendment No. 47.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.706 On agreeing to the Schrader 
amendment (A046) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.707 Amendment (A047) offered by Mr. 
Smith (MO). (consideration: CR H4839; text: CR H4839) An 
amendment numbered 48 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to ensure prompt restoration and rebuilding in the event of an 
activation of any floodway or backwater feature within the 
Mississippi Rivers and Tributaries system.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Smith (MO) Amendment No. 48.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.707 On agreeing to the Smith (MO) 
amendment (A047) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.708 Amendment (A048) offered by Mr. 
Young (AK). (consideration: CR H4839-4840; text: CR H4839) An 
amendment numbered 49 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to Requires the Secretary to conduct an assessment of dams 
classified as Class III under the Dam Safety Action 
Classification of the Corps of Engineers. This amendment 
requires the Secretary to provide a report to Congress 
describing anticipated impacts on the local communities if the 
Secretary no longer assumes responsibility of the Class III 
dam, or what the effects would be if the Secretary continues to 
assume responsibility of the dams over a period of 15 years 
after the date of enactment of this Act.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 918, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Young (AK) Amendment No. 49.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.708 On agreeing to the Young (AK) 
amendment (A048) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.709 Amendment (A049) offered by Mr. 
Costa. (consideration: CR H4840-4841; text: CR H4840) An 
amendment numbered 50 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to authorize the Army Corps to accept contributed funds from 
the owners of non-federal Section 7 reservoirs for the purpose 
of reviewing/revising operational documents, including flood 
control manuals and rule curves.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Costa Amendment No. 50.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.709 On agreeing to the Costa amendment 
(A049) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.710 Amendment (A050) offered by Mr. 
Soto. (consideration: CR H4841; text: CR H4841) An amendment 
numbered 51 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to direct 
the Secretary, to the maximum extent practicable, to endeavor 
to provide information to all adjoining residential property 
stakeholders, next to property which the Army Corps of 
Engineers holds an interest.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Soto Amendment No. 51.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.710 On agreeing to the Soto amendment 
(A050) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.711 Amendment (A051) offered by Mr. 
Paulsen. (consideration: CR H4841-4842; text: CR H4841) An 
amendment numbered 52 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 
to expedite the completion of a disposition study and requires 
the Secretary to report on the feasibility of preserving and 
enhancing recreational opportunities and the health of the 
ecosystem of Upper St. Anthony Falls Lock and Dam.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to the provisions of H. Res. 918, 
the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the Paulsen Amendment No. 52.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.711 On agreeing to the Paulsen 
amendment (A051) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.712 Amendment (A052) offered by Mr. 
Moulton. (consideration: CR H4842; text: CR H4842) An amendment 
numbered 53 printed in Part A of House Report 115-711 to add at 
the end of title I the following section entitled: Corps of 
Engineers Continuing Authorities Program.
    June 6, 2018. Pursuant to a previous special order of the 
House, the Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Moulton Amendment No. 53.
    June 6, 2018. H.AMDT.712 On agreeing to the Moulton 
amendment (A052) Agreed to by voice vote.
    June 6, 2018. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 8.
    June 6, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant to 
the rule.
    June 6, 2018. The House adopted the amendment in the nature 
of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole 
House on the state of the Union.
    June 6, 2018. Ms. Velazquez moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure. (text: CR H4843-4844)
    June 6, 2018. The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions 
contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported 
back to the House with an amendment to add the end of title I, 
a section entitled: Post-Hurricane Recovery and Resiliency.
    June 6, 2018. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    June 6, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H4844-4846)
    June 6, 2018. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 180-227 (Roll no. 237).
    June 6, 2018. On passage Passed by recorded vote: 408-2 
(Roll no. 238).
    June 6, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    June 6, 2018. The Clerk was authorized to correct section 
numbers, punctuation, and cross references, and to make other 
necessary technical and conforming corrections in the 
engrossment of H.R. 8.
    June 11, 2018. Received in the Senate.
    June 26, 2018. Read twice. Placed on Senate Legislative 
Calendar under General Orders. Calendar No. 488.
    See Public Law 115-270 (S. 3021) for further action.

                Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act of 2017


                    PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 953)

Summary

    This bill amends the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Federal Water Pollution Control 
Act (commonly known as the Clean Water Act) to prohibit the 
Environmental Protection Agency or a state from requiring a 
permit under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination 
System for a discharge of a pesticide from a point source into 
navigable waters if the discharge is approved under FIFRA. 
Point source pollution is waste discharged from a distinct 
place, such as a pipe, channel, or tunnel. The bill provides 
that the discharge of pesticides pursuant to FIFRA would not 
require a Clean Water Act permit.

Legislative History

    Feb. 8, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Feb. 16, 2017. Ordered reported by the Committee on 
Agriculture by voice vote.
    May 18, 2017. Reported by the Committee on Agriculture. H. 
Rept. 115-131, Part I.
    May 22, 2017. Rules Committee Resolution H. Res. 348 
Reported to House. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 953 
with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be 
considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion 
to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be 
considered read. Specified amendments are in order. It shall be 
in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose of 
amendment under the five-minute rule an amendment in the nature 
of a substitute consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 
115-21.
    May 23, 2017. Rule H. Res. 348 passed House.
    May 24, 2017. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 348. (consideration: CR H4535-4553)
    May 24, 2017. Rule provides for consideration of H.R. 953 
with 1 hour of general debate. Previous question shall be 
considered as ordered without intervening motions except motion 
to recommit with or without instructions. Measure will be 
considered read. Specified amendments are in order. It shall be 
in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose of 
amendment under the five-minute rule an amendment in the nature 
of a substitute consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 
115-21.
    May 24, 2017. House resolved itself into the Committee of 
the Whole House on the state of the Union pursuant to H. Res. 
348 and Rule XVIII.
    May 24, 2017. The Speaker designated the Honorable Jeff 
Duncan to act as Chairman of the Committee.
    May 24, 2017. The Committee of the Whole proceeded with one 
hour of general debate on H.R. 953.
    May 24, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 348, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Esty (CT) amendment.
    May 24, 2017. Pursuant to the provisions of H.Res. 348, the 
Committee of the Whole proceeded with 10 minutes of debate on 
the Huffman amendment.
    May 24, 2017. The House rose from the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union to report H.R. 953.
    May 24, 2017. The House adopted the amendment in the nature 
of a substitute as agreed to by the Committee of the Whole 
House on the state of the Union.
    May 24, 2017. Mr. McGovern moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure.
    May 24, 2017. The House proceeded with 10 minutes of debate 
on the motion to recommit with instructions. The instructions 
contained in the motion seek to require the bill to be reported 
back to the House with an amendment to prohibit the Act, 
including any amendments from applying to the discharge of a 
pesticide if the manufacturer or distributor of the pesticide 
has made a political contribution to the President or to any 
Federal official charged with registration, regulation, or 
approval of the use of the pesticide.
    May 24, 2017. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    May 24, 2017. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by recorded vote: 183-230 (Roll no. 281).
    May 24, 2017. On passage Passed by recorded vote: 256-165 
(Roll no. 282). (text: CR H4545)
    May 24, 2017. Motion to reconsider laid on the table Agreed 
to without objection.
    May 25, 2017. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

 To Provide for Operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System 
 Pursuant to a Certain Operation Plan for a Specified Period of Time, 
                         and for Other Purposes


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 3144)

Summary

    This bill requires the Bureau of Reclamation, the 
Bonneville Power Administration, and the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers to operate the Federal Columbia River Power System 
(FCRPS) in a manner consistent with the document titled 
``Endangered Species Act Section 7(a)(2) Supplemental 
Biological Opinion,'' dated January 17, 2014, until the later 
of September 30, 2022, or the date upon which a subsequent 
final biological opinion for FCRPS operations is in effect with 
no pending further judicial review.

Legislative History

    June 30, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    July 20, 2017. Committee on Natural Resources hearing held.
    Oct. 12, 2017. Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee 
on Water, Power and Oceans hearing held.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Ordered reported by a vote of 23-17 by the 
Committee on Natural Resources.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Reported by the Committee on Natural 
Resources. H. Rept. 115-643, Part I.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
492.
    Apr. 25, 2018. Considered under the provisions of rule H. 
Res. 839. (consideration: CR H3542-3560)
    Apr. 25, 2018. The rule provides for consideration of H.R. 
4, under a structured rule, and H.R. 3144, under a closed rule. 
The rule makes in order only those amendments printed in Part A 
of the committee report for H.R. 4. The rule provides for 1 
hour of general debate for both H.R. 4 and H.R. 3144. The rule 
provides for one motion to recommit for both bills. And, the 
rule provides that on any legislative day during the period 
from April 30, 2018 through May 4, 2018, the Journal of the 
proceedings of the previous day shall be considered as 
approved.
    Apr. 25, 2018. The House proceeded with one hour of debate 
on H.R. 3144.
    Apr. 25, 2018. The House resumed with debate on H.R. 3144.
    Apr. 25, 2018. The previous question was ordered pursuant 
to the rule.
    Apr. 25, 2018. Ms. Jayapal moved to recommit with 
instructions to the Committee on Natural Resources. (text: CR 
H3558)
    Apr. 25, 2018. The House proceeded with 10 minutes of 
debate on the Jayapal motion to recommit with instructions. The 
instructions contained in the motion seek to require the bill 
to be reported back to the House with an amendment stating that 
nothing in this Act shall prohibit the sale of electric power 
generated by the Federal Columbia River Power System at the 
lowest possible rate consistent with sound business practices 
and other factors required by current law.
    Apr. 25, 2018. The previous question on the motion to 
recommit with instructions was ordered without objection.
    Apr. 25, 2018. On motion to recommit with instructions 
Failed by the Yeas and Nays: 190-226 (Roll no. 152).
    Apr. 25, 2018. On passage Passed by the Yeas and Nays: 225-
189 (Roll no. 153). (text: CR H3542-3543)
    Apr. 25, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Apr. 26, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

                         Every Kid Outdoors Act


      REPORTED (BY THE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES) (H.R. 3186)

Summary

    H.R. 3186 directs the Departments of the Interior, 
Agriculture, Commerce, and the Army to establish the Every Kids 
Outdoors program to provide fourth graders free access to 
federal lands and waters to which the public has access.

Legislative History

    Sep. 5, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Natural Resources. H. Rept. 115-880, Part I.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Committee on Agriculture discharged.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Aug. 3, 2018. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
678.
    Sep. 12, 2018. Mr. Gianforte moved to suspend the rules and 
pass the bill, as amended.
    Sep. 12, 2018. Considered under suspension of the rules. 
(consideration: CR H8139-8140)
    Sep. 12, 2018. The House proceeded with forty minutes of 
debate on H.R. 3186.
    Sep. 12, 2018. Considered as unfinished business. 
(consideration: CR H8158)
    Sep. 12, 2018. On motion to suspend the rules and pass the 
bill, as amended Agreed to by the Yeas and Nays: (\2/3\ 
required): 383-2 (Roll no. 395). (text: CR H8139)
    Sep. 12, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 17, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources.
    Oct. 2, 2018. Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. 
Ordered to be reported without amendment favorably.
    Nov. 28, 2018. Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. 
Reported by Senator Murkowski without amendment. With written 
report No. 115-394.
    Nov. 28, 2018. Placed on Senate Legislative Calendar under 
General Orders. Calendar No. 680.

  To Designate the Flood Control Project in Sedgwick County, Kansas, 
 Commonly Known as the Wichita-Valley Center Flood Control Project, as 
                 the ``M.S. `Mitch' Mitchell Floodway''


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 3383)

Summary

    This bill designates the Wichita-Valley Center Flood 
Control Project in Sedgwick County, Kansas, as the ``M.S. 
'Mitch' Mitchell Floodway.''

Legislative History

    July 26, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Mr. Shuster asked unanimous consent to 
discharge from committee and consider.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Committee on Transportation discharged.
    Sep. 26, 2018. Considered by unanimous consent. 
(consideration: CR H9060)
    Sep. 26, 2018. On passage Passed without objection. (text: 
CR H9060)
    Sep. 26, 2018. Motion to reconsider laid on the table 
Agreed to without objection.
    Sep. 27, 2018. Received in the Senate and Read twice and 
referred to the Committee on Environment and Public Works.

                  Water Infrastructure Improvement Act


                   PENDING IN THE SENATE (H.R. 7279)

Summary

    H.R. 7279 amends the Clean Water Act (CWA) to provide for 
an integrated planning process under the Act. H.R. 7279 also 
requires the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) to promote and coordinate the integration of green 
infrastructure into permitting and enforcement activities under 
the CWA and other activities. Under the bill, green 
infrastructure ``means the range of measures that use plant or 
soil systems, permeable pavement or other permeable surfaces or 
substrates, stormwater harvest and reuse, or landscaping to 
store, infiltrate, or evapotranspirate stormwater and reduce 
flows to sewer systems or to surface waters.'' The use of green 
infrastructure can provide cost-effective means for 
municipalities to manage their wastewater and stormwater 
systems. H.R. 7279 also requires the EPA to establish an 
``Office of the Municipal Ombudsman'' that would be charged 
with providing technical assistance to municipalities seeking 
to comply with the CWA.

Legislative History

    Dec. 13, 2018. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Dec. 19, 2018. Considered in the House under Suspension of 
the Rules. Passed the House by a \2/3\ recorded vote of 351 
yeas and 10 nays (Roll no. 441).

                       Reported by the Committee


                Brownfields Reauthorization Act of 2017


                 REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE (H.R. 1758)

Summary

    The Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields 
Revitalization Act (``the Brownfields Law''; P.L. 107-117) 
amended the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, 
and Liability Act (CERCLA or Superfund; P.L. 96-510) to 
authorize funding through EPA for brownfields assessment and 
cleanup grants, provide targeted liability protections, and 
increase support for state and tribal voluntary cleanup 
programs.
    H.R. 1758 is bipartisan legislation that makes targeted 
changes to the Brownfields Law to: Increase funding limits for 
direct remediation grants; Create a new multipurpose grant for 
entities to conduct assessment and remediation activities at 
one or more brownfield sites in a proposed area; Expand 
eligibility for brownfields grants to certain nonprofit 
organizations; and expand grant eligibility to government 
entities that acquired brownfields property prior to the 
enactment of the Brownfields Law.
    The bill reauthorizes funding for brownfields grants and 
state voluntary cleanup programs for fiscal years 2018 to 2022.

Legislative History

    Mar. 29, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    July 27, 2017. Ordered reported, amended, by voice vote.
    Nov. 21, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure. H. Rept. 115-419, Part I.
    For further action see H.R. 3017.

                      Recreation Not Red-Tape Act


       REPORTED BY THE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES (H.R. 3400)

Summary

    This bill amends the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement 
Act to require the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the 
Forest Service to review the process for the issuance and 
renewal of special recreation permits, including for cross-
jurisdictional trips, with respect to outfitters and guides. 
Additionally, this bill requires the Army Corps of Engineers 
and the Department of Transportation to consider how land and 
water management decisions can enhance recreation opportunities 
and the recreation economy.

Legislative History

    July 27, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Oct. 3, 2017. Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee 
on Federal Lands hearing held.
    Apr. 18, 2018. Committee on Natural Resources, markup held. 
Ordered to be Reported (Amended) by Voice Vote.
    Dec. 3, 2018. Committee on Natural Resources report filed. 
H. Rept. 115-1063, Part I.
    Dec. 3, 2018. Referral to the Committee on Transportation 
and Infrastructure and the Committee on Energy and Commerce 
extended for a period ending not later than Dec. 28, 2018.
    Dec. 3, 2018. Committee on Agriculture and the Committee on 
Armed Services discharged from further consideration.

 Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational Enhancement Act or the Share Act


      REPORTED (BY THE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES) (H.R. 3668)

Summary

    H.R. 3668, the ``Sportsmen's Heritage and Recreational 
Enhancement Act'' (SHARE Act), includes provisions that 
increase opportunities for hunters, anglers, and recreational 
shooters; eliminate regulatory impediments and safeguard 
against new regulations that impede outdoor sporting 
activities; and protect Second Amendment rights.
    Title III of this bill contains the ``Recreational Lands 
Self-Defense Act'' which prohibits the Secretary of the Army 
from making or enforcing any regulation that would prohibit an 
individual from possessing a firearm at a water resources 
development project, with certain exceptions.

Legislative History

    Sep. 5, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Economic 
Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management.
    Sep. 5, 2017. Referred to the Subcommittee on Water 
Resources and Environment.
    Sep. 12, 2017. Subcommittee on Federal Lands, Committee on 
Natural Resources hearing held.
    Sep. 13, 2017. Ordered reported, as amended, by the 
Committee on Natural Resources, by the Yeas and Nays: 22-13.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Reported (Amended) by the Committee on 
Natural Resources. H. Rept. 115-314, Part I.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Agriculture discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on the Judiciary discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Energy and Commerce discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Committee on Ways and Means discharged.
    Sep. 18, 2017. Placed on the Union Calendar, Calendar No. 
224.

Legislative and Oversight Activities: Hearings, Meetings, and Oversight 
                      Letters (Majority/Minority)


                                Hearings


BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: THE ROLE OF FEDERAL 
          AGENCIES IN WATER INFRASTRUCTURE (SERIAL NO. 115-5)

    On March 9, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine how the federal government, in conjunction 
with its partners in state and local government, can work to 
reduce inefficiencies and delays in project delivery, include 
affordability considerations in the rulemaking process, better 
use data and technology, and maximize benefits from existing 
resources. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the Mercatus 
Center at George Mason University, the Bipartisan Policy 
Center, the Environmental Council of the States, Sutter Butte 
(California) Flood Control Agency, the U.S. Conference of 
Mayors, the Associated General Contractors of America, and the 
Center for American Progress.

   BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: REVITALIZING 
AMERICAN COMMUNITIES THROUGH THE BROWNFIELDS PROGRAM (SERIAL NO. 115-7)

    On March 28, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the federal brownfields program carried out 
by the Environmental Protection Agency, how the program has 
been successful in revitalizing communities and spurring 
economic growth, and potential improvements to the program. The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. Conference of 
Mayors, the mayor of Rialto, California, the National League of 
Cities, the National Association of Counties, the Association 
of State and Territorial Solid Waste Management Officials, and 
Anka Funds.

  BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: IMPROVING WATER 
        QUALITY THROUGH INTEGRATED PLANNING (SERIAL NO. 115-16)

    On May 18, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing 
to examine the status of the Environmental Protection Agency's 
(EPA) implementation of its integrated planning policy. The 
Subcommittee focused on ways EPA can work with states and 
municipalities to develop integrated stormwater and wastewater 
requirements to achieve greater flexibility for communities to 
meet their Clean Water Act compliance obligations and maximize 
their limited resources to benefit to the communities they 
serve. The Subcommittee heard testimony from the U.S. 
Conference of Mayors, the National League of Cities, the 
National Association of Counties, the Environmental Council of 
the States, the American Public Works Association, and the 
Natural Resources Defense Council.

 BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: IMPLEMENTATION OF 
 THE WATER RESOURCES REFORM AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2014 AND THE WATER 
         RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2016 (SERIAL NO. 115-22)

    On July 19, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine the implementation the Water Resources 
Reform and Development Act of 2014 and the Water Resources 
Development Act of 2016, which was enacted as part of the Water 
Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act (WIIN Act). The 
Subcommittee heard testimony from the United States Army Corps 
of Engineers.

BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: WATER STAKEHOLDERS' 
                    PERSPECTIVES (SERIAL NO. 115-25)

    On September 26, 2017, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to gather stakeholder perspectives that will assist the 
Subcommittee and Full Committee in developing proposals focused 
on building a 21st-century infrastructure for America. The 
Subcommittee heard from the U.S. Conference of Mayors, McWane, 
Inc., a member of both the Association of California Water 
Agencies and the California Association of Sanitation Agencies, 
the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, the 
Association of Regional Water Organizations, the National 
Association of Water Companies, and the Natural Resources 
Defense Council.

   AMERICA'S WATER RESOURCES INFRASTRUCTURE: APPROACHES TO ENHANCED 
                  PROJECT DELIVERY (SERIAL NO. 115-33)

    On January 18, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing to examine new approaches to speed the delivery of 
critical water infrastructure projects. The testimony heard at 
the hearing helped inform the Committee's work as it considered 
a new Water Resources Development Act (WRDA), which ultimately 
was signed into law (P.L. 115-270). The Subcommittee heard from 
the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Sutter Butte (California) 
Flood Control Agency, Associated General Contractors.

  BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: WATER RESOURCES 
            PROJECTS AND POLICY, PART 1 (SERIAL NO. 115-41)

    On March 15, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing on Reports to Congress on Future Water Resources 
Development and on Chief's Reports. Congressional review of 
these reports, along with an explanation of the process by 
which the Corps develops projects and activities, is a 
necessary step in the development of a Water Resources 
Development Act, which ultimately was signed into law (P.L. 
115-270). The Subcommittee heard testimony from the Assistant 
Secretary of the Army (Civil Works) and U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers.

  BUILDING A 21ST-CENTURY INFRASTRUCTURE FOR AMERICA: WATER RESOURCES 
            PROJECTS AND POLICY, PART 2 (SERIAL NO. 115-54)

    On September 7, 2018, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing on Chief's Reports. Congressional review of these 
reports, along with an explanation of the process by which the 
Corps develops its projects, is a necessary step in the 
development of a Water Resources Development Act, which 
ultimately was signed into law (P.L. 115-270). The Subcommittee 
heard testimony from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

                                Meetings


 AMERICA'S WATER RESOURCES INFRASTRUCTURE: CONCEPTS FOR THE NEXT WATER 
                   RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ACT, PART 1

    On October 27, 2017, the Subcommittee held a field 
roundtable policy discussion in Miami, Florida, among 
bipartisan leaders of the Committee, Subcommittee, Members of 
the regional Florida Congressional Delegation, and public and 
private stakeholders on water infrastructure needs (e.g., 
ports, locks and dams, and inland waterways) and challenges 
states and communities face in addressing those needs. 
Participants were the National Association of Counties, a 
member of both the American Association of Port Authorities and 
the Florida Ports Council, the National Waterways Conference, 
the American Waterways Operators and Waterways Council, Inc., 
the South Florida Water Management District, the Everglades 
Foundation, the National Association of Flood and Stormwater 
Management Agencies, the American Shore and Beach Preservation 
Association, and the Florida Department of Transportation.

 AMERICA'S WATER RESOURCES INFRASTRUCTURE: CONCEPTS FOR THE NEXT WATER 
                   RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ACT, PART 2

    On April 20, 2018, the Subcommittee held a field roundtable 
policy discussion in Coos Bay, Oregon, among bipartisan leaders 
of the Committee, Subcommittee, and public and private 
stakeholders on challenges states and communities face in 
rebuilding and determining possible solutions to address 
America's water infrastructure needs. This roundtable was part 
of the Subcommittee's work this Congress to develop the next 
Water Resources Development Act to improve the country's ports, 
locks and dams, inland waterways, and other water resources 
infrastructure. The Water Resources Development Act of 2018 was 
ultimately signed into law (P.L. 115-270). Participants were 
the Port of Coos Bay, American Association of Port Authorities, 
Port of Port Orford, Oregon Albacore Commission, Pacific 
Northwest Waterways Association.

                           Oversight Letters


                    INTERNATIONAL WASTEWATER SYSTEMS

    On February 8, 2018, Subcommittee on Water Resources and 
Environment Chairman Garret Graves (R-LA), Congresswoman Martha 
McSally (R-AZ), and Senator John McCain (R-AZ) sent a letter to 
the Comptroller General requesting GAO conduct a review of the 
U.S. Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission 
and its role in managing two international wastewater treatment 
plans in Arizona and California. This report is expected in the 
116th Congress.

                  CENTRAL EVERGLADES PLANNING PROJECT

    On May 22, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA), Subcommittee on 
Water Resources and Environment Chairman Garret Graves (R-LA), 
and Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Vice 
Chairman Brian Mast (R-FL) wrote a letter to the Assistant 
Secretary of the Army for Civil Works requesting the Assistant 
Secretary to expeditiously review and provide a timely decision 
on a Post-Authorization Change Report for the Central 
Everglades Planning Project, submitted by the South Florida 
Water Management District. This report was authorized within 
the America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 (P.L. 115-270).

                     LONG ISLAND SOUND RESTORATION

    On June 16, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that 
GAO review the federal water quality improvement and ecosystem 
restoration efforts under way in the Long Island Sound. On July 
19, 2018, GAO released report GAO-18-410, titled ``Long Island 
Sound Restoration: Improved Reporting and Cost Estimates Could 
Help Guide Future Efforts.''

                        PUGET SOUND RESTORATION

    On June 16, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that 
GAO review the federal water quality improvement and ecosystem 
restoration efforts under way in the Puget Sound. On July 19, 
2018, GAO released report GAO-18-453, titled ``Puget Sound 
Restoration: Additional Actions Could Improve Assessments of 
Progress.''

                     SAN FRANCISCO BAY RESTORATION

    On June 16, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that 
GAO review the federal water quality improvement and ecosystem 
restoration efforts under way in the San Francisco Bay. On 
August 16, 2018, GAO released report GAO-18-473, titled ``San 
Francisco Bay Delta Watershed: Wide Range of Restoration 
Efforts Need Updated Federal Reporting and Coordination 
Roles.''

                    COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN RESTORATION

    On June 16, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that 
GAO review the federal water quality improvement and ecosystem 
restoration efforts under way in the Columbia River Basin. On 
August 24, 2018, GAO released report GAO-18-561, titled 
``Columbia River Basin: Additional Federal Actions Would 
Benefit Restoration Efforts.''

            COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN RESTORATION IMPLEMENTATION

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review the 
implementation and effectiveness of the Columbia River Basin 
restoration program authorized under section 5010 of Public Law 
114-322. The report is expected in the 116th Congress.

                  FEDERALLY OWNED HOPPER DREDGE FLEET

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review of the costs and 
benefits of the federally owned hopper dredge fleet. The report 
is expected in the 116th Congress.

                      INLAND WATERWAYS MANAGEMENT

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review alternative 
models for managing the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. On 
November 7, 2018, GAO released report GAO-19-20, titled 
``Inland Waterways: Actions Needed to Increase Budget 
Transparency and Contracting Efficiency.''

          PRESIDENT'S BUDGET REQUESTS FOR CIVIL WORKS PROGRAM

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review of the 
president's budget requests for the Corps of Engineers Civil 
Works program for fiscal years 2008 through 2017. The report is 
expected in the 116th Congress.

                         SHELLFISH AQUICULTURE

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review the shellfish 
aquaculture industry in the Nation's coastal states. The report 
is expected in the 116th Congress.

                        219 PROGRAM OF WRDA 1992

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review the 
effectiveness of projects carried out under the 219 program of 
WRDA 1992. The report is expected in the 116th Congress.

                      CORPS BENEFIT TO COST RATIOS

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review the methodology 
and performance metrics used by the Corps of Engineers to 
calculate benefit-to-cost ratios and evaluate construction 
progress. The report is expected in the 116th Congress.

                  SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY MODERNIZATION

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review the 
modernization of the Saint Lawrence Seaway. On September 5, 
2018, GAO released report GAO-18-610, titled ``Great Lakes-St. 
Lawrence Seaway: Assessing Risks and Measuring Performance 
Could Improve Maritime Transportation.''

                     WATERCRAFT INSPECTION STATIONS

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter, later joined by Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), to the 
Comptroller General requesting that GAO review of the 
implementation and effectiveness of the watercraft inspection 
stations established by the Secretary of the Army under section 
104 of the River and Harbor Act of 1958. The report is expected 
in the 118th Congress.

             TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY FINANCIAL VIABILITY

    On June 5, 2015, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) wrote a letter to 
the Comptroller General requesting GAO conduct a review of 
TVA's debt status, its plans for reducing this debt and whether 
those plans are reasonable, and its current financial status. 
On March 23, 2017, GAO released a report GAO-17-343, titled 
``Tennessee Valley Authority: Actions Needed to Better 
Communicate Debt Reduction Plans and Address Billions in 
Unfunded Pension Liabilities.''

             TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY FINANCIAL VIABILITY

    On December 21, 2016, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and Committee on 
Environment and Public Works Chairman James Inhofe (R-OK) sent 
a letter to the Comptroller General requesting that GAO review 
the geographic diversity among projects. In December 2018, GAO 
is expected to release a report titled ``Army Corps of 
Engineers: Budget Requests Included Construction Projects 
Located in Over 30 States and Were Selected Using a Multi-level 
Process.''

                         WATER STORAGE PRICING

    On June 12, 2014, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Chairman Bill Shuster (R-PA) and then Ranking 
Member Nick J. Rahall II (D-WV) wrote a letter to the 
Comptroller General requesting GAO conduct a review of the 
Corps' water storage pricing strategy, how water reallocation 
activities may impact storage prices, how storage prices differ 
from contract to contract, and whether or not formulas for 
storage pricing create results that make it cost prohibitive 
for municipalities to contract for storage with the Corps. On 
August 18, 2017, GAO released report GAO-17-500, ``Army Corps 
of Engineers: Better Data Needed on Water Storage Pricing.''

                       Minority Oversight Letters


               OVERSIGHT OF U.S. ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS

    On January 3, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General asking to be included as a 
co-requester in a GAO review initiated by Chairman Bill Shuster 
on issues related to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

                     HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND

    On January 4, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to President-elect Donald J. Trump urging action to make 
the $9 billion balance of the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund 
immediately available to dredge ports and inland harbors.

                          INVESTING IN AMERICA

    On February 7, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to President Donald J. Trump to urge action on the 
Investing in America initiatives to improve infrastructure, 
which include A Penny for Progress, Unlocking the Harbor 
Maintenance Trust Fund, and the increase or removal of the 
passenger facility charge (PFC) cap for airport development.

      HARBOR MAINTENANCE TRUST FUND IN THE FY 2018 BUDGET REQUEST

    On March 9, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Chairman 
Garrett Graves (R-LA) sent a letter to President Donald J. 
Trump requesting that the President fully utilize the Harbor 
Maintenance Trust Fund in the Fiscal Year 2018 Budget Request.

                          BROWNFIELDS PROGRAM

    On March 10, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Committee 
on Energy and Commerce Ranking Member Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-
NJ), Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking 
Member Grace Napolitano (D-CA), Subcommittee on Environment and 
the Economy Ranking Member Paul Tonko (D-NY), and Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Vice Ranking Member Elizabeth 
Esty (D-CT) sent a letter to the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requesting information 
regarding the support for the Federal funding of the 
Brownfields categorical and competitive grants programs.

                          CLEAN WATER PROGRAMS

    On March 10, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Committee 
on Energy and Commerce Ranking Member Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-
NJ), Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking 
Member Grace Napolitano (D-CA), Subcommittee on Environment and 
the Economy Ranking Member Paul Tonko (D-NY) sent a letter to 
the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
to urge support for the EPA's State Revolving Fund (Clean Water 
SRF) and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (Drinking Water 
SRF) programs.

                            CLEAN WATER RULE

    On August 18, 2017, On March 10, 2017, Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio 
(D-OR), Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking 
Member Grace Napolitano (D-CA),) Member of Congress Donald S. 
Beyer, Jr. (D-VA), Member of Congress Paul Tonko (D-NY) Member 
of Congress Doris Matsui (D-CA), Member of Congress Alan 
Lowenthal (D-CA), Member of Congress Gerald E. Connolly (D-VA), 
Member of Congress Matt Cartwright (D-PA), Member of Congress 
Jared Polis (D-CO), Member of Congress Mike Quigley (D-IL), 
Member of Congress Marcy Kaptur (D-OH), Member of Congress 
Jared Huffman (D-CA), Member of Congress Barbara Lee (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Debbie Dingell (D-MI), Member of Congress 
Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), Member of Congress Brenda L. 
Lawrence (D-MI), Member of Congress Andre Carson (D-IN), Member 
of Congress Adam Smith (D-WA), Member of Congress Jerrold 
Nadler (D-NY), Member of Congress Gregorio Kilili Camacho 
Sablan (D-MP), Member of Congress Dwight Evans (D-PA), Member 
of Congress Keith Ellison (D-MN), Member of Congress Donald M. 
Payne, Jr. (D-NJ), Member of Congress Stephen F. Lynch (D-MA), 
Member of Congress Niki Tsongas (D-MD), Member of Congress 
Sander Levin (D-MI), Member of Congress Seth Moulton (D-MA), 
Member of Congress Bill Foster (D-IL), Member of Nanette Diaz 
Barragan (D-CA), Member of Congress Jamie Raskin (D-MD), Member 
of Congress Anthony Brown (D-MD), Member of Congress Madeleine 
Z. Bordallo (D-GU), Member of Congress A. Donald McEachin (D-
VA), Member of Congress Earl Blumenauer (D-OR), Member of 
Congress William R. Keating (D-MA), Member of Congress James P. 
McGovern (D-VA), Member of Congress Sheila Jackson Lee (D-TX), 
Member of Congress Janice D. Schakowsky (D-IL), Member of 
Congress Elijah E. Cummings (D-MD), Member of Congress John 
Conyers, Jr. (D-MI), Member of Congress Gwen Moore (D-WI), 
Member of Congress Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL), Member of 
Congress Louise M. Slaughter (D-NY), Member of Congress Hakeem 
Jeffries (D-NY), Member of Congress Raul M. Grijalva (D-AZ), 
Member of Congress Mark Pocan (D-WI), Member of Congress Carol 
Shea-Porter (D-NH), Member of Congress Michael E. Capuano (D-
MA), Member of Congress David N. Ciccilline (D-RI), Member of 
Congress John K. Delaney (D-MD), Member of Congress Mike Doyle 
(D-MD), Member of Congress Katherine Clark (D-MA), Member of 
Congress Bonnie Watson Coleman (D-NJ), Member of Congress 
Joseph P. Kennedy, III (D-MA), Member of Congress Nydia M. 
Velazquez (D-NY), Member of Congress Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Mark DeSaulnier (D-CA), Member of Congress 
Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-NJ), Member of Congress John Yarmuth (D-
KY), Member of Congress Alma S. Adams (D-NC), Member of 
Congress Donald Norcross (D-NJ), Member of Congress Mike 
Thompson (D-CA), Member of Congress Betty McCollum (D-MN), 
Member of Congress Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), Member of Congress 
Chellie Pingree (D-ME), Member of Congress Lucille Roybal-
Allard (D-CA), Member of Congress Ruben J. Kihuen (D-NV), 
Member of Congress Jackie Speier (D-CA), Member of Congress 
Grace Meng (D-NY), Member of Congress Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott 
(D-VA), Member of Congress Diana DeGette (D-CO), Member of 
Congress Daniel T. Kildee (D-MI), Member of Congress Henry C. 
``Hank'' Johnson, Jr. (D-GA), Member of Congress Luis V. 
Gutierrez (D-IL) Member of Congress Rick Nolan (D-MN), Member 
of Congress Steve Cohen (D-TN), Member of Congress John 
Sarbanes (D-MD), Member of Congress David E. Price (D-NC), 
Member of Congress Suzanne Bonamici (D-OR), Member of Congress 
Judy Chu (D-CA), Member of Congress Daniel W. Lipinski, Member 
of Congress Jim Langevin (D-RI), Member of Congress Elizabeth 
H. Esty (D-CT), Member of Congress Linda Sanchez (D-CA), Member 
of Congress Marcia L. Fudge (D-OH), Member of Congress Robert 
A. Brady (D-PA), Member of Congress Albio Sires (D-NJ), Member 
of Congress Jose E. Serrano (D-NY), Member of Congress Jimmy 
Gomez (D-CA), Member of Congress Salud O. Carbajal (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Brendan F. Boyle (D-PA), Member of Congress 
Tony Cardenas (D-CA), Member of Congress Bill Pascrell (D-NJ), 
Member of Congress Richard E. Neal (D-MA), Member of Congress 
Darren Soto (D-FL), Member of Congress Jerry McNerney (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Pramila Jayapal (D-WA), Member of Congress 
Adam B. Schiff (D-CA), Member of Congress Brad Sherman (D-CA), 
Member of Congress Stephanie Murphy (D-FL), Member of Congress 
Josh Gottheimer (D-NJ), and Member of Congress Ted W. Lieu (D-
CA) sent a letter the Administrator of the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) to oppose the proposed rule rescinding 
the Clean Water Rule (Docket No. EPA-HQ-OQ-2017-0203), also 
called the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule.

                         EPA EXPENDITURES AUDIT

    On October 4, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking Member 
Grace Napolitano (D-CA) sent a letter to the Inspector General 
requesting an audit of the recent expenditures made by the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for Administrator Scott 
Pruitt's security to determine if there is potential waster or 
abuse of taxpayer dollars.

                    VIOLATION OF ANTIDEFICIENCY ACT

    On October 12, 2017, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Committee 
on Energy and Commerce Ranking Member Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-
NJ), Committee on Oversight and Government Reform Ranking 
Member Elijah E. Cummings (D-MD), and Subcommittee on Interior, 
Environment, and Related Agencies Ranking Member Betty McCollum 
(D-MN) sent a letter to the Comptroller General requesting a 
legal opinion from GAO regarding whether the Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA) violated statutory prohibitions on the 
use of appropriated funds for lobbying and publicity or 
propaganda purposes as well as the Antideficiency Act.

                            NO-BID CONTRACT

    On January 3, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) requesting further information on the process of 
awarding a $120,000 no-bid contract by the EPA to Definers 
Public Affairs to provide ``news analysis and brief service 
focusing on EPA work and other topics of interest to EPA.''

                        AWARDING NO-BID CONTRACT

    On January 5, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Committee 
on Energy and Commerce Ranking Member Frank Pallone, Jr. (D-
NJ), Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking 
Member Grace Napolitano (D-CA), Subcommittee on Environment and 
the Economy Ranking Member Paul Tonko (D-NY), and Subcommittee 
on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Ranking Member 
Betty McCollum (D-MN) sent a letter to the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expressing serious 
concerns regarding the awarding of a $120,000 no-bid contract 
by the EPA to Definers Public Affairs to provide ``news 
analysis and brief service focusing on EPA work and other 
topics of interest to EPA.''

                    VIOLATION OF ANTIDEFICIENCY ACT

    On January 9, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) sent a 
letter to the Comptroller General asking to be included as a 
co-requester in a GAO review initiated by Senator Udall (D-NM) 
reviewing whether EPA violated the Antidefiency Act by 
obligating fiscal year 2017 funds to the Administrator's office 
with a privacy booth. On April 16, 2018, the Comptroller 
General released a letter concluding that, ``Because EPA used 
its appropriations in a manner specifically prohibited by law, 
EPA violated the Antideficiency Act.''

                      CLEAN WATER ACT PROTECTIONS

    On April 24, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and Senate 
Committee on Environment and Public Works Ranking Member Tom 
Carper (DE) sent a letter to the Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection (EPA) expressing concern and 
requesting information over the decision the strip EPA experts 
of their authority to make important decisions about Clean 
Water Act protections.

                          STATUTORY COMPLIANCE

    On May 10, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR), Senate 
Committee on Environment and Public Works Ranking Member Tom 
Carper (D-DE), Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and 
Related Agencies Ranking Member Tom Udall (D-NM), and 
Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies 
Ranking Member Betty McCollum (D-MN) sent a letter to the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection (EPA) urging 
compliance with the law by providing Congress and the GAO all 
statutorily-required information in regards to violations of 
the Antidefiency Act.

                          CLEAN WATER ACT LAWS

    On June 27, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and Senate 
Committee on Environment and Public Works Ranking Member Tom 
Carper (DE) sent a letter to the Attorney General and the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 
expressing concern that the Trump administration is unlawfully 
slowing or ending enforcement of the Clean Water Act in cases 
that fall outside the administration's overly narrow and 
currently legally unsupported interpretations of the law's 
reach.

                        TOXIC SUBSTANCES REPORT

    On July 9, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking Member 
Grace Napolitano (D-CA) sent a letter to the Administrator of 
the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Acting 
Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease 
Registry (ATSDR) expressing concern on the manner in which 
ATSDR made available the Draft Toxicological Profile for 
Perfluoroalkyls for review and comment on June 21, 2018, in the 
Federal Register and the press reports that political aides in 
the White House and EPA sought to block the release of the 
study.

                      Oversight of Clean Water Act

    On July 19, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and Senate 
Committee on Environment and Public Works Ranking Member Tom 
Carper (DE) sent a letter to the Acting Administrator of the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requesting immediate 
revocation of the June 2018 memorandum issued by the former EPA 
Administrator, Scott Pruitt, and take no further action to 
weaken EPA's oversight and enforcement of the Clean Water Act 
in protecting local rivers, lakes, and streams.

                   CLEAN WATER ACT AND STATE PROGRAMS

    On October 18, 2018, Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure Ranking Member Peter DeFazio (D-OR) and 
Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment Ranking Member 
Grace Napolitano (D-CA) sent a letter to the Comptroller 
General requesting a GAO investigation into the Environmental 
Protection Agency's (EPA) implementation and enforcement of the 
Clean Water Act, including its oversight of approved State 
programs.

                      Oversight Within Legislation


                              BROWNFIELDS

    2018 BUILD Act--(Division N of Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2018) contains two sections on oversight. Section 11(b) 
requires a report from the Administrator of the Environmental 
Protection Agency on the new ranking criteria outlined in law. 
The report is due September 30, 2022. Section 12 requires the 
Inspector General of the Environmental Protection Agency to 
submit to Congress a report on the management of the program. 
The report is due September 30, 2022.

          EXPEDITING THE EVALUATION AND PROCESSING OF PERMITS

    Section 1006(5) of WRRDA 2014 (P.L. 113-121) instructed the 
GAO to report to Congress on the implementation by the 
Secretary of the Army of the authority provided by section 214 
of WRDA 2000 as amended to public utility companies and natural 
gas companies. On August, 3, 2017, GAO released report GAO-17-
678R, titled ``Corps of Engineers: Extent and Status of 
Expedited Permit Processing for Public-Utility Companies, 
Natural Gas Companies, and Railroad Carriers.''

                       INLAND WATERWAYS OVERSIGHT

    Section 2007 of WRRDA 2014 (P.L. 113-121) instructed the 
GAO to report to Congress on the challenges associated with the 
Olmsted Lock and Dam project. On February 16, 2017, GAO 
released report GAO 17-147, titled ``Army Corps of Engineers: 
Factors Contributing to Cost Increases and Schedule Delays in 
the Olmsted Locks and Dam Project.''

                  OVERSIGHT INCLUDED WITHIN AWIA 2018

    Section 1204 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Comptroller General to report to 
Congress on the benefit-cost procedures used by the Office of 
Management and Budget (OMB) and recommendations to improving 
the benefit-cost analysis procedures of the Corps and OMB. This 
report is due in October, 2019.
    Section 1205 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish required reports on 
the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund, with additional 
considerations. This report is due April, 2019.
    Section 1206 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to develop a list of existing 
nonpowered dams, which have the greatest potential for 
hydropower development. This report is due May, 2020.
    Section 1207 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report of all 
federally authorized ports and harbors that could become 
innovative ports for offshore wind development and barriers to 
the development for offshore wind development. This report is 
due October, 2019.
    Section 1208 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report to 
Congress on activities relating to the use of innovative 
materials in water resources development projects. This report 
is due October, 2019.
    Section 1209 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on how to 
improve and implement the waiver process for non-federal cost 
shares for certain storm damage prevention and reduction 
projects. This report is due October, 2019.
    Section 1210 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report to 
Congress on the extent to which the Corps has carried out the 
program for removing snags, obstructions, and other debris in 
federal channels pursuant to section 3 of the Act of March 2, 
1945. This report is due April, 2019.
    Section 1211 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on federal 
policy constraints on the ability of the Corps to address urban 
flooding. This report is due October, 2019.
    Section 1212 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on 
incomplete feasibility studies for certain projects that would 
mitigate damages from weather or other events. This report is 
due October, 2019.
    Section 1213 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
application of enhanced use leasing authorities, and other 
military leasing authorities to the civil works program of the 
Corps. This report is due October, 2020.
    Section 1214 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on any 
potential disproportionate and adverse health or environmental 
effects of programs, policies, and activities of the Corps 
related to water resources development projects on minority 
communities, low-income communities, rural communities, and 
Indian tribes. This report is due October, 2020.
    Section 1215 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to contract with the National 
Academy of Public Administration to study the efficiency of the 
Corps' current staff salaries and administrative expense 
procedures. This report is due October, 2019.
    Section 1216 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to include opportunities for 
the potential beneficial use of dredged materials in its 
assessment of the operation and maintenance needs at the 
Nation's harbors and inland harbors. This report is due 
biennially.
    Section 1217 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to assess the anticipated 
effects of the Corps continuing to be responsible for the 
maintenance of certain projects. This report is due January, 
2019.
    Section 1218 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
durability and resiliency of existing hurricane barriers and 
harbors of refuge in the North Atlantic Division. This report 
is due October, 2019.
    Section 1220 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
status of McMicken Dam, Arizona and Muddy River, Massachusetts 
projects.
    Section 1221 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
implementation of the oversight committee for the Table Rock 
Lake Master Plan. This report is due February, 2019.
    Section 1222 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to report on the use of 
forecast-informed reservoir operations at the Lake Mendocino 
project in California and the viability of using forecast-
informed reservoir operations at other dams owned and operated 
by the Corps. This report is due October, 2019.
    Section 1223 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report 
summarizing the path forward and timeline to implement the 
Cedar River, Cedar Rapids, Iowa project. This report is due 
January, 2019.
    Section 1224 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
structure and operations plan for the Old River control 
structure based on the best available science and improved 
monitoring capabilities. This report is due April, 2019.
    Section 1226 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to submit a report regarding 
the impacts of interception-rearing complex construction on 
navigation, flood control, and other authorized purposes set 
forth in the Missouri River Master Manual. This report is due 
May, 2020.
    Section 1227 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
function and reliability of the Lower Missouri River bank 
stabilization and navigation project. This report is due April, 
2019.
    Section 1229 of the Water Resources Development Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) directs the Corps to furnish a report on the 
status of the implementation of the water supply contract at 
Wright Patman Lake, Texas. This report is due June 30, 2019.
    Section 4303 of America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 
(P.L. 115-270) instructed GAO to conduct an audit on certain 
repayment contracts on the Harlan County Dam. This audit is due 
April, 2019.
 OVERSIGHT PLAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
                             115TH CONGRESS


                        Subcommittee on Aviation

    1. Implementation of the FAA Extension, Safety, and 
Security Act of 2016. The FAA Extension, Safety, and Security 
Act of 2016 (P.L. 114-190) was signed into law on July 15, 
2016. This Act authorizes funding for the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) through fiscal year 2017, and contains a 
number of safety-critical and time-sensitive reforms. The 
Subcommittee will closely oversee the FAA's efforts to 
implement the provisions of this Act.
    2. Safety Programs. The Subcommittee has held numerous 
safety hearings and will continue its oversight. Maintaining a 
safe and efficient aviation system is critical to the aviation 
industry, passengers, the U.S. economy, job creation, and U.S. 
competitiveness in the global marketplace. Issues to be 
addressed include: general aviation safety, key safety 
agreements, the safe integration of unmanned aircraft systems, 
pilot and controller training, losses of separation between 
aircraft, the FAA's enforcement and certification activities, 
commercial airline safety, and the FAA's voluntary reporting 
and data-sharing and assessment programs.
    3. National Transportation Safety Board. Authorization for 
the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) expired in 
2008. A reauthorization bill passed the House in 2010 but was 
not enacted.
    4. Airline Financial Position and Customer Service. The 
aviation marketplace has gone through many changes and over the 
next decade, the FAA predicts that air traffic operations will 
increase. The Office of the Secretary within the Department of 
Transportation (DOT) is responsible for economic oversight of 
the airline industry, including ensuring that air carriers do 
not engage in unfair and deceptive practices that could harm 
consumers and ensuring that business agreements among air 
carriers do not result in harmful effects. The DOT's actions in 
this regard may have a dramatic impact on the industry, 
competition, job creation, and airlines' obligations to their 
passengers. The Subcommittee will continue to examine 
opportunities to improve the airline industry's 
competitiveness, review recently established regulations to 
ensure the aviation system remains safe and accessible to the 
traveling public, and provide oversight of standards for 
passenger service.
    5. Oversight of the Commercial Space Industry. The mission 
of the FAA's Office of Commercial Space Transportation is to 
ensure protection of the public, property, and the national 
security and foreign policy interests of the United States 
during commercial launch or reentry activities, and to 
encourage, facilitate, and promote U.S. commercial space 
transportation. The Subcommittee will continue to monitor the 
status and future of the U.S. commercial space transportation 
industry and the role of the FAA in providing safety oversight 
of the industry.
    6. Evaluation of FAA's NextGen Air Traffic Control 
Modernization. Since the early 1980s, the FAA has been working 
to modernize the air traffic control system, and its most 
current effort is the Next Generation Air Transportation System 
(NextGen). The FAA describes NextGen as ``a monumental, 
historic shift forward in the modernization of our air 
transportation system'' and as ``[i]ntegrating NextGen 
capabilities to transform the National Airspace System''. The 
FAA has stated that NextGen will result in greater airspace 
system efficiency; reduced noise exposure; reduced emissions 
and fuel burn; improved safety; increased accuracy and 
reliability in equipment and software used for navigation and 
air traffic control; and the capability for future computer 
enhancements. Over the years, the FAA's NextGen efforts have 
been behind schedule and over budget. The Subcommittee will 
continue to monitor and examine the FAA's efforts to establish 
performance metrics, meet deadlines, stay within budget, ensure 
an appropriate level of aircraft equipage with NextGen 
avionics, and pursue solutions to identified challenges.
    7. Cybersecurity of the National Airspace System. As the 
FAA modernizes air traffic control technology, and the aviation 
industry modernizes the aircraft fleet, concerns about the 
robustness and resiliency of these systems have arisen. 
Ensuring the cybersecurity of these systems is of critical 
importance. The FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 
directs the FAA to implement a strategic framework for 
cybersecurity. The Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
the cybersecurity activities of the FAA and relevant 
stakeholders to ensure appropriate steps are being taken by the 
FAA to address cyber-threats and complete the strategic 
framework for cybersecurity.
    8. Implementation of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act 
of 2012. The FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (P.L. 
112-95) (FMRA) was signed into law on February 14, 2012. The 
FMRA authorized funding for, and reformed and revised the 
safety programs, air traffic control modernization (NextGen) 
efforts, and operations of the FAA through fiscal year 2015. 
The Subcommittee will continue to closely oversee the FAA's 
efforts to implement the remaining mandates contained in the 
FMRA and to improve aviation safety.
    9. Investment in Aviation Infrastructure. America's 
airports are part of a global aviation system, and as such they 
must remain safe and efficient in order to compete with global 
hubs of air commerce. Over the next five years, the FAA 
estimates a need for $32.5 billion in projects eligible for 
Airport Improvement Program (AIP) grants. Airports rely on AIP 
funding, supplemented with revenue from the statutorily-
authorized passenger facility charge, which is capped at $4.50 
per segment and $18 per round trip. The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight as appropriate regarding airport financing 
and the FAA's administration of the AIP.

        Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation

    1. Coast Guard Budget. H.R. 4188, the Coast Guard 
Authorization Act of 2016, authorized $6.98 billion for the 
Service in each of fiscal years 2016 and 2017, was signed into 
law on February 8, 2016.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will hold hearings 
on the President's fiscal year 2018 and 2019 budget requests 
and consider legislation to authorize the Coast Guard. The 
Subcommittee will explore ways to improve Coast Guard 
operations, and improvements to laws governing maritime 
transportation.
    2. Coast Guard Acquisition. The Coast Guard is currently 
undergoing a major recapitalization of its oceangoing assets. 
The recapitalization will replace or modernize more than 90 
ships and 200 aircraft used to carry out the Service's missions 
beyond near coastal waters. It will also replace antiquated 
command, control, and communications systems. The program faces 
serious challenges related to schedule and budget. The longer 
the acquisition program drags out, the more resources are 
siphoned off to maintain existing assets. In many cases, those 
assets are at or beyond projected service life and are more 
difficult and expensive to maintain. The Subcommittee is 
concerned that delays in new asset acquisition, competing 
demands from shoreside infrastructure and other Coast Guard 
cutter capital needs, and the cost of legacy asset maintenance 
threaten the ability of the Service to complete this 
recapitalization and avoid gaps in operational capability.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue to 
closely review the programs of record, as well as any changes 
to those programs which may be advisable or necessary to ensure 
the men and women of the Coast Guard who risk their lives for 
our Nation have the best equipment possible at the best price 
for the taxpayer.
    3. Mission Balance. The Subcommittee continues to have 
concerns with the Coast Guard's ability to balance funding and 
focus among the Service's many distinct and competing missions. 
Since September 11, 2001, significant additional resources have 
gone to the Service's homeland security activities. Security-
related missions such as ports, waterways, and coastal security 
and migrant interdiction have seen dramatic increases from pre-
September 11, 2001 funding levels. Other traditional Coast 
Guard missions have not seen such increases. Resources and man-
hours devoted to missions such as drug interdiction and 
fisheries law enforcement are well below pre-September 11, 2001 
funding levels.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of the Coast Guard's mission balance to ensure the 
Service qualitatively and quantitatively reviews its many 
missions, makes and justifies decisions about which missions it 
cannot afford to meet performance measures, identifies and 
responds to exigencies that divert resources between missions, 
and plans how it allocates resources appropriately among its 
many missions.
    4. Maritime Domain Awareness. The effort to know what is 
happening at all times on the ocean, coastal and interior 
waters of the United States, and aboard the vessels that 
transit in or through waters under U.S. jurisdiction is known 
as Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA). The successful 
implementation of MDA is critical to maritime safety, homeland 
security, and the efficiency and reliability of the U.S. 
maritime supply chain.
    The Coast Guard relies on several new and developing 
technologies to acquire, manage, and disseminate interoperable 
MDA information. The Subcommittee is concerned with the Coast 
Guard's apparent inability or disinterest to assess new 
technologies, such as unmanned, autonomous aerial and 
underwater vehicles, in order to acquire MDA information in a 
more cost-effective manner with greater accuracy and 
efficiency.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of the Service's ongoing efforts to assess, develop, 
and implement new MDA technologies to ensure that Coast Guard 
operations are informed by the best MDA information possible 
that is gathered in a timely, reliable manner, and provides 
high value for the taxpayer. The Subcommittee will also examine 
the costs imposed on maritime stakeholders as part of the MDA 
program, and examine methods to reduce those costs without 
negative impacts to the quality and quantity of MDA 
information.
    5. Coast Guard Prevention and Response Activities. The 
Coast Guard plays major roles in response to oil spills (i.e. 
DEEPWATER HORIZON) and natural disasters (i.e. hurricanes and 
flood events). The Service was the Federal On-Scene Coordinator 
and National Incident Commander for the 2010 DEEPWATER HORIZON 
spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The Coast Guard was a first 
responder to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita which devastated New 
Orleans and the Mississippi River Delta in 2005, and in 2016, 
the Coast Guard responded to severe flood events in Louisiana 
and North Carolina. In addition, the Coast Guard enforces 
domestically the implementation of the National Invasive 
Species Act, and internationally, U.S. compliance with a 
convention to prevent invasive species from being introduced 
into U.S. waters through the discharge of ballast water. Due to 
a 2008 federal court decision, the discharge of ballast water 
and other ``discharges incidental to the normal operation of 
vessels'' such as bilge water, deck wash, and air conditioning 
condensate are now regulated by the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) under the Clean Water Act. A number of states have 
adopted ballast water standards. Thus far, these standards have 
been waived because they have proven unenforceable. However, if 
implemented these standards would severely complicate vessel 
operations and impede the flow of commerce along our coast, 
Great Lakes, and inland rivers.
    In the 115th Congress, the Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight on the Coast Guard's crisis prevention and response 
capabilities. Oil spills, natural disasters, and mass migration 
events can each over-extend the Coast Guard's prevention and 
response systems and capabilities. The Subcommittee will 
conduct oversight on Coast Guard prevention and response 
programs, including its existing regulations authorizing the 
use of Alternative Planning Criteria. The Subcommittee will 
also work with the Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee 
to conduct oversight of the Coast Guard's implementation of its 
ballast water regulation, including the status of the Coast 
Guard's type approval process for ballast water treatment 
systems, and EPA's implementation of its Vessel General Permit 
program for vessel incidental discharges. The Subcommittee will 
work to set a single nationwide ballast water standard that 
ensures the efficient movement of maritime commerce, defends 
seafaring and port jobs, and protects the environment.
    6. Short Sea Shipping. Short sea shipping is the waterborne 
movement of commercial freight between two ports in the United 
States or between ports in the United States and Canada. At the 
present time, the most highly developed water freight 
transportation systems in the United States operate on the 
Mississippi River, the Great Lakes, and the St. Lawrence 
Seaway, most often carrying agricultural products and other raw 
materials. However, the Maritime Administration has found these 
routes are underutilized, carrying approximately 13% of total 
freight tonnage in the United States. By comparison, nearly 70% 
of the freight tonnage transported in the United States is 
moved by trucks travelling across our Nation's roadways.
    Revitalization of our marine highways has the potential to 
reduce congestion on our highways, improve air quality, and 
create new maritime industry jobs for Americans. The 
Subcommittee will examine potential options for increasing the 
cost-competitiveness and expanded use of short sea shipping in 
the 115th Congress.
    7. FMC and MARAD Budget. The Subcommittee has jurisdiction 
over the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and the non-defense 
related programs of the Maritime Administration (MARAD). The 
FMC is responsible for the economic regulation of U.S. 
waterborne foreign commerce and unfair shipping practices. 
MARAD oversees several programs related to defense readiness, 
as well as programs designed to promote and develop the 
domestic merchant marine and shipbuilding industries.
    The Subcommittee will continue to conduct oversight of the 
FMC and MARAD in the 115th Congress. The Subcommittee will 
explore ways to promote job growth in the domestic fleet while 
reducing costs at both agencies.
    8. National Maritime Strategy. Section 603 of the Howard 
Coble Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2014 
directed the Secretary of Transportation, in consultation with 
the Commandant of the Coast Guard, to develop and transmit to 
the Congress a National Maritime Strategy no later than 60 days 
after the date of enactment. This comprehensive strategy was to 
include recommendations to increase the competitiveness and use 
of U.S.-flag vessels in the U.S. foreign trade, enhance 
shipbuilding, ensure federal agency compliance with cargo 
preference requirements, and increase the use of short sea 
shipping in the United States. Congress is still waiting to 
receive the Strategy.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the Maritime 
Administration and the Coast Guard to determine the status of 
the development of this strategy to promote and expand economic 
opportunities for U.S.-flag carriers and related marine 
industries and the future of the U.S. Merchant Marine.
    9. Ports Safety and Security. The Subcommittee will 
continue oversight of U.S. ports and potential vulnerabilities 
with respect to dirty bombs and fissile materials and the 
adequacy of the existing multi-layered, risk-based security 
strategy. U.S. ports are a critical component in an efficient 
U.S. marine transportation system since they are the primary 
portals through which cargo and other goods enter and exit the 
United States. In 2014, 23.1 million jobs in the United States 
were supported by the cargo moving through U.S. seaports. 
Furthermore, marine cargo activity generated around $4.6 
trillion of total economic activity or about 26% of the United 
States' $17.4 trillion Gross Domestic Product in 2014. Any 
incident occurring in U.S. ports will impact the U.S. economy 
and the flow of goods into and out of the United States.

 Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency 
                               Management

    1. Emergency Management. The Subcommittee will continue to 
examine and evaluate the Nation's ability to prevent, prepare 
for, mitigate against, respond to, and recover from disasters 
and emergencies of all types including terrorism. In the 115th 
Congress, continued oversight will be needed as states continue 
to be impacted by and recover from prior disasters, such as 
Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Matthew, and the Louisiana Floods. 
In addition, the Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
FEMA's implementation of reforms and additional authorities 
from the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 and the Post-
Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006.
    The Subcommittee intends to continue its comprehensive 
review and assessment of how federal disaster assistance has 
evolved over the past several decades and its continued 
effectiveness. The purpose is to examine how and why disaster 
costs and losses have continued to increase, which agencies 
provide assistance and how that money is spent, what guidance 
or controls are in place for the effective use of assistance, 
and the appropriate role for the Federal Government.
    2. Border Security. During the 114th Congress, the 
Subcommittee conducted oversight of land ports of entry (LPOEs) 
construction and the implementation of a Public Private 
Partnership program created as part of the Fiscal Year 2014 
Consolidated Appropriations Act. Additional legislation was 
moved to make changes and modifications of that program in the 
114th Congress. The Subcommittee will continue its oversight of 
LPOE construction projects, the implementation of the Public 
Private Partnership program and examine additional ways in 
which private dollars could be leveraged.
    3. Leasing. During the 113th and 114th Congresses, the 
Subcommittee held hearings and roundtables identifying the 
large number of GSA leases expiring in the next five years and 
examining GSA's process for addressing them. GSA currently 
leases 195 million rentable square feet--more than half of the 
GSA's total space inventory. The cost of leasing space accounts 
for more than half of the GSA's Federal Buildings Fund (FBF) 
annual expenses, totaling more than $5.4 billion annually. Over 
the next five years, more than 50% of GSA's leased space will 
expire, creating an opportunity to significantly reduce leasing 
costs to the taxpayer. The Subcommittee will continue its 
oversight of GSA leasing and how it is managing the replacement 
of expiring leases with good deals for the taxpayer.
    In addition, in the 112th and 113th Congresses, problems 
with independent leasing authorities of agencies outside of GSA 
were made apparent. In 2010, the Securities and Exchange 
Commission (SEC), which has its own independent leasing 
authority, signed a sole-source 10-year lease for a state of 
the art building it later determined it did not need, binding 
the taxpayer to more than $500 million. The Subcommittee 
conducted an investigation and held hearings that revealed 
serious questions about SEC's management of its space and its 
leasing authority. In the 114th Congress, the Subcommittee 
continued its oversight by requesting a GAO review of agencies 
with independent leasing authorities and holding a hearing 
focusing on how agencies with such authorities were managing 
them. In addition, questions about how the Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA) has used its leasing authority resulted 
in VA procurement of leases for its outpatient clinics and 
centers through GSA's leasing authorities. Because of these 
ongoing issues surrounding independent leasing authorities, the 
Subcommittee will continue its oversight of leases outside of 
GSA.
    4. Real Property Management. The management of Federal Real 
Property has been on the GAO's High Risk list since 2003 due to 
a number of mismanagement issues including the overreliance on 
costly leasing to meet long-term space needs and underused or 
vacant space. In addition, with nearly half of GSA's assets 
over 50 years old, GSA has faced challenges maintaining a 
balanced inventory, draining Federal resources and costing more 
to maintain old buildings that are often inefficient. While 
commercial leasing may be advisable in many cases, GSA is often 
driven to costly operating leases when ownership may be less 
costly to the taxpayer. The Office of Management and Budget's 
budget scorekeeping rules are key drivers on ``own vs. lease'' 
asset decision-making. Current budget scorekeeping rules 
generally leave GSA with only two options for meeting the 
Federal Government's general purpose space needs: direct 
appropriations for new construction or long-term leases. In 
addition, with tight budget constraints and the lack of funds 
for new construction, GSA has begun exploring alternative 
arrangements for space acquisition and redevelopment.
    During the 113th and 114th congresses, the Subcommittee 
held roundtables and hearings on how Public-Private 
Partnerships could be used as alternative methods of financing 
space. In addition, the Committee established a Public Private 
Partnership Panel that explored the use of P3's across various 
types of infrastructure, including public buildings. The P3 
Panel recommended, among other things: (1) review and modify 
budgetary scoring rules for commercially leased office space to 
enable operating lease treatment of long-term leases and fixed-
priced, below market purchase options; and (2) fully utilize 
existing lease authorities and Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) budgetary scoring procedures to proceed with long-term 
ground lease/lease back arrangements where the federal 
government retains ownership of leasehold improvements at the 
end of the ground-lease term.
    In 2013, OMB issued a directive to agencies called ``Freeze 
the Footprint'' and later modified the directive in 2015 to 
shrink the space footprint. That directive requires agencies to 
reduce their amount of office and warehouse space to FY2012 
levels. The Subcommittee will continue to conduct 
investigations and oversight of GSA's management of its real 
property portfolio and examine ways to ensure cost-effective 
choices are made. In addition, the Subcommittee will work to 
ensure GSA maximizes the utilization of existing space, 
renegotiates existing leases to reduce costs, and sells under-
used or vacant properties which will generate revenue. Finally, 
the Subcommittee will work to ensure GSA fully utilizes its 
enhanced property management authority to make better use of 
space it retains, such as out-leasing empty Federal space to 
generate income for the Federal Buildings Fund and help offset 
costs. The Subcommittee will conduct close oversight of GSA's 
use of these authorities to ensure they are managed and used 
appropriately.
    5. Capital Investment and Leasing Program (CILP). As part 
of the Committee's annual work to review and authorize GSA's 
requests for authority to repair, alter, construct and lease 
property for use by Federal agencies, the Subcommittee will 
review each prospectus presented to the Committee and recommend 
approval only after the Subcommittee is satisfied that the 
requests are cost-effective and in the best interest of the 
government. The Subcommittee will work aggressively with GSA 
and tenant agencies to shrink the space footprint where 
appropriate.
    6. Federal Courthouses. In June of 2010, GAO issued a 
report on the Federal courthouse program and found that of the 
33 courthouses built since 2000, there was 3.56 million square 
feet of extra space, costing the taxpayer $835 million plus $51 
million annually to operate and maintain. Since that time, the 
Judiciary developed a new review process to identify the need 
for new courthouses. In 2013, the Committee requested the 
Judiciary apply the new process to the courthouses on its 5-
Year Courthouse Plan. The Judiciary completed the process in 
late 2014 and issued an updated Plan in 2015. The Judiciary 
received funding for courthouse construction in Fiscal Year 
2016. The Subcommittee will closely oversee the progress made 
on courthouses authorized to ensure they are constructed within 
the limitations placed upon them by the Committee and to ensure 
they stay below or within budget.
    7. Federal Protective Service (FPS). As a part of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, the Federal Protective Service 
was transferred from the Public Buildings Service of GSA to the 
Department of Homeland Security. However, responsibility for 
the protection of federal buildings, generally, remains with 
FPS within DHS. The Subcommittee will continue to monitor and 
review the policies, procedures, and requirements of security 
at public buildings.
    8. Major Development Projects. The Federal Bureau of 
Investigation headquarters consolidation project was authorized 
in the 114th Congress. The Committee refused to provide GSA and 
the FBI a blank check, but set a clear limitation to the costs 
and other parameters to ensure the project would meet the needs 
of the FBI, shrink its space by 33 percent, and minimize costs 
to the taxpayer. Should the project receive funding in the 
115th Congress, the Subcommittee plans to conduct aggressive 
oversight of the project to ensure it stays on time and within 
budget.
    In addition, there are a number of other proposed major 
construction and development projects that utilize alternative 
methods of acquiring space, such as GSA's exchange authority. 
This includes the Department of Labor headquarters building. 
The Subcommittee plans to conduct close review and oversight of 
these major development projects, particularly examining how 
GSA is utilizing its exchange authority in this context.
    9. Architect of the Capitol. The subcommittee will continue 
ongoing oversight of projects being undertaken by the Architect 
of the Capitol pursuant to the Master Plan for the Capitol 
Complex. Consistent oversight will ensure proper prioritization 
and cost savings.
    10. Smithsonian Institution Facilities. The Subcommittee 
will continue its oversight of projects undertaken by the 
Smithsonian Institution including the acquisition, construction 
and use of local and remote museums, research and storage 
facilities of the Institution. The Subcommittee will continue 
to ensure cost-effective solutions to the Smithsonian's space 
needs such as leveraging private dollars and disposal or 
effective reuse of underused assets.
    11. John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. As a 
part of its ongoing oversight of the Kennedy Center's programs, 
the Subcommittee will regularly review the construction, 
alteration, and modernization activities of the Kennedy Center 
that are conducted using federal funds to ensure appropriate 
management and cost savings.
    12. Economic Development. In the 114th Congress, the 
Subcommittee worked to ensure economic development programs 
focused on their core missions of leveraging private dollars 
through infrastructure improvements to attract new jobs to 
distressed communities. The Subcommittee will continue to work 
to ensure these programs are targeted, effective, and remain 
focused on their core missions.

                  Subcommittee on Highways and Transit

    1. FAST Act Implementation. The Fixing America's Surface 
Transportation Act (P.L. 114-94; FAST Act) reauthorized Federal 
surface transportation programs through fiscal year 2020. 
Enacted on December 4, 2015, the FAST Act improves the Nation's 
transportation infrastructure, reforms Federal surface 
transportation programs, refocuses those programs on addressing 
national priorities, and encourages innovation to make the 
surface transportation system safer and more efficient. A large 
part of the Subcommittee's oversight activities in the 115th 
Congress will focus on the implementation of the FAST Act, 
including the areas of: streamlining project delivery; freight 
mobility; competitive grant programs; federal credit assistance 
programs; safety programs and regulations; transit program 
requirements; and research and transportation technologies 
activities.
    2. MAP-21 Implementation. Enacted in July 2012, the Moving 
Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (P.L. 112-141; MAP-
21) reauthorized Federal surface transportation programs 
through fiscal year 2014. While there has been progress made on 
the implementation of MAP-21, there are still significant 
provisions that are not fully implemented. As a result, the 
Subcommittee will continue its oversight of the implementation 
of MAP-21, specifically in the following areas: streamlining 
project delivery; performance management; transportation 
planning; motor carrier safety regulations; and transit safety 
oversight.
    3. Sustainability of Surface Transportation Programs. The 
Federal highway, highway safety, and public transportation 
programs are user-fee financed through Federal excise taxes 
levied on motor fuels and on various highway-related products 
such as tires and heavy trucks. Revenues from these user fees 
are deposited into the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) and may be used 
only for eligible transportation projects and activities. By 
fiscal year 2021, revenues credited to the Highway Account and 
Mass Transit Account of the HTF will be insufficient to meet 
its obligations, according to projections by Congressional 
Budget Office. The Subcommittee will monitor the status and 
solvency of the HTF, and its ability to fully fund the programs 
authorized under the FAST Act and to meet future surface 
transportation investment needs.
    4. Fiscal Year 2018 and 2019 Budget Requests. The 
Subcommittee will review and evaluate the Administration's 
fiscal year 2018 and fiscal year 2019 budget requests for the 
Office of the Secretary of Transportation, Federal Highway 
Administration, Federal Transit Administration, Federal Motor 
Carrier Safety Administration, and National Highway Traffic 
Safety Administration.

     Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials

    1. Fiscal Year 2018 and 2019 Budget Requests. The 
Subcommittee will review and evaluate the fiscal year 2018 and 
fiscal year 2019 budget proposals for the Federal Railroad 
Administration (FRA), Amtrak, the Surface Transportation Board 
(STB), the Railroad Retirement Board, the National Mediation 
Board, and the Pipelines and Hazardous Materials Safety 
Administration (PHMSA).
    2. Rail Infrastructure and Safety Programs. The Passenger 
Rail Reform and Investment Act of 2015 (PRRIA), enacted as 
Title XI of the FAST Act, reauthorized Amtrak and programs 
administered by the FRA. PRRIA restructured and consolidated 
the grant programs administered by FRA to include: Consolidated 
Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvement Grants, authorizing 
grants for passenger and freight rail projects that improve 
safety, reliability or efficiency; Federal Partnership for 
State of Good Repair Grants, authorizing capital grants to 
reduce the state-of-good-repair backlog for assets used to 
provide intercity passenger rail service; and Restoration and 
Enhancement Grants, authorizing operating assistance grants to 
initiate, restore, or enhance intercity passenger rail service. 
PRRIA authorized a total of $2.2 billion for these programs for 
fiscal years 2016 through 2020. PRRIA also made several 
improvements to the Railroad Rehabilitation and Improvement 
Financing (RRIF) program, which provides long-term, low-
interest loans and loan guarantees for railroad-related 
improvements. While this program is authorized to provide up to 
$35 billion in lending, FRA has executed only about $5.2 
billion in loans; $30.5 billion is currently available in 
credit authority. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
the grant and loan programs and the ongoing construction of 
projects throughout the country as grantees build-out their 
projects.
    PRRIA also addressed the safety, efficiency, and 
reliability of the rail industry. The Act included several 
provisions to improve safety at highway-rail grade crossings, 
including a requirement that all states develop highway-rail 
grade crossing safety action plans. The Act emphasized the 
safety of intercity passenger and commuter rail operations, 
with requirements that carriers develop action plans to ensure 
compliance with speed limits on curves and in bridges and 
tunnels; that the Secretary evaluate track inspection 
regulations on high-density commuter railroad lines; and that 
audio and image recording devices be installed in passenger 
train locomotives. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of 
FRA's safety programs and the changes enacted as part of the 
Act.
    The work at FRA to implement the Rail Safety Improvement 
Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-432) continues, in particular the Act's 
requirement for the installation of Positive Train Control 
(PTC) systems by December 31, 2015, on rail routes carrying 
passengers or poisonous or toxic-by-inhalation hazardous 
materials.
    In October 2015, the Positive Train Control Enforcement and 
Implementation Act of 2015, enacted as part of the Surface 
Transportation Extension Act of 2015 (P.L. 114-73), extended 
the deadline for installation of PTC to December 31, 2018. At 
the discretion of the Secretary of Transportation, the deadline 
may be extended for individual railroads for up to two 
additional years. The Act requires each railroad carrier to 
report annually to DOT on its progress toward implementing PTC 
systems. PRRIA also made available $199 million from the Mass 
Transit Account of the Highway Trust Fund for discretionary 
grants to public transit agencies and state and local 
governments to assist them with the costs of installing PTC.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of FRA's safety 
programs, grants issued for implementation of PTC, and 
continued efforts to implement the 2008 and 2015 Acts.
    3. Amtrak. PRRIA reauthorized Amtrak, Amtrak's Office of 
the Inspector General, and the Northeast Corridor Commission 
through fiscal year 2020. The Act fundamentally changed the 
authorization structure of Amtrak by providing funding by 
``lines of business'', (specifically the Northeast Corridor and 
the National Network) rather than providing separate grants for 
operating and capital/debt service activities. All costs and 
revenues of the company must be allocated to the newly created 
accounts. The Act also reformed Amtrak's operations, budgeting, 
and planning processes to reflect the lines-of-business 
approach. Further, the Act allowed for more private sector 
participation in stations, rights-of-way, and operations. PRRIA 
established a State-Supported Route Advisory Committee to help 
remedy issues pertaining to cost allocation on state-supported 
routes, and required Amtrak to contract with a third party 
entity to develop and recommend objective methodologies for 
Amtrak to use in evaluating intercity passenger rail routes and 
services. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of Amtrak, 
Amtrak's Office of the Inspector General, and the Northeast 
Corridor Commission, as well as implementation of the 2008 and 
2015 Acts.
    4. Surface Transportation Board. The Surface Transportation 
Board Reauthorization Act of 2015 reauthorized the STB for the 
first time since the agency was created in 1995. The Act 
expanded the Board from three to five members; set expedited 
timetables for consideration of rate complaints; authorized the 
STB to initiate investigations on its own initiative; modified 
the voluntary arbitration process for small rate disputes; and 
made other changes to improve the STB's efficiency and 
responsiveness. The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
STB and its implementation of the reauthorization Act.
    5. California High-Speed Rail Program. The California high-
speed rail project involves the construction of a new high-
speed rail line connecting the San Francisco Bay Area, Los 
Angeles, and San Diego. To date, federal funding for the 
project has totaled approximately $3.9 billion, most of which 
was made available by the American Recovery and Reinvestment 
Act of 2009 (ARRA). The project is the largest recipient of 
FRA's High Speed and Intercity Passenger Rail Program and the 
Federal ARRA funds must be expended before September 2017. 
Construction has begun in the Central Valley, but funding to 
complete the project remains uncertain. The Subcommittee will 
continue to provide oversight of the project and protect 
taxpayer funding.
    6. Pipeline Safety Programs. Congress reauthorized PHMSA's 
pipeline safety program in the 114th Congress by enacting the 
Protecting our Infrastructure of Pipelines and Enhancing Safety 
Act of 2016 (PIPES). The PIPES Act will ensure the agency 
completes its responsibilities under the Pipeline Safety, 
Regulatory Certainty, and Job Creation Act of 2011; provided 
for a number of assessments of the current safety program; 
included the establishment of minimum standards for underground 
natural gas storage systems and liquefied natural gas 
facilities; provided PHMSA with emergency order authority to 
impose emergency restrictions, prohibitions, and safety 
measures on owners and operators of pipeline facilities to 
abate imminent hazards; and reformed PHMSA to be a more 
dynamic, data-driven regulator. The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight of the Office of Pipeline Safety at PHMSA and its 
implementation of the Act.
    7. Hazardous Materials Safety Programs. The Hazardous 
Material Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2015, enacted 
as Title VII of the FAST Act, reauthorized the hazardous 
materials safety program administered by PHMSA. The Act 
included a number of provisions to enhance the safety of 
hazardous materials transportation, with a significant focus on 
the transportation of flammable liquids, including crude oil 
and ethanol, by rail. The Act requires all new tank cars to be 
equipped with thermal blankets and protection for top fittings; 
mandates that all DOT-111 tank cars in flammable liquids 
service be retrofitted in accordance with new DOT standards; 
requires railroads to provide states and local responders with 
advanced notification and information on high-hazard flammable 
trains; and authorizes grant funding to assist communities in 
preparing for and responding to hazardous materials accidents. 
The Act also directs the GAO to conduct an evaluation of 
Electronic Controlled Pneumatic (ECP) brake systems and directs 
the Department of Transportation, through the National Academy 
of Sciences, to conduct tests of ECP brake systems. The 
Subcommittee will continue oversight of PHMSA's hazardous 
materials safety program.

            Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment

    1. Clean Water Act and Water Infrastructure Programs. 
Continued improvement of water quality will likely require a 
combination of regulatory and non-regulatory approaches, as 
well as continued investment in the implementation of water 
quality-related and water infrastructure programs. The 
Subcommittee's oversight will focus on issues related to these 
regulatory and non-regulatory approaches and water 
infrastructure investment.
    The Subcommittee will conduct oversight of the 
implementation of various regulatory and non-regulatory 
programs under the Clean Water Act (CWA), including how the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Army Corps of 
Engineers (Corps) implement these programs in conjunction with 
the states, and trends on the effectiveness of the CWA on water 
quality. This includes oversight of issues involving the 
establishment and implementation of water quality standards, 
total maximum daily loads, and effluent limitations, dealing 
with discharges of oil or hazardous substances, permitting of 
point source discharges of pollutants under the National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program, 
permitting of discharges of dredged or fill materials under the 
CWA section 404 permit program, and how the EPA and Corps 
assert federal jurisdiction and make jurisdictional 
determinations under the CWA. Oversight also will include an 
examination of Federal and state policies and efforts to 
address the presence of nutrients and other contaminants in 
waters under the CWA and other Federal statutes, science and 
data quality issues, the impact of CWA-associated releases on 
waters that may be used as a source of drinking water, and 
continued efforts to improve the management of combined and 
sanitary sewer overflows, stormwater, and nonpoint sources of 
pollution.
    Continued investments in our Nation's water-related 
infrastructure should prioritize the creation of American jobs 
and support a healthy economy. In furtherance of this point, 
the Subcommittee will conduct oversight of wastewater treatment 
and water pollution control funding issues, including levels 
and sources of funding and management of grant and loan 
programs; opportunities for utilities to increase their overall 
efficiency and resiliency; wastewater security; and 
infrastructure needs.
    The Subcommittee also will pursue and examine finding 
innovative ways to finance new and replacement of old water 
infrastructure projects; providing states, counties, and towns 
with additional tools and flexibility to address local 
environmental challenges; and address local affordability 
concerns. As part of this, oversight may include a review of 
the effectiveness of watershed, market, and performance-based 
approaches to addressing local water pollution concerns.
    Further, the Subcommittee's oversight will include a review 
of the EPA's implementation of integrated approaches to 
municipal stormwater and wastewater management through EPA's 
integrated planning approach framework. The Subcommittee may 
investigate whether non-regulatory approaches, such as water 
quality trading and other market-based approaches, and other 
innovative approaches undertaken by state and local 
governments, could result in improvements to the environment.
    Moreover, the Subcommittee may review the implications of 
addressing, through traditional CWA permitting requirements, 
certain pollutant discharges, including discharges of 
pesticides, ballast water and incidental discharges from 
vessels, stormwater, and water transfers.
    2. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources Program. The 
Subcommittee will review efforts to improve the efficiency and 
effectiveness of the organization, management, and missions of 
the civil works program of the Corps, including the selection, 
planning, and implementation of water resources projects; 
financing and maintenance of harbor and inland waterways 
infrastructure, and utilization of large, medium, and small 
harbors; the backlog of uninitiated Corps construction projects 
or deferred Corps maintenance projects, including 
prioritization of projects; asset management of projects in its 
operation and maintenance account, including existing and 
future levels of service; and efforts to improve the 
efficiency, effectiveness, transparency, and consistent 
implementation of the Agency's regulatory programs, including 
those pertaining to wetlands (including the jurisdictional 
scope and procedural and substantive requirements of the 
permitting programs) and dredging activities. The Subcommittee 
will review the Corps' implementation of provisions of the 
Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 and the 
Water Resources Development Act of 2016, including those that 
were intended to improve the efficiency of the project planning 
and project delivery process.
    Continued investments in our Nation's infrastructure should 
prioritize the creation of American jobs and support a healthy 
economy. The Subcommittee will focus on getting projects for 
the Nation built more efficiently and cost effectively, thereby 
more quickly delivering project benefits to the public, while 
ensuring compliance with existing planning and environmental 
laws. In addition, the Subcommittee will review Corps' 
activities under the authority of Section 14 of the Rivers and 
Harbors Act of 1899 to ensure that Corps review of proposed 
non-federal sponsor modifications to federal projects are 
carried out in an effective manner.
    The Subcommittee has initiated a study to be carried out by 
GAO to review water storage pricing at Corps facilities.
    3. EPA--Superfund/Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act and Brownfields. The Superfund 
program under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) is aimed at cleaning 
up land in the United States that has been contaminated by 
hazardous waste and poses a risk to human health and/or the 
environment. The Brownfields program was authorized under the 
Brownfields Revitalization and Environmental Restoration Act 
(which amended CERCLA). The Brownfields program is aimed at 
enhancing state, local, and private-sector cleanups of 
properties, the redevelopment or reuse of which may be 
complicated by the presence or potential presence of a 
contaminant. Unaddressed brownfields and Superfund sites drive 
down property values and tax revenues, pose potential human 
health concerns, and can deter reinvestment in cities and 
towns. The Brownfields program protects from Superfund 
liability many parties engaged in voluntary brownfields 
cleanups, and supports state and local brownfields assessment 
and cleanup activities, and state voluntary cleanup programs. 
The Subcommittee's oversight will focus on issues related to 
implementation of the Superfund and Brownfields programs.
    The Subcommittee will review efforts to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of the contaminated site cleanup 
process, the process of assessing natural resources damages, 
and the efforts to hold responsible parties accountable, 
consistent with Federal law. In addition, the Subcommittee will 
review the liability, financing, and settlement mechanisms and 
procedures under the current Superfund program, including the 
relation of funding sources and levels for the Superfund and 
Brownfields programs to current demands and needs. The 
Subcommittee will continue to review implementation of the 
Small Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization 
Act. This includes evaluating whether there is a need to amend 
the liability provisions associated with brownfields sites, 
including those providing protections for innocent parties.
    The Subcommittee also will review the role of the states in 
conducting and financing cleanups, and review the relationships 
among the states, EPA, and other Federal entities in 
implementing the Superfund and Brownfields programs. Further, 
the Subcommittee's oversight will include a review of ongoing 
Federal, state, and local efforts to revitalize brownfields, 
including through the implementation of the Small Business 
Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act. Finally, 
the Subcommittee will work to promote state, local, and private 
efforts to clean up and redevelop Superfund and brownfields 
sites.
    4. Tennessee Valley Authority. The Subcommittee will review 
the management of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and its 
programs, including its energy program, operations in the 
current marketplace, its long-term management of TVA assets, 
properties, and byproducts of energy generation, and the impact 
of TVA debt on its long-term goals.
    Until mid-2006, the TVA had made significant payments on 
its long-term debt in an attempt to reduce its total financing 
obligations. Since 2006, however, TVA's debt has begun to 
steadily climb to levels that may place the taxpayer at risk. 
TVA's debt is statutorily capped at $30 billion and at the end 
of fiscal year 2014 carried $23.6 billion in total debt. The 
Subcommittee may initiate a review of TVA's commitment to long-
term financial sustainability to lessen the risk posed to 
bondholders, ratepayers, and the taxpayer. The Subcommittee may 
also examine issues related to its management of the TVA 
workforce.
    The 115th Congress may be an appropriate time to revisit 
TVA's debt reduction activities and variables that impact their 
debt reduction strategies.
    5. International Boundary and Water Commission--The 
International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) was 
established in 1889 with the responsibility for applying the 
boundary and water treaties between the United States and 
Mexico and settling any disputes over their application. The 
body is comprised of both U.S. and Mexican sections, headed by 
an Engineer-Commissioner who is appointed by the president. The 
U.S. Section is headquartered in El Paso, TX and operates under 
the guidance of the State Department. The IBWC carries out, in 
accordance with their governing treaties, the distribution, 
regulation, and conservation of water in the Rio Grande and 
Colorado Rivers for use by both countries; joint construction, 
operations, and maintenance of international storage dams and 
reservoirs and hydroelectric plants, flood protection, and 
sanitation projects for border water quality problems, as well 
as demarcating the boundary between the U.S. and Mexico.
    The Subcommittee will continue to monitor the Amistad Dam 
in Del Rio, TX. The dam is currently being assessed by a bi-
national panel of experts to address a sinkhole that has 
developed under the dam and is causing seepage. The 
Subcommittee will also continue to monitor the ongoing 
situation in Nogales, AZ at the International Outfall 
Interceptor (IOI), a binational sewer line that carries 
millions of gallons of waste each day from Ambos Nogales, 
Mexico to a treatment plant in Rio Rico, AZ. The IOI runs 
underneath and adjacent to a storm drain/tunnel which is 
deteriorating. The entire project is in need of major 
structural repairs, but the parties involved have yet to come 
to agreement on funding.
    Hearings Held Pursuant to Clauses 2(n), (o), and (p) of Rule XI

    115-11 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: The State of Railroad, Pipeline, and Hazardous 
Materials Safety Regulations and Opportunities for Reform.'' 
Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. 
April 26, 2017
    115-12 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Mitigating Damage and Recovering Quickly from 
Disasters.'' Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings and Emergency Management April 27, 2017
    115-14 ``Maritime Transportation Regulatory Issues.'' 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. May 3, 
2017
    115-16 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Improving Water Quality through Integrated Planning.'' 
Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment. May 18, 2017
    115-17 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Coast Guard Sea, Land, and Air Capabilities, Part 1.'' 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. June 
7, 2017
    115-20 ``Implementing the Federal Assets Sale and Transfer 
Act (FASTA): Maximizing Taxpayer Returns and Reducing Waste in 
Real Estate.'' Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public 
Buildings and Emergency Management. July 12, 2017
    115-21 ``FAST Act Implementation: Improving the Safety of 
the Nation's Roads.'' Subcommittee on Highways and Transit. 
July 18, 2017
    115-22 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Implementation of the Water Resources Reform and 
Development Act of 2014 and the Water Resources Development Act 
of 2016.'' Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment. 
July 19, 2017
    115-23 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Coast Guard Sea, Land, and Air Capabilities, Part 2.'' 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. July 
25, 2017
    115-24 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Economic Development Stakeholders' Perspectives.'' 
Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and 
Emergency Management. September 13, 2017
    115-25 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Water Stakeholders' Perspectives.'' Subcommittee on 
Water Resources and Environment. September 26, 2017
    115-30 ``Unmanned Aircraft Systems: Emerging Uses in a 
Changing National Airspace.'' Subcommittee on Aviation. 
November 29, 2017
    115-33 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Water Resources Projects and Policy, Part I.'' 
Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment. January 18, 
2018
    115-34 ``Examination of Reports on the El Faro Marine 
Casualty and Coast Guard's Electronic Health Records.'' 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. 
January 30, 2018
    115-35 ``Oversight of Positive Train Control Implementation 
in the United States.'' Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, 
and Hazardous Materials. February 15, 2018
    115-38 ``Building a 21st-Century Infrastructure for 
America: Long-Term Funding for Highways and Transit Programs.'' 
Subcommittee on Highways and Transit. March 7, 2018
    115-39 ``Implementation of Coast Guard Programs.'' 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. March 
7, 2018
    115-40 ``Review of the Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Request for 
the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Programs.'' 
Subcommittee on Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation. March 
14, 2018
    115-43 ``