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                                                      Calendar No. 521
114th Congress     }                                    {       Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session        }                                    {      114-281
======================================================================
 
     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                       APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 2017
                                _______
                                

                 June 16, 2016.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

         Ms. Murkowski, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                                 REPORT

                         [To accompany S. 3068]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 3068) 
making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2017, and for other purposes, reports favorably 
thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Total obligational authority, fiscal year 2017

Total of bill as reported to the Senate................. $32,762,011,000
Amount of 2016 appropriations...........................  32,925,579,000
Amount of 2017 budget estimate..........................  33,176,164,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to--
    2016 appropriations.................................    -163,568,000
    2017 budget estimate................................    -414,153,000

         ========================================================
            __________________________________________________




                                CONTENTS

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of Bill..................................................     4
    Major Changes Recommended in the Bill........................     4
    Reprogramming Guidelines.....................................    10
Title I:
    Department of the Interior:
        Land and Water Resources: Bureau of Land Management......    12
    Fish and Wildlife and Parks:
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...........................    21
        National Park Service....................................    29
    Energy and Minerals:
        U.S. Geological Survey...................................    35
        Bureau of Ocean Energy Management........................    39
        Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement...........    41
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.....    42
    Indian Affairs: Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian 
      Education..................................................    44
    Departmental Offices:
        Office of the Secretary..................................    51
        Insular Affairs..........................................    53
        Office of the Solicitor..................................    54
        Office of Inspector General..............................    54
        Office of Special Trustee for American Indians...........    55
    Department-wide Programs:
        Wildland Fire Management.................................    55
        Central Hazardous Materials Fund.........................    56
        Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration.......    56
        Working Capital Fund.....................................    56
        Payments in Lieu of Taxes................................    56
    General Provisions: Department of the Interior...............    57
Title II:
    Environmental Protection Agency:
        Program Description......................................    59
        Science and Technology...................................    61
        Environmental Programs and Management....................    64
        Office of Inspector General..............................    73
        Buildings and Facilities.................................    73
        Hazardous Substance Superfund............................    73
        Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund..............    75
        Inland Oil Spill Program.................................    76
        State and Tribal Assistance Grants.......................    76
        Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program......    77
        Administrative Provisions................................    77
Title III:
    Related Agencies:
        Department of Agriculture: Forest Service................    78
        Administrative Provisions................................    88
        Department of Health and Human Services:
            Indian Health Service................................    88
            Contract Support Costs...............................    90
            National Institutes of Health........................    91
            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.....    92
        Other Related Agencies:
            Executive Office of the President....................    92
            Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
              Environmental Quality..............................    92
            Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.......    93
            Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation..........    94
            Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native 
              Culture and Arts Development.......................    94
            Smithsonian Institution..............................    95
            National Gallery of Art..............................    97
            John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.......    98
            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.....    98
            National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities:
                National Endowment for the Arts..................    99
                National Endowment for the Humanities............   100
            Commission of Fine Arts..............................   100
            National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs...........   101
            Advisory Council on Historic Preservation............   101
            National Capital Planning Commission.................   102
            United States Holocaust Memorial Museum..............   102
            Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission.............   102
            Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission...............   103
Title IV: General Provisions.....................................   104
Title V: Wildfire Disaster Funding...............................   106
Title VI: Alaska Land Use Council Act............................   107
Title VII: Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission Act............   108
Compliance with Paragraph 7, Rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................   109
Compliance with Paragraph 7(c), Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   110
Compliance with Paragraph 12, Rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   110
Budgetary Impact of Bill.........................................   117
Comparative Statement of Budget Authority........................   118

                            SUMMARY OF BILL

    For this bill, estimates totaling $32,762,011,000 in new 
obligational authority are provided for the programs and 
activities of the agencies and bureaus of the Department of the 
Interior, except the Bureau of Reclamation, and the following 
related agencies:
    Environmental Protection Agency
    Department of Agriculture: Forest Service
    Department of Health and Human Services:
        Indian Health Service
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
        Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry
  Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental 
        Quality
    Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board
    Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation
  Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and 
        Arts Development
    Smithsonian Institution
    National Gallery of Art
    John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
    Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars
    National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities:
        National Endowment for the Arts
        National Endowment for the Humanities
    Commission of Fine Arts
    National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs
    Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
    National Capital Planning Commission
    United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
    Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission
    Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission

                 Major Changes Recommended in the Bill

    This bill includes revisions to the budget estimate for the 
2017 fiscal year.
    A comparative summary of funding in the bill is shown by 
agency or principal program in the following table:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Chairman's
                                                                                Chairman's       recommendation
                                                          Budget estimate     recommendation     compared with
                                                                                                budget estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
          TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
Bureau of Land Management..............................          1,245,185          1,243,528             -1,657
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.........................          1,562,899          1,496,423            -66,476
National Park Service..................................          3,101,450          2,913,918           -187,532
United States Geological Survey........................          1,168,803          1,068,135           -100,668
Bureau of Ocean Energy Management......................             80,194             74,616             -5,578
Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.........             96,337             83,141            -13,196
Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement...            157,925            236,845             78,920
Bureau of Indian Affairs...............................          2,933,715          2,854,579            -79,136
Departmental Offices...................................            646,831            630,169            -16,662
Department-wide Programs...............................          1,248,890          1,678,839            429,949
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title I--Department of the Interior.......         12,242,229         12,280,193             37,964
                                                        ========================================================
       TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
Science and Technology.................................            754,184            695,910            -58,274
Environmental Programs and Management..................          2,852,893          2,538,545           -314,348
Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund........              7,433              3,674             -3,759
Office of Inspector General............................             51,527             41,489            -10,038
Buildings and Facilities...............................             52,078             38,660            -13,418
Hazardous Substance Superfund..........................          1,128,989          1,077,784            -51,205
Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund............             94,285             91,296             -2,989
Inland Oil Spill Program...............................             25,410             18,079             -7,331
State and Tribal Assistance Grants.....................          3,280,400          3,613,278            332,878
WIFIA..................................................             20,000             30,000             10,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title II--Environmental Protection Agency.          8,267,199          8,108,715           -115,484
                                                        ========================================================
              TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
Department of Agriculture: Forest Service..............          5,740,428          5,744,978              4,550
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Indian Health Service..............................          5,185,015          4,993,778           -191,237
    National Institutes of Health: National Institute               77,349             77,349  .................
     of Environmental Health Sciences..................
    Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry...             74,691             74,691  .................
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of                       3,015              3,000                -15
 Environmental Quality.................................
Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.........             12,436             11,000             -1,436
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation............             15,431             15,431  .................
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture              11,835             15,212              3,377
 and Arts Development..................................
Smithsonian Institution................................            922,224            860,243            -61,981
National Gallery of Art................................            158,401            155,525             -2,876
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.........             35,260             35,260  .................
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.......             10,400             10,500                100
National Endowment for the Arts........................            149,849            148,449             -1,400
National Endowment for the Humanities..................            149,848            148,442             -1,406
Commission of Fine Arts................................              2,762              2,653               -109
National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs.............              1,400              2,000                600
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..............              6,493              6,493  .................
National Capital Planning Commission...................              8,099              8,099  .................
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum................             57,000             57,000  .................
Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission...............             44,800              1,000            -43,800
Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission.................  .................              2,000              2,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Title III--Related Agencies...............         12,666,736         12,373,103           -293,633
                                                        ========================================================
      Grand Total......................................         33,176,164         32,762,011           -414,153
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

    The following table displays appropriations from the Land 
and Water Conservation Fund.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Fiscal year 2016   Budget request
                                                                 enacted       (Discretionary)    In this bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Land and Water Conservation Fund..........................      $450,000,000      $475,000,000      $400,000,000
 
State and Local Programs..................................       160,800,000       173,501,000       150,806,000
    National Park Service State Assistance................       110,000,000       110,006,000       110,006,000
    Coop. Endangered Species Conservation Fund............        30,800,000        53,495,000        30,800,000
    American Battlefield Protection Act...................        10,000,000        10,000,000        10,000,000
    Highlands Conservation Act............................        10,000,000  ................  ................
 
Forest Legacy Program.....................................        62,347,000        62,347,000        61,049,000
    Rescission............................................  ................  ................        -8,297,000
 
Federal Land Acquisition..................................       226,853,000       239,152,000       196,442,000
    Bureau of Land Management.............................        38,630,000        43,959,000        33,416,000
    Fish and Wildlife Service.............................        58,500,000        58,655,000        47,871,000
    National Park Service.................................        53,670,000        58,242,000        48,417,000
    Forest Service........................................        63,435,000        65,653,000        54,738,000
    Department of the Interior Valuation Services.........        12,618,000        12,643,000        12,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    WILDLAND FIRE BUDGETING REFORMS

    This bill provides a total of $4,446,291,000 for wildland 
fire programs for the Forest Service and Department of the 
Interior, including a total amount of $2,304,291,000 for 
wildland fire suppression activities of which $661,291,000 is 
provided with an emergency designation for additional 
suppression resources. The recommendation also includes an 
important reform proposal that amends the Budget Control Act of 
2011 (Public Law 112-25) to allow certain wildland fire 
suppression activities to be funded through a disaster cap 
adjustment consistent with other natural disasters, as detailed 
below. This recommendation is a modification of the proposal 
included in the fiscal year 2017 budget request, and the 
subject of bipartisan legislation introduced in both the House 
and the Senate. Legislative language to enact this proposal is 
included in title V, but under congressional budgeting rules, 
this bill cannot both create a new cap adjustment to the 
statutory discretionary spending limits and appropriate funding 
under that cap. Therefore, no funds are recommended through the 
disaster cap adjustment.
    Historically, budgeting for wildland firefighting is 
determined by the 10-year average of suppression costs. The 
proposal continues this practice and only provides access to 
the cap adjustment when regular fire suppression amounts are 
exhausted. The funding provided in this bill, the disaster cap 
proposal and the $593,000,000 in additional suppression 
resources and $700,000,000 in fire borrowing repayment provided 
in fiscal year 2016 should allow the agencies to execute their 
budgets more effectively because the threat of fire borrowing 
has been reduced. These resources, coupled with the creation of 
a mechanism to treat wildfires like disasters, lay the 
foundation to put wildfire spending on a path to 
sustainability.
    This is not a ``blank check'' for additional spending. To 
complement the new structure proposed in title V for fire 
suppression, this bill invests in funding for prevention 
activities and post-fire rehabilitation, in order to tackle the 
fire problem from both ends, which can dramatically decrease 
the suppression costs when fires do occur.
    This bill provides a multifaceted approach to combat the 
increasing cost of fighting wildfire. Without the additional 
resources made available for Federal wildland fire management 
within this bill to attack the problem before, during, and 
after a wildfire event, it is evident that the Federal land 
management agencies will not get ahead of the disastrous curve 
on catastrophic fire, and suppression costs and the economic 
costs to communities nationwide will continue to rise.

                        MULTI-AGENCY DIRECTIVES

    Wildlife Data Coordination.--The Department of the Interior 
and U.S. Forest Service are expected to prioritize continued 
coordination with other Federal agencies and State wildlife 
agencies to utilize State fish and wildlife data and analyses 
as an applicable source to inform land use, land planning, and 
related natural resource decisions. Federal agencies should not 
unnecessarily duplicate raw data, but when appropriate, 
evaluate existing analysis of data prepared by the States and 
reciprocally, share data with State wildlife managers, to 
ensure that the most complete data set is available for 
decision support systems.
    Land Grants, Acequias and Community Ditches.--The 
Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture are urged to 
recognize the traditional use of State-recognized community 
land grants, acequias, and community ditches in the American 
Southwest during the land use planning process.
    Federal Fire Science Coordination.--The U.S. Forest Service 
and the Department of the Interior are directed to work with 
the Office of Science and Technology Policy and other Federal 
agencies involved in fire science research to establish a 
Federal Fire Science Coordination Council, chartered by the 
Fire Executive Council, as recommended by the National Science 
and Technology Council's Wildland Fire Science and Technology 
Task Force Final Report from November 2015. The Federal Fire 
Science Coordination Council is directed to develop a forum for 
science exchange and communication between the leadership of 
Federal fire-science producers and users and to establish 
mechanisms to systematically assess user requirements and 
priorities for Federal fire science, research, and technology 
support. Specifically, the Federal Fire Science Coordination 
Council is directed to use research published by the Joint Fire 
Science Program and other Federal fire science agencies to 
develop best practices for wildfire risk management in the 
Wildland Urban Interface. In order to more reliably protect 
responders and the public, sustain communities, and conserve 
the land, the U.S. Forest Service and the Department of the 
Interior shall share these best practices with their partners 
who manage wildfire risk and suppression in the Wildland Urban 
Interface, including State, local, and tribal governments and 
community groups.
    Puget Sound Federal Partnership Efforts.--The Committee 
believes that continued efforts to clean up and restore Puget 
Sound are an important national economic priority and sustained 
coordination and sharing of expertise among Federal partners is 
critical to furthering ongoing restoration efforts. The 
Committee believes that the Puget Sound Federal Caucus 
Memorandum of Understanding, signed in 2014, strengthens 
interagency collaboration. The Committee directs the agencies 
funded by this bill who are party to the Memorandum to work 
with their counterparts in the Puget Sound Federal Caucus to 
renew and strengthen the Memorandum prior to its expiration on 
March 27, 2017.
    White Nose Bat Syndrome.--The Forest Service, the National 
Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land 
Management, and the United States Geological Survey are to be 
commended for their respective roles in bat conservation and in 
the fight against white-nose syndrome in bats. These agencies 
must continue to play an important role in the implementation 
of the National Science Strategy on white-nose syndrome. Within 
the funds provided, these agencies are expected to prioritize 
research on, and efforts to address, white-nose syndrome in 
bats and also to work with other Federal, State, and private 
organizations to implement the North American Bat Monitoring 
Program.
    Multi-Agency Transparency.--The Committee expresses support 
for increasing transparency within all agencies of the 
Department of the Interior, the Forest Service and the 
Environmental Protection Agency. The agencies are encouraged to 
disclose costs associated with analyses required by the 
National Environmental Policy Act.
    Social Cost of Carbon.--The Administrator of the EPA should 
not promulgate any regulations in fiscal year 2017 using the 
May 2013 estimates for the social cost of carbon until a new 
working group is convened. The working group should include the 
relevant agencies and affected stakeholders, re-examine the 
social cost of carbon using the best available science, and 
revise the estimate using an accurate discount rate and 
domestic estimate in accordance with Executive Order 12866 and 
OMB Circular A-4. To increase transparency, the working group 
should solicit public comments prior to finalizing any updates.
    Sportsman/Recreational Access.--The Committee believes 
increasing access to our public lands is important and provides 
funding to all four land management agencies, the Bureau of 
Land Management, National Park Service, Forest Service, and the 
Fish and Wildlife Service, to complete projects that enhance 
access to public lands for hunting, fishing, and other 
recreational activities. The Committee expects recreational 
access projects to be selected based on their role in meeting 
key recreation needs and the agencies should consider all 
potential projects rather than limit consideration only to 
projects included on the fiscal year 2017 Land and Water 
Conservation Fund discretionary and mandatory lists. The 
Committee strongly encourages the land management agencies to 
work with their respective regions, State offices, and/or 
management units to identify projects not on the submitted 
lists to ensure other recreational access projects are 
appropriately considered for funding. Further, the agencies are 
again directed to include in future budget justifications an 
explanation of the process and criteria used for allocating 
funds for recreational access.
    Land and Water Conservation.--The Committee's 
recommendation for fiscal year 2017 represents a $93,859,000 
increase over the Committee's recommendation for fiscal year 
2016, a 31 percent increase and a $50,000,000 decrease from the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The Committee remains concerned 
about the prioritization of projects and reminds the agencies 
that properties should have willing sellers, updated market 
information, and the support of Federal, State, and local 
officials. The Committee also encourages the agencies to 
consider geographic distribution, historic sites, wilderness 
inholdings, and the national trail system when prioritizing 
projects.
    Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act Training 
[ANILCA].--The Department of the Interior and the Forest 
Service shall conduct annual ANILCA training for all employees 
with any oversight, regulatory, or managerial duties or 
responsibilities for the State of Alaska. Additionally, the 
Department of the Interior and the Forest Service shall conduct 
annual ANILCA training in a village within a conservation 
system unit for all land managers stationed within the State of 
Alaska.
    Paper Reduction Efforts.--The Committee is concerned about 
the millions of taxpayer dollars spent on wasteful printing 
practices each year and the lack of clear printing policies 
within each of the agencies. While progress has been made to 
better utilize the cloud and digitize records, little progress 
has been made to reform in-house printing practices. The 
Committee urges each agency funded by this bill to work with 
the Office of Management and Budget to reduce printing and 
reproduction by 34 percent and directs each agency to submit a 
report to the Committee within 60 days of enactment of this act 
on what steps have been taken to reduce printing volume and 
costs. The report should specifically identify how much money 
each agency will be saving.
    Transparency of Information.--Federal agencies funded under 
this act shall clearly state within the text, audio, or video 
used for advertising or educational purposes, including emails 
or Internet postings, that the communication is printed, 
published, or produced and disseminated at U.S. taxpayer 
expense. The funds used by a Federal agency to carry out this 
requirement shall be derived from amounts made available to the 
agency for advertising or other communications regarding the 
programs and activities of the agency.
    Fleet Management Practices.--Agencies shall provide 
supporting documentation on their methods for determining their 
optimal fleet inventories and justification for any deviation 
from GSA's Federal Property Management Regulations. Agency OIGs 
shall be responsible for doing yearly audits of fleet 
management practices and be made publicly available.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee recognizes the critical 
importance of early detection and rapid response [EDRR] of 
invasive species as a strategy to mitigate the threats and 
impacts of invasive species and expects the Department of the 
Interior and the Forest Service to prioritize EDRR and control 
of invasive species that imperil endangered, threatened, or 
candidate species. In particular, the Committee supports 
efforts to prioritize EDRR in areas with large populations of 
invasive species. Within 180 days of the date of enactment of 
this act, the agencies shall provide the Committee with an 
report on their efforts to prioritize EDRR as part of their 
expected program of work for fiscal year 2017, including detail 
on how the agencies plan to protect specific native species and 
natural resource values on public lands across the Nation.
    Economic Analyses of Grazing on Public Lands.--The Forest 
Service and the Bureau of Land Management are encouraged to 
update their respective analysis regarding the economic 
contributions, both direct and indirect, of livestock grazing 
on public lands.
    Protection of Water Rights.--The Committee believes that 
neither the Forest Service nor the Bureau of Land Management 
has the authority to require, as a condition of the issuance, 
renewal, or extension of any Forest Service or Bureau of Land 
Management permit, lease, allotment, easement, or other land 
use and occupancy arrangement, the transfer or relinquishment 
of any water right, in whole or in part, granted under State 
law.
    Unmanned Aircraft for Wildfire Firefighting and Safety.--
The Committee is encouraged by 2015 exercises with Unmanned 
Aerial Systems supporting wildland fire suppression activities. 
The Committee recognizes the potential of safely integrating 
commercial Unmanned Aircraft Systems into wildland firefighting 
to aid decisionmaking and provide an additional mechanism to 
ensure the safety of firefighters. The Forest Service and the 
Department are directed to work with the Federal Aviation 
Administration Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aerial Systems 
to evaluate the potential of integrating this additional tool 
into the firefighting mission, as well as to evaluate 
additional uses for the technology to improve situational 
awareness during fire events and deployment of firefighting 
resources.
    Executive Order 13658.--The Committee is concerned about 
the impacts of Executive Order 13658 on outfitters operating on 
public lands. The Committee understands that Federal agencies 
attempted to work with the Department of Labor to craft an 
exemption for outfitters operating on public lands and is 
disappointed that those efforts were unsuccessful. The 
Committee urges the affected agencies funded by this act to 
work with the Department of Labor to seek an alternative remedy 
to implementing the 2014 rule.
    Community-Based Collaboration.--The Committee appreciates 
the significant emphasis on collaborative land management 
programs within the existing budgets of the Department of the 
Interior and U.S. Forest Service. However, the Committee is 
also aware that there is additional need for training, 
facilitation and other services to help stakeholders resolve 
conflict and develop community-based collaborative solutions to 
natural resource challenges. The Department of the Interior and 
the U.S. Forest Service are encouraged to work with State and 
local governments, conservation groups and other third-party 
stakeholders, including universities, to identify additional 
ways to develop stakeholder capacity and enhance existing 
collaborative programs.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

    The Chairman retains the reprogramming guidelines contained 
in the Statement of Managers accompanying the Conference Report 
for the Fiscal Year 2016 Interior, Environment, and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act (Public Law 114-113).

                                TITLE I

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                        LAND AND WATER RESOURCES

                       Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management [Bureau] manages over 245 
million acres of public lands, primarily in 11 Western States 
and Alaska. The Bureau also has responsibility for 700 million 
acres of federally owned sub-surface mineral estate. The Bureau 
is mandated to administer these lands for multiple uses, 
including recreation, wildlife habitat, mineral and energy 
production, timber harvesting, and rangeland grazing, while 
managing natural, cultural, and historical resources.

                   MANAGEMENT OF LANDS AND RESOURCES

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,072,675,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,075,545,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,088,470,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $1,088,470,000 
for the Management of Lands and Resources account. This amount 
is $15,795,000 above the enacted level. Program changes to the 
enacted level are detailed in the following budget activity 
narratives. Funding levels for each sub-activity can be found 
in the table that accompanies this statement.
    The United States, as an Arctic Nation, has broad interest 
in the region, which includes meeting security needs, 
protecting the environment, responsibly managing resources, 
supporting indigenous communities, promoting scientific 
research and strengthening international cooperation. The 
United States assumed chairmanship of the Arctic Council in 
April of 2015 for a 2-year term. During this period, our Nation 
has had an opportunity to focus on our status as an Arctic 
Nation and to work toward making significant progress on policy 
objectives in the President's 2009 National Security Directive 
and the 2013 National Strategy for the Arctic Region. In 
conjunction with and complement to the efforts of the 
Commission, the Bureau is directed to focus on enhancing 
economic opportunities for the people who live and work in the 
region. While the Committee appreciates the diverse mission of 
the Commission, it believes that focusing on subsistence and 
improving the lives of the local people through economic 
development is of the utmost importance.
    Land Resources.--The bill provides $252,721,000 for land 
resources, an increase of $2,125,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee again rejects the budget request proposal to 
implement a new grazing administration fee. The funding 
increase provided for Rangeland Management is to improve the 
management of the grazing program. Within the funds provided 
for Rangeland Management, the Committee directs the Bureau to 
continue to prioritize activities related to Secretarial Order 
3336 on Rangeland Fire Prevention, Management and Restoration 
and managing the spread of invasive plants.
    The Bureau is directed to provide information to the 
Committee within 45 days of enactment of this act detailing 
efforts resulting from direction contained in the Fiscal Year 
2016 Senate Report to find ways to strategically incorporate 
public and private firefighting assets into fighting wildland 
fire. Within the funds provided for forestry management, the 
Bureau is directed to spend funds to address overstocked 
forests and fuels treatments.
    Wild Horse and Burro Program.--The Committee recognizes the 
magnitude of the challenges currently facing the Bureau as it 
relates to the wild horse and burro program. The Committee also 
notes that the request for this fiscal year is down despite the 
Bureau releasing statistics that show that wild horse 
populations on public rangelands are now 2.5 times greater than 
in 1971 when the wild horse and burro protection law was 
passed. With wild horse herd sizes doubling every 4 years and 
adoption numbers down significantly from the last decade, this 
program is unsustainable in its current state. While humane 
care of wild horses and burros is an imperative, damage to the 
range resulting from overpopulation must be taken seriously and 
addressed. The Committee is pleased that the Bureau has 
addressed horse overpopulation in some areas that conflict with 
sage-grouse habitat health goals and directs the Bureau to 
continue these efforts. Within the amount provided for wild 
horse and burro management, the Bureau is directed to continue 
to implement reforms based on the findings and recommendations 
outlined in the National Academy of Sciences June 2013 report 
and to address the severe overpopulation of wild horses on 
public lands through gathers and innovative and cost-effective 
long- and short-term holding options and population control 
methods. Priority should be given to strategies that create 
cost-savings over time.
    The Committee remains concerned about the well-being of 
animals on the range due to drought conditions and population 
trends, as well as about the resulting impacts to rangeland and 
riparian areas. Consequently, the Bureau is directed to 
accelerate gathers in an effort to strive for appropriate 
management levels in Herd Management Areas.
    Planning 2.0.--The Committee is concerned that changes made 
by the proposed Planning 2.0 rule will diminish the impact of 
State and local input on the Bureau's land use planning. The 
Bureau is expected to work with Governors and local government 
representatives to address their concerns with the proposed 
rule.
    Vacant Grazing Allotments.--The Committee directs the 
Bureau to make vacant grazing allotments available to a holder 
of a grazing permit or lease when lands covered by the holder 
of the permit or lease are unusable because of drought or 
wildfire, or other condition beyond the control of the 
permittee.
    Railroad Rights-of-Way.--The Committee notes with concern 
the broad ramifications of the Bureau's treatment of acceptable 
uses of railroad rights of way as re-interpreted in the 
Department's Solicitor's Opinion M-37025, issued on November 4, 
2011. The Committee believes the Department should amend its 
policies to ensure any use of a right-of-way granted pursuant 
to the General Railroad Right-of-Way Act of 1875 by the 
railroad holding title to the right of way, or authorized by 
such railroad, is within the scope of the railroad's authority 
to use, or authorize others to use, the right of way received 
pursuant to the act, if authorization of the use would have 
been considered under Department policy to be within the scope 
of a railroad's authority as of the day before the effective 
date of the Opinion M-37025. In the interim, the Bureau should 
refrain from engaging in unnecessary and costly new permitting 
activities for existing uses.
    Red Cliffs National Conservation Area.--Regarding Red 
Cliffs NCA, the Committee directs the Secretary to clarify that 
nothing in section 1974(h) of Public Law 111-11 prohibits the 
authorization of the development of utilities, particularly 
given the importance of potential utility development to the 
surrounding communities. Additionally, the Bureau is aware of 
the long-term transportation needs of Washington County and is 
directed to work cooperatively with the county to address them.
    Wildlife and Fisheries.--The bill provides $112,596,000 for 
wildlife and fisheries, which is $10,685,000 above the enacted 
level. The Committee notes the $37,000,000 increase for fiscal 
year 2016 that has been included in the base budget of this 
account for the purposes of sage-grouse habitat improvement. Of 
the funds provided, no less than $45,643,000 is for on-the-
ground activities to improve sage-grouse habitat, including 
removal of conifers, creating fire breaks, seeding, reducing 
fuels, removing invasive species and post-fire restoration 
activities. The Bureau should dedicate funding for 
collaborations with States on the implementation of both State 
and Federal plans designed to promote sustainable sage-grouse 
populations. Additionally, the Committee believes that failure 
by Federal agencies to adequately implement conservation 
measures on public lands or any other circumstance beyond the 
control of the agencies should not be considered grounds to 
review the Endangered Species Act status of any population of 
the sage-grouse. Additionally, the Committee remains concerned 
about the scope of the withdrawals associated with sage-grouse 
and the fact that the acres of potentially impacted essential 
sage-grouse habitat are dwarfed by the magnitude of the 
withdrawal. This continues to lead the Committee to question 
the necessity of the withdrawals because most development would 
be required to include mitigation activities.
    National Seed Strategy.--The Committee acknowledges the 
successful creation of a National Seed Strategy and, of the 
funds provided for wildlife management, $5,000,000 is to begin 
implementation of the Strategy, which is expected to expand 
efforts to respond with restoration resources to landscape-
scale ecological changes due to drought, invasive species and 
catastrophic wildfires. The Committee encourages the Department 
to thoroughly and objectively undertake a comprehensive 
assessment of seed needs and capacities as the Strategy is 
implemented. The Committee expects BLM to use the National Seed 
Strategy in conjunction with other plant conservation 
activities to build upon programs for seed collection, 
conservation, procurement and storage, including coordinated 
efforts with the Department of Agriculture's Plant Material 
Centers to avoid addition expense and duplication effort.
    The Committee continues to support the Bureau's Plant 
Conservation Program which, in 2017, is expected to support 
implementation of the National Seed Strategy at a landscape 
level and to lead the interagency Native Plant Materials 
Development program, the Seeds of Success program, the Plant 
Conservation Alliance, several regional native plant materials 
development programs, and related research and programmatic 
activity.
    Recreation Management.--The bill provides $68,729,000 for 
recreation management, a decrease of $732,000 below the enacted 
level. Of the funds provided, $15,264,000 is for wilderness 
management and $53,465,000 is for recreation management 
activities to reflect the direction of the Committee to 
prioritize recreation management over the creation of lands to 
be managed as wilderness. Of the funds made available for 
wilderness, priority shall be given to activities to improve 
wilderness habitat and adjoining habitat by managing for 
noxious weed infestations and fuels management. Of the funds 
provided for recreation management, $2,000,000 is for 
activities directly related to units of the National Landscape 
Conservation System.
    Energy and Minerals Management.--The bill provides 
$171,747,000 for oil, gas, coal, and other minerals management, 
an increase of $5,143,000 above the enacted level. Within the 
oil and gas programs, funding levels are sufficient to maintain 
program capacity. The detailed allocation of funding by program 
is included in the table that accompanies this statement. Of 
the funds provided to Oil and Gas Management, the budget 
request is provided for legacy well remediation, for completion 
of the additional modules associated with Phase II of the AFMSS 
II database, and for special pay authority. Additionally, 
$6,000,000 is provided to maintain capacity for Bureau related 
expenses associated with oil and gas applications for permits 
to drill and related use authorizations. The Committee again 
rejects the creation of a new inspection and enforcement fee, 
but provides the full $48,000,000 the Bureau cited as necessary 
to address deficiencies identified in Government Accountability 
Office reports to improve production accountability to better 
ensure proper revenue collection.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the current 
downward leasing trends on public lands, which have only been 
exacerbated by current market conditions. The cumulative impact 
of actions undertaken by the Bureau and the Department have 
only served to further disincentive conventional resource 
development on public lands when compared to non-Federal lands. 
Leasing numbers are at all-time lows, with expected collection 
of APD fees to be roughly $15,000,000 less than in 2015. 
Despite the plummeting leasing numbers, protests are now also 
on the rise. While the Bureau's final rule regarding hydraulic 
fracturing has been stayed by the U.S. District Court of 
Wyoming, a new burdensome proposal on venting and flaring, 
which is bound to overlap with EPA and State rules, and the 
proposed $10 tax per barrel of oil have sent additional signals 
that the administration is not interested in sustaining a 
robust oil and gas industry in the United States, particularly 
on public lands. Additionally, efforts underway to change 
royalty rates or product valuations at the Department will only 
further this problem; consequently additional funds for these 
efforts are not provided.
    Prior to the finalization of any actions associated with 
rulemakings on oil and gas royalty rate review or oil, gas, or 
coal valuations, the Bureau is directed to provide reports to 
the Committee with specific modeling detailing the anticipated 
impacts of increases, decreases, and maintenance of oil and gas 
royalty rates and coal valuations on expected new leasing on 
public lands and resulting impacts to the Federal treasury. The 
Committee acknowledges the role market factors play in 
forecasting economics associated development on public lands 
and directs the agency to take those factors into account when 
preparing the reports.
    The Bureau is directed to provide the Committee with a plan 
to achieve cost-savings and efficiencies by transitioning to 
Internet oil and gas leasing within 180 days of enactment.
    The Committee admonishes the Bureau for the exceedingly 
slow manner in which it is complying with direction previously 
given herein regarding a return to the practice of quarterly 
disclosures of its oil and gas statistics. The Bureau is also 
expected to continue the direction related to disclosure and 
reporting of deferred leasing on lands that have been nominated 
and are otherwise available for oil and gas activity under 
resource management plans. The Bureau has been directed to 
submit, within 60 days of said deferral, a report to the 
Committee containing an explanation for the deferral.
    Legacy Wells.--The Bureau is directed to develop a long-
term strategy to fund its responsibility to cleanup legacy 
wells.
    Lease Terminations.--The Committee is aware of the process 
related to termination and reinstatement of an oil and gas 
leases on Bureau lands if a payment in not received on or prior 
to the due date. The Committee understands that no physical or 
electronic notice is given to lease holders prior to lease 
expiration or immediately after lease expiration and that 
leases are automatically terminated. The Committee believes 
this does not contribute to a good working relationship between 
lease holders and the Federal Government and, more importantly, 
creates an expensive and unnecessary burden for the agency when 
lease payments are erroneously made in an untimely fashion. The 
cost to issue notice of imminent lease expiration, 
electronically or physically, will result in a negligible cost 
compared to the potential requirement to engage in unnecessary 
compliance activities and evaluations that would not have 
existed prior to lease expiration. To be clear, the Committee 
does not believe that lease holders should have no consequences 
for tardy lease payments. However, automatic lease termination 
and an overly burdensome reinstatement process are not in the 
best interest of the Bureau. Consequently, the Bureau and 
Office of Natural Resources Revenue is required to develop a 
policy to provide notice of imminent lease expiration to lease 
holders and revisit whether changes should be made to the 
current law requiring automatic termination of lease for late 
payment to reflect a more sensible reinstatement process.
    Additionally, the Committee directs any coordinating office 
created by the Bureau in partnership with other oil and gas 
related permitting agencies shall closely coordinate with the 
Fort Berthold tribal authorities.
    The Committee continues to reject the proposal to repeal 
section 224(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.
    Of the funds provided for renewable energy management, the 
Committee directs the Bureau of focus on the development and 
deployment of geothermal and hydropower, both of which are 
clean energy technologies that produce low-cost power.
    Secretarial Order 3338.--The Committee notes with dismay 
Secretarial Order 3338, which places a moratorium on coal 
leasing activities on Bureau lands. The Committee is not aware 
of any economic justification for raising leasing and royalty 
rates on coal. Additionally, the Committee questions the need 
for the moratorium, as neither the GAO nor Inspector General 
reports on Federal coal leasing suggested the need for a 
moratorium or for a complete overhaul of the program via a 
programmatic environmental impact statement. The Mineral 
Leasing Act requires that any guideline or regulation developed 
by the Secretary for Federal coal leasing must ``ensure the 
maximum economic recovery of coal.'' The Bureau has not 
presented compelling evidence that there is a tangible, 
economic case for reviewing coal leasing and royalty rates. 
And, the Committee is concerned that an increase in the royalty 
rate will result in reduced bonus payments, and further 
diminish revenues from coal activities.
    Placer Mining Reclamation Activities.--The Bureau is 
instructed to delay the implementation of recently developed 
mining reclamation standards for the purpose of working with 
State officials and local placer miners to establish metrics 
that are viable, reasonable, and in accordance with previous 
directions provided in 2016. In the interim, the Bureau is 
instructed to utilize existing revegetation standards, and 
approve reclamation where evidence of regrowth exists within 
180 days of enactment.
    Realty and Ownership Management.--The bill provides 
$73,480,000 for public land realty and ownership management 
activities, an increase of $228,000 above the enacted level. 
The Committee expects the Bureau to complete an inventory of 
contaminated Alaska Native lands in need of remediation, and 
the Committee continues the direction to the Bureau to 
coordinate with all responsible Federal agencies to expedite 
the cleanup process, including the Department of Defense and 
the Forest Service, so that the lands meet appropriate 
environmental standards at the earliest possible date.
    Resource Protection and Maintenance.--The bill provides 
$113,119,000 for resource protection and maintenance, an 
increase of $3,941,000 above the enacted level. The additional 
funds provided are for the Bureau's geospatial strategy. The 
Bureau is expected to prioritize marijuana eradication 
programs.
    Red River Land Ownership.--The Bureau is expected to defer 
any final decision-making regarding land use plans as part of 
the Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas Resource Management Plan 
Revision until appropriate surveys have been conducted to 
determine ownership along the Red River or until a legislative 
solution is enacted. The Bureau is encouraged to consider 
recurring recreational events carefully as land use plans are 
revised or updated.
    Transportation and Facilities Maintenance.--The bill 
provides $68,143,000 for transportation and facilities 
maintenance, a decrease of $2,186,000 below the enacted level, 
of which $1,700,000 is for the Department's Southwest Border 
Radio Initiative.
    Workforce and Organizational Support.--The bill provides 
$169,549,000 for workforce organization and support, $996,000 
below the enacted level.
    National Landscape Conservation System.--The bill provides 
$36,819,000 for major units of the National Landscape 
Conservation System, equal to the enacted level. Within the 
funds provided, the Bureau shall prioritize initiating 
foundational efforts at newly designated national monuments, 
particularly new monuments designated in California. That said, 
the Committee reminds the Bureau that the fiscal restraint 
required by the budget agreement was in place when new 
monuments were designated and believes the Bureau should be 
cognizant of spending constraints when recommending lands for 
monument designation. Additionally, while monument designations 
are made at the Presidential level, the Committee reminds the 
Bureau and the Department of its belief that monument 
designations should only be made in circumstances where there 
is robust support at the local, State and Federal level. 
Further, it is the Committee's belief that when developing a 
plan for a national monument livestock grazing should continue 
at historic levels and be considered integral to or 
inextricably tied to existing and future conditions of the 
area.
    Bureau of Land Management Foundation.--The establishment of 
a Bureau of Land Management Foundation referred to in title I 
of the bill shall be a charitable and nonprofit corporation 
under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, 
which shall not be considered an agency or establishment of the 
United States and consequently shall have no Federal employees. 
The purpose of the Foundation is to provide an opportunity for 
the Bureau to address a variety of specific challenges facing 
the Bureau that could be better addressed with the support of a 
foundation, including: the reclamation and remediation of 
legacy wells, abandoned mine land sites, and contaminated 
native lands; sustainable management of wild horses and burros; 
expanded scientific understanding of responsible development 
techniques; voluntary conservation activities; and the proper 
identification and cataloging of cultural and historical 
treasures on the public lands. To enable this, the Foundation 
is established to encourage, accept, and administer private 
gifts of money and of real and personal property for the 
benefit of, or in connection with the activities and services 
of, the Bureau of Land Management; and to undertake and conduct 
activities that further the purposes for which public lands are 
administered; and to undertake, conduct, and encourage 
educational, technical, scientific, and other assistance or 
activities that support the mission of the Bureau of Land 
Management.
    The Bureau of Land Management Foundation shall consist of a 
Board having as members no less than six private citizens of 
the United States appointed by the Secretary of the Interior 
whose initial terms shall be staggered to assure continuity of 
administration. Thereafter, the term shall be 6 years, unless a 
successor is chosen to fill a vacancy occurring prior to the 
expiration of the term for which his predecessor was chosen, in 
which event the successor shall be chosen only for the 
remainder of that term. The Chairman shall be an elected member 
of the Board. Membership on the Board shall not be deemed to be 
an office within the meaning of the statutes of the United 
States. The Bureau shall submit a report within 30 days of the 
date of enactment of this act to the Committee outlining 
specifics of the establishment of the Foundation for 
concurrence and approval.
    Mining Law Administration.--The bill provides $39,696,000 
for mining law administration. This amount is equal to the 
budget request and the enacted level and is fully offset by 
collections from mining claims fees.
    Rio Grande Instream Flow Study.--In 1968, Congress 
designated a stretch of the Rio Grande River as one of the 
America's first Wild and Scenic Rivers and expanded it in 1994 
for a total of 74 miles. The Bureau's Taos Resource Management 
Plan calls for initiation of flow studies in all permanent 
streams within the resource area to establish minimum flows 
necessary to maintain aquatic habitat. The Committee is 
concerned that the Bureau has yet to initiate a Rio Grande flow 
analysis covering the designated scenic, geologic, 
recreational, fish habitat, and cultural and riparian values 
and notes that an instream flow study is incredibly important 
to establish threshold flow values. The Committee urges the 
Bureau to identify the resources necessary to complete a study. 
Flow levels are especially important to many small business 
outfitters that rely on the Rio Grande.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $38,630,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      43,959,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      33,416,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $33,416,000 for land 
acquisition, a decrease of $5,214,000 below the enacted level, 
and the Committee provides $8,000,000 for recreational access 
as requested. The amount provided within this bill is available 
for the following distribution of funds and projects requested 
by the administration:

                        BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   MTMadison River Special Recreation      $4,000,000       $4,000,000
      Management Are
   IDHenry's Lake Area of Critical             50,000           50,000
      Environmental Concern
   IDSalmon River Special Recreation          700,000          700,000
      Management Area
   IDThousand Springs Area of                 300,000          300,000
      Critical Environmental Concern
   IDCraters of the Moon National           1,200,000        1,200,000
      Monument and Preserve/Oregon
      National Historic Trail
   IDSands Desert Habitat Management        2,750,000        2,750,000
      Area/Teton River
   NMRio Grande del Norte National          1,250,000        1,250,000
      Monument
   CODominguez-Escalante National             350,000          350,000
      Conservation Area
   COUpper Colorado River Special           1,500,000        1,500,000
      Recreation Management Area
   VAMeadowood Special Recreation           1,400,000        1,400,000
      Management Area
   MDNanjemoy National Resource             1,600,000        1,600,000
      Management Area
   AZAgua Fria National Monument            3,300,000        3,300,000
   MTLewis and Clark National               2,000,000        2,000,000
      Historic Trail/Upper Missouri
      River Breaks National Monument/
      Upper Missouri Wild and Scenic
      River
   CADos Palmas Area of Critical              650,000          650,000
      Environmental Concern
   NMKasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National         750,000          750,000
      Monument
     Other Projects                        10,501,000  ...............
     Sportsman/Recreational Access          8,000,000        8,000,000
     Acquisition Management                 2,042,000        2,000,000
     Inholdings, Emergencies, and           1,616,000        1,616,000
      Hardships
                                      ----------------------------------
           Total, Land Acquisition         43,959,000       33,416,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $107,734,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     106,985,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     102,946,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $102,946,000 for 
Oregon and California Grant Lands, a decrease of $4,788,000 
below the enacted level. The Committee appreciates the unique 
and important role of the Oregon and California Grants Lands 
within the Bureau. The Committee is concerned about the 
Bureau's ability to generate an adequate and predictable supply 
of timber and the resulting county revenues in Western Oregon 
under the agency's proposal to limit sustained yield management 
to just 20 percent of the forest land. The Committee is 
concerned that the Bureau's recent management and pending plans 
are inconsistent with the agency's principal obligation under 
the Oregon and California Act and believes the agency should 
reconsider its current direction. Additionally, the Committee 
is interested in determining whether efficiencies can be 
achieved within the program. The Bureau shall provide 
information to the Committee that outlines efficiencies that 
could be created within the Oregon and California Grants Lands 
program without diminishing production capacity or compromising 
core mission requirements, particularly timber harvests within 
120 days of enactment.

                           range improvements

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      10,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $10,000,000 for range 
improvements, an amount equal to the enacted level.

               service charges, deposits, and forfeitures

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $31,050,000
Offsetting collections..................................     -31,050,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      31,050,000
Offsetting collections..................................     -31,050,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      31,050,000
Offsetting collections..................................      31,050,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $31,050,000 for 
service charges, deposits, and forfeitures. The appropriation 
is fully offset by the collection of fees to pay for reasonable 
administrative and other costs.

                       miscellaneous trust funds

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $24,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      24,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      24,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $24,000,000 for 
miscellaneous trust funds, equal to the enacted level.

                      FISH AND WILDLIFE AND PARKS


                     U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal Federal 
agency responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing 
fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats. The Service 
manages more than 150 million acres in the National Wildlife 
Refuge System, which encompasses 563 national wildlife refuges, 
thousands of small wetlands and other special management areas 
and Marine National Monuments. It also operates 72 national 
fish hatcheries, 65 fish and wildlife management offices, and 
80 ecological services field stations. The agency enforces 
Federal wildlife laws, administers the Endangered Species Act, 
manages migratory bird populations, restores nationally 
significant fisheries, conserves and restores wildlife habitat 
such as wetlands, and helps foreign governments with their 
conservation efforts. It also oversees the Federal Assistance 
program, which distributes hundreds of millions of dollars in 
excise taxes on fishing and hunting equipment to State fish and 
wildlife agencies.

                          RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,238,771,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,309,912,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,249,207,000

    The bill provides $1,249,207,000 for resource management. 
This amount is $10,436,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level and $60,705,000 below the administration's request.
    Ecological Services.--$237,332,000 is provided for 
Ecological Services activities. Within the ecological services 
program, funding is provided as follows:
    Listing.--$17,411,000 is provided for endangered species, 
$3,104,000 below the fiscal year 2016 level. Consistent with 
the request, legislative caps for petition processing, for 
listing activities related to foreign species, and for critical 
habitat designations have been maintained. The Committee has 
provided $1,501,000 for petition activities, $1,504,000 for 
listing of foreign species, and $1,501,000 for critical habitat 
designations.
    Settlement Agreements.--The Committee is concerned that 
there is not adequate transparency for impacted stakeholders 
when the Service chooses to enter into a settlement agreement 
on an endangered species listing petition. This is particularly 
troubling in the context of multiple species--as happened in 
the 2011 multispecies litigation settlement agreements. The 
Committee urges the Service to avoid entering into any multi-
species settlement agreement unless the State and local 
governments where the species are located are a party to that 
agreement.
    Transparency of Data.--The Committee is also concerned 
about the extent to which underlying data that is used in 
listing determinations and critical habitat designations is 
made available to the public. Specifically, the Committee is 
concerned that there are instances where that data is not made 
available to the public, including to State and local 
governments who are directly impacted by these listing 
decisions. Within 60 days of enactment of this act, the 
Committee directs the Service provide a plan to improve 
transparency of the underlying data it uses to make 
determinations for species listings and de-listing activities, 
including the feasibility of publishing all data and materials 
used in listing determinations on the Internet.
    Wildlife Census.--The Committee directs the Fish and 
Wildlife Service to conduct a domestic census of the following 
exotic U.S. bred wildlife: Red Lechwe, Barasingha, Arabian 
Oryx, Eld's Deer. The Service shall not limit data used for 
this census to information gathered from permit applications. 
In addition to permit applications, the Service should make 
inquiries of ranchers and others that own these animals. The 
census final numbers shall be statistically validated using a 
recognized protocol and compare the Service's census numbers 
with other estimates that are publicly available. The Service 
shall provide the report to the Committee upon completion and 
permitting shall continue uninterrupted for these four species 
during the census period. The Service shall take no rulemaking 
actions regarding the four species listed herein before the 
census is completed, until the Committee has had at least 120 
days to review the report.
    Planning and Consultation.--The bill provides $102,966,000 
for planning and consultation, $3,887,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 level. Within planning and consultation, an additional 
$3,000,000 is provided for Gulf Coast Restoration activities, 
consistent with the budget request.
    Conservation and Restoration.--The bill provides 
$32,396,000 for conservation and restoration. This is equal to 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Recovery.--$84,556,000 is provided for recovery, an 
increase of $2,543,000 over the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. 
The Service dedicated $4,000,000 to initiating and concluding 
delisting and downlisting rulemakings in fiscal year 2016. The 
bill provides an increase of $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 level for such activities. The Service is directed to use 
the additional resources to focus on delisting and downlisting 
of species that have met articulated conservation goals. The 
Service should use funding to propose or finalize rules for 
species with completed five-year review status reviews that 
recommend delisting and downlisting. There are at least 49 
species that fit into that category.
    Within the funds provided, $2,500,000 is for the State of 
the Birds program. Additionally, the Service is directed to use 
$1,000,000 of the amount provided to reinstate the wolf-
livestock loss demonstration program as authorized by Public 
Law 111-11. States with de-listed wolf populations shall 
continue to be eligible for funding, provided that those States 
continue to meet the eligibility criteria contained in Public 
Law 111-11.
    California Condor and Aplomado Falcon.--The Service is 
directed to prioritize the recovery of the California condor 
and the aplomado falcon, and provide the necessary funding to 
enable the longstanding public-private partnership to continue 
to support the wild population through captive propagation, 
releases, and management, as the Service and the States work to 
address the continued environmental threats to the species, 
including lead.
    American Burying Beetle.--The Committee is aware that the 
Service is currently undertaking a required status review of 
the American Burying Beetle to determine whether listing as an 
endangered species is still warranted. Within funds provided, 
the Service is directed to propose a rule by the end of the 
fiscal year to delisting or downlist the American Burying 
Beetle should the status review make a finding that delisting 
or downlisting is warranted.
    Northern Long-Eared Bat.--The Committee is closely 
following the Service's work on the Northern Long-Eared Bat and 
notes that white-nose syndrome continues to be the major threat 
to the species.
    North Carolina Red Wolf.--The Committee acknowledges the 
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission's request that the 
Service end the Red Wolf recovery program and declare the Red 
Wolf extinct. The program has failed to meet population goals 
for the Red Wolf and has impacted North Carolina landowners and 
the populations of several other native species. The Committee 
understands that the Service is undertaking a review of the Red 
Wolf recovery program that is expected to conclude in September 
2016. The Committee urges the Service to coordinate closely 
with the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission on 
decisions related to future of the Red Wolf recovery program.
    Subsistence Activities.--The Committee is closely 
monitoring the Service's efforts to implement an agreement 
between the United States and the Russian Federation on 
management of the Alaska-Chukotka Polar Bear Population. The 
Service should seek the most current science on this matter as 
it works to implement the agreement. The Committee believes 
successful management of the population can only occur with the 
engagement of the Alaska Natives and expects the Service to 
consult with Alaska Native Organizations on matters related to 
subsistence, which are culturally important and a primary 
source of their nutritional needs. The Committee expects the 
Service to work with Alaska Native organizations and other 
wildlife management organizations with expertise in subsistence 
to implement a civil-based, co-management regime.
    National Wildlife Refuge System.--$482,400,000 is provided 
for the National Wildlife Refuge System, an increase of 
$973,000 over the fiscal year 2016 level. Within that amount, 
an increase of $1,241,000 has been provided for wildlife and 
habitat management. Funding for the subsistence program has 
been provided at the request level, and $9,726,000 has been 
provided for invasive species. Additionally, the bill provides 
$1,000,000 for the Pacific Marine National Monuments.
    Continued Funding Prohibitions.--The Committee directs the 
Service to continue the directive from fiscal year 2016 that 
prohibits a caribou hunt on Kagalaska Island and efforts to 
remove cattle on Chirikof and Wosnesenski Islands in the State 
of Alaska.
    Karluk Lake.--The Committee is extremely disappointed with 
the Service's January 2016 decision to deny a special use 
permit to conduct nutrient enrichment in Karluk Lake within the 
Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge. The final Environmental 
Assessment was inadequate and failed to recognize the 
measurable benefits of ongoing enrichment programs in other 
areas in the State of Alaska. While fish populations have 
recently increased in Karluk Lake, the Environmental Assessment 
did not adequately consider that nutrient enrichment may have 
helped fish populations in prior years and is an important tool 
for future years. The Committee understands that the Refuge's 
Comprehensive Conservation Plan includes provisions for and 
outlines means to rehabilitate fish stocks on the Refuge, 
including lake enrichment. In an effort to look at this issue 
in a more balanced manner, the Service is directed to move 
forward with a formal compatibility determination on the 
Refuge's Comprehensive Conservation Plan for fish 
rehabilitation and publish a list of approved tools that can be 
used to accomplish such rehabilitation.
    Corolla Wild Horses.--The Corolla Wild Horses are a unique 
piece of America's history that can be traced back over 400 
years to the arrival of Spanish explorers on the Outer Banks of 
North Carolina. Due to economic development in Currituck 
County, North Carolina, the herd size has diminished resulting 
in lack of genetic diversity, threatening the entire herd. 
Because the horses roam on private and some Service land, a 
management plan is needed between the Service, the State of 
North Carolina, Currituck County, North Carolina, and the 
Corolla Wild Horses Fund that allows for the herd size to be 
grown to no fewer than 110 and no greater than 130 horses, 
which may be achieved through the introduction of horses from a 
related herd. The Committee expects this management plan be 
entered into between the four parties no later than 180 days 
after enactment of this act and the Committee expects the 
Corolla Wild Horses Fund to continue to pay all costs 
associated with managing the Corolla horses.
    Conservation and Enforcement.--$138,624,000 has been 
provided for Conservation and Enforcement, which is $1,723,000 
above the enacted level in fiscal year 2016.
    Within Conservation and Enforcement, the bill includes 
$47,755,000 for the migratory bird management program. This 
includes $500,000 for aviation management to continue the 
Service's efforts on aviation safety and training for pilots.
    Further, $75,053,000 is included for law enforcement 
activities to help combat illegal global wildlife trafficking 
and for implementation of the Lacey Act. Additionally, the bill 
includes $15,816,000 for international affairs, which is equal 
to the administration's request. Within that funding, $550,000 
is included to support the Arctic Council.
    Wildlife Trafficking.--The Service plays a critical role in 
the ongoing effort to combat the global crisis of wildlife 
poaching and trafficking, which is driven by demand for high-
value illegal wildlife products and facilitated by 
sophisticated criminal networks profiting from this multi-
billion dollar black market industry. Poaching of rhinoceros 
and elephants has reached unprecedented levels, and illegal 
trade is undermining the conservation of scores of other 
species. The Committee continues to support government-wide 
efforts to combat wildlife trafficking, and recommends funding 
equal to the President's request for the Service's Office of 
Law Enforcement and the International Affairs program. These 
resources will support the Service in continuing to strengthen 
its forensic capabilities to disrupt smuggling networks, 
improve collaboration with other Federal, State, local, and 
foreign governments, and promote international wildlife 
conservation.
    In response to the high level of wildlife trafficking 
flowing into the United States, the Committee directs the 
Service to conduct an analysis of potential options for 
increasing the capacity of the wildlife port inspection program 
under the Office of Law Enforcement. The analysis should 
include a detailed explanation of the existing program and 
potential options for enhancing the program. The Committee 
directs the Service to submit this analysis to the Committee 
within 180 days of enactment.
    Shellfish Inspections.--The Committee is very concerned 
about the Fish and Wildlife Service's recent and unexplained 
decision to change its interpretation of their longstanding 
shellfish and nonliving fishery products inspection exemption 
to no longer include non-threatened and non-injurious 
echinoderm, such as sea urchins and sea cucumbers. This shift 
has had negative economic effects with no demonstrated benefit. 
The Committee notes that the general inspection of seafood for 
import or export is not included in the Service's mandate and 
directs the Service to reevaluate its interpretation of 
shellfish to encompass aquatic invertebrates marketed and 
consumed as seafood.
    Fish and Aquatic Conservation.--$153,880,000 is provided 
for Fish and Aquatic Conservation, an increase of $5,624,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Adequate funding is 
provided to ensure that no fish hatcheries will close in fiscal 
year 2017.
    Within the Fish and Aquatic Conservation program, funding 
is provided for national fish hatchery system operations, 
maintenance and equipment, and aquatic habitat and species 
conservation as follows:
    National Fish Hatchery System Operations.--$53,759,000 is 
provided for National Fish Hatchery System Operations, equal to 
the fiscal year 2017 request.
    It is recognized that the Service has entered into 
reimbursable agreements with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 
the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Department of Interior's 
Central Utah Project, and the Bonneville Power Administration 
in order to ensure the continued operation of mitigation 
hatcheries. So that operations at these hatcheries are not 
disrupted, future budget requests must ensure that Federal 
partners have committed to making sufficient funding available 
to reimburse the Service before the Service proposes to 
eliminate funding for mitigation hatcheries.
    Maintenance and Equipment.--$22,920,000 is provided for 
maintenance and equipment expenses related to the National Fish 
Hatchery System, an increase of $3,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level and equal to the administration's 
request. A portion of the funding provided for National Fish 
Hatchery Maintenance and Equipment should be allocated to 
hatcheries where partner agencies fund mitigation work.
    Aquatic Habitat and Species Conservation.--$77,201,000 is 
provided for aquatic habitat and species conservation, an 
increase of $2,283,000 over the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. 
Within aquatic habitat and species conservation, funding is 
provided as follows:
    Habitat Assessment and Restoration.--$30,220,000 is 
provided for habitat assessment and restoration activities, an 
increase of $1,579,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level. Within this amount, $3,000,000 has been provided for 
work related to implementation of the Klamath Basin Restoration 
Agreement and related settlement agreements. The Committee also 
provides $14,748,000 for the fish passage improvements, 
$1,500,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2016.
    Population Assessment and Cooperative Management.--
$30,821,000 is provided for population assessment and 
cooperative management activities, equal to the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. Funding is provided for fisheries 
subsistence.
    Aquatic Invasive Species.--$16,160,000 is provided for 
aquatic invasive species activities, an increase of $704,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level and equal to the 
administration's request. Within this amount, $2,038,000 is 
provided for invasive species prevention.
    Asian Carp.--The Committee recognizes the importance of the 
work conducted by the Fish and Wildlife Service to combat the 
serious threat of Asian carp to the ecosystem and fisheries of 
the Great Lakes and provides $7,900,000 to be used specifically 
on Asian carp activities. To prevent Asian carp from entering 
the Great Lakes, the Committee recommends the Aquatic Invasive 
Species program create a dedicated funding source to increase 
the intensity and geographic scope of efforts to combat Asian 
carp.
    Invasive Species.--The Committee is aware that work is 
ongoing in several regions to address the threats posed by 
aquatic invasive species and directs the Service to continue to 
make available competitive grant funding for projects to 
eliminate these destructive, non-native species, which include 
Asian carp, quagga-zebra mussels, and variable-leaf 
watermilfoil. The Committee encourages the Service to support 
research, monitoring, and mitigation efforts, as well as 
efforts to disseminate such work, in all regions.
    Cooperative Landscape Conservation.--Cooperative landscape 
conservation is funded at $11,288,000. This is $1,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Within that amount, 
$700,000 is provided for Gulf Coast restoration.
    Science Support.--$14,985,000 is provided for science 
support. This represents a decrease of $2,000,000 from fiscal 
year 2016. Adaptive science is funded at $9,517,000, of which 
$931,000 is for Gulf Coast restoration activities. Service 
science is funded at $5,468,000.
    Within Service science, $2,500,000 is provided for white-
nose syndrome research. In addition to these funds, the Service 
is encouraged to continue dedicating at least $2,000,000 of 
funds appropriated for species recovery to white-nose syndrome 
work. The Service should also continue, along with the United 
States Geological Survey, to lead and implement the North 
American Bat Monitoring Program in association with other 
Federal natural resource management agencies and offices, 
States, and non-governmental partners.
    General Operations.--$142,957,000 is provided for general 
operations, a decrease of $100,000 below the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level. The Director's office is funded at $1,699,000.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $23,687,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      23,740,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      16,935,000

    A total appropriation of $16,935,000 has been provided for 
the Construction account. This amount is $6,752,000 below the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The amount provided within the 
bill is available for the following distribution of funds and 
projects requested by the administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              Budget        Chairman's
State               Project                  estimate     recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   OR Clark R. Bavin National Fish and           2,500           2,500
       Wildlife Forensics Lab
   IL Crab Orchard NWR                             400             400
   NM Valle de Oro NWR                           3,063           3,063
   VA Harrison Lake NFH                            842             842
   VA Harrison Lake NFH                            997             997
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            LAND ACQUISITION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $68,500,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      58,655,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      47,871,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $47,871,000 for land 
acquisition, an overall decrease of $20,629,000 below the 
enacted level and a $10,629,000 decrease for specific land 
acquisition projects. The Committee provides $2,000,000 for a 
recreational access line for these purposes. The Committee 
continues to support the work of the Highlands Conservation Act 
grants to protect and preserve the priority projects in PA, NJ, 
NY, and CT and expects the Service to include the program in 
the fiscal year 2018 budget if there are eligible projects. The 
amount provided within this bill is available for the following 
distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

                        FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   HI Hakalau Forest National              $6,200,000       $6,200,000
       Wildlife Refuge
ND/SD Dakota Grassland Conservation         8,000,000        8,000,000
       Area
   MT Red Rocks Lake National               2,000,000        2,000,000
       Wildlife Refuge
ND/SD Dakota Tallgrass Prairie              3,000,000        3,000,000
       Wildlife Management Area
   MD Blackwater National Wildlife          1,200,000        1,200,000
       Refuge
   VA James River National Wildlife           900,000          900,000
       Refuge
   FL Everglades Headwaters National        2,500,000        2,500,000
       Wildlife Refugre and
       Conservation Area
   PA Cherry Valley National Wildlife       2,200,000        2,200,000
       Refuge
   AR Cache River National Wildlife         1,406,000        1,406,000
       Refuge
      Other Projects                        8,478,000  ...............
      Acquisition Management               12,955,000       12,000,000
      Land Protection Planning                465,000          465,000
      Inholdings/Emergencies/               5,351,000        5,000,000
       Hardships
      Exchanges                             1,500,000        1,000,000
      Sportsman/Recreational Access         2,500,000        2,000,000
      Highlands Conservation           ..............  ...............
                                      ----------------------------------
            Total, Land Acquisition        58,655,000       47,871,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $53,495,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      53,495,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      53,495,000

    The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund 
program has been provided $53,495,000, equal to the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. Funds are to be distributed as follows: 
$10,508,000 for endangered species conservation grants to 
States and territories; $9,485,000 for habitat conservation 
planning grants; $11,162,000 for species recovery land 
acquisition grants; $19,638,000 for habitat conservation land 
acquisition grants; and $2,702,000 for program administration.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $13,228,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................................
Chairman's recommendation...............................      13,228,000

    The National Wildlife Refuge Fund has been provided 
$13,228,000. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $35,145,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      35,145,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      38,145,000

    The North American Wetlands Conservation Fund program has 
been provided $38,145,000. This amount is $3,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level.

              NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $3,910,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       3,910,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       3,910,000

    The recommendation for the neotropical migratory bird 
conservation fund is $3,910,000 equal to the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $11,061,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      11,061,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      11,061,000

    The multinational species conservation fund programs have 
been provided $11,061,000, equal to the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level. Funds are distributed as follows: $2,582,000 for 
African elephant conservation; $3,440,000 for rhinoceros and 
tiger conservation; $1,557,000 for Asian elephant conservation; 
$1,975,000 for great ape conservation; and $1,507,000 for 
marine turtle conservation.

                    STATE AND TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $60,571,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      66,981,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      62,571,000

    The State and Tribal Wildlife Grants program has been 
provided $62,571,000. This amount is $2,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The recommended level provides 
$53,000,000 for State and tribal apportioned grants; $4,084,000 
for competitive grants for tribes; and $5,487,000 for 
competitive grants for States.
    Pacific Flyway.--The Committee is concerned about the loss 
of seasonal wetland habitat along the Pacific Flyway as a 
result of the drought in California. The Committee encourages 
the Service to work with private landowners and organizations 
representing agriculture, conservation science, and waterbird 
habitat enhancement to develop critical waterbird conservation 
programs that provide temporary, seasonal, and working wetland 
habitat for shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors and other species.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.

                         National Park Service

    Since the creation of Yellowstone National Park in 1872, 
the National Park System has grown to encompass 401 sites 
spanning more than 84 million acres in all 50 States, the 
District of Columbia, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, 
Saipan, and the Virgin Islands. The National Park Service, 
created in 1916, is charged with preserving these sites 
``unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.'' The 
Service and its more than 20,000 employees also contribute to 
the protection of other historical, cultural and recreational 
resources through a variety of grant and technical assistance 
programs.

                 operation of the national park system

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,369,596,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,524,362,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   2,405,627,000

    The Committee recommends $2,405,627,000 for the operation 
of the national park system, an increase of $36,031,000 above 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The National Park Service 
will celebrate its centennial in fiscal year 2017 and in 
acknowledgement of this milestone the administration requested 
significant additional funding for the agency. The Committee 
strongly supports the work of the Service and its unique 
mission in not only land management and conservation, but also 
in interpreting and preserving America's history and culture. 
However, given budgetary constraints not all aspects of the 
request could be accommodated. Program changes are detailed 
below and in the table that accompanies the Committee report.
    Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$328,071,000 for resource stewardship, an increase of $31,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level for Everglades 
Restoration efforts as requested. Within the funds provided, 
the service shall maintain funding for the National Capital 
Area Performing Arts program at current levels.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends $251,280,000 
for visitor services which is equal to the enacted level.
    Facility Operations and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $763,487,000 for facility operations and 
maintenance, an increase of $25,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. These additional funds are part of the 
proposed Centennial Initiative to address the maintenance 
backlog and shall be allocated equally between cyclic and 
repair/rehab maintenance. The Committee notes that this 
recurring base funding increase is in addition to the 
$35,000,000 increase provided for these maintenance efforts in 
fiscal year 2016.
    Park Support.--The Committee recommends $526,641,000 for 
park support, an increase of $11,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. The increase above the request is to fully 
fund all new park units and monuments, including requested 
increases for the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, 
Honouliuli, and Wild and Scenic River Partnerships as well as 
other critical operating needs. The final allocation of the 
funds shall be provided to the Committee as part of the 
Service's annual operating plan, which is due 60 days from 
enactment of this act. Funding for the Roosevelt-Campobello 
International Park shall be at the level detailed on page 21 of 
the agency's budget justification entitled ``Special 
Exhibits.'' The NPS shall continue to follow the direction 
contained in the statement of managers accompanying the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016 (Public Law 114-113) 
concerning the submission of future budget requests for the 
Roosevelt-Campobello International Park. The recommendation 
also provides the requested funding levels for the Valles 
Caldera National Preserve and for the Belmont-Paul Women's 
Equality National Monument, formerly the Sewall-Belmont House 
and Museum, which is now a park service unit.
    External Administrative Costs.--The Committee recommends 
$180,603,000 for external administrative costs which is equal 
to the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Ste. Genevieve Special Resource Study.--The Committee is 
pleased that the National Park Service followed congressional 
direction and completed the Ste. Genevieve Special Resources 
Study [SRS], which had been ongoing since 2010. The Committee 
supports the addition of a new National Park Service unit at 
Ste. Genevieve, which was recommended in the study. During the 
comment period on the proposed SRS, residents overwhelmingly 
voiced support for the addition of Ste. Genevieve as a new unit 
of the National Park Service. Ste. Genevieve boasts a history 
older than our nation itself and is unique as the home to the 
highest concentration of vertical log buildings in the country. 
The buildings are representative of French colonial 
architecture and well preserved. It is critical this site has 
proper recognition for the immense cultural and historical 
value it provides to the country.
    Point Reyes National Seashore.--The Committee notes that 
multi-generational ranching and dairying is not only important 
both ecologically and economically for the Point Reyes National 
Seashore and surrounding community, but also entirely 
consistent with Congress's intent when it first established the 
Point Reyes National Seashore. The National Park Service shall, 
without delay, complete and begin implementing its Ranch 
Comprehensive Management Plan at the Point Reyes National 
Seashore in a manner that provides for lease terms of up to 20 
years, preserves park resources and supports continued historic 
beef and dairy ranches in the pastoral zone of the park. Until 
the date on which new permits or other authorizations are 
issued pursuant to the Ranch Comprehensive Management Plan, the 
Secretary shall continue to support and issue authorizations to 
existing beef and dairy ranches, subject to any terms and 
conditions the Secretary deems appropriate.
    Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park.--The 
Committee supports requested funding for the Blackstone River 
Valley National Historical Park with the expectation that the 
Service will continue to make funds available to the local 
coordinating entity to maintain staffing and capacity to assist 
in management of the park, as authorized by Public Law 113-291.
    Freedom Riders Park.--The Committee believes that Freedom 
Riders Park, the site of the May 14, 1961 bus burning, 
associated and adjacent to the Selma to Montgomery National 
Historic Trail is an important national project that will be a 
place for school groups, tourists and others to reflect and 
learn about the historic events surrounding the Civil Rights 
Movement.
    Innovative Flood Control Alternatives.--The Committee is 
concerned that interior flooding behind levee systems could 
jeopardize public safety, Federal investments, and regional 
transportation systems due to the dense, urban environment in 
Washington, DC particularly in the Federal Triangle area of the 
city. The Committee directs the National Park Service to work 
collaboratively with the National Capital Planning Commission, 
the Smithsonian Institution, affected Federal agencies and 
other stakeholders (to study innovative and sustainable low 
impact development alternatives to address interior flooding in 
the Federal Triangle area of Washington, DC.
    Nicodemus, Kansas.--Founded in 1877 by newly freed slaves, 
Nicodemus, Kansas was the first African American community 
settled west of the Mississippi River. The Nicodemus National 
Historic Site was designated in 1996 to preserve, protect and 
interpret the legacy of the community. The Committee is 
encouraged by discussions between the National Park Service and 
the Nicodemus Historic Society regarding a new or enhanced 
cooperative agreement that will increase visitor interaction 
and transfer greater control of the on-site interpretive 
services of the Nicodemus National Historic Site to descendants 
of Nicodemus and local community members. The Committee urges 
the National Park Service to work in an expedited manner with 
local community leaders to finalize such agreement. Given that 
many visitors wish to explore National Park Service sites on 
the weekend, the Committee also stresses the importance of 
ensuring that its normal operating hours include being open on 
Saturdays and Sundays.
    Bottled Water Ban.--The Park Service issued a Policy 
Memorandum on December 14, 2011 (11-03) that requires parks to 
educate visitors about the importance of recycling and reducing 
waste. In addition, the memorandum provides NPS park 
supervisors the option of eliminating the sale of disposable 
plastic water bottles as a measure to accomplish the goal of 
reducing waste. To date, 22 NPS units have eliminated the sale 
of bottled water, 13 in the Intermountain Region, 2 in the 
Midwest Region, 1 in the National Capital Region, and 6 in the 
Southeast Region. The Committee believes that this is a 
misguided policy that makes little sense from an environmental 
or health perspective. For example, the policy bans the sale of 
water but still permits the sale of other options to park 
visitors like soda, juice, and other sugary drinks in plastic 
bottles. Moreover, independent groups have reviewed the agency 
policy and found the Service does not even collect the data to 
determine whether the policy has any impact on reducing waste. 
The Committee expects the agency to withdraw this policy 
administratively--that is the quickest, easiest solution to 
resolve this issue. However, the Committee is aware of 
legislative efforts in the House to overturn the policy via 
statute and certainly will consider this option if the Service 
is unwilling to reverse course on its own.
    Director's Order 21.--Given the National Park Service 
budget constraints of the last decade and the need to find 
other revenue sources, Congress provided NPS authority to 
expand its donor acknowledgement policies as part of Public Law 
113-291. Within 90 days of enactment, the Service shall report 
to the Committee on the steps that it has taken or is planning 
to take in fiscal year 2017 to implement the law.

                  NATIONAL RECREATION AND PRESERVATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $62,632,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      54,392,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      62,638,000

    The Committee recommends $62,638,000 for national 
recreation and preservation programs, an increase of $6,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Natural Programs.--The Committee recommends $13,581,000 for 
natural programs. As requested, a total of $2,020,000 is 
included for the Chesapeake Gateways and Trails program.
    Heritage Partnership Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$19,821,000 for heritage partnership programs, which is equal 
to the enacted level. This level of funding provides 
$18,839,000 for grants to national heritage areas and $982,000 
to administer the program.
    In order to provide stable funding sources for all areas, 
the bill provides funding for longstanding areas at fiscal year 
2016 funding levels; provides a total of $300,000 to national 
heritage areas with recently approved management plans, known 
as tier 2 areas; and provides $150,000 to each tier 1 area that 
has been authorized and is still in the process of having its 
management plan approved. The Service is directed to refrain 
from further funding reallocations. The Committee notes that 
the Service has not provided the requested report detailing 
funding alternatives for the national heritage area program as 
provided by Public Law 114-113.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $65,410,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      87,410,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      67,910,000

    The Committee recommends $67,910,000 for the historic 
preservation fund, an increase of $2,500,000 above the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level.
    The Committee recommendation provides $47,925,000 for 
grants-in-aid to States and territories a $1 million increase 
above the enacted level and $9,985,000 for grants-in-aid to 
tribes, which is equal to the enacted level for both programs.
    The Committee has provided an additional $1,500,000 above 
the enacted level in support of the Civil Rights in America 
portion of the Centennial Initiative for a total of 
$10,000,000. These funds are available to protect and preserve 
the history and sites associated with the Civil Rights 
Movement, with priority given to projects focused on the near-
decade of the Movement from August 1955 to July 1963 that have 
not received appropriate attention to date.

                              construction

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $192,937,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     252,038,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     217,320,000

    The bill includes $217,320,000 for construction 
requirements for the national park system, which is $24,383,000 
above the enacted level. These recurring base funds are 
provided in addition to the $55,000,000 increase that was 
provided by the Committee in fiscal year 2016 and are in 
support of the Centennial Initiative, particularly addressing 
deferred maintenance needs nationwide. An additional $700,000 
above the request has been included for renewable energy 
projects at National Park System units.
    The following table details the line item construction 
activity for specific projects requested by the administration.

                   NATIONAL PARK SERVICE CONSTRUCTION
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Chairman's
State               Project               Budget request  recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   DC National Mall, replace Lincoln        $2,210,000      $2,210,000
       Memorial Roof
   NY Gateway NRA, replace electrical        9,144,000       9,144,000
       infrastructure
   DC White House, replace/rehab            17,160,000      17,160,000
       utilities
   AK Wrangell St. Elias NP, repair          4,658,000       4,658,000
       Kennecott Mine structures
   GA Ocmulgee National Monument, roof       2,006,000       2,006,000
       repairs
   WA Mt. Rainier NP, Paradise Inn          13,211,000      13,211,000
       rehabilitation
   MA Lowell NHP, Boott Cotton Mills         4,601,000       4,601,000
       Museum rehab/fire and safety
   PR San Juan NHS, Santa Elena/San          1,947,000       1,947,000
       Agustin Bastions rehab
   WY Yellowstone NP, Mammoth Hotel         16,126,000      16,126,000
       seismic retrofit
   DC National Mall, replace George          9,456,000       9,456,000
       Washington screening facility
   SD Jewel Cave NM, structural              6,797,000       6,797,000
       upgrades
   CA Yosemite NP, El Portal sewer          13,929,000      13,929,000
       rehabilitation
   NY Gateway NRA, structural                1,597,000       1,597,000
       demolition Floyd Bennett Field
   MD C&O; Canal NHP, canal structure         7,770,000       7,770,000
       repairs
   AL Selma to Montgomery NHT, Selma         2,080,000       2,080,000
       interpretive center
   DC National Mall, water conveyance        7,604,000       7,604,000
       rehab
   VA Shenandoah NP, water system            2,003,000       2,003,000
       repairs
   NE Scotts Bluff NM, visitor center        3,080,000       3,080,000
       rehabilitation
   SD Mt. Rushmore NM, stabilization         2,089,000       2,089,000
       and rehabilitation
   MO Ozark National Scenic Riverways,       2,033,000       2,033,000
       replace utilities
   AZ Grand Canyon NP, North Rim water      10,458,000      10,458,000
       distribution system
      Other requested projects              13,385,000  ..............
                                       ---------------------------------
            Total                          153,344,000     136,276,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    land and water conservation fund


                              (RESCISSION)

Appropriations, 2016....................................    -$28,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     -30,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     -28,000,000

    The bill includes a rescission of $28,000,000 in annual 
contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 460l-10a. This 
authority has not been used in recent years and there are no 
plans to use it in fiscal year 2017.

                 land acquisition and state assistance

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $173,670,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     178,248,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     168,423,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $168,423,000 for land 
acquisition and State assistance, a decrease of $5,247,000 
below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level of which $58,417,000 
is for land acquisition and $110,006,000 is for State 
assistance. The Committee provides $2,000,000 for a 
recreational access activity for the Park Service as requested. 
The Committee is aware of efforts by non-Federal agencies in 
helping the Federal Government leverage funds in order to 
maximize funding for the management and acquisition of lands 
for the Ice Age, North Country, and New England Scenic Trails. 
The funding provided by the Committee for recreation access may 
be available to acquire land to close gaps in the National 
Scenic Trails. The Committee urges the Service to consider 
geographic distribution to ensure investments for the trail 
system are reflected in project prioritization. The amount 
provided within this bill is available for the following 
distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

                          NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
 State              Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
    WY Grand Teton National Park          $22,500,000      $22,500,000
    HI Hawaii Volcanoes National Park       6,000,000        6,000,000
    ID Nez Perce National Historical          400,000          400,000
        Park
    AL Little River Canyon National           516,500          517,000
        Preserve
       Other Projects                       7,897,500  ...............
       Acquisition Management              10,000,000        9,000,000
       Emergencies, Hardships,              3,928,000        3,000,000
        Relocations and Deficiencies
       Inholdings, Exchanges,               5,000,000        5,000,000
        Donations
       American Battlefield                10,000,000       10,000,000
        Protection Grant Program
       Sportsman/Recreational Access        2,000,000        2,000,000
                                      ----------------------------------
             Total, Land Acquisition       68,242,000       58,417,000
                                      ==================================
       State Assistance Grants,            94,000,000       94,000,000
        Discretionary
       State Assistance Grants,            12,000,000       12,000,000
        Competitive
       Administrative Expenses              4,006,000        4,006,000
                                      ----------------------------------
             Total, State Assistance      110,006,000      110,006,000
                                      ==================================
             Total, Land Acquisition      178,248,000      168,423,000
              and State Assistance
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                          CENTENNIAL CHALLENGE

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $15,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      35,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      20,000,000

    The recommendation includes $20,000,000, $5,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2016 level for the Centennial Challenge 
program. This funding will be used to continue a program begun 
under Public Law 110-161 that provides dedicated Federal 
funding to leverage partnerships for signature projects and 
programs for the national park system, including critical 
infrastructure investments. The Committee expects that these 
funds will be used primarily as an additional tool for the 
Service to address its backlog maintenance issues. These funds 
shall be used to complement increases provided in the 
Operations of the National Park Service appropriation to 
enhance the visitor experience and better protect cultural and 
natural resources at national park system units as part of the 
Service's 2017 centennial celebration. While a 1-to-1 matching 
requirement is required by law for projects to qualify for 
these funds, the Service is urged to give preference to 
projects that demonstrate additional leveraging capacity from 
its partners.

                          ENERGY AND MINERALS


                         U.S. Geological Survey

    Established in 1879, the U.S. Geological Survey [USGS] 
serves as the Earth and natural science research bureau for the 
Department of the Interior and is the only integrated natural 
resources research bureau in the Federal Government. USGS 
conducts research, monitoring, and assessments to contribute to 
understanding America's lands, water, and biological resources. 
Its research and data products support the Department's 
resource and land management needs and also provide the water, 
biological, energy, and mineral resources information needed by 
other Federal, State, tribal, and local government agencies to 
guide planning, management, and regulatory programs. More than 
9,000 scientists, technicians, and support staff of the USGS 
are located in nearly 400 offices in every State and in several 
foreign countries throughout the world. The USGS leverages its 
resources and expertise in partnership with more than 2,000 
agencies of Federal, State, local, and tribal governments; the 
academic community; nongovernmental organizations; and the 
private sector.

                 SURVEYS, INVESTIGATIONS, AND RESEARCH

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,062,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,168,803,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,068,135,000

    The bill provides $1,068,135,000 for the U.S. Geological 
Survey, an increase of $6,135,000 over the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level. General program reductions that accompany these 
changes are detailed in the table included at the end of the 
report. While the USGS appears to be adapting to new demands by 
expanding its research capacity in program areas such 
Ecosystems and Climate and Land Use Change, the Committee wants 
to ensure that the agency is taking a balanced approach towards 
implementing its program areas. The Committee directs the 
Survey to report back within 180 days of enactment of this act 
on what new studies and projects over $500,000 that have been 
initiated within the last 1-3 fiscal years under the various 
program areas.
    Ecosystems.--The bill provides $157,541,000 for Ecosystems 
programs, which is a decrease of $2,691,000 over the 2016 
enacted level. Within the wildlife program, an additional 
$250,000 is provided to continue White Nose Syndrome studies 
and the funds appropriated shall continue to help lead, and 
implement the North American Bat Monitoring Program in 
association with other Federal natural resource management 
agencies and offices, States, and non-governmental partners. 
The Committee also provides an additional $250,000 for the 
invasive species program to combat invasive species of national 
concern. The Committee expects the base funding of $5,620,000 
to continue to be used to address Asian Carp issues in the 
Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River.
    The Committee is aware of the work the Survey is performing 
in critical landscapes such as the Arctic, Puget Sound, 
California Bay Delta, Great Lakes, Columbia River, and the 
Chesapeake Bay, and encourages this work to continue. The 
Committee also appreciates the research that USGS is conducting 
regarding the Columbia River's flow regimes and understands the 
value of such research in light of the Columbia River Treaty. 
The Committee urges such flow regime research to be conducted 
in partnership with academic partners that have an advanced-
technology observation and prediction system in this Estuary.
    Climate and Land Use Change.--The bill provides 
$140,475,000 for the Climate and Land Use Change program, an 
increase of $500,000 for Arctic research. Program adjustments 
have been made to the sub-activities to provide an increase of 
$15,400,000 for the Landsat system to stay on track with the 
NASA Landsat operation and plan. The Committee is aware of the 
Survey's obligations to deliver the ground system for Landsat 9 
on time while maintaining support functions for other program 
areas; therefore, the Committee directs the Survey to provide a 
spending plan in 60 days after enactment of this act on how to 
meet these obligations under the current funding levels for the 
Climate and Land Use Change sub-activity.
    Energy, Minerals and Environmental Health.--The bill 
provides $94,511,000 for Energy, Minerals, and Environmental 
Health programs, equal to the current year fiscal year 2016 
enacted level. The Committee acknowledges the high quality of 
research that USGS performs for all the relevant DOI agencies, 
but is concerned that some scientific activities are reaching 
into non-traditional program areas at a rapid pace while not 
devoting enough resources to program areas such as mineral 
resources.
    The Committee does not accept the proposed decrease of 
$1,500,000 for geophysical and remote sensing activities, and 
provides an additional $1,550,000 for these activities. 
Geologic and geophysical mapping and the understanding they 
provide are the basis for resource discovery and without them 
the mineral potential is largely unknown, therefore, the 
Committee not only rejects the proposal to end these 
activities, but expects this work to continue in areas 
surrounding the Kugruk fault zone. It is the Committee's 
expectation this funding will be used for geologic needs and 
encourages the Survey to work collaboratively with State 
geological surveys to focus resources toward completing the 
core task of geologic mapping where there are regions of the 
country that have high quality mineral and energy resources 
that remain unmapped at a useable scale. The Committee also 
expects a portion of this funding to be used to consult with 
State geological surveys to update and conduct new evaluations 
of oil and gas resources in low-permeability reservoirs. The 
Committee accepts the proposed decrease of $1,550,000 for the 
toxic substances hydrology program.
    The Committee is concerned about our Nation's dependence on 
foreign minerals. The Survey is directed to report back to the 
Committee within 1 year on the extent the Survey has surveyed 
the U.S. domestic mineral base. This report should include 
projections and gaps in knowledge in resource assessments in 
order to gain a better understanding of the needs to strengthen 
mineral security. The report should also include what 
commodities the Survey determines to be strategic or critical 
minerals. The Survey is urged to conduct a study on the 
feasibility of carbon mineralization for permanent 
sequestration of carbon dioxide emissions, as described in the 
recently published report, ``Rapid Carbon Mineralization for 
Permanent Disposal of Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions,'' 
with specific focus on the technical feasibility and potential 
sequestration sites. The Survey should consult with EPA, the 
Department of Energy, and other relevant agencies.
    Natural Hazards.--The bill includes $142,339,000 for 
Natural Hazards programs, an increase of $3,326,000 above the 
current fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Within the Earthquake 
Hazards program, the Committee continues to support the early 
earthquake warning event characterization activity and provides 
$1,000,000 to the base level of $8,200,000 for an earthquake 
early warning prototype. The Committee is concerned about the 
lack of knowledge and real time instrumentation available for 
the Cascadia subduction zone and the continued development of a 
system for the Cascadia will help prepare for and mitigate the 
negative human and economic impacts in the region in the event 
of a major event.
    Earthquakes have enormous potential to cause catastrophic 
casualties, damage, economic loss, and disruption. Many remote 
and urbanized areas across the country, including in the 
Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and California, are at particular 
risk of significant damage should a significant earthquake hit. 
The Committee understands the National Science Foundation [NSF] 
has supported temporary seismometer deployments across the 
United States for the EarthScope USArray project and that once 
the project is complete in a specific area the seismometers may 
then be available for regional networks, States, and other 
entities to adopt after the project concludes. The Committee is 
aware the Survey is in the process of working on the cost 
benefit proposal and spending plan for adoption of seismic 
stations as directed by the Committee in Public Law 114-113. As 
the Survey continues to complete this work, the Committee 
expects the Survey to include an implementation plan for the 
adoption of future seismic stations. The Committee provides an 
additional $500,000 for the USGS Earthquake Program to fund the 
purchase or maintenance of domestic and international seismic 
stations.
    In 2000, Congress authorized the Advanced National Seismic 
System to ``establish and maintain an advanced infrastructure 
for seismic monitoring throughout the United States that 
operates with high performance standards . . .''. The Committee 
is concerned, that after a decade and half later, not all 50 
States meet the baseline earthquake detection and monitoring 
standards set by this program; therefore, the Committee 
provides $1,000,000 for the Earthquake Program to work with 
regional seismic networks to meet the ANSS earthquake detection 
standards by leveraging data from active USArray Transportable 
Array stations.
    The Committee is encouraged by the work to restore 
monitoring networks on high-threat volcanoes and the Committee 
expects the $1,000,000 provided in fiscal year 2016 for the 
Volcano Hazards Program [VHP] and the additional $1,000,000 
increase provided in this bill will be used to continue 
deferred network maintenance of volcano hazard monitoring 
stations for the highest risk volcanoes which includes a plan 
for upgrading the telemetry at the networks from analog to 
digital, and replacing analog seismometers with new, more 
sensitive, digital seismometers. The Committee is concerned 
several monitors within the VHP are not in compliance with the 
Federal Communications Commission [FCC] regulations and 
therefore directs the Survey to report back to the Committee 
within 60 days with a funding plan that includes how many 
stations are out of compliance and the cost of bringing the 
stations into compliance.
    The Committee remains concerned that systems and equipment 
used to monitor, detect, and warn the public of volcanic and 
seismic hazards, including lahars and earthquakes on high-
threat volcanoes, are outdated and inadequate to address the 
substantial risks posed by those natural hazards. The Survey is 
directed to report back to the Committee within 1 year of 
enactment of this act on the agency's plan to repair, upgrade, 
and expand monitoring, detection, and warning systems and 
equipment on high-threat volcanoes.
    Water Resources.--The bill includes $211,187,000 for Water 
Resources, an increase of $500,000 above the current year 
enacted level. Program increases include $2,000,000 for 
groundwater resource studies within the Mississippi River 
Alluvial Plain, $700,000 for streamflow information and 
streamgages, and $500,000 for the groundwater network. The 
Committee also includes $300,000 to re-establish the streamgage 
on the Unuk River for water quality testing and monitoring 
given the lack of quality data available for study in the 
watershed. The Committee directs the Survey to enter into a 
formal partnership with local tribes and other Federal agencies 
as necessary in the area to develop a water quality strategy 
for the area's transboundary rivers. The Committee recognizes 
the need for additional groundwater research on shallow and 
fractured bedrock terrain, and expects the Survey to report 
back within 60 days of enactment of this act on a research 
strategy that would enhance the understanding of groundwater 
contamination occurrences and threats.
    The Water Resources Research Act remains at the enacted 
fiscal year level of $6,500,000.
    Core Science Systems.--The bill includes $116,050,000 for 
Core Science Systems, an increase of $4,500,000 from the 
current year enacted level. Program increases include 
$2,000,000 for 3D Elevation: National Enhancement and 
$2,500,000 for the Alaska mapping program. The National 
Geologic Cooperative Mapping program is funded at $24,397,000 
with $24,299,000 provided for Science Synthesis, Analysis and 
Research Program.
    Science Support.--The bill includes $105,611,000 for 
Science Support programs, an amount equal to the enacted level.
    Facilities.--The bill includes $100,421,000 for facilities, 
deferred maintenance and capital improvement, which is equal to 
the current year enacted level.
    The Committee supports the USGS's National Wildlife Health 
Center [NWHC] and its important role in detecting novel 
pathogens and emerging infectious diseases, developing rapid 
diagnostic tests, conducting disease surveillance, and 
designing vaccines used to control these diseases. The current 
location of NWHC provides critical collaboration opportunities 
that enhances the work of the center. The Committee is aware of 
preliminary agency plans regarding the future of NWHC. No final 
decision on possible relocation of the center shall be made 
this fiscal year. Within 90 days of enactment of this act, the 
Committee requests a report on how USGS future budget planning 
will support the infrastructure needs at NWHC.

                   Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

    The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is responsible for 
resource evaluation, environmental review, leasing activities, 
and lease management for the Nation's offshore energy and 
minerals resources.

                        OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $170,857,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     175,138,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     169,560,000

    The bill provides $169,560,000 for the Ocean Energy 
Management account, $1,297,000 below the enacted level. This 
amount will be partially offset with the collection of 
offsetting rental receipts and cost recovery fees totaling 
$94,944,000.
    Renewable Energy.--The bill provides $23,887,000 for 
renewable energy activities, a decrease of $391,000 below the 
enacted level as detailed in the request. The Bureau should 
continue to work with the Department of Energy to identify and 
permit a national offshore wind test site and to exchange 
information with the Department and the coastal States about 
the development of new technology related to the structural 
material, environmental, and design safety criteria, as well as 
design and performance standards, of transitional depth and 
floating wind turbines. The Bureau is also expected to continue 
working with coastal States and other stakeholders to study new 
wind energy areas, including in shallow, transitional, and deep 
(over 200 feet) waters.
    Conventional Energy.--The bill provides $58,963,000 for 
conventional energy activities, a decrease of $906,000 below 
the enacted level. The Committee concurs with the agency 
proposed reductions. The Bureau is reminded to continue to 
provide quarterly reports on the status of exploration and 
development plans to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations as required under the approval of the 
reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, 
Regulation and Enforcement.
    Environmental Assessment.--The bill provides $68,045,000 
for environmental assessment activities, equal to the enacted 
level.
    Executive Direction.--The bill provides $18,665,000 for 
executive direction of the Bureau, including the Office of the 
Director, equal to the enacted level.
    Other.--The Committee recognizes the critical need to 
inventory sources of sand in Federal waters and strongly 
supports the Bureau's work on these efforts, particularly 
through the Atlantic Sand Assessment Project. The Bureau should 
continue to support and expand these efforts, particularly in 
the Northeast, and work with affected coastal States to assess 
the feasibility of resource extraction and reduce conflicts 
with other activities, including commercial fishing.
    The Committee rejects the Administration's proposal to 
divert outer continental shelf [OCS] oil and gas revenues from 
Gulf of Mexico coastal communities to their Coastal Climate 
Resilience Program. The Committee finds this proposal to be in 
direct contradiction to current law, the Gulf of Mexico Energy 
Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432). Since 2006, Gulf of 
Mexico OCS revenues have served a necessary purpose for coastal 
conservation, restoration, and hurricane protection. The 
Committee believes the Administration's proposed action would 
force Gulf States to shoulder the full responsibility for 
environment and infrastructure costs resulting from energy 
production and spontaneous meteorological events. In future 
requests, the Administration should prioritize activities like 
the Coastal Climate Resilience Program either within current 
discretionary spending caps or find acceptable offsets that do 
not take away from important critical existing needs.
    Offshore Wind Energy Development.--North Carolina beaches 
and historic lighthouses attract tourists from all over the 
world, and any hindrance of the viewshed from shore could 
greatly impact tourist revenue to the State and local economy. 
Consequently, the Director of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management shall not issue wind leases offshore that would 
allow wind turbines to be constructed or located less than 24 
nautical miles from the State of North Carolina shoreline.

             Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement

    The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is 
responsible for regulating and enforcing safety, environmental, 
and conservation compliance during the development of the 
Nation's ocean energy and mineral resources on the Outer 
Continental Shelf, and oil spill research.

             OFFSHORE SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $189,772,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     189,968,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     189,772,000

    The bill provides $189,772,000 for the Offshore Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement account, commensurate with the 
enacted level. This amount will be partially offset with the 
collection of offsetting rental receipts, cost recovery fees, 
and inspection fees, totaling $96,530,000.
    Operations, Safety and Regulation.--The bill provides 
$144,954,000 for operations, safety, and regulation activities, 
equal to the enacted level.
    Administrative Operations.--The bill provides $18,268,000 
for administrative operations equal to the enacted level.
    Executive Direction.--The bill provides $18,236,000 for 
executive direction of the Bureau, including the Office of the 
Director equal to the enacted level.
    The Committee has taken a rescission of $25,000,000 from 
this account given the unusually high level of unobligated 
balances. This will have no impact on the safety functions 
performed by the agency.
    Other.--The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
current downward leasing trends on the Outer Continental Shelf. 
The Committee believes this trend will have a negative impact 
on future production and royalties and continues to have an 
immediate negative impact upon bonus bids and rentals.
    The cumulative impact of rule-makings and proposed guidance 
by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management [BOEM] and the Bureau 
of Safety and Environmental Enforcement [BSEE] and lack of 
outreach and communication with the regulated community has 
created uncertainty and a lack of interest for some entities to 
do business in the United States. The Committee notes the 
Central Gulf of Mexico recently held lease sales that generated 
some of the lowest revenues in history, including during times 
when commodity prices were lower.
    The Committee recognizes while the Government has talented 
engineers and geologists within its ranks, the Committee 
understands that the private sector also has many talented 
individuals with many years of experience. The Committee 
strongly urges a more cooperative working relationship between 
the bureaus and the regulated community. The Well-Control Rule 
was the most technically complex OCS regulation ever 
promulgated. The Committee believes BSEE should have had a 
better process in place that could have led to better results 
for industry, the regulating agencies, and the environment.
    The Committee recognizes that the offshore energy industry 
is now regulated by multiple bureaus. This has created a 
scenario where the same entities are responding to multiple 
Government agencies at the same time and occasionally seeking 
the same information. The Committee directs BOEM and BSEE to 
provide the Committee with a joint report demonstrating the two 
agencies are coordinating future rule-makings and ensuring the 
timing is such that new rule-making or proposed guidance 
comment periods do not overlap with the exceptions of 
emergencies.
    The Committee is concerned that the Bureau of Safety and 
Environmental Enforcement, and its agents, may be utilizing 
inappropriate tactics towards oil and gas operators, lessees 
and third parties with respect to the acquisition of privately 
owned helicopter fuel in the Gulf of Mexico. The Committee 
strongly believes that privately owned fuel should only be 
acquired with the explicit approval of its owners. In the event 
the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement continues to 
access and use fuel owned by third parties without their 
explicit, full approval, the Committee directs the Department 
of the Interior to provide an official legal opinion that 
identifies the direct, specific legal and regulatory authority 
that BSEE cites as authorizing the acquisition of privately 
owned helicopter fuel without consent of the owner. The legal 
opinion shall be provided to the Committee within 90 days of 
enactment of this act.

                           oil spill research

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $14,899,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      14,899,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      14,899,000

    The bill provides $14,899,000 for oil spill research, as 
requested and equal to the enacted level.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
[OSMRE] was established in 1977 to oversee and carry out the 
requirements of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act 
[SMCRA] in concert with States and Indian tribes. OSMRE's 
primary objectives are to ensure coal mining activities are 
conducted in a manner that protects citizens and the 
environment during mining, ensure the land is properly 
reclaimed, and mitigate effects of past mining by reclaiming 
abandoned coal mines. OSMRE addresses its mission with a mix of 
grants to States and tribes to carry out their own regulatory 
and reclamation programs, and the administration of OSMRE's 
regulatory and reclamation programs. The Surface Mining Control 
and Reclamation Act Amendments of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) 
revised the mine reclamation fee distribution mechanism 
beginning in fiscal year 2008. State and tribal reclamation 
grants are now provided under mandatory appropriations instead 
of through this bill.

                       REGULATION AND TECHNOLOGY

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $123,353,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     127,650,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     119,811,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $119,811,000 for 
Regulation and Technology, $3,542,000 below the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level.
    Since fiscal year 2011, the administration has proposed to 
reduce grants to State programs. This proposal has been 
rejected by the full Congress each year and is once again 
rejected this year. The bill funds regulatory grants at 
$68,590,000, which is equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level. Program development and maintenance is funded at 
$2,764,000, a reduction of $2,000,000. Additionally, State 
program evaluation is funded at $7,616,000.
    Stream Buffer.--The Committee is disappointed with OSMRE's 
efforts to implement the directives contained in the fiscal 
year 2016 Consolidated Appropriations Act. The Committee does 
not believe that OSMRE fully implemented the directive in the 
manner the act required. As such, the bill includes language 
that prohibits OSMRE from moving forward with the Stream Buffer 
Zone rule in fiscal year 2017.
    Approximate Original Contours.--The Committee understands 
that OSMRE has taken aggressive actions against States with 
primacy under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 
1977 [SMCRA] for alleged violations of policies and regulations 
pertaining to the standards in SMCRA that require land be 
restored to the approximately original contour. The Committee 
is concerned that OSMRE has lost multiple enforcement actions 
on the merits, but continues to appeal those enforcement 
actions at potentially high costs to both the Federal 
Government and the small businesses that have been targeted. In 
fiscal year 2017, the Committee urges OSMRE to conclude 
enforcement actions in the most expeditious manner possible. 
Further, within 60 days of enactment, the Committee directs 
OSMRE to provide a report with details of all enforcement 
actions initiated by OSMRE to ensure compliance with SMCRA's 
approximate original contour requirements since 2007. The 
report should include the outcomes of enforcement actions that 
have concluded and the status of enforcement actions that 
continue to be appealed.

                    ABANDONED MINE RECLAMATION FUND

Appropriations, 2015....................................    $117,303,000
Budget estimate, 2016...................................      30,375,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     117,134,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $117,134,000 for 
the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund, $169,000 below the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level. Of the funds provided, $27,134,000 
shall be derived from the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund 
consistent with the fiscal year 2016 appropriation, and 
$90,000,000 shall be derived from the General Fund.
    The Committee provides a total of $90,000,000 for grants to 
States for the reclamation of abandoned mine lands in 
conjunction with economic and community development and reuse 
goals. States shall use these funds to accelerate the 
remediation of AML sites with economic and community 
development end uses in mind. In doing so, the Committee 
envisions a collaborative partnership between the State AML 
programs and their respective State and local economic and 
community development programs that will explore ways to return 
legacy coal sites to productive reuse. The Committee notes that 
these grants are provided from the General Fund and are 
therefore separate from the estimated $174,000,000 in mandatory 
payments from the Abandoned Mine Land fund in fiscal year 2017.
    Assistance to Impacted States.--Consistent with fiscal year 
2016 implementation, $75,000,000 shall be provided to the three 
Appalachian States with the largest unfunded needs for the 
reclamation of Priority 1 and Priority 2 sites as delineated in 
the Abandoned Mine Land Inventory System. State AML programs, 
in consultation with State economic and community development 
authorities, shall develop a list of eligible AML projects in 
Appalachian counties that have a nexus to economic and 
community development, and select qualifying AML projects that 
have the potential to create long-term economic benefits. State 
AML programs should consider whether a model similar to the 
Appalachian Regional Commission grants process could streamline 
project selection, and whether an interagency agreement or 
other contracting mechanisms could streamline program 
implementation. Eligible grant recipients are limited to State 
and local governmental entities who may subcontract project-
related activities as appropriate.
    Further, the Committee believes that an incremental 
approach is warranted to better understand programmatic impacts 
of proposing criteria changes to the underlying law. Each State 
presents unique opportunities and the Committee believes more 
States can contribute to the success of the pilot. As such, the 
Committee provides $15,000,000 for the next three Appalachian 
States with the largest unfunded needs for the reclamation of 
Priority 1 and Priority 2 sites as delineated in the Abandoned 
Mine Land Inventory System. The $15,000,000 shall be divided 
equally among the next three States. Eligible grant recipients 
for the $15,000,000 are also limited to State and local 
governmental entities who may subcontract project-related 
activities as appropriate. The Committee expects that the 
efforts of all six States under this pilot program will inform 
future policy discussions, possibly under a reauthorization of 
SMCRA, which the Committee supports.

                             INDIAN AFFAIRS


        Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of Indian Education

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] was founded in 1824 to 
uphold a Government-to-government relationship between the 
Federal Government and tribal entities. The Federal Government 
retains trust responsibility for individual Indians and tribes 
as a result of formal treaties and agreements with Native 
Americans.
    The Bureau provides services directly or through contracts, 
grants, or compacts to a population of 1.9 million American 
Indians and Alaska Natives who are members of 566 federally 
recognized Indian tribes in the lower 48 States and Alaska. 
Programs administered by the BIA and tribes include an 
education system for almost 48,000 elementary and secondary 
students; 28 tribal colleges, universities and post secondary 
schools; social services; natural resource management on 56 
million acres of trust land; economic development; law 
enforcement; administration of tribal courts; implementation of 
land and water claim settlements; replacement and repair of 
schools; repair and maintenance of roads and bridges; and 
repair of structural deficiencies on high hazard dams.

                      operation of indian programs


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,267,924,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,395,786,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   2,326,339,000

    The bill provides a total of $2,326,339,000 for the 
Operations of Indian Programs account, an increase of 
$58,415,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Fixed 
costs and internal transfers for BIA have been included 
throughout the core programs of the agencies.
    Tribal Government.--The bill provides $308,686,000 for 
tribal government programs, an increase of $7,169,000 over the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The recommendation supports 
$4,645,000 for small and needy tribes. This increase in funding 
will enable all small and needy tribes to receive the maximum 
base level provided by the Bureau to run tribal governments. 
The recommendation supports $464,000 for new tribes and notes 
the challenge of reconciling the timing of the tribal 
recognition process with the annual budget formulation process. 
If additional tribes are recognized during fiscal year 2017 
beyond those contemplated in the budget request, the Bureau is 
urged to support their capacity building efforts to the extent 
feasible. The Committee also provides an increase of $3,614,000 
for road maintenance. The Committee is concerned about the 
future funding of the Road Maintenance account and the backlog 
for deferred maintenance of roads in Indian Country; therefore, 
the Committee directs the Bureau to report back to the 
Committee in 60 days of enactment of this act on how the Bureau 
plans to allocate the funds provided in the bill.
    Human Services.--The bill includes $159,161,000 for human 
services programs, an increase of $12,157,000 above the enacted 
level. Program increases include $7,164,000 for Social 
Services, $3,305,000 for the Indian Child Welfare Act, and 
$1,687,000 for the Housing Program in order to expand and 
continue the Tiwahe initiative. The Committee recommends 
increasing funds for Tiwahe as a way to strengthen tribal 
communities in Indian country by leveraging programs and 
resources; however, it is important to measure program 
effectiveness as the initiative continues and grows. The 
Committee directs the Bureau to report back in 90 days of 
enactment of this act on the performance measures being used to 
monitor and track the initiative's effectiveness in Indian 
country.
    Trust--Natural Resources Management.--The recommendation 
includes $201,992,000 for trust and natural resources programs, 
an increase of $10,146,000 above the enacted level. Within this 
amount, $39,661,000 is provided for rights protection 
implementation programs, an increase of $2,023,000 above the 
enacted level; $12,905,000 for irrigation operations and 
maintenance, an increase of $1,507,000 above the enacted level; 
$54,155,000 for forestry thinning activities, an increase of 
$2,241,000 above the enacted level; and $16,203,000 for Fish, 
Wildlife, and Parks, an increase of $2,557,000. The Committee 
recommends an increase of $2,000,000 for the Tribal Management/
Development Program for Alaska subsistence programs as 
requested, which includes consideration of funding for the 
projects and pilot programs referenced in the budget 
submission.
    Within the increases provided for Fish, Wildlife, and 
Parks, the Committee recommends $545,000 for substantially 
producing tribal hatcheries in BIA's Northwest Region currently 
not receiving BIA hatchery operations funding. Also within the 
amounts provided, the Committee expects the Bureau to make 
$300,000 available for tribal trust fishery resources, and 
$1,700,000 for fish hatchery operations and maintenance 
programs.
    The Committee directs the Bureau to enter into a formal 
partnership with local tribes and the United States Geological 
Survey to help develop a water quality strategy for 
transboundary rivers including the Unuk River.
    The Committee also recognizes that many tribes west of the 
Mississippi River tend to have reservations that are larger in 
terms of land mass than those east of the Mississippi River and 
face challenges including drought. However, the Committee 
expects that tribes across the country who have resource 
challenges receive appropriate funding.
    Trust-Real Estate Services.--The bill includes 
$123,092,000, for trust-real estate services programs, a 
decrease of $4,394,000 from the enacted level. The Committee 
accepts the proposed reduction of $6,893,000, as requested. The 
decrease eliminates funding for economic development that 
supported the Klamath River Basin Agreement which is not 
required in fiscal year 2017. The Committee does include 
$1,500,000 to support tribes' capacity to engage in settlement 
negotiations and implementation related to water rights and 
tribal trust fishery resources in the Klamath Basin. The 
Committee also includes an increase of $400,000 for the Alaska 
Native programs which includes the Alaska Native Claims 
Settlement Act [ANSCA] Historical Places and Cemetery Sites 
program that certifies claims for historical places and 
cultural sites.
    Education.--The bill includes $874,159,000 for educational 
programs, an increase of $21,792,000 above the enacted level. 
Program increases include: $8,396,000 for ISEP formula funds to 
support a level of $400,233,000; $2,019,000 for the education 
program enhancements to support a level of $14,201,000; 
$2,039,000 for early child and family development to support a 
level of $17,659,000; $2,059,000 for tribal grant support costs 
to support a level of $75,335,000; $1,603,000 for student 
transportation to support a level of $54,745,000; $3,121,000 
for facilities maintenance to support a level of $66,219,000; 
$3,156,000 for facilities operation to support a level of 
$59,043,000. Program increases for post-secondary programs 
include $2,127,000 for Haskell and SIPI to support a level of 
$22,117,000; $503,000 for Tribal Technical Colleges to support 
a level of $7,414,000; and $2,000,000 for education information 
technology to support a level of $10,283,000.
    The administration is commended for its continued focus on 
tribal education programs, including efforts to improve 
collaboration between the Departments of the Interior and 
Education and to implement Executive Order 13592 to improve 
educational outcomes for American Indian and Alaska Native 
students. It is noted the administration is currently in the 
process of making much needed reforms to the Bureau of Indian 
Education [BIE] to improve the quality of education offered to 
address the performance gap of students educated at BIE-funded 
schools. The first phase of the reform effort was approved in 
2015; however, the Bureau has not provided sufficient 
information to the Committee on the progress of implementing 
the first phase of reform nor has the Bureau provided 
sufficient information on the second phase of reform. The 
Committee is fully supportive of efforts to reform the Bureau 
in order to improve the quality of education and services 
provided to schools funded by the Bureau, particularly with 
respect to facilities maintenance and improvement needs. 
However, the Committee is very concerned that the Bureau 
continues to struggle to provide basic detail about proposed 
organizational and budgetary changes associated with the 
administration's reform efforts, including significant 
increases proposed in the request. As a result, funding 
increases proposed for the education program management 
activity have been withheld until the Bureau can better justify 
its request.
    The Committee is concerned that the Bureau has been unable 
to provide sufficient detail regarding how the education 
program enhancements funds will be allocated in fiscal year 
2017. The Committee is also concerned that the Bureau has 
failed to fully account for the proposed costs of its new 
Education Resource Centers, which are now partially funded. 
Within 30 days of enactment of this act, the Bureau is directed 
to provide to the Committee a report that includes: (1) a 
detailed allocation of the activities funded through the 
education program enhancement program for fiscal year 2015, 
2016 and 2017; and (2) a line-item budget for the Bureau's 
Education Resource Centers for fiscal year 2016 and 2017, 
including all sources of funding they are expected to receive.
    The Committee remains concerned the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary-Indian Affairs, which includes the Bureau of Indian 
Education [BIE], and the Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] has not 
addressed the findings or implemented 11 of 13 recommendations 
in the Government Accountability Office [GAO] reports (GAO-13-
774, GAO-14-121, and GAO-16-313). These reports outline 
systemic problems with management and the safety condition of 
BIE schools, such as lack of oversight over school spending and 
facilities, including construction, operation, maintenance, 
basic repair, and safety upgrades needed to improve the 
condition of schools that serve Indian Country. The Committee 
stands ready to work with the administration on the appropriate 
steps forward and directs the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary-Indian Affairs to report back within 30 days of 
enactment of this act on the progress made towards implementing 
the GAO recommendations.
    The Committee fully supports broadening access to Native 
language and culture programs, which have been linked to higher 
academic achievement for Native youth. The Committee is pleased 
to see that the proposed increase for the ISEP program is 
expected to enhance access to Native language and culture 
programs in BIE-funded schools and directs the Bureau to report 
within 60 days of enactment that details how the increases 
provided in this bill will be used to support these programs.
    The Committee remains concerned about the distribution 
methodology of the Johnson O'Malley assistance grants and 
requests the Bureau report back to the Committee within 30 days 
of enactment of this act on the status of updating the JOM 
counts and the methodology used to determine the new counts.
    The Committee strongly supports the work that tribal 
colleges and universities do to provide high quality, 
affordable higher education opportunities to Native students. 
The Committee's recommendation provides the requested 
$2,000,000 increase above the enacted level for the operations 
of Haskell and SIPI universities and supports the requested 
levels for Tribal Technical Colleges and postsecondary 
programs. The Committees provided sufficient funding to forward 
fund the Tribal Technical Colleges in fiscal year 2016 and 
continues to believe there should be parity in the way that all 
tribal colleges receive assistance and are funded. The 
Committee encourages the Bureau to look for ways to forward 
fund Haskell and SIPI in future budget requests so that all 
tribal colleges are on the same funding schedule.
    The Committee also recognizes that many tribal colleges 
have significant unfunded needs and directs the Bureau to work 
with tribal leaders and other stakeholders to develop a 
consistent methodology for determining tribal college operating 
needs to inform future budget requests. The Committee expects 
the methodology to address operating and infrastructure needs 
including classrooms and housing.
    The administration's emphasis on education must be 
complemented by efforts to improve interagency coordination for 
the multiplicity of programs that affect the wellbeing of 
Native children. In addition to education, these include 
healthcare, social service, child welfare and juvenile justice 
programs. The Committee encourages the Bureau to work with 
other relevant Federal, State, local, and tribal organizations 
to begin the process of identifying ways to make programs more 
effective in serving Native Children.
    The Committee understands the importance of bringing 
broadband to reservations and villages and includes an 
additional $2,000,000 in this bill to partially fund this 
effort. The Committee directs the Agency to report back within 
90 days of enactment of this act on a scalable plan to increase 
bandwidth in schools, procure computers, and software.
    Within the funding provided for the Early Childhood and 
Family Development Program, the Bureau shall not reduce funding 
for currently operating Family and Child Education programs. 
The Bureau, working with the Indian Health Service as 
appropriate, is also urged to consider integrating school-based 
preventative health services such as dental care into 
elementary schools in order to improve health outcomes of 
tribal students.
    The Committee recognizes the importance Alaska Native 
boarding schools play in the education and development of 
Alaska Native youth. The Committee encourages and recommends 
the Bureau take steps to ensure these schools receive 
sufficient support that allows them to help students 
effectively transition to post-secondary and career options.
    Public Safety and Justice.--The bill includes $386,921,000 
for public safety and justice programs, an increase of 
$9,498,000 above the enacted level. The program increases 
support a level of $203,191,000 for criminal investigations and 
police services, $96,507,000 for detention and corrections, 
$16,245,000 for tribal justice support, and $30,753,000 for 
tribal courts.
    The Committee does not accept the proposed $8,206,000 
decrease for tribal justice support and restores this amount to 
ensure $10,000,000 remains available to address the needs of 
Public Law 83-280 States. The Committee remains concerned about 
the tribal courts needs as identified in the Indian Law and 
Order Commission's November 2013 report which notes Federal 
investment in tribal justice for Public Law 83-280 States has 
been more limited than elsewhere in Indian Country. The 
Committee expects the Bureau to work with Indian tribes and 
tribal organizations to consider options that promote, sustain, 
design, or pilot tribal court systems for tribal communities 
subject to full or partial State jurisdiction under Public Law 
83-280. As part of this process, the Bureau should conduct 
meaningful consultations with tribes and tribal organizations 
and the Committee expects the Bureau to have extensive 
communication with tribes on how this funding may result in a 
strategic plan identifying the funding and technical 
infrastructure needs for these States.
    The Committee is also aware the Bureau has not submitted 
reports required by the Tribal Law and Order Act, Public Law 
111-211. Providing this information would help ensure tribal 
governments are receiving funding levels for public safety and 
justice programs based on need; therefore, the Committee 
strongly encourages the Bureau submit this annual report.
    Community and Economic Development.--The bill provides 
$41,844,000 for community and economic development programs, an 
increase of $1,225,000 above the enacted level. Program 
increases included $1,059,000 for the job placement and 
training program and $151,000 for minerals and mining program. 
The Committee is concerned the Bureau has not maintained 
sufficient digital records for the oil and gas programs and 
understands the Bureau has developed a National Indian Oil and 
Gas Evaluation Management System [NIOGEMS] which has been 
distributed to some tribes and regional offices. The Committee 
instructs the Bureau to report back within 120 days of 
enactment of this act on the cost to further expand this system 
to more reservations and offices. The Committee is also 
concerned about the status of the new Energy Service Center 
which is supposed to help facilitate energy development in 
Indian Country. The Committee directs the Bureau to report back 
in 120 days of enactment of this act on the progress of opening 
this office and outline any obstacles that may delay the 
opening of the Center.
    Executive Direction and Administrative Services.--The bill 
includes $230,484,000 for executive direction and 
administrative services, an increase of $822,000 above the 
enacted level.
    The Committee is concerned that the Bureau's budget does 
not adequately fund operating costs for treaty fishing sites on 
the Columbia River that were authorized to be set aside by 
Congress by Public Law 79-14 and title IV of Public Law 100-581 
to allow tribes access to fishing locations in lieu of 
traditional fishing grounds that were compromised by dams. The 
Bureau is directed to work with the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers and affected tribes and provide a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations within 60 days of enactment of 
this act that details the amounts needed to fully fund 
operating and law enforcement needs at such sites. The Bureau 
is also urged to incorporate any unfunded needs identified by 
the requested report in future budget requests.
    Rights of Way.--The Committee is aware that the Bureau's 
process for maintaining rights-of-way records has long been a 
problem and encourages the Bureau to develop a plan to update 
and digitize its inventory of records and to make the records 
publicly available in a commonly used mapping format. The 
Committee is concerned that some records have been lost and the 
Bureau often struggles to provide documentation to tribes and 
other stakeholders in a timely fashion. The lack of access to 
current records creates bureaucratic roadblocks that too often 
disrupt projects on Indian land and create unnecessary 
conflict. Updating and digitizing rights-of-way documents and 
making them available on a public database will ensure that the 
BIA is fulfilling its responsibility to tribes and will help 
ensure that projects are completed in a more timely and cost-
effective manner.

                         CONTRACT SUPPORT COSTS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $277,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     278,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     278,000,000

    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee has continued 
language from fiscal year 2016 establishing an indefinite 
appropriation for contract support costs estimated to be 
$278,000,000, which is an increase of $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2016 level. The Committee believes fully funding 
these costs will ensure that tribes have the necessary 
resources they need to deliver program services efficiently and 
effectively. The Committee also modified the language to delete 
a provision that contradicted certain provisions of the Indian 
Self Determination Act.

                              CONSTRUCTION

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $193,973,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     197,017,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     192,017,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $192,017,000 for 
the Construction account. This amount is a decrease of 
$1,956,000 below the enacted level. The decrease is attributed 
to the one time funding amount of $5,000,000 provided in fiscal 
year 2016 as outlined in the joint explanatory statement 
accompanied by Public Law 114-113. The Committee understands 
many schools are in need of repair, improvement, and upgrades 
in order to bring schools into good condition. The Committee 
stands ready to work with the administration and tribes to 
develop a comprehensive strategy that provides safe, 
functional, and accessible facilities for schools. The 
Committee directs the Bureau to report back within 90 days of 
enactment of this act on the progress the Bureau has made 
towards implementing a long-term facilities plan similar to the 
Department of Defense [DOD] process in 2009 as encouraged in 
the joint explanatory statement accompanied by Public Law 114-
113. Details of the recommendation are contained in the table 
that accompanies this statement.

INDIAN LAND AND WATER CLAIMS SETTLEMENTS AND MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS TO 
                                INDIANS

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $49,475,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     55,155,000.
Chairman's recommendation...............................      49,475,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $49,475,000 for 
the Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements account which is 
equal to the enacted level. The Committee appreciates the 
importance of settling the numerous land and water settlements 
and directs the Department to submit a spending plan to the 
Committee within 90 days of enactment of this act for how it 
plans to allocate the funds provided by the bill for the 
specific settlements detailed in the budget request.

                 INDIAN GUARANTEED LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $7,748,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       7,757,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       8,748,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $8,748,000 for 
the Indian Guaranteed Loan account. This amount is an increase 
of $1,000,000 above the enacted level. The total loan principal 
provided is not to exceed $119,907,851.

                          Departmental Offices


                        Office of the Secretary


                        DEPARTMENTAL OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $721,769,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     278,376,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     265,000,000

    The bill includes a total appropriation of $265,000,000 for 
the Office of the Secretary account. This amount is 
$456,769,000 below the enacted level. The large reduction is 
explained by moving PILT to a separate appropriation.
    Leadership and Administration.--The recommendation includes 
an appropriation of $121,885,000 for the leadership and 
administration activity, $1,000,000 below the enacted level. 
Within leadership and administration programs, the Committee 
has provided the amounts requested for community development 
programs.
    The Committee is deeply concerned with the direction of the 
Office of the Secretary and its role in implementing policies 
which have led to the erosion of programs that generate 
royalties to the Treasury. The unnecessary Federal coal leasing 
moratorium will have a highly significant impact upon revenues 
that would otherwise accrue to the Treasury. In addition, oil 
and gas leasing is at an all-time low, a trajectory that began 
long before the presence of low commodity prices. The 
Department has been delegated duties and responsibilities 
beyond those relating to its conservation mission. Congress has 
provided no direction to cease or fundamentally alter 
activities or authorities under the Mineral Leasing Act and it 
is the duty of the Secretary to follow the direction of 
Congress in faithfully administering these programs, unless 
otherwise directed by Congress.
    The Committee is also concerned about raising royalty rates 
at a time of weak interest in Federal resources, a weak 
interest that results, at least is significant measure, due to 
policies hostile to development on Federal lands. The Committee 
directs the Secretary not to raise royalty rates until such 
time as the Secretary can formally report to the Committee and 
justify, using economic data, how the raising of royalty rates 
will lead to greater interest in Federal resources that belong 
to the taxpayer and how higher rates will ultimately result in 
a better return on the taxpayer's resources.
    As noted above, the Committee continues to be concerned 
about Secretarial Order 3338 which placed a moratorium on coal 
leasing until the completion of a new Programmatic 
Environmental Impact Statement. The Committee believes the 
Secretarial order will have significant consequences for States 
that share in mineral revenues through the Mineral Leasing Act. 
These State budgets often rely upon a steady stream of revenues 
from Federal minerals within the individual State borders. The 
Committee believes the impact of this decision will have 
lasting negative consequences for the States and the U.S. 
Treasury.
    Management Services.--The bill provides an appropriation of 
$21,365,000 for the management services activity, equal to the 
enacted level.
    Natural Resources Revenue.--The bill includes an 
appropriation of $121,750,000 for the natural resources revenue 
activity, $3,769,000 below the enacted level.
    The Committee is concerned with the Office of Natural 
Resources Revenue's [ONRR] coal valuation rule. The Committee 
is concerned on a number of fronts. It appears this rule is 
meant to solve problems of royalty evasion or underpayment that 
both the Government Accountability Office and the Department's 
Office of Inspector General found are not industry wide. In the 
Committee's opinion, ONRR would be better served enforcing 
actions on violators instead of promulgating new regulations 
that potentially harm an entire industry. The Committee is also 
concerned about ONRR's interest under the rule to ``exercise 
considerable discretion''. The Committee notes that an 
excessive amount of agency discretion, including the adjustment 
of royalty rates could lead to abuse. The Committee directs 
ONRR to brief the Committee on the rule and how it will use its 
discretion within 90 days of enactment.
    Lease Terminations.--The Office of Natural Resources 
Revenue is directed to work with the Bureau of Land Management 
on the direction regarding Lease Terminations found in the 
report language relating to the Bureau of Land Management.
    The Committee understands that if the proposed funding 
levels are maintained for at least one additional year the 
Office of Navajo and Hopi Relocation [OHNIR] may close in 2018. 
The Committee directs the Secretary, in consultation with the 
Office of Navajo and Hopi Relocation [OHNIR], to report back to 
the Committee within 90 days detailing the functions of the 
OHNIR that could be transferred to the Department of Interior. 
It is the Committee's expectation this report include any costs 
associated with a potential transfer and any costs to maintain 
ongoing activities of the OHNIR. This report should also 
include a legal analysis examining whether any potential office 
closure would require enacting legislation to transfer or 
maintain any identified functions to another agency or 
organization.

                            Insular Affairs

    The Office of Insular Affairs [OIA] was established on 
August 4, 1995, through Secretarial Order No. 3191, which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. OIA has administrative responsibility for coordinating 
Federal policy in the territories of American Samoa, Guam, the 
U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands [CNMI], and oversight of Federal programs and 
funds in the freely associated states of the Federated States 
of Micronesia [FSM], the Republic of the Marshall Islands 
[RMI], and the Republic of Palau.
    Following the expiration of the first Compact of Free 
Association in 2003, a new Compact of Free Association was 
negotiated between the United States and the states of FSM and 
RMI. Under the Compact, the status of free association 
recognizes each Freely Associated State as a sovereign state 
with the capacity to conduct foreign affairs consistent with 
the terms of the Compact. The Compact places full 
responsibility for defense with the United States. The Compact 
also provides grant funds and Federal program assistance, 
principally through the Department of the Interior.

                       assistance to territories

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $86,976,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      99,399,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      93,870,000

    The bill includes $93,870,000 for assistance to 
territories, $6,894,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level.
    Within these amounts, the bill includes a total of 
$3,000,000 to continue discretionary grants to mitigate the 
impact of Compact-related migration on affected jurisdictions, 
as authorized by section 104(e) of Public Law 108-188. This 
amount is equal to the fiscal year 2016 level. As in previous 
years, the Department shall allocate these grants in 
conjunction with other currently authorized mandatory grants in 
order to help offset educational costs incurred by these 
jurisdictions. The recommendation also includes a total of 
$3,000,000 for brown tree snake removal activities.
    The bill recognizes that the Office of Insular Affairs' 
most impactful spending is through projects to improve 
education, drinking water, sanitation, health, safety, 
transportation, reliability of power, improving availability of 
technology, including through fiber optics, and economic 
opportunity and sustainability. The agreement directs these 
funds to be awarded accordingly and does not provide funding 
for new initiatives proposed in the budget request. 
Additionally, the Office of Insular Affairs is directed to 
continue to award non-competitive technical assistance funds to 
support investments in civic education programs for Insular 
Area students.
    The Office is directed to coordinate with the Forest 
Service and other applicable entities to prepare a report on 
activities to implement the Regional Biosecurity Plan for 
Micronesia and Hawaii within 180 days of enactment. The report 
shall include an update of Department of the Interior and 
Forest Service accomplishments in implementation of the RBP in 
the previous fiscal year. The report shall also include the 
agencies' planned activities for further implementation of the 
RBP.
    American Samoa Operations Grants/American Samoa 
Construction.--The bill provides $22,752,000 for grants to 
American Samoa, equal to the enacted level.
    CNMI/Covenant Grants.--The recommendation includes 
$27,720,000 for covenant grants, equal to the enacted level.

                      compact of free association

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $16,465,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       3,318,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      16,465,000

    The bill includes $16,465,000 for Compact of Free 
Association programs, equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level. Within the funds provided, the Committee has provided 
$500,000 for Enewetak support, in agreement with the request.
    Language has been included in the title I general 
provisions section to extend the eligibility for the Republic 
of Palau to receive Federal aid until a new Compact of Free 
Association is enacted by Congress.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $65,800,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      69,448,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      65,758,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $65,758,000 for 
the Office of the Solicitor, $42,000 below the enacted level.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $50,047,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      55,911,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      50,047,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $50,047,000 for 
the Office of Inspector General, equal to the enacted level.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians

    The Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians 
holds responsibility for approximately 56 million acres of 
land, with more than 10 million acres belonging to individual 
Indians and 46 millions acres held in trust for Indian tribes.

                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $139,029,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     140,379,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     139,029,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $139,029,000 for the 
``Federal Trust Programs'' account, equal to the fiscal year 
2016 level. The recommendation includes a total appropriation 
of $19,632,000 for historical accounting activities.

                        Department-wide Programs


                        wildland fire management


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The Department's Wildland Fire Management account funds 
fire prevention, readiness, suppression, and rehabilitation 
activities performed by the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of 
Land Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the 
National Park Service.

Appropriations, 2016\1\.................................    $993,745,000
Budget estimate, 2017\2\................................   1,114,624,000
Chairman's recommendation\3\............................   1,113,962,000

\1\Includes $177,000,000 appropriated under the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Account.
\2\Includes $290,000,000 for suppression designated as disaster pursuant 
to pending congressional action.
\3\Includes $171,291,000 for suppression designated as emergency.

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $1,113,962,000 
for wildland fire management, an increase of $120,217,000 above 
the enacted level. This includes $171,291,000 provided with an 
emergency designation, for additional suppression resources. 
This bill includes a proposal for a permanent fix to end fire 
borrowing and make wildfire budgeting sustainable. Funding 
levels for each subactivity can be found in the table at the 
end of this statement and in the following budget activity 
narrative.
    Fire Operations.--The bill provides $727,784,000 for 
wildfire preparedness and suppression, an increase of 
$112,426,000 above the enacted level. This amount includes 
$332,784,000 for preparedness and $395,000,000 for fire 
suppression operations. As noted, the bill provides 
$171,291,000, with an emergency designation, for additional 
suppression resources that the Department can access in lieu of 
the President's budget proposal to provide this amount within 
the disaster cap. These emergency funds are only available if 
discretionary funds for suppression are exhausted.
    Other Operations.--The bill provides $214,887,000 for other 
wildland fire management operations, an increase of $13,500,000 
above the enacted level. This includes $180,000,000 for 
hazardous fuels reduction, $20,470,000 for burned area 
rehabilitation, $8,427,000 for fire facilities, and $5,990,000 
for joint fire science. Within the amount provided for 
hazardous fuels reduction, $20,000,000 is available for 
resilient landscape activities.
    The Committee notes the importance of proactive actions 
that protect communities and habitat from catastrophic 
wildfire. For example, a fire break was created by a 
partnership between the State of Alaska, Fish and Wildlife 
Service, and private landowners in the Kenai Peninsula of 
Alaska as a preventative measure prior to the start of the 
Funny River Fire. This fire break prevented a destructive fire 
from needlessly destroying homes and threatening lives. Within 
the additional funds provided for hazardous fuels management, 
the Department should increase efforts to partner with other 
Federal and non-Federal entities to proactively prevent and 
fight wildfire.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $10,010,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      13,513,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,010,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $10,010,000 for the 
Central Hazardous Materials Fund, equal to the enacted level.

           NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT AND RESTORATION

                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $7,767,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       9,229,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       7,767,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $7,767,000 for 
the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund, an amount equal to 
the enacted level. The detailed allocation of funding by 
activity is included in the table at the end of this 
explanatory report.

                          WORKING CAPITAL FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $67,100,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     111,524,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      67,100,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $67,100,000 for 
the Working Capital Fund. This amount is equal to the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level.

                       PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $452,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................................
Chairman's recommendation...............................     480,000,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $480,000,000 for 
Payments in Lieu of Taxes [PILT]. This amount is $28,000,000 
above the enacted level and sufficient to fully fund estimated 
payments for the fiscal year. A separate appropriation has been 
established to fund PILT outside of the Office of the 
Secretary.

                           General Provisions


                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    Title I of the bill includes ``General Provisions, 
Department of the Interior'', which are various legislative 
provisions affecting the Department. Several of these 
provisions have been carried in previous years and others are 
newly proposed this year. The provisions are:
    Sec. 101. Provides secretarial authority for the intra-
bureau transfer of program funds for expenditures in cases of 
emergency when all other emergency funds are exhausted.
    Sec. 102. Provides for the department-wide expenditure or 
transfer of funds by the Secretary in the event of actual or 
potential emergencies including forest fires, range fires, 
earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions, storms, oil spills, 
grasshopper and Mormon cricket outbreaks, and surface mine 
reclamation emergencies.
    Sec. 103. Provides for use of appropriated funds by the 
Secretary for contracts, rental cars and aircraft, certain 
library memberships, and certain telephone expenses.
    Sec. 104. Provides for the transfer of unobligated balances 
from the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the Office of Special 
Trustee for American Indians for expenditure or transfer for 
Indian trust management activities.
    Sec. 105. Permits the redistribution of tribal priority 
allocation and tribal base funds to alleviate funding 
inequities.
    Sec. 106. Authorizes the acquisition of lands for the 
purpose of operating and maintaining facilities that support 
visitors to Ellis, Governors, and Liberty Islands.
    Sec. 107. Authorizes Outer Continental Shelf inspection 
fees to be collected by the Secretary of the Interior.
    Sec. 108. Authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
continue the reorganization of the Bureau of Ocean Energy 
Management, Regulation and Enforcement.
    Sec. 109. Provides the Secretary of the Interior with 
authority to enter into multi-year cooperative agreements with 
nonprofit organizations for long-term care of wild horses and 
burros.
    Sec. 110. Provides for the humane transfer of excess wild 
horses.
    Sec. 111. Prohibits funds from being used to list the 
lesser prairie-chicken as a threatened or endangered species.
    Sec. 112. Addresses the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's 
responsibilities for mass marking of salmonid stocks.
    Sec. 113. Continues prohibition on Secretarial Order No. 
3310.
    Sec. 114. Allows the Bureau of Indian Affairs and Bureau of 
Indian Education to more efficiently and effectively perform 
reimbursable work.
    Sec. 115. Addresses the issuance of rules for sage-grouse.
    Sec. 116. Extends authorization for certain payments to the 
Republic of Palau for fiscal year 2017.
    Sec. 117. Prohibits funds from being used to implement a 
Fish and Wildlife Service regulation.
    Sec. 118. Extends a provision limiting funding for any 
proposal to approve specified rights-of-way or similar 
authorizations on the Mojave National Preserve or lands managed 
by the Needles Field Office of the Bureau of Land Management.
    Sec. 119. Requires reissuance of final rules regarding the 
gray wolf.
    Sec. 120. Provides authority for the Department of the 
Interior to enter into cooperative agreements with nonprofit 
organizations designated under the Older Americans Act.
    Sec. 121. Funding prohibition for the Office of Surface 
Mining Reclamation and Enforcement.
    Sec. 122. Authorizes land exchange between the State of 
Alaska and the Department of the Interior for the purpose of 
construction of a one-lane, life-saving road from King Cove to 
Cold Bay, Alaska.
    Sec. 123. Boundary Adjustment, Natchez National Historical 
Park.
    Sec. 124. Renames ``Olympic Wilderness'' in the Olympic 
National Park after Daniel J. Evans. Any reference in a law, 
map, regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United 
States to the Olympic Wilderness shall be deemed to be a 
reference to the Daniel J. Evans Wilderness.
    Sec. 125. Special resource study to preserve Civil Rights 
sites.
    Sec. 126. Reconstitutes the Royalty Policy Committee to 
provide additional public input.
    Sec. 127. Modifies the Continuous Operations rule.

                                TITLE II

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

                          Program Description

    The Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] was created 
through Executive Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1970, designed 
to consolidate certain Federal Government environmental 
activities into a single agency. The plan was submitted by the 
President to the Congress on July 8, 1970, and the EPA was 
established as an independent agency in the executive branch on 
December 2, 1970, by consolidating 15 components from 5 
departments and independent agencies.
    A description of EPA's pollution control programs by media 
follows:
    Air.--The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorize a 
national program of air pollution research, regulation, 
prevention, and enforcement activities.
    Water Quality.--The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as 
amended, provides the framework for protection of the Nation's 
surface waters. The law recognizes that it is the primary 
responsibility of the States to prevent, reduce, and eliminate 
water pollution. The States determine the desired uses for 
their waters, set standards, identify current uses and, where 
uses are being impaired or threatened, develop plans for the 
protection or restoration of the designated use. They implement 
the plans through control programs such as permitting and 
enforcement, construction of municipal waste water treatment 
works, and nonpoint source control practices. The act also 
regulates discharge of dredge or fill material into waters of 
the United States, including wetlands.
    Drinking Water.--The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974, as 
amended in 1996, charges EPA with the responsibility of 
implementing a program to assure that the Nation's public 
drinking water supplies are free of contamination that may pose 
a human health risk, and to protect and prevent the 
endangerment of ground water resources which serve as drinking 
water supplies.
    Hazardous Waste.--The Resource Conservation and Recovery 
Act of 1976 [RCRA] mandated EPA to develop a regulatory program 
to protect human health and the environment from improper 
hazardous waste disposal practices. The RCRA Program manages 
hazardous wastes from generation through disposal.
    EPA's responsibilities and authorities to manage hazardous 
waste were greatly expanded under the Hazardous and Solid Waste 
Amendments of 1984. Not only did the regulated universe of 
wastes and facilities dealing with hazardous waste increase 
significantly, but past mismanagement practices, in particular 
prior releases at inactive hazardous and solid waste management 
units, were to be identified and corrective action taken. The 
1984 amendments also authorized a regulatory and implementation 
program directed to owners and operators of underground storage 
tanks.
    The Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest Establishment Act 
of 2012 amended subtitle C of the Solid Waste Disposal Act to 
establish an electronic means of tracking wastes subject to 
RCRA regulation. Appropriations to the Hazardous Waste 
Electronic Manifest Fund support development, operation, 
maintenance, and upgrading of the hazardous waste electronic 
manifest system.
    Pesticides.--The objective of the pesticide program is to 
protect the public health and the environment from unreasonable 
risks while permitting the use of necessary pest control 
approaches. This objective is pursued by EPA under the Food 
Quality Protection Act, the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and 
Rodenticide Act, the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and 
the Pesticide Registration Improvement Extension Act of 2012 
through three principal means: (1) review of existing and new 
pesticide products; (2) enforcement of pesticide use rules; and 
(3) research and development to reinforce the ability to 
evaluate the risks and benefits of pesticides.
    Radiation.--The radiation program's major emphasis is to 
minimize the exposure of persons to ionizing radiation, whether 
from naturally occurring sources, from medical or industrial 
applications, nuclear power sources, or weapons development.
    Toxic Substances.--The Toxic Substances Control Act 
establishes a program to stimulate the development of adequate 
data on the effects of chemical substances on health and the 
environment, and institute control action for those chemicals 
which present an unreasonable risk of injury to health or the 
environment. The act's coverage affects more than 60,000 
chemicals currently in commerce, and all new chemicals.
    Multimedia.--Multimedia activities are designed to support 
programs where the problems, tools, and results are cross media 
and must be integrated to effect results. This integrated 
program encompasses the EPA's research, enforcement, and 
abatement activities.
    Superfund.--The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 established a national 
program to protect public health and the environment from the 
threats posed by inactive hazardous waste sites and 
uncontrolled spills of hazardous substances. The original 
statute was amended by the Superfund Amendments and 
Reauthorization Act of 1986. Under these authorities, EPA 
manages a hazardous waste site clean-up program including 
emergency response and long-term remediation.
    Brownfields.--The Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 as amended by the Small 
Business Liability Relief and Brownfields Revitalization Act of 
2002 establishes a national program to assess, cleanup, and 
provide support to States, tribes, local communities, and other 
stakeholders to work together to develop Brownfields.
    Leaking Underground Storage Tanks.--The Leaking Underground 
Storage Tank [LUST] Program addresses petroleum releases from 
federally regulated underground storage tanks. It was created 
in 1986 when Congress amended subtitle I of the Solid Waste 
Disposal Act. EPA implements the LUST response program 
primarily through cooperative agreements with the States. In 
2005, the Energy Policy Act expanded eligible uses of the Trust 
Fund to include certain leak prevention activities.
    Inland Oil Spill.--The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 
as amended by section 4202 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, 
established a national program to help prepare for, and respond 
to, any oil spill affecting the inland waters of the United 
States.

                         Science and Technology


Appropriations, 2016....................................    $734,648,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     754,184,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     695,910,000

    The bill provides $695,910,000 for science and technology 
activities with an additional $15,496,000 to be paid from 
Hazardous Substance Superfund to fund ongoing research 
activities authorized by the Comprehensive Environmental, 
Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended. This amount 
is $38,738,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. A 
detailed allocation of funding by program is included in the 
table that accompanies this report. Additional changes to the 
request are detailed below
    Clean Air and Climate.--$104,886,000 is provided for clean 
air and climate activities. This amount is $11,655,000 below 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--$5,997,000 is provided for 
indoor air and radiation activities. This amount is equal to 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The proposed elimination of 
radon activities has been rejected.
    Homeland Security.--$36,765,000 is provided for homeland 
security activities. This amount is a decrease of $358,000 
below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Pesticides Licensing.--$5,289,000 is provided for pesticide 
program activities. This amount is a decrease of $738,000 below 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Research: National Priorities.--The bill provides 
$5,000,000, which shall be used for extramural research grants, 
independent of the Science to Achieve Results [STAR] grant 
program, to fund high-priority water quality and availability 
research by not-for-profit organizations who often partner with 
the Agency. Funds shall be awarded competitively with priority 
given to partners proposing research of national scope and who 
provide a 25-percent match. The Agency is directed to allocate 
funds to grantees within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    Research: Air, Climate, and Energy.--$82,715,000 is 
provided for the air, climate, and energy research program. 
This amount is a decrease of $9,191,000 below the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. The funding requested to engage in 
additional research related to hydraulic fracturing is not 
provided.
    Research: Safe and Sustainable Water Resources.--
$106,275,000 is provided for safe and sustainable water 
resources research. This amount is $1,177,000 below the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level. The Committee notes that the Agency 
has indicated that it will complete its assessment related to 
hydraulic fracturing in 2016. The assessment was first 
requested in 2010 and it is the Committee's view that the 
Agency has spent substantial time and resources on this topic. 
As such, no additional funding for hydraulic fracturing 
research is provided.
    Research: Sustainable Communities.--$134,327,000 has been 
provided for research activities for sustainable communities. 
This amount is $5,648,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level.
    Research: Chemical Safety and Sustainability.--$126,058,000 
is provided for the chemical safety and sustainability program. 
This amount is a reduction of $872,000 below the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level.
    Within the funds provided, $1,000,000 shall be used to 
contract with the National Academy of Sciences [NAS] to conduct 
the peer review of the revised draft IRIS assessment of 
formaldehyde. The review shall ensure that all recommendations 
and concerns raised in the April 2011 report of the NAS are 
fully addressed in the revised draft assessment.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Computational Toxicology.--The Committee supports the 
Agency's computational toxicology research activities to 
advance the next generation of risk assessment methods to 
enable integration of tiered toxicity evaluation strategies, 
advanced high throughput molecular biological assays and 
computational methods with exposure information to support 
risk-based decisions for privatization and screening. The 
Committee directs the Agency's National Center for 
Computational Toxicology [NCCT] to develop data use guidance 
for ToxCast and other computational data which describes 
appropriate methods for data analyses, determining true 
positives from artifacts and non-specific responses, and for 
establishing scientific confidence, including limitations, in 
the use of results for specific applications, including 
limitations, in the use of results for specific applications, 
including those by EPA programs and offices. This guidance 
shall be subjected to public review and comment and independent 
scientific peer review prior to finalization.
    The Committee directs NCCT to lead in developing 
applications of new computational approaches in risk 
assessment. These programs will be critical to informing 
implementation of an enhanced Toxic Substances Control Act 
[TSCA] chemical assessment program. Both NCCT and the Office of 
Pollution Prevention and Toxics [OPPT] shall assign one FTE to 
collaborate on evaluation and demonstration of confidence in 
such methods for specific applications by OPPT, in particular 
the TSCA work plan program. An interim progress report shall be 
submitted no later than February 2, 2017.
    Enhanced Aquifer Use.--The Committee notes ground water 
levels are continuing to decline across the Nation from decades 
of aquifer use. Augmenting drinking water supplies through 
artificial or enhanced recharge into aquifers represents a 
cost-effective way of increasing the availability of water and 
to address seasonal scarcity. Enhanced Aquifer Recharge [EAR] 
also represents a key practice for the management and 
restoration of ecosystems. EAR may involve the use or injection 
of treated drinking water, treated wastewater or collected 
storm water. However the most promising systems have focused on 
the use of surface water diversion during high flow periods. 
The Committee further notes that in much of the West, the 
availability of new allocations of surface waters is severely 
limited or non-existent. Ground water supplies in many areas 
are stressed by over use and decreasing natural recharge. While 
conservation and recovery are key water resource management 
tools, EAR represents a significant approach to creating new 
water supplies. The conversion of storm-flow, during times of 
excess supply, to base-flow and ground water based drinking 
water supplies, for times of high demand, provides a new 
resource management approach for the Nation's water needs. The 
Committee urges the Agency to coordinate with the United States 
Geological Survey to support research efforts designed to 
establish a best practices approach for EAR.
    Integrated Risk Information System.--The Committee is aware 
of efforts by the Agency to implement the 2011 National Academy 
of Science's [NAS] Chapter 7 and 2014 NAS report 
recommendations for the Integrated Risk Information System 
[IRIS] but remains concerned that the recommendations have not 
been fully implemented. In published appendices that accompany 
final IRIS assessments, EPA has detailed some of the Agency's 
deficiencies in meeting the NAS high-priority reforms. The 
Committee directs the Agency to convene an interagency working 
group to be Co-Chaired with the Office of Information and 
Regulatory Affairs and to include relevant executive branch 
stakeholders to review compliance with the NAS recommendations 
in IRIS assessments issued since the 2014 NAS report. The 
working group shall focus specifically on transition from the 
use of single point estimates of hazard and exposure to 
presenting more complete information on the distribution of 
estimated hazards, exposures, and/or risks, including central 
tendency values; on processes for evaluating study quality, 
relevance, and risk of bias; the use of a transparent and 
reproducible weight-of-evidence process for applying scientific 
findings; the selection of an adverse outcome; and the use of 
default linear low-dose extrapolation and other default 
modeling approaches to hazard determinations. The Committee 
directs the Agency to issue a report to the Committees of 
Appropriations of the House and Senate on the findings of the 
working group and the implementation plans of its findings 
within 180 days of enactment of this act. The working group 
report shall also include a timetable for EPA's full 
implementation of the NAS recommendations for all IRIS 
assessments issued since the 2014 NAS report.
    Nanomaterials Research.--The Committee notes the increased 
capabilities that the Food and Drug Administration [FDA] has 
developed to study environment, health, and safety of 
nanomaterials [nanoEHS] within FDA's Jefferson Laboratory 
Campus, including the National Center for Toxicological 
Research, and its consolidated headquarters at White Oak, 
Maryland. The FDA can and should be more involved in nanoEHS 
research with other agencies, particularly in activities 
involving human health. Out of the amounts appropriated, the 
Administrator shall seek to involve the FDA in nanoEHS research 
to the maximum extent possible, including participation in EPA 
funded research.
    Public Access to Research.--In February 2013, the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the 
President issued guidelines on increasing public access to the 
results of federally funded scientific research. Given the 
importance of research funded by EPA, the Agency is encouraged 
to comply expeditiously.
    Risk Assessment Methods.--For all draft or final EPA risk 
assessments that will be issued in fiscal year 2017, the Agency 
is directed to provide clear criteria for judging the quality 
of all key studies and to provide a description of how all 
evidence will be integrated, based on the strengths and 
weaknesses.
    Response to Public Comments.--The Administrator shall 
ensure that each Science Advisory Board [SAB] review panel 
makes certain that all reports to EPA include a written summary 
responding to substantive public comments received by the panel 
during the SAB review process.

                 Environmental Programs and Management

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $2,613,679,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   2,852,893,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   2,538,545,000

    The bill provides $2,538,545,000 for environmental programs 
and management activities. This amount is a decrease of 
$75,134,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. A 
detailed allocation of funding by program is included in the 
table that accompanies this report. Additional changes to the 
request are detailed below.
    Brownfields.--$25,593,000 has been provided for the 
Brownfields program. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level.
    Clean Air and Climate.--$245,797,000 has been provided for 
clean air and climate programs. This amount is a decrease of 
$27,311,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The 
Committee notes that the Clean Power Plan has been stayed by 
the United States Supreme Court.
    Enforcement.--The bill provides $216,573,000 for 
enforcement, $24,064,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level.
    Environmental Protection: National Priorities.--The bill 
provides $15,000,000 for a competitive grant program to provide 
technical assistance for improved water quality or safe 
drinking water to rural and urban communities or individual 
private well owners. The Agency is directed to provide 
$13,500,000 for grants to qualified not-for-profit 
organizations, including organizations authorized by section 
1442(e) of the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300j-
1(e)(8)), for the sole purpose of providing on-site training 
technical assistance for water systems in rural or urban 
communities. The Agency is also directed to provide $1,500,000 
for grants to qualified not-for-profit organizations for 
technical assistance for individual private well owners. The 
Agency shall require each grantee to provide a minimum 10 
percent match, including in-kind contributions. The Agency is 
directed to allocate funds to grantees within 180 days of 
enactment.
    Geographic Programs.--The bill provides $435,410,000 for 
Geographic Programs, an increase of $7,673,000 above the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level. Funding levels for the specific 
geographic programs are as follows:
  --$300,000,000 for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.
  --$73,000,000 for the Chesapeake Bay program.
  --$4,819,000 for the San Francisco Bay program.
  --$28,000,000 for the Puget Sound program.
  --$1,399,000 for the South Florida program.
  --$5,940,000 for the Long Island Sound program.
  --$11,000,000 for the Gulf of Mexico program.
  --$4,399,000 for the Lake Champlain program.
  --$5,000,000 for the Southern New England Estuaries program.
  --$948,000 for the Lake Pontchartrain program.
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.--A long-term goal of 
the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative [GLRI] articulated in 
the GLRI Plan calls for land use, recreation and economic 
activities that are managed to ensure that nearshore aquatic, 
wetland and upland habitats will sustain the health and 
function of natural communities. The Committee is aware that 
Metropolitan Planning Organizations in the region are working 
on site-specific land-use and economic development projects 
with local communities bordering the Great Lakes that can help 
advance this effort. The Agency is encouraged to work with 
these groups to advance this long-term goal as they allocate 
funding under the GLRI.
    Additionally, the Committee urges the Environmental 
Protection Agency and Great Lakes Interagency Taskforce to 
provide continued attention and resources towards building the 
capacity of on-the-ground partners, including States and 
tribes, as ongoing partners in the stewardship of the Great 
Lakes. The Committee recognizes the importance of tribal self-
governance and encourages the EPA to work with tribal 
governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs to develop a 
proposal for the creation of a distinct GLRI tribal program 
through which GLRI funds would be provided to allow tribes the 
flexibility to develop the programs that are of the highest 
priorities to their communities, and which fulfill the spirit 
of self-determination, meet treaty obligations, and carry out 
Federal trust responsibilities.
    Chesapeake Bay.--The Committee recommends $73,000,000 for 
the Chesapeake Bay program. From within the amount provided, 
$6,000,000 is for nutrient and sediment removal grants and 
$6,000,000 is for small watershed grants to control polluted 
runoff from urban, suburban and agricultural lands.
    Indoor Air and Radiation.--$2,272,000 has been provided for 
indoor air and radiation activities, equal to the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level. The proposed elimination of the radon 
program has been rejected.
    Information Exchange.--$118,305,000 has been provided for 
information exchange programs. This amount is a decrease of 
$8,234,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Within 
that amount, the environmental education program is funded at 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Additional funding is as 
follows: Executive Management and Operations is funded at 
$42,019,000, including $4,000,000 for the Office of Public 
Affairs.
    Legal/Science/Regulatory/Economic Review.--The 
recommendation provides $100,272,000, a reduction of 
$11,142,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Funding 
for the Civil Rights/Title VI compliance program is not less 
than the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Operations and Administration.--$482,751,000 is provided 
for operations and administration.
    Pesticides Licensing.--$107,896,000 is provided for 
pesticides licensing activities, an increase of $5,534,000 
above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.
    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.--The recommendation 
provides $104,887,000, equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level.
    Toxics Risk Review and Prevention.--$89,298,000 is provided 
for toxics risk review and prevention activities, equal to the 
fiscal year 2016 level for all program projects with the 
exception of the endocrine disruptor program project, which is 
reduced by $3,224,000 as requested in the budget. Within 
funding provided to the Agency, EPA is required to maintain 
funding for the Chemical Risk Review and Reduction program 
project at not less than the fiscal year 2014 level.
    Water: Ecosystems.--$48,256,000 has been provided for water 
ecosystem programs, an increase of $468,000 above the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level. Within the amount provided, 
$27,191,000 has been provided for National Estuary Program 
grants as authorized by section 320 of the Clean Water Act. 
This amount is an increase of $468,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 enacted level and is sufficient to provide each of the 28 
national estuaries in the program with a grant of at least 
$600,000.
    Water: Human Health Protection.--$98,507,000 has been 
provided for water-related human health protection activities 
equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The proposed 
elimination of the beach program has been rejected and funding 
is restored to the fiscal year 2016 level.
    Water Quality Protection.--$191,191,000 has been provided 
for water quality protection. This is $19,226,000 below the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Within that amount, $3,000,000 
has been provided for a pilot project to assist communities 
successfully implement plans under EPA's Integrated Planning 
Initiative. The Committee notes that the Agency's rule to 
redefine navigable waters has been stayed by the Courts.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account.
    Anti-Deficiency Act Violations.--On December 14, 2015, the 
Government Accountability Office [GAO] concluded that the 
Agency violated existing prohibitions against publicity or 
propaganda and grassroots lobbing contained in prior 
appropriations acts in association with its advocacy related to 
the Waters of the United States Rulemaking. Because the Agency 
expended funds in violation of these prohibitions, the GAO 
concluded that the Agency violated the Antideficiency Act. In 
addition to the reporting requirements that are required as a 
result of the Antideficiency Act violation, the Agency is 
directed to coordinate with the Office of Management and Budget 
to ensure that GAO's findings are disseminated to 
communications office throughout the Government.
    Carbon Emissions From Biomass.--The Committee notes that 
``forest management activities'' referred to in section 414 
includes activities to increase yield after stand 
establishment, and activities to maintain or enhance forest 
health including fuel, pest infestation, and disease 
treatments. Forest management activities maintain or increase 
forest carbon stocks over time.
    Combined Sewer Overflow.--The Committee supports the 
Agency's mission to improve water quality and protect the Great 
Lakes, the drinking water source for millions of Americans. 
This Committee notes that many communities around the entire 
Great Lakes Basin have made great strides to update wastewater 
infrastructures since the Agency's last report to Congress on 
Combined Sewer Overflows in the Lake Michigan Basin, as 
directed by Congress in H.Rept. 108-674. Despite the progress 
made, the Committee remains concerned that billions of gallons 
of untreated water and contaminants from a variety of sources, 
including combined sewage overflows from wastewater treatment 
facilities, are dumped into the Great Lakes every year.
    The Committee directs the EPA to report to Congress, within 
60 days, the plan and timeline for the implementation of 
immediate public notice requirements for treatment works 
dumping sewage into the Great Lakes as required by the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2016. Specifically, the 
requirements should allow for immediate notice via a widely 
accessed medium such as local newspaper or television 
programming for each community affected by a discharge as well 
as enable a region wide and transparent database allowing for 
an accurate assessment of the cause of sewer overflows, where 
these overflows are occurring, the total annual volume, as well 
as, the average historic volume at the locations where these 
overflows occur. The Agency should also outline what steps are 
being taken to work with States and local stakeholders to 
quickly notify the public about the volume and state of the 
treatment of the discharge, the date and time of the discharge, 
expected duration, and the location of the discharge to the 
maximum level of specificity practicable.
    Coal Combustion Residuals.--The Committee believes that 
coal combustion residuals [CCRs] are an important resource for 
the Nation's economy. In 2014, over 60 million tons of CCRs 
were used in road and bridge construction, saving taxpayers 
billions. CCRs must continue to be beneficially used. At the 
same time, they must also be responsibly stored under a Federal 
regulatory framework that provides effective oversight at the 
State level. The Committee is concerned the final rule on CCRs 
issued on April 17, 2015 relies solely on citizen-suits for 
enforcement instead of providing the regulatory guidance and 
oversight necessary to ensure the proper management of CCRs. 
Within 120 days of the date of enactment, the Committee directs 
the Administrator to provide a report on the effectiveness of 
self-implementing Federal CCR regulations enforced solely 
through citizen suits versus the effectiveness of 
implementation of a Federal CCR rule through a State-
implemented permit program authorized by EPA.
    Corn Rootworm.--The United State Department of Agriculture 
estimates that damage caused by the corn rootworm costs farmers 
$1 billion annually in yield losses and treatment expenses. The 
Committee understands that the Agency has been reviewing a new 
mode of action to control corn rootworm for a number of years, 
and recently completed a preliminary step. As growers need 
additional modes of action to most effectively deal with this 
pest, the Committee notes its strong interest in a timely 
completion of the registration for this new mode of action.
    Ecolabels for Federal Procurement.--Multiple forest 
certification programs have been recognized throughout the 
Federal Government as supporting the use of sustainable 
products in building construction and other uses. The Committee 
urges EPA to add additional forest certification standards that 
have been recognized by other Federal programs, including 
USDA's BioPreferred Program, to its Interim Recommendations 
under Executive Order 13693. The Committee urges EPA to report 
back on progress on implementation of the Committee's 
recommendation within 60 days of enactment.
    Glyphosate Reregistration.--The Committee is aware that the 
Agency is currently in the process of reviewing the 
registration for glyphosate, which is a very important crop 
protection tool for America's farmers. Furthermore, glyphosate 
has been used for decades and, when properly applied, has been 
found to present a low risk to humans and wildlife by 
regulatory bodies around the world, including Australia, 
Canada, the European Union, Japan, and by the Joint FAO/WHO 
Meeting on Pesticide Residues. The Committee urges the Agency 
to complete its reregistration of glyphosate expeditiously.
    Grant Guidelines.--The Committee is extremely concerned 
about reports that an Agency grant was used to support an anti-
agriculture advocacy campaign. The campaign, funded in part by 
Federal funding, included billboards and a Web site that 
explicitly accused the agriculture industry as being a primary 
polluter of local waterways and urged increased regulation of 
agriculture. The use of Federal funds for such advocacy is 
inappropriate and may be in violation of Federal lobbying 
prohibitions. In response to this, the Agency must ensure there 
is sufficient oversight and training in place to avoid similar 
misuse of grant funds in the future. To achieve this goal, 
within 90 days of enactment, the Agency is directed to update 
its grant policies, training, and guidelines to ensure Federal 
funds are not used in this manner, including an update of the 
mechanism by which the Agency tracks the use of its grants, and 
to provide the Committee with a copy of its updated grant 
policies, training, and guidelines.
    Fuel Standards.--The Committee supports efforts to reduce 
pollution from marine vessels that may be harmful to human 
health and coastal environments. While that is the case, the 
Committee is concerned the mandate for fuel with a sulfur 
content of 0.1% in the North American Emission Control Area is 
having a disproportionately negative impact on vessels which 
have engines that generate less than 32,000 horsepower. This 
impact may cause some shippers to shift from marine based 
transport to less efficient, higher emitting modes. In an 
effort to avoid negative environmental consequences and modal 
shifting, the Committee directs the Agency to consider 
exempting vessels with engines that generate less than 32,000 
horsepower and operate more than 50 miles from the coastline. 
Within 180 days of enactment of this act, the Agency should 
provide the Committee with a report detailing their decision.
    Interagency Consultations.--Several provisions of the 
Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act [FIFRA] 
require the Agency and the United States Department of 
Agriculture [USDA] to coordinate activities related the 
products regulated under the law. USDA has a robust history of 
collecting and analyzing data related to agricultural economics 
and the environmental impacts of farming tools and practices, 
including crop protection and pest management. However, there 
have been recent instances in which the USDA has not been 
consulted or informed of key regulatory actions and decisions 
by the EPA as prescribed by FIFRA. In two of these cases USDA 
has publicly commented on their exclusion from the process. 
Consequently, the Committee directs the Administrator of the 
EPA to consult with the Secretary of the Department of 
Agriculture on economic analyses, rules and other regulatory 
actions that impact products currently approved under FIFRA.
    Lead Test Kit.--In 2008, EPA adopted the Lead Renovation, 
Repair and Painting rule which included criteria by which the 
Agency could certify a test kit that contractors could use 
onsite to comply with the rule. The Committee is concerned that 
8 years later, no kit has been developed that meets these 
standards. The Committee is concerned that this action is not 
adequate and is concerned that progress is not being made to 
identify a solution to this issue. If no solution is reached by 
the end of the fiscal year, EPA should reopen the rule and 
determine whether it is possible to include an opt-out 
provision until a test kit is certified that can comply with 
the rule.
    Methane.--The Committee is concerned about the Agency's 
efforts to regulate methane from existing petroleum and gas 
sources. Over the past decade, the United States added more 
than 86,000 new petroleum and natural wells, during which 
methane emissions from petroleum and natural gas systems fell 
by 11 percent. Based on the data suggesting that methane 
emissions are declining, the Committee believes that States are 
adequately regulating methane emissions.
    National Ambient Air Quality Standards.--The Committee 
remains concerned about potentially overlapping implementation 
schedules related to the 2008 and 2015 standards for ground-
level ozone. Because the Agency did not publish implementing 
regulations for the 2008 standard of 75 parts per billion [ppb] 
until February 2015 and then revised the standard to 70 ppb in 
October 2015, States now face the prospect of implementing two 
national ambient air quality standards for ozone 
simultaneously. Based on Agency data, the Committee expects a 
number of counties to be in non-attainment with both the 2008 
standard and the 2015 standard. Additionally, Agency data 
suggests that a number of marginal non-attainment counties will 
meet the 2015 standard by 2025 due to other air regulations. In 
an effort to find the most sensible path to reduce ground level 
ozone, some flexibility must be granted to States that face the 
burden of implementing these potentially overlapping standards. 
Within 90 days of the date of enactment of this act, the Agency 
is directed to provide the Committee with a report examining 
the potential for administrative options to enable States to 
enter into cooperative agreements with the Agency that provide 
regulatory relief and meaningfully clean up the air.
    Pesticide Registration Improvement Act.--The Committee 
appreciates the work of the Agency and its partners to 
implement a sensible registration service fee system for 
applications for pesticide registration. The Committee urges 
the Agency to ensure that its review of applications complies 
with the predictable evaluation process and specific decision 
review periods contemplated in the legislation to the maximum 
extent possible.
    Additionally, the Committee is aware that there are 
approximately $10,300,000 in maintenance fees paid by 
registrants in prior years under 7 U.S.C. 136a-1 that are 
currently unavailable for obligation. The Committees note that 
the underlying authorization provides the Agency with the 
authority to make those fees available when appropriated 
dollars exceed the statutory maximum collection of $27,800,000. 
The Committee urges the Agency to dedicate appropriated 
resources, to the extent practicable, toward reducing the 
maintenance fee backlog without harming other aspects of the 
program and asks the Agency to provide the Committee with a 
detailed plan to show how the Agency intends to make available 
the previously collected maintenance fees in this and future 
fiscal years.
    Rural Heating Costs.--Many rural Alaskan villages depend 
primarily on diesel-run generators to provide their homes and 
businesses with electricity, and fuel oil to generate heat. 
Diesel must be shipped on barges or delivered by airplane. The 
Committee is concerned that some rural Alaskan villages are 
facing significantly increased costs of home heating because of 
the Agency's requirement for Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel [ULSD]. In 
addition to increased cost, the Committee is aware that some 
villages experience as much as 50 percent loss of efficiency. 
Given that these villages are remote and using traditional 
diesel could have a limited impact on air quality, the 
Committee directs the Agency to determine whether there is an 
exemption available from the requirement to use ULSD in these 
villages.
    Small Refinery Relief.--Congress directed the Agency, in 
consultation with the Department of Energy [DOE], to grant 
hardship relief to small refineries if compliance with the 
Renewable Fuel Standard [RFS] would impose a disproportionate 
economic hardship. In response to several recent petitions, the 
Agency determined that compliance with the RFS would have a 
disproportionate economic impact on a small refinery, but 
denied hardship relief because the small refinery remained 
profitable notwithstanding the disproportionate economic 
impact. This is inconsistent with congressional intent because 
the statute does not contemplate that a small refinery would 
only be able to obtain an exemption by showing that the RFS 
program threatens its viability. Congress explicitly authorized 
the Agency to grant small refinery hardship relief to ensure 
that small refineries remain both competitive and profitable. 
In the intensely competitive transportation fuels market, small 
entities cannot remain competitive and profitable if they face 
disproportionate structural or economic metrics such as 
limitations on access to capital, lack of other business lines, 
disproportionate production of diesel fuel, or other site 
specific factors identified in DOE's original 2011 Small 
Refinery Exemption Study prepared for Congress.
    When making decisions about small refinery exemptions under 
the RFS program, the Agency is directed to follow DOE's 
recommendations which are to be based on the original 2011 
Small Refinery Exemption Study prepared for Congress and the 
conference report to division D of the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act of 2016. Should the Administrator disagree 
with a waiver recommendation from the Secretary of Energy, 
either to approve or deny, the Agency shall provide a report to 
the Committee on Appropriations and to the Secretary of Energy 
that explains the Agency position. Such report shall be 
provided 10 days prior to issuing a decision on a waiver 
petition.
    Significant New Alternatives Policy (``SNAP'') Program.--
The Committee is concerned that the Agency has proposed to 
change the listing status of certain substitutes used in 
domestic and commercial refrigeration and foam-blowing sectors 
pursuant to the SNAP program. This proposal comes less than 1 
year after the publication of a first round of restrictions 
that are being implemented over the next several years. The 
current proposal, coupled with the mandates from last year's 
rulemaking, will greatly impact the compliance and transition 
costs faced by companies and industries as they work to 
implement and comply with two sets of regulations in relatively 
short amounts of time given the complexity of transitioning to 
new materials. These transition and compliance costs and tasks 
include: research and development activities, conducting risk 
assessments of replacement materials, designing, testing and 
building new manufacturing units and capabilities, developing 
and implementing safety and training programs and ensuring 
certifications and building codes compliance. In addition, as 
the Committee previously noted with the first round of 
regulations, there are also potential timeframe conflicts with 
the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards. With 
respect to foam applications, the Committee is aware that the 
proposal provides an exception for certain military, space and 
aeronautic foam applications until 2025. The Committee believes 
that a similar exception should also be allowed for other 
businesses in order to ensure a level playing field. Since the 
Agency's proposal is not being driven by any statutory 
deadline, the Committee encourages the Agency to take into 
account all reasonable transition costs, parallel efforts at 
the international level, industry and non-governmental 
organization recommendations, and compliance concerns, 
including ensuring that a maximum amount of time is provided 
for an efficient and smooth status transition and that avoids 
or limits, to the maximum extent possible, the costs and 
transition issues noted above.
    Toxic Substances Control Act Modernization.--The Committee 
notes that legislation to modernize the Toxic Substances 
Control Act [TSCA] was recently approved by both the Senate and 
the House of Representatives. This bill includes language that 
will enable the EPA to collect and spend new fees to conduct 
additional chemical reviews, consistent with TSCA modernization 
legislation. Those fees are expected to be $25,000,000 per year 
once the program is fully implemented. The Congressional Budget 
Office estimates that in fiscal year 2017, fee collections will 
begin several months after the beginning of the fiscal year and 
will total $4,000,000. This bill also includes language 
ensuring that new fee collections will supplement, not 
supplant, appropriated resources for these activities.
    Uranium.--This Committee is extremely concerned with the 
Agency's rulemaking regarding health and environmental 
protection standards for uranium and thorium mill tailings 
(Part 192). The Committee is concerned the Agency has failed to 
justify this rulemaking or consult with State regulators or the 
industry that will be regulated by this rule. The Agency 
acknowledges it is not aware of a single example of groundwater 
contamination caused by an in-situ uranium recovery project. 
The Committee encourages EPA to withdraw this rulemaking and 
instead work with State regulators, the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission, and the uranium recovery industry to collect 
sufficient data to determine if any updates are needed to the 
existing generally applicable standards.
    Weed Resistance.--The Committee is aware of American 
farmers' need for additional tools to combat weed resistance. 
The Committee notes that on March 31, 2016, the Agency opened 
the public comment period for the registration for new uses of 
dicamba in conjunction with soybean and cotton products already 
in the market. That period was extended for another thirty days 
on May 1. The Committee encourages the Agency to finalize the 
registration by the end of this summer incorporating the 
concerns of farmers and applicators in order to facilitate 
timely corresponding State registrations, which will enable 
farmers to have the full flexibility of weed control options 
for the 2017 growing season.
    Wood Stoves.--EPA's final rule entitled ``Standards of 
Performance for New Residential Wood Heaters, New Residential 
Hydronic Heaters and Forced-Air Furnaces'' published at 80 Fed. 
Reg. 13672 (March 16, 2015) will hold manufacturers to new 
emissions standards for particulate matter [PM] in 2020. The 
Committee is concerned that the observed variance for the best 
current methods of measuring PM emission from new residential 
wood stoves may be too great for the test to reliably confirm 
compliance with the Step II, 2020 standard. The Administrator 
shall report to the Committee in 180 days with steps the EPA is 
taking to develop, and confirm, precise and repeatable testing 
methodologies, and on progress by the industry to implement 
reliable product testing with the 2020 standard in mind, and 
how the EPA will act if reliable tests cannot be developed and 
deployed with sufficient time for the industry to design, 
demonstrate, market and manufacture compliant product lines in 
advance of the Step II emissions limits set to take place in 
2020.
    Sustainable Chemistry.--The Committee recognizes the 
importance of activities promoting sustainable chemistry 
innovation, research, and development. Within available funds, 
the Committee encourages the Agency to continue to invest in 
supporting these activities.
    Dust and Soil Evaluation.--The Committee recognizes that 
lead-contaminated dust and soil found in homes is a significant 
source of lead exposure for children. The current hazard 
standards for lead in dust and soil are based on pre-1995 
research, and may no longer be sufficient to protect children 
from lead poisoning. The Committee is aware that the Agency is 
currently making use of an Information Collection Request from 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development [HUD] in its 
deliberations on potential changes to the Lead Dust Standard.
    The Committee directs the Agency, in consultation with the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and HUD, to provide 
the Committee with a report on the progress related to its 
deliberations related to lead-contaminated dust and soil within 
90 days of enactment and every 180 days thereafter. Given the 
significant impact lead exposure can have on children and their 
development, once such deliberations are complete, the 
Committee urges the Agency to act expeditiously to take 
appropriate regulatory action, if warranted.

             HAZARDOUS WASTE ELECTRIC MANIFEST SYSTEM FUND

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $3,674,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       7,433,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       3,674,000

    The bill provides $3,674,000 for the Hazardous Waste 
Electric Manifest System Fund. This amount is equal to the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $41,489,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      51,527,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      41,489,000

    The bill provides $41,489,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General. This amount is equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level. A detailed allocation of funding is included in the 
table that accompanies this report.

                        Buildings and Facilities

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $42,317,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      52,078,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      38,660,000

    The bill provides $38,660,000 for buildings and facilities 
programs. This amount is a reduction of $3,657,000 from the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level.

                     Hazardous Substance Superfund


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,088,769,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,128,989,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,077,784,000

    The bill provides $1,077,784,000 for Superfund programs. 
This amount is a decrease of $10,985,000 below above the 
enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by program is 
included in the table that accompanies this report. Additional 
changes to the request are detailed below.
    Homeland Security.--$32,589,000 is provided for homeland 
security activities, a reduction of $3,773,000 below the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level.
    Research: Sustainable Communities.--$11,463,000 is provided 
for the sustainable and healthy communities program, a 
reduction of $2,569,000 below the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level.
    Superfund Cleanup.--$711,067,000 is provided for Superfund 
cleanup activities, equal to the fiscal year 2016 enacted 
level. The Agency is directed to factor community acceptance 
into its Superfund remedial cleanup remedy selection process 
and, when supported by a community, consider remedial cleanup 
remedies that provide green space as part of a remedial action 
that is protective of human health and the environment.
    Additional Guidance.--The Committee has provided the 
following additional guidance with respect to funding provided 
under this account:
    Animas River Spill.--The Committee is still concerned with 
ensuring that an adequate long-term water quality monitoring 
program is in place for the States and tribes affected 
following the Gold King Mine Spill into the Animas River that 
impacted Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and the Navajo Nation. 
The Committee recognizes the investments made by the EPA in 
fiscal year 2016 and believes that EPA should continue to work 
using available and previously obligated funds to continue this 
effort in fiscal year 2017 and beyond. The Committee directs 
the EPA to work in consultation with affected States and Tribes 
on this effort.
    In addition, the Committee expects the EPA to process all 
State, tribal, and local requests for reimbursements for costs 
incurred in an expeditious manner. For cooperative agreements 
providing reimbursement for past costs, the Committee directs 
EPA to only require a close out report indicating the funds 
were reimbursed to the requesting entity based on the 
documented justification received. No further Agency reporting 
requirements are needed. Within 30 days of enactment, EPA shall 
provide the Committee with a written report outlining all 
State, local, and Tribal reimbursement requests and their 
status as granted, denied, or pending, with an explanation of 
the source of funds and any reasons for denial or pending 
requests.
    Finally, the Committee directs the EPA, in conjunction with 
the Department of Justice, to ensure that the process for 
making determinations under the Federal Torts Claims Act is 
conducted and completed in a timely manner.
    Financial Assurance.--The Committee remains concerned that 
the Agency is engaged in a rulemaking to require potentially 
duplicative financial assurance requirements for hardrock 
mining under the Superfund statute and has included bill 
language to prohibit funding for this matter moving forward. 
The Committee has directed the Agency to engage in a 
comprehensive market capacity study prior to publishing its 
draft rule that is expected to be released early in fiscal year 
2017. Based on information provided by the Agency, the 
Committee is concerned that the Agency is not engaging in as 
comprehensive a study as was directed because the Agency is 
relying primarily on existing data. Because the Agency insists 
this rulemaking is not duplicative of other financial assurance 
requirements, it seeks to reason that the financial products 
that are required do not currently exist and therefore, a sole 
reliance on existing data is unwarranted and may not provide 
the full picture contemplated for a comprehensive study. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the agency to include 
projections and potential future market adaptations in the 
market capacity study before it is submitted to the Congress.
    Recycling.--The Committee finds that, in order to increase 
recycling, it is necessary to clarify that recyclables (i.e., 
metals, paper, plastic, glass, rubber, and textiles) should not 
be regulated as ``waste'' but rather as valuable commodities 
with significant economic and environmental benefits. Under the 
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], the Agency has 
the statutory authority to regulate the management and disposal 
of hazardous and non-hazardous solid waste. Regulatory 
uncertainty around whether and when a substance becomes a solid 
waste subject to RCRA's regulatory and compliance schemes is 
the central challenge facing the recycling industry. The 
Committee acknowledges the process established by the Agency in 
its January 2015 Definition of Solid Waste rule to ensure that 
certain scrap materials are legitimately recycled. The 
Committee notes that qualifying scrap materials which are 
handled in accordance with the rule are not solid waste, but 
are instead commodity-grade materials.
    Sediment Guidance.--The Committee is aware that the 
Government Accountability Office is auditing the Agency's 
cleanup of contaminated sediment sites under the Superfund 
program as a result of concern in Congress that the Agency is 
not following its own 2005 Contaminated Sediment Guidance. The 
Fiscal Year 2016 Interior, Environment Conference Report 
directed EPA to complete within 90 days of enactment a report 
on the Agency's compliance with the Contaminated Sediment 
Guidance, especially with regard to the integration of 
Contaminated Sediment Technical Advisory Committee and National 
Remedy Review Board recommendations into final remedies 
selected, as well as the use of adaptive management policies in 
these remedies for sites currently undergoing investigation or 
where remedies have been selected in the last 5 years. The 
Committee directs the Agency to submit a report on its 
implementation of the GAO recommendations within 90 days of 
enactment.
    Contaminants of Emerging Concern.--The Committee recommends 
$181,306,000 for Emergency Response and Removal activities to 
include collaborative work with State, tribal, and local 
governments to help communities address contaminants of 
emerging concern. Furthermore, the Committee recommends that 
the Agency expeditiously remediate Superfund sites contaminated 
by these emerging contaminants, and provide technical 
assistance and support to States and tribes during the remedial 
cleanup process.

              Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $91,941,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      94,285,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      91,296,000

    The bill provides $91,296,000 for leaking underground 
storage tank trust fund activities. This amount is $645,000 
below the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. A detailed allocation 
of funding by program is included in the table that accompanies 
this statement.

                        Inland Oil Spill Program

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $18,209,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      25,410,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      18,079,000

    The bill provides $18,079,000 for inland oil spill 
programs. This amount is a decrease of $130,000 below the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level. A detailed allocation of 
funding by program is included in the table that accompanies 
this statement.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $3,518,161,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   3,280,400,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   3,613,278,000

    The bill provides $3,613,278,000 for State and tribal 
assistance grants. This amount is $95,117,000 above the fiscal 
year 2016 enacted level. A detailed allocation of funding by 
program is included in the table that accompanies this 
statement. Additional changes to the request are detailed 
below.
    Infrastructure Assistance.--$2,400,500,000 has been 
provided for infrastructure assistance. The amount provided 
includes $1,350,000,000 for the Clean Water State Revolving 
Fund [CWSRF] program and $1,020,500,000 for the Drinking Water 
State Revolving Fund [DWSRF] program. The funding provided is 
$378,500,000 more than was requested by the administration in 
fiscal year 2017. The Committee directs the Agency to continue 
implementing the American Iron and Steel provision in the same 
manner as it has done in fiscal year 2016.
    Targeted Airshed Grant.--$20,000,000 has been provided for 
Targeted Airshed Grants. These grants shall be distributed on a 
competitive basis to nonattainment areas that EPA determines 
are ranked as the top five most polluted areas relative to 
annual ozone or particulate matter 2.5 standards as well as the 
top five areas based on the 24-hour particulate matter 2.5 
standard where the design values exceed the 35 mg/m3 standard. 
To determine these areas, the Agency shall use the most recent 
design values calculated from validated air quality data. The 
Committees notes that these funds are available for emission 
reduction activities deemed necessary for compliance with 
national ambient air quality standards and included in a State 
Implementation Plan submitted to EPA. Not later than the end of 
fiscal year 2017, EPA should provide a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations that includes a table showing how fiscal year 
2016 funds were allocated. The table should also include grant 
recipients and metrics for anticipated or actual results.
    Categorical Grants.--For categorical grants to States and 
other environmental partners for the implementation of 
delegated programs, the bill provides $1,087,778,000. The 
Committee continues to reject the elimination of the Radon 
program and the Beaches Protection program and funding is 
provided at fiscal year 2016 enacted levels for both programs.
    Categorical Grant: Multipurpose Grants.--The multipurpose 
grant program was intended to distribute grants to States in a 
manner that gave States flexibility to work on each individual 
State's high priority environmental activities. The Agency 
chose to implement the multipurpose grant program in a manner 
that was not flexible and aligns more directly with the 
Agency's priorities. Given that such is the case, the Committee 
has not continued funding for the multipurpose grant program.
    Categorical Grant: Nonpoint Source (Sec. 319).--The 
Committee has provided $184,915,000 in Nonpoint Source grants, 
a $20,000,000 increase above the fiscal year 2016 level. The 
Committee expects the Agency to examine the allocation formula 
to ensure that resources are being spent in areas with the most 
pressing need.
    Categorical Grant: Public Water System Supervision.--The 
bill provides $109,700,000 for Public Water System Supervision 
grants. This is an increase of $7,737,000 above the fiscal year 
2016 level.
    Categorical Grant State and Tribal Air Quality 
Management.--The Committee disagrees with the Agency's 
implementation of the directive from fiscal year 2016 to update 
the formula for State and Tribal Air Quality Management Grants. 
The Committee directs the Agency to hold all States and regions 
harmless in fiscal year 2017 by allocating funds in the exact 
same manner as fiscal year 2016. The Agency has indicated that 
it may further update the formula to consider additional 
factors. Should the Agency update the formula, the Committee 
directs the Agency to provide the new formula and funding 
estimates.
    Further, the Committee notes that internal transportation 
systems can make a significant impact on improving air quality 
by reducing traffic congestion and vehicle emissions. The 
Committee directs the EPA to seek opportunities to support the 
planning and development of such systems via grants and 
technical assistance, as appropriate, as a component of broader 
efforts to improve air quality.

          Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     $20,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      30,000,000

    The bill provides $30,000,000 for the Water Infrastructure 
Finance and Innovation Program [WIFIA], which is $10,000,000 
above the administration's request. The Committee believes this 
level of funding will allow for a minimum of $250,000,000 in 
loans to help improve water infrastructure. The WIFIA program 
is intended to supplement the State Revolving Funds and help 
reduce the tremendous water infrastructure challenges facing 
the Nation. A detailed allocation of funding by program is 
included in the table that accompanies this statement.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

             (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSIONS OF FUNDS)

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.

                               TITLE III

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service, a bureau of the Department of 
Agriculture, manages 193 million acres in 44 States and 
territories. In addition, the Service maintains a system of 
research stations and experimental forests and ranges 
throughout the country. The Agency also provides technical and 
financial assistance to private landowners, States, and 
communities to help sustain the Nation's urban and rural 
forests.

                     forest and rangeland research

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $291,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     291,982,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     280,000,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $280,000,000 for 
forest and rangeland research. This amount is $11,000,000 below 
the enacted level.
    Forest Inventory and Analysis.--The bill provides 
$77,000,000 for forest inventory and analysis, $2,000,000 above 
the enacted level.
    Research and Development Programs.--The bill provides 
$203,000,000 for base research activities. The Committee 
recognizes the role of the forests products sector in the U.S. 
economy and supports work at the Forest Products Laboratory to 
research the use of wood building materials in the domestic 
construction industry; and wood-based material usage such as 
fiber-based productions, cellulose nanomaterials, chemical feed 
stocks, and bioenergy. Because demand is expected to increase 
substantially for wood as a sustainable raw material and for 
associated technical expertise in the design of timber, wood 
and wood products in architecture and engineering, and other 
sustainable, renewable, and recyclable material and products, 
the Committee directs the Forest Products Laboratory to support 
work conducted at Land Grant Universities intended to 
accelerate the growth of the domestic finished wood products 
industry.
    The Forest Products Laboratory, which conducts innovative 
wood and fiber utilization research that contributes to 
conservation and forest resource productivity, is provided 
$27,000,000 to advance ongoing work and collaborative 
partnerships that will optimize the research for the 
commercialization of high value, high volume biomass uses while 
helping eliminate hazardous fuels in our Nation's forests. Of 
the funds provided to the Forest Products Laboratory, no less 
than $2,000,000 is to leverage investments in research and 
technology development, creating new and expanded markets for 
wood products to help ensure forests are healthy, sustainable 
and more resilient to disturbances. Additionally, the Committee 
directs the Forest Products Laboratory to collaborate with 
University partners to advance cost-effective biomass uses.
    Ceratocystis Disease.--The Committee notes the Forest 
Service's report ``Risk and pathway assessment for the 
introduction of exotic insects and pathogens that could affect 
Hawai'i's native forests'' and directs the Forest Service to 
work with the Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park 
Service, the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, 
and the States of Hawai'i and Florida to develop recommended 
actions based on the findings of the report to respond to the 
emergence of Ceratocystis disease in Hawai'i and Florida.
    Within the Research and Development program, the Committee 
recognizes the Water, Air & Soil Program's potential to advance 
environmental monitoring technologies and methods. The 
Committee urges the Forest Service to advance partnerships 
between this program and other Federal agencies to explore 
alternative and innovative testing systems for toxins, 
pollutants, and other environmental contaminants such as 
analyzing moss to detect heavy metal deposition.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $237,023,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     234,004,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     220,831,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $220,831,000 for 
State and private forestry programs, a decrease of $16,192,000 
below the enacted level. Program changes to the enacted level 
are detailed in the following budget activity narratives and 
funding levels for each subactivity can also be found in the 
table at the end of this report.
    Landscape Scale Restoration [LSR].--The bill provides an 
appropriation of $14,000,000 for landscape scale restoration, 
an amount equal to the enacted level. The Committee recommends 
that all funding allocated be awarded competitively to States 
for the purpose of conducting collaborative, science-based 
restoration of priority forest landscapes and managing forest 
resources that are at risk of catastrophic wildfire, invasive 
species, insect infestations and disease, and any other threats 
that degrade the vitality of forest ecosystems. The Committee 
believes LSR investments should be used exclusively for 
projects that are outcome driven to encourage active forest 
management on cross-boundary priority forest landscapes, to 
actively restore and protect forests from natural threats and 
wildfire, and to advance active forest management priorities 
identified in statewide forest assessment and resource 
strategies. Additionally, Committee urges the Forest Service to 
work with the Department of the Interior to increase cross-
boundary collaboration through the Hazardous Fuels Program, 
particularly with State Foresters and private sector 
organizations, in efforts to reduce hazardous fuels in high 
fire risk landscapes and to prioritize projects that work 
across ownership boundaries in landscapes, particularly those 
areas identified as priorities in State Forest Action Plans. 
For greater transparency and accountability, the Secretary 
shall provide to the Committee a report within 180 days on the 
status of development, execution, and administration of 
selected projects; accounting of program funding expenditures; 
and specific accomplishments that have resulted from landscape-
scale restoration projects funded through this appropriation 
and projects funded since the inception of the LSR budget line 
item.
    Forest Health Management.--The bill provides $92,060,000 
for forest health management activities, an amount $7,540,000 
below the enacted level. This includes $51,382,000 for 
activities on Federal lands and $40,678,000 on cooperative 
lands.
    Cooperative Forestry.--The bill provides $98,474,000 for 
cooperative forestry activities, a decrease of $16,949,000 
below the enacted level. This includes $19,036,000 for forest 
stewardship, $3,000,000 for community forest and open space 
conservation, and $23,686,000 for urban and community forestry.
    Forest Legacy.--The bill provides $61,049,000 for the 
forest legacy program, a decrease of $1,298,000 below the 
enacted level. The Committee includes a rescission of 
$8,297,000 in Forest Legacy funds. This funding rescission is 
from cost savings of some projects and funds returned from 
failed or partially failed projects. The amount provided within 
this bill is available for the following distribution of funds 
and projects requested by the administration:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   GAAltamaha River--Sansavilla            $5,000,000       $5,000,000
      Project
   MTWhitefish Lake Watershed Project       7,000,000        7,000,000
   OREast Moraine Wallowa Lake                900,000          900,000
   FLSilver Springs Watershed               3,500,000        3,500,000
   WASouth Puget Sound                      6,318,000        6,318,000
   HIHo'omau                                2,000,000        2,000,000
   SCGold Branch                            2,030,000        2,030,000
   FLWolfe Creek Forest                     2,800,000        2,800,000
   TNKarst Forest at Grassy Cove            1,350,000        1,350,000
   UTZion-Simon Gulch                       2,500,000        2,500,000
   NCEast Fork of French Broad              4,000,000        4,000,000
      Headwaters Phase IV
   NHBeebe River uplands                    2,600,000        2,600,000
   FMYela Valley Watershed                    565,000          565,000
   MAWest Quabbin Woodlands                 2,895,000        2,895,000
   MOEleven Point Forest                    2,000,000        2,000,000
   HIHelemano Wilderness Area               2,000,000        2,000,000
   VANew River Headwaters                   1,320,000        1,320,000
   NMBrazos Cliff                           3,480,000        3,480,000
   ALCoastal Headwaters Forest              3,000,000        3,000,000
     Other Projects                           689,000  ...............
     Administration                         6,400,000        5,791,000
                                      ----------------------------------
           Subtotal, Forest Legacy     ..............       61,049,000
            Program
 
     Rescission of funds from failed   ..............       -8,297,000
      or partially failed projects
                                      ----------------------------------
           Total, Forest Legacy            62,347,000       52,752,000
            Program
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    International Forestry.--The bill provides $8,000,000 for 
international forestry activities, an amount equal to the 
enacted level.
    The Committee recognizes that the Wild Salmon Center has 
successfully competed for grants through the International 
Forestry and other programs. Forest Service specialists with 
expertise in fisheries, habitat restoration, protected area 
management, community engagement, and other topics contribute 
to the Wild Salmon Center's three basic strategies for wild 
salmon conservation: protect important habitat, promote 
sustainable fisheries, and empower local communities to 
advocate for the health of their own watersheds. These efforts 
also draw from examples and experiences of community-based 
watershed councils in the U.S. Pacific Northwest, a multi-
stakeholder initiative to improve watershed health and 
conservation. For the last 10 years, the U.S. Forest Service 
and Wild Salmon Center have worked together to build a 
community of invested stakeholders to protect wild salmon and 
safeguard food security and economic stability for communities 
across the Pacific Rim.

                         national forest system

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $1,509,364,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   1,500,996,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   1,519,672,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $1,519,672,000 for 
national forest system operations, an increase of $10,308,000 
above the enacted level. Program changes to the enacted level 
are detailed in the following budget activity narratives and 
funding levels for each subactivity can also be found in the 
table at the end of this statement.
    Land Management Planning, Inventory and Monitoring.--The 
bill provides $32,930,000 for Land Management Planning and 
$147,998,000 for Inventory and Monitoring, a decrease of 
$4,608,000 and equal to the enacted level, respectively. The 
Committee continues to reject the proposal to consolidate these 
two line items.
    Grazing Management.--The bill provides $56,856,000 for 
grazing management programs, equal to the enacted level. The 
Committee again rejects the proposed new grazing fees.
    The Committees directs the Forest Service to make vacant 
grazing allotments available to a holder of a grazing permit or 
lease when lands covered by the holder of the permit or lease 
are unusable because of drought or wildfire. The Committee 
recognizes the importance of grazing on Forest Service lands 
not only because of its economic impacts and ability to be used 
as management tool, but also for its role in the heritage of 
the Western States.
    Forest Products.--The bill provides $369,805,000 for forest 
products, $10,000,000 above the enacted level. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to report program outputs from the 
Forest Products line item by counting only commercial products, 
including sawlogs, pulpwood, commercial biomass, and commercial 
firewood. Personal use firewood should be reported separately 
and should not be used to calculate program costs or 
efficiencies.
    The Committee notes that over the last 10 years the timber 
supply in Region 10 has been constrained to less than 10 
percent of the allowable sale quantity in the current land 
management plan. As a result, numerous mills have closed. The 
Committee reproves the Forest Service for not previously 
following this directive. In an effort to restore confidence in 
the timber supply and foster and allow investment in new 
facilities, the Forest Service pledged to prepare and offer 
four 10-year timber sales each with a volume of 150-200 million 
board feet; however, the agency converted the first two timber 
sales to smaller stewardship projects, which neither restored 
confidence or allowed investment in new facilities. The 
Committee directs the Forest Service to prepare and offer, 
within 2 years, the four 10-year timber sales as promised.
    Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness.--The bill provides 
$264,595,000 for recreation, heritage, and wilderness, 
$2,876,000 above the enacted level. The Committee appreciates 
that the Forest Service has initiated a comprehensive review of 
its permitting system in order to improve and facilitate access 
to Federal lands. The Committee is concerned that the 
permitting process for recreational activities varies widely 
across regions and from forest-to-forest, and is concerned that 
the Forest Service does not have a functioning online 
permitting system. The Forest Service is directed to increase 
transparency and consistency in their permitting processes and 
provide a report to the Committee within 120 days regarding a 
plan to address these concerns and any legislative or 
administrative changes that must be made to improve the process 
for citizens to access their public lands.
    Additional funds are included for recreation programs 
within the Forest Service. The Forest Service is directed to 
increase the pace and scale of evaluation of special-use 
permits, particularly in Region 10, as a means by which access 
to public lands and economic activity can be increased in 
national forest communities.
    Vegetation and Watershed Management.--The bill provides 
$188,716,000 for vegetation and watershed management 
activities, which is $4,000,000 above the enacted level. The 
Committee expresses concern with the pace and scale of the 
Forest Service's use of the authorities granted by section 8204 
of the Agricultural Act of 2014 to perform critically needed 
treatments of insect and disease infested trees on National 
Forests. The Committee expects the Forest Service to fully and 
promptly implement this authority. Additionally, the Service is 
directed to include in the fiscal year 2018 budget submission 
specific information regarding geographic locations where the 
Service intends to take advantage of this authority.
    Wildlife and Fish Habitat Management.--The bill provides 
$138,466,000 for wildlife and fish habitat management, 
$2,000,000 below the enacted level.
    Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund.--The bill 
provides $40,000,000 for collaborative forest landscape 
restoration projects.
    Minerals and Geology Management.--The bill provides 
$81,923,000 for minerals and geology management, $5,500,000 
above the enacted level. Of the funds provided, $5,500,000 is 
for the remediation of Forest Service liabilities on orphan 
mine sites pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980.
    Law Enforcement.--The bill provides $124,653,000 for law 
enforcement activities, $2,000,000 below the enacted level. Of 
the funds provided, up to $13,000,000 is for marijuana 
eradication activities.
    Integrated Resource Restoration [IRR].--The Committee notes 
with interest that the Forest Service did not include a 
proposal in the request for expansion of the IRR program and 
continues to have concerns relating to transparency and 
execution of congressional priorities as it relates to IRR.
    Tongass National Forest.--The Committee remains opposed to 
the Forest Service's implementation strategy in Region 10 with 
respect to the timber program and its ability to preserve a 
viable timber industry. The Committee notes that in order to 
preserve a viable timber industry, the Forest Service must 
provide a reliable supply of economically viable timber from 
the national forest system that includes both old growth and 
young growth. The Committee expects the Forest Service to meet 
the requirements of section 705(a) of the Alaska National 
Interest Lands Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 539d(a)) and directs 
to Forest Service to submit a report to the Committee within 60 
days outlining how the transition plan to-date has meet the 
requirements of the above referenced law, as well as how the 
Forest Service intends to comply with the above referenced law 
moving forward. Additionally, the Committee reproves the Forest 
Service for ignoring the direction to make available funds 
previously set-aside for activities related to the proposed 
Transition Framework for assistance in Region 10 to conduct a 
comprehensive inventory of young growth to include the stand-
level field work on young growth, recommended by the Tongass 
Advisory Committee, to ground-proof and refine inventory and 
growth data and improve inventory accuracy. The Forest 
Service's insistence on ignoring this direction, as well as 
other direction regarding the offering of timber sales in 
Region 10, is unacceptable to the Committee. Given all of these 
factors, no funds are provided for the Forest Service to issue 
a Record of Decision for any Forest Plan Amendments to the 2008 
Tongass Land Management Plan that includes transition to young 
growth management.
    Bighorn Sheep.--The Committee directs the Service to 
complete Risk of Contact analyses using the Western Association 
of Fish and Wildlife Agencies' occupied bighorn habitat maps, 
telemetry data, and recent bighorn observations. The Service is 
further directed to transparently and promptly share findings 
with other Federal land management agencies, State and local 
governments, State wildlife agencies, and State and Federal 
animal health professionals, including the Agricultural 
Research Service, permittees, and stakeholders. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to engage the Agricultural Research 
Service and the aforementioned cooperating agencies and 
participants to ensure the best professional scientific 
understanding of where and if disease transmission occurs, and 
the degree of that risk, before making further management 
decisions that impact permittees. The Forest Service is further 
directed, if warranted, to use this base of information to 
swiftly identify and implement actions to resolve high-risk of 
disease transmission allotments, including if agreeable to the 
permittee, the relocation of domestic sheep to lower-risk 
allotments, with minimal disruption and displacement of 
permittees. The Forest Service is directed to provide bi-annual 
briefings to the Committee on its progress and adherence to the 
directives contained herein. Additionally, the Forest Service 
is directed to make vacant grazing lots available to a holder 
of a grazing permit or lease when lands covered by the holder 
of the permit or lease are unusable because of drought, 
wildfire, or agency action beyond the permittee's control.
    Gila Headwaters.--The Forest Service is expected to 
consider the Wild and Scenic River qualities, as defined by the 
Wild and Scenic River Act, of the headwaters of the Gila River 
as part of the ongoing Forest Plan Revision on the Gila 
National Forest in New Mexico. The headwaters of the Gila River 
originates in America's first designated wilderness area and 
supports a rich forest ecosystem including distinct native fish 
species.
    Stewardship Contracting.--The Committee understands a 
rulemaking is underway for a Small Business Timber Set Aside 
for Stewardship Contracting and expects the process to be 
completed expeditiously.
    Good Neighbor Authority.--The Committee directs the Forest 
Service, to the greatest extent possible, to make the Federal 
and State Cooperative Watershed Restoration and Protection 
authority (as amended by section 417, division G, of the 
Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2014 (Public Law 113-76; 128 
Stat. 341)) widely available for treatment of insect infested 
trees, reduction of hazardous fuels, and other activities, 
including for removal of timber.
    The Committee supports efforts of the Forest Service to 
foster and facilitate partnerships with collaborative groups 
working to increase the pace, scale, and quality of forest 
restoration in all forest types, grasslands and unique habitats 
managed by the Forest Service and on adjacent lands. 
Coordination should occur between divisions within the agency 
to facilitate and implement partnership agreements.
    The Forest Service is directed to provide a report to the 
Committee regarding their spending and strategies related to 
wild horses and burros management on national forest lands.

                  CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $364,164,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     343,280,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     355,674,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $355,674,000 for 
capital improvement and maintenance programs, a decrease of 
$8,490,000 below the enacted level. As in previous years, this 
amount is offset with a $16,000,000 scoring credit related to 
the Roads and Trails Fund.
    Facilities.--The bill provides $69,600,000, including 
$55,369,000 for maintenance and $14,231,000 for construction, a 
total decrease of $1,790,000 below the enacted level. The 
Committee finds that repairs, maintenance and upgrades are 
needed for the smokejumper bases operated by the Forest 
Service. The Forest Service should seek to address the backlog 
of repairs, maintenance and needed upgrades of its smokejumper 
bases in order to help keep bases in operational status.
    Roads.--The bill provides $179,094,000, including 
$150,454,000 for maintenance and $28,640,000 for construction, 
a total increase of $7,000,000 above the enacted level.
    Trails.--The bill provides $74,830,000, including 
$69,777,000 for maintenance and $5,053,000 for construction, 
$2,700,000 below the enacted level.
    Deferred Maintenance.--The bill provides $3,150,000 for 
deferred maintenance, an amount equal to the enacted level.
    Legacy Road and Trail Remediation.--The bill provides 
$29,000,000 for the legacy road initiative, a decrease of 
$11,000,000 below the enacted level. The Forest Service is 
expected to allocate this funding in a manner proportionate to 
the distribution of roads in need of attention across the 
system and to direct funds to regions most in need of road 
remediation.

                            land acquisition

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $63,435,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      65,653,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      54,738,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $54,738,000 for land 
acquisition. This amount is a decrease of $8,697,000 below the 
enacted level.
    The Committee has provided $5,000,000 for recreational 
access and the Forest Service is directed to prioritize 
recreational access projects that significantly enhance access 
to existing public lands that have inadequate access for 
hunting, fishing, and other recreational activities. The 
Committee remains concerned about the prioritization of 
projects and the ability to allocate funds once appropriated. 
The Committee strongly encourages the Agency to quickly close 
projects once funds have been made available and a willing 
seller has been identified, a appraisal has been completed, and 
a purchase contract has been agreed to.
    The amount provided within this bill is available for the 
following distribution of funds and projects requested by the 
administration:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Budget            Bill
State               Project                 estimate     (Discretionary)
------------------------------------------------------------------------
   ID CLP: High Divide (Sawtooth           $2,800,000       $2,800,000
       National Recreation Area)
   ID CLP: High Divide (Caribou-              330,000          330,000
       Targee)
   WY Greater Yellowstown Are               2,850,000        2,850,000
       (Bridger-Teton)
   CA Sierra Nevada Checkerboard (El        1,200,000        1,200,000
       Dorado/Tahoe)
   CA CLP: National Trails (Pacific         4,905,000        4,905,000
       Crest National Scenic Trail)
   MN Minnesota North Woods                 3,500,000        3,500,000
   FL CLP: Florida/Georgia Longleaf         3,850,000        3,850,000
       Pine Initiative
   MT Swan Valley                           4,000,000        4,000,000
   IN Hoosiers Upland Natural               1,600,000        1,600,000
       Treasures
   AK Admiralty Island National             4,000,000        4,000,000
       Monument Cube Cove
   VA CLP: Southern Blue Ridge              2,280,000        2,280,000
   TN CLP: Southern Blue Ridge              3,400,000        3,400,000
   NC CLP: Southern Blue Ridge              1,850,000        1,850,000
   NC North Carolina Threatened               360,000          360,000
       Treasures
   SC South Carolina Coastal Legacy         1,600,000        1,600,000
      Other Projects                       11,178,000  ...............
      Acquisition Management                8,500,000        7,200,000
      Cash Equalization                       750,000          700,000
      Critical Inholdings/Wilderness        2,000,000        3,313,000
      Sportsman/Recreational Access         4,700,000        5,000,000
                                      ----------------------------------
            Total, Land Acquisition        65,653,000       54,738,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------


        acquisition of lands for national forests, special acts

Appropriations, 2016....................................        $950,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................         950,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................         950,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $950,000, which is 
equal to the enacted level. These funds are derived from 
receipts at certain forests.

            acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges

Appropriations, 2016....................................        $216,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................         216,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................         216,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $216,000, which is 
equal to the enacted level. This amount is derived from funds 
deposited by State, county, and municipal governments or public 
school authorities pursuant to the act of December 4, 1967, as 
amended (16 U.S.C. 484a).

                         range betterment fund

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $2,320,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       2,320,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,320,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $2,320,000, which is 
equal to the request. This amount is for range rehabilitation, 
protection, and improvement, and is derived from fees received 
for livestock grazing on national forests pursuant to section 
401(b)(1) of Public Law 94-579, as amended.

    gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research

Appropriations, 2016....................................         $45,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................          45,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................          45,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $45,000, which is 
equal to the budget request. This amount is derived from the 
fund established under 16 U.S.C. 1643(b).

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       2,441,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,500,000

    The bill provides an appropriation of $2,500,000, equal to 
the enacted level. This account provides for carrying out the 
Forest Service's responsibilities for subsistence under the 
Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act.

                        wildland fire management


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

Appropriations, 2016\1\.................................  $3,909,329,000
Budget estimate, 2017\2\................................   3,315,541,000
Chairman's recommendation\3\............................   3,332,329,000

\1\Includes $823,000,000 appropriated under the FLAME Wildfire 
Suppression Reserve Account and $700,000,000 in fire borrowing 
repayment.
\2\Includes $864,096,000 for suppression designated as disaster pursuant 
to pending congressional action.
\3\Includes $490,000,000 for suppression designated as emergency.

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $3,332,329,000 
for wildland fire management, an increase of $123,000,000 above 
the enacted level. This includes $490,000,000 provided with an 
emergency designation, for additional suppression resources. 
This year's bill includes a proposal for a permanent fix to end 
fire borrowing and make wildfire budgeting sustainable. Funding 
levels for each subactivity can also be found in the table at 
the end of this statement. Of the funds provided, $2,000,000 is 
for the Southwest Ecological Restoration Institutes to continue 
to enhance the Forest Service's capacity to execute science-
based forest restoration treatments to reduce the risk of 
wildfires and improve the health of dry forest ecosystems.
    Fire Operations.--The bill provides $2,330,620,000 for 
wildfire preparedness and suppression operations, $437,000,000 
above the enacted level. This amount includes $1,082,620,000 
for preparedness and $1,248,000,000 for suppression. As noted, 
the bill provides $490,000,000, with an emergency designation, 
for additional suppression resources that the Forest Service 
can access in lieu of the President's budget proposal to 
provide this amount within the disaster cap. These emergency 
funds are only available if discretionary funds for suppression 
are exhausted.
    Other Operations.--The bill provides $511,709,000 for other 
wildland fire management operations, an increase of $19,000,000 
above the enacted level. The bill provides $390,000,000 for 
hazardous fuels reduction, of which up to $15,000,000 may be 
used for biomass utilization grants. The Forest Service is 
encouraged to use biomass utilization grant funds for the 
development of bioenergy and bio-based products, such as 
nanotechnology, that will expand commercial markets for low 
value wood to facilitate increased removal of biomass beyond 
traditional fuels treatment. Investing in the research and 
development of advanced woody biomass uses will help reduce 
excessive hazardous fuels on our Nation's forestlands while 
creating new economic markets and opportunity for taxpayers.
    The bill also provides $19,795,000 for fire plan research 
and development, $6,914,000 for joint fire science, $80,000,000 
for State fire assistance, and $15,000,000 for volunteer fire 
assistance.
    The Committee urges the Forest Service to increase cross-
boundary collaboration through their hazardous fuels programs, 
including with State Foresters and private sector 
organizations, in efforts to reduce hazardous fuels in high 
fire risk landscapes and to prioritize projects that work 
across ownership boundaries in landscapes, particularly those 
areas identified as priorities in State Forest Action Plans. 
The Committee notes the importance of proactive actions that 
protect communities and habitat from catastrophic wildfire.
    Fire Suppression Aviation.--The Committee acknowledges the 
importance of ensuring all necessary resources are on hand to 
fight the wildfires that ravage the Nation's forests, and 
understands how critical private industry is in these efforts. 
The Committee also recognizes the investment of the Forest 
Service in developing the Next Generation Large Air Tanker 
Modernization Strategy and the need to ensure a sufficient 
number of available aircraft and the proper mix of Federal and 
private equipment to adequately respond to the needs of the 
agencies fighting wildfires. Due to Congressional action, the 
Forest Service has begun to take possession of seven, 
Government-owned C-130H aircraft, as well as to pursue the 
acquisition of new aircraft with funding provided in fiscal 
year 2015. The Forest Service is directed to provide a report 
to the Committee, prior to requesting additional acquisition of 
air tankers, providing evidence of cost-savings expected to 
result from the acquisition of Federal aircraft. This 
evaluation should include not only costs charged to the Forest 
Service, but costs charged to other agencies so the Committee 
has an accurate accounting of the actual cost of Federal 
ownership compared with utilization of private contractors. The 
Committee also recognizes the importance of scoopers in 
fighting wildland fire and encourages the Service to continue 
to utilize scooper contracts, as appropriate.
    Wildland Fire Science Partnership.--The Committee 
appreciates the work of the Wildland Fire Science Partnership 
and expects funds within joint fire science to be used to study 
current wildland firefighting operations and the safety and 
health impacts of such operations on wildland firefighters.

                       Administrative Provisions


                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    The bill continues several administrative provisions from 
previous years.
    There continues to be a need to improve transparency and 
communication between the Forest Service and the Committee. To 
accomplish this, the Forest Service is directed to work with 
the Committee on a budget restructure proposal with the goal of 
improving methods by which spending can be reported by 
congressional priority, as well as by region, State, and 
forest.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service

    The Indian Health Service [IHS] is the agency within the 
Department of Health and Human Services that has responsibility 
for providing Federal health services to approximately 2.2 
million American Indians and Alaska Natives. The provision of 
health services to tribes grew out of the special relationship 
between the Federal Government and Indian tribes that was 
established in 1787, based on article I, section 8 of the 
Constitution, and given form and substance by numerous 
treaties, laws, Supreme Court decisions, and Executive orders 
that followed. Most notable among these is the Snyder Act of 
1921, which provides the basic authority for most Indian health 
services provided by the Federal Government to Native Americans 
and Alaska Natives.
    IHS services are provided directly and through tribally 
contracted and operated programs in over 600 healthcare 
facilities located throughout the United States, primarily in 
rural and isolated areas. Healthcare is also purchased from 
more than 9,000 private providers annually. The Federal system 
consists of 28 hospitals, 61 health centers, and 34 health 
stations. Through Public Law 93-638, the Indian Self-
Determination and Education Act, tribes and tribal 
organizations compact and contract health programs to manage 17 
hospitals, 249 health centers and 70 health stations. In 
addition, grants to 34 nonprofit urban Indian health 
organizations provide a variety of health and referral 
services.

                         indian health services

Appropriations, 2016....................................  $3,566,387,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................   3,815,109,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................   3,650,171,000

    The Committee recommends $3,650,171,000 for clinical 
services programs of the Indian Health Service. This is an 
increase of $83,784,000 above the enacted level. Changes to the 
enacted level are detailed below and in the table accompanying 
this report.
    While the Committee must live within statutory budget 
constraints, it has fully funded the programmatic budget 
request for high priority programs designed to address some of 
the most difficult issues facing Indian Country such as suicide 
and alcohol and substance abuse.
    Accordingly, the Committee has provided increases above the 
enacted level in the services account including $4,000,000 for 
the Domestic Violence Prevention Program, and $16,800,000 for 
the alcohol and substance abuse program to focus on tribal 
youth and the incorporation of more holistic healthcare models 
to improve outcomes. The Service is directed to allocate 
$2,000,000 of the increase provided for the alcohol and 
substance abuse program to fund essential detoxification and 
related services provided by the Service's public and private 
partners to IHS beneficiaries.
    The Committee has fully funded the programmatic request for 
mental health programs of $25,000,000 which includes $3,600,000 
for the Zero Suicide Initiative and $21,400,000 for the 
Behavioral Health Integration Initiative to better integrate 
treatment programs for mental health and substance abuse 
problems.
    The Committee has also provided $29,587,000 for staffing of 
newly opened health facilities and $9,000,000 for tribal clinic 
leases, particularly Village Built Clinics, for a total of 
$11,000,000. Other important increases include $1,000,000 for 
the Urban Health program and $1,000,000 for the Indian Health 
Professions program which is equal to the request.
    Funds for the staffing of new facilities are provided 
solely to support facilities on the Health Care Facilities 
Construction Priority System and Joint Venture construction 
projects that have opened in fiscal year 2016 or will open in 
fiscal year 2017. None of these funds may be allocated to a 
facility until such facility has achieved beneficial occupancy 
status.
    The Committee notes that the Service's budget request 
included $20,000,000 for a Health Information Technology 
Initiative. However, the Committee was recently informed that 
the agency was allocated $60,000,000 of Nonrecurring Expenses 
Fund resources from the Department of Health and Human Services 
some of which is available for IT programs.
    Other.--The Committee is aware that the community of 
Gallup, New Mexico, has long faced a crisis of alcohol-related 
deaths of tribal members, including deaths of 24 individuals 
over the past 2 years, many of which were linked to exposure. 
These deaths underscore the urgent need for substance abuse 
treatment, residential services and detoxification services, 
particularly those provided by the nonprofit Na' Nizhoozhi 
Center, also known as the Gallup Detox Center, which has a 
longstanding relationship with the Service and serves members 
of multiple tribes. Over the past several years, however, the 
Center has lost access to critical funding sources, resulting 
in reduced services and the threat of the facility's closure. 
Given the public health risk involved, the Committee believes 
that it is essential that this facility remain open to provide 
its life-saving services to the community and expects the 
Service to continue its partnership with the Center and to work 
with the Center and other Federal, State, local, and tribal 
partners to develop a sustainable model for the Center to 
enhance its clinical capacity.
    Dental Care Alternatives.--The Committee is concerned that 
tooth decay in Indian Country has reached epidemic proportions 
and notes that preschool children of American Indian and Alaska 
Natives have the highest level of tooth decay of any population 
group in the United States. The Committee understands that the 
geographic isolation of tribal health facilities makes it 
difficult to attract dentists to serve as providers and 
believes that one alternative to improve access to dental care 
is to allow volunteer dentists to treat patients. However, the 
Committee has heard reports that delays in getting approved 
healthcare providers credentialed to work at tribal or Indian 
Health Service facilities have resulted in candidates 
abandoning their efforts to volunteer because they could not be 
processed in a timely fashion. To address this problem, the 
Committee urges the Service to explore establishing a 
centralized credentialing system to encompass volunteer 
providers. The Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs have 
centralized credentialing systems and the Committee believes 
that the Service should consult with those Departments, as well 
as private sector credential verification organizations and 
state dental associations, and work to establish a pilot 
project to test the feasibility of a centralized credentialing 
system.

                         Contract Support Costs

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $717,970,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     800,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     800,000,000

    The Committee has continued language from fiscal year 2016 
establishing an indefinite appropriation for contract support 
costs estimated to be $800,000,000, which is an increase of 
$82,030,000 above the fiscal year 2016 level. The Committee has 
modified the language to delete a provision that contradicted 
certain provisions of the Indian Self-Determination and 
Education Assistance Act.

                        indian health facilities

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $523,232,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     569,906,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     543,607,000

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

    The Committee recommends $543,607,000 for health facilities 
operations of the Indian Health Service. This amount is 
$20,375,000 above the enacted level. Increases above the 
enacted level include $3,395,000 for the staffing of new 
facilities; $3,367,000 for facilities maintenance and 
improvement, equal to the request; $3,613,000 for sanitation 
facilities construction, equal to the request; and $10,000,000 
for healthcare facilities construction for the small ambulatory 
clinic program. The Committee notes that this is the first 
funding for the small ambulatory program since 2008. This 
program is another critical tool for addressing facilities 
maintenance and construction backlogs throughout the Nation. 
The Committee encourages the Service to give strong 
consideration to utilizing these new resources to assist with 
infrastructure improvements at remote sites such as Gambell and 
Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.
    The Committee directs the Service to work with the 
Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium to formulate 
options for facilities upgrades and ultimately a replacement 
facility at Mt. Edgecombe in Sitka. The plan shall be submitted 
to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of this act.
    The stipulations included in the ``Indian Health Services'' 
account regarding the allocation of funds for the staffing of 
new facilities pertain to the funds in this account as well. 
Within 60 days of enactment of this act, the Service shall 
submit a spending plan to the Committee that details the 
project-level distribution of funds provided for healthcare 
facilities construction.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the quality 
of healthcare services provided at many of the Service's 
facilities and expects the Service, in consultation with the 
Committee, to update its performance metrics to better address 
patient health outcomes.

                     National Institutes of Health


          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, an 
agency within the National Institutes of Health, was authorized 
in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, to conduct 
multidisciplinary research and training activities associated 
with the Nation's Hazardous Substance Superfund program, and in 
section 126(g) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization 
Act of 1968, to conduct training and education of workers who 
are or may be engaged in activities related to hazardous waste 
removal or containment or emergency response.

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $77,349,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      77,349,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      77,349,000

    The bill provides $77,349,000 for the operations of the 
``National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences'' 
account. This amount is equal to the budget request and the 
enacted level.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

    The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry 
[ATSDR], an agency of the Public Health Service, was created in 
section 104(i) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980. The ATSDR's primary 
mission is to conduct surveys and screening programs to 
determine relationships between exposure to toxic substances 
and illness. Other activities include the maintenance and 
annual update of a list of hazardous substances most commonly 
found at Superfund sites, the preparation of toxicological 
profiles on each such hazardous substance, consultations on 
health issues relating to exposure to hazardous or toxic 
substances, and the development and implementation of certain 
research activities related to ATSDR's mission.

            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $74,691,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      74,691,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      74,691,000

    The bill provides a total appropriation of $74,691,000 for 
the operations of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease 
Registry account. This amount is equal to the budget request 
and the enacted level.
    Birth Cohort Study.--Continued funding for the ATSDR 
supports the birth cohort study on the Navajo Nation. The 
Committee supports the continuation of this study to better 
understand the relationship between uranium exposures, birth 
outcomes, and early developmental delays on the Navajo Nation.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


                   Executive Office of the President


  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    The Council on Environmental Quality [CEQ] and the Office 
of Environmental Quality [OEQ] were established by the National 
Environmental Policy Act of 1969 [NEPA] and the Environmental 
Quality Improvement Act of 1970, respectively. The Council 
serves as a source of environmental expertise and policy 
analysis for the White House, Executive Office of the 
President, and other Federal agencies. CEQ promulgates 
regulations binding on all Federal agencies to implement the 
procedural provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act 
and resolves interagency environmental disputes informally and 
through issuance of findings and recommendations.

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $3,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       3,015,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       3,000,000

    The bill provides $3,000,000 for the operations of the 
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental 
Quality account. This amount is equal to the enacted level.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

    The Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board was 
authorized by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 to 
investigate accidental releases of certain chemicals substances 
that result in, or may cause, serious injury, death, 
substantial property damage, or serious adverse effects on 
human health. It became operational in fiscal year 1998.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $11,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      12,436,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      11,000,000

    The bill provides $11,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board. This amount 
is equal to the enacted level.
    The Committee remains focused on internal activities at the 
U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board. A report 
from the Inspector General of the Environmental Protection 
Agency investigated the Board and found that a ``lack of 
internal guidance and implementation of controls puts the CSB's 
$11,000,000 budget at risk.'' The Committee is encouraged by 
efforts at the Board under the new Chair's leadership to remedy 
these issues, but remains concerned that more must to be done 
to restore credibility to an agency with the important 
responsibility of investigating industrial chemical accidents. 
Given the scope of internal issues still requiring resolution 
and pending investigations that require completion, the 
Committee encourages CSB to focus the resources allocated on 
these critical tasks.
    The Inspector General report indicated that the CSB does 
not have internal guidance over its annual budget process. The 
Committee directs the CSB to develop such guidance and provide 
it to the Committee within 90 days of passage of this act.
    The Committee also notes that this year's budget request 
included funding for CSB to organize an annual symposium or 
forum on innovations in chemical safety. Although attendance at 
conferences on chemical safety can be useful for CSB staff, 
industry stakeholders, and other interested parties, the 
Committee notes that a number of similar meetings related to 
chemical safety already take place on an annual basis and 
questions the utility of another federally funded event. The 
Committee directs the CSB to provide further justification for 
this expenditure prior to expending any resources for this 
purpose.
    The Committee is aware of CSB's announcement of a study on 
land use and facility siting. The Committee is concerned about 
the scope of such a study and the necessity of the Board 
devoting Federal resources to land use issues that are 
historically the province of state and local jurisdiction. The 
Committee directs CSB to provide a report detailing the 
intended scope of and justification for the study prior to 
expending any funds for this purpose.
    The Committee notes that this year's budget request 
includes funding for safety video production. The Committee has 
heard concerns that certain videos produced by the CSB have 
encouraged members of the public to lobby Members of Congress 
and state legislatures on pending or future Federal or State 
legislation. The Board is reminded of the prohibition against 
this type of advocacy and expects strict adherence to the 
prohibition.

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

    The Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation was 
established by Public Law 93-531. The Office is charged with 
planning and conducting relocation activities associated with 
the settlement of land disputes between the Navajo Nation and 
Hopi Tribe.
    The Committee directs the Office of Navajo and Hopi 
Relocation [OHNIR], in consultation with the Secretary of 
Interior, to report back to the Committee within 90 days 
detailing the functions of the OHNIR that could be transferred 
to the Department of Interior. It is the Committee's 
expectation this report include any costs associated with a 
potential transfer and any costs to maintain ongoing activities 
of the OHNIR. This report should also include a legal analysis 
examining whether any potential office closure would require 
enacting legislation to transfer or maintain any identified 
functions to another agency or organization.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $15,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      15,431,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      15,431,000

    The bill provides $15,431,000 for the Office of Navajo and 
Hopi Indian Relocation, an increase of $431,000 above the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development

    The Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture 
and Arts Development [IAIA] was originally founded in 1962 as a 
Bureau of Indian Affairs [BIA] high school. The Institute was 
moved out of the BIA in 1988 to become a federally chartered 4-
year college governed by a board of trustees appointed by the 
President of the United States and confirmed by the Senate. Its 
mission is to serve as the national center of research, 
training, language, and scholarship for Native Americans and 
Alaska Natives through the dedicated study, creative 
application, preservation, and care of Native cultures and 
arts. In addition to its academic programs, the IAIA houses the 
National Collection of Contemporary Indian Art and carries the 
designation as the National Repository for Native Languages. 
The IAIA's operations are funded by direct Federal support and 
a diversified private sector approach to foundations, 
corporations, tribes, and individual donors.

                        payment to the institute

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $11,619,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      11,835,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      15,212,000

    The recommendation provides $15,212,000 for the Institute 
of American Indian Arts, an increase of $3,377,000 above the 
request and $3,593,000 above the enacted level. The increase 
above the request shall be used to complete the Institute's 
transition to forward funding during fiscal year 2017 rather 
than to phasing in forward funding over multiple years as 
proposed by the administration. Amounts provided for fiscal 
year 2017 shall be supplemented by $2,000,000 in prior-year 
carryover funds, for a total operating level of $9,835,000. 
Requested increases for fixed costs and academic program 
requirements are included within the Committee's 
recommendation.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    Congress established the Smithsonian Institution in 1846 to 
administer a large bequest left to the United States by James 
Smithson, an English scientist, for the purpose of establishing 
in Washington, DC, an institution ``. . . for the increase and 
diffusion of knowledge among men.'' The act establishing the 
Smithsonian provided for the administration of the trust, 
independent of the Government itself, by a Board of Regents and 
a Secretary, who were given broad discretion in the use of 
these funds. The board was to be composed of both private 
citizens and members of all three branches of the Federal 
Government in order to ensure ``the wise and faithful use'' of 
the Institution's funds. The trust funds were permanently 
loaned to the U.S. Treasury to be maintained in a separate 
account, with the interest from that money used for the 
operation of the Institution. Construction of the Smithsonian 
Castle was completed in 1855 and collections that the 
Government had accepted on behalf of the Institution were moved 
into the building. Today, the Smithsonian Institution is the 
world's largest museum and research complex, housing 
approximately 144 million objects and specimens, and receiving 
an estimated 25 million visitors annually.
    Its facilities include 19 museums and galleries, the 
National Zoo, and nine research facilities--most located in or 
near Washington, DC, with others in Massachusetts, New York, 
Florida, Arizona, Hawaii, and the Republic of Panama. The 
Smithsonian's growth continues as construction proceeds on the 
National Museum of African American History and Culture, 
authorized by Congress in 2003 and scheduled to open to the 
public in 2016.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $696,045,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     759,224,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     718,059,000

    The bill provides $718,059,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Smithsonian Institution. This amount is an increase of 
$22,014,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. Unless 
otherwise provided, increases above the fiscal year 2016 level 
account for fixed costs for the Institution's programs. In 
fiscal year 2016, the Institution reprogrammed $1,500,000 from 
the Collections Care Preservation Fund within the Institution-
wide Programs to support staffing needed to provide for the 
Smithsonian's collections. The recommendation includes the 
annualized costs to maintain the collections staffing hired in 
fiscal year 2016 by the Institution to support multiple 
museums.
    The Committee understands the role the Institution has 
played as a source of learning and inspiration, and appreciates 
the challenges the Institution must overcome to keep the 
museums open and available to the public. The Committee also 
understand the importance of collaboration and partnerships and 
strongly encourages areas, such as the National Zoological 
Park, to work with external sources to provide support in 
pathological research, services, and training to augment the 
existing needs of the National Zoo.
    The Committee provides a total of $294,323,000 for 
Facilities Services, of which $76,327,000 is for Facilities 
Maintenance and $217,996,000 is for Facilities Operations, 
Security and Support. Increases of $1,600,000 for the 
Facilities Maintenance and $3,900,000 for the Facilities 
Operations have been included for facilities, operations, and 
maintenance, respectively, to fund necessary expenses required 
for the opening of the National Museum of African American 
History and Culture in 2016.
    The creation of a Museum of the American Latino within the 
Smithsonian Institution at some future date continues to be a 
strongly supported priority. Until such time, the Smithsonian 
Latino Center, which was formed in 1997 with the goal of 
promoting the inclusion of Latino contributions in the 
Institution's exhibitions, collections and public outreach 
programs, should continue this important work. In accordance 
with the recommendations provided to Congress and the President 
of the United States in the May 2011 report by the National 
Museum of the American Latino Commission (created by Public Law 
110-229), the Committee urges collaboration between the 
Smithsonian and appropriate Federal and local organizations to 
increase Latino programming, exhibitions, collections, and 
outreach at the Institution. The Committee expects that within 
the funds provided for program support and outreach, the 
Institution will be able to increase support for this effort. 
The Committee is also aware the Asian Pacific American Center 
is examining ways in which it could expand its outreach, both 
within the Institution and beyond the National Mall. The 
Committee continues to encourage the Institution to find ways 
to share the contributions Asian Americans have contributed to 
the American experience.
    The subcommittee recognizes that the Smithsonian must raise 
private funds to supplement its Federal funding. The 
subcommittee wishes to ensure, however, that revenue-producing 
activities do not detract from the core mission or the 
reputation of the Smithsonian. The subcommittee directs the 
Smithsonian to review and report with 90 days of enactment of 
this act on how it balances the need to produce revenue through 
the activities of Smithsonian Enterprises with the pursuit of 
its core mission and with protection of its reputation.

                           facilities capital

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $144,198,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     163,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     142,184,000

    The bill includes $142,184,000 for the Smithsonian 
Institution's Facilities Capital program, $2,014,000 below the 
current year enacted level. Within these funds, $71,884,000 is 
provided for revitalizations efforts, $20,300,000 for planning 
and design efforts, and $50,000,000 is provided for 
construction.
    The Committee understands the Institution is in the process 
of a multi-year, multi-phase renovation project for the 
National Air and Space Museum, including the necessary 
replacement of the building's facade. The Committee has 
included the $50 million, as requested, to support the 
construction of a storage facility at Udvar-Hazy to facilitate 
the upcoming renovation. The Committee recognizes the museum is 
a popular stop for visitors and it is important to ensure the 
public has access to the collection of artifacts; however, the 
Committee is also concerned the estimated half a billion dollar 
cost for the museum's renovations will limit the ability to 
modernize and make repairs to other facilities. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Smithsonian to report back to the 
Committee within 90 days from enactment of this act regarding 
total estimated project costs, phasing opportunities, and 
construction timelines, as well as potential partnership 
funding options and building technologies or design features 
that could be integrated during the construction of the project 
to lower the estimated costs. The report shall also detail the 
Institution's plans to maintain the public's access to the 
National Air and Space Museum's important collections during 
the construction of the project.

                        National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art was created in 1937 by a joint 
resolution of Congress accepting Andrew W. Mellon's gift to the 
Nation of his art collection. The generosity of the Mellon 
family also provided the funds to construct the Gallery's two 
landmark buildings, the West Building, designed by Alexander 
Pope and completed in 1941, and the East Building, designed by 
I.M. Pei and completed in 1978. In 1999, an outdoor sculpture 
garden was created with funding from the Cafritz Foundation. 
Today, these two buildings and the Sculpture Garden form a 
museum complex that houses one of the world's premier art 
collections. Since the Gallery's founding, Federal funds have 
been appropriated to ensure the operation, maintenance, 
protection, and care of its collection. Private contributions 
are used by the Gallery for art acquisition and conservation, 
scholarly and scientific research, exhibitions, and educational 
outreach programs.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $124,988,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     135,801,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     132,961,000

    The bill provides $132,961,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the National Gallery of Art. This amount is $7,973,000 above 
the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The distribution of funds 
among the Gallery's various activities is displayed in the 
table that accompanies this report.

            repair, restoration, and renovation of buildings

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $22,564,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      22,600,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      22,564,000

    The bill provides $22,564,000 for major repairs, 
restoration and renovation of the Gallery's buildings. This 
amount is equal to the enacted level.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    Originally established in 1958 as the National Cultural 
Center, an independently administered bureau of the Smithsonian 
Institution, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts 
was designated as a living memorial to President Kennedy in 
1964. The Kennedy Center building was constructed with a 
combination of private contributions, Federal matching funds 
and long-term revenue bonds held by the U.S. Department of the 
Treasury. Since 1972, Congress has provided funds for the 
operations and repair of the presidential monument, initially 
through the National Park Service and since 1995 to the Kennedy 
Center Board of Trustees. Approximately 87 percent of the 
Center's total annual operating budget is derived from 
nonappropriated funds such as ticket sales, auxiliary income, 
investment income and private contributions that support 
performing arts programming and administrative activities.

                       operations and maintenance

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $21,660,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      22,260,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      22,260,000

    The bill provides $22,269,000 for the operations and 
maintenance of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing 
Arts, the same amount as the administration's fiscal year 2017 
request.

                     CAPITAL REPAIR AND RESTORATION

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $14,740,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      13,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      13,000,000

    The bill provides $13,000,000 for the Kennedy Center's 
capital repair and restoration program, equal to the 
administration's request.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is the 
living national memorial to President Wilson established by 
Congress in 1968 and headquartered in Washington, DC. Its 
mission is to commemorate the ideals and concerns of the former 
president by providing a link between the world of ideas and 
the world of policy; and by fostering research, study, 
discussion, and collaboration among a full spectrum of 
individuals concerned with policy and scholarship in national 
and world affairs. The Woodrow Wilson Center is a nonpartisan 
institution that is supported by a combination of public and 
private funds.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $10,500,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      10,400,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      10,500,000

    The bill provides $10,500,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the same 
amount as the fiscal year 2016 enacted level.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts

    Established in 1965 as an independent agency of the Federal 
Government, the National Endowment for the Arts [NEA] is the 
official arts organization of the United States Government. As 
the largest annual funder of the arts in the United States, the 
NEA has helped to create regional theater, opera, ballet, 
symphony orchestras, museums and other arts organizations that 
Americans now enjoy. Since its founding, the National Endowment 
for the Arts has awarded more than 120,000 grants that have 
brought the arts to Americans in communities both large and 
small. The NEA, through its competitive, peer-reviewed grants 
process, uses the majority of its annual operating funds to 
award grants to nonprofit organizations for arts education, 
arts outreach, artistic excellence and partnership agreements. 
In addition to those activities, State and jurisdictional arts 
agencies are awarded 40 percent of the Endowment's funds.

                       grants and administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $147,949,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     149,849,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     148,449,000

    The bill provides $148,449,000 for grants and 
administration of the National Endowment for the Arts, $500,000 
above the fiscal year enacted level. The NEA is to be commended 
for the work it has done through its Healing Arts Partnerships 
with Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and Fort 
Belvoir Community Hospital to incorporate arts therapy into the 
treatment plans of active-duty military patients and their 
families. The Committee understands the NEA is working to 
expand this successful program to additional locations and 
supports this expansion to help service members and their 
families in their recovery, reintegration, or transition to 
civilian life. The Committee also encourages State arts 
agencies to explore how they can contribute to expanding arts 
programs for service members and their families at the local 
level. The distribution of funds among the agency's various 
activities is displayed in the table that accompanies this 
statement.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

    The National Endowment for the Humanities [NEH] was 
established by the 1965 National Foundation on the Arts and 
Humanities Act as an independent Federal agency of the United 
States Government dedicated to supporting research, education, 
preservation, and public programs in the humanities. Today, it 
is the largest funder of humanities programs in the Nation. 
NEH's longstanding tradition of a peer-reviewed competitive 
grant process is designed to ensure that the most meritorious 
projects are funded. Typically, NEH grants are used to support 
cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, 
colleges, universities, public television and radio, and 
individual scholars. The NEH, through its State-Federal 
partnership, also provides grants to State humanities councils 
in all 50 States and the 6 territories.

                       grants and administration

Appropriations, 2016....................................    $147,942,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     149,848,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................     148,442,000

    The bill provides $148,442,000 for grants and 
administration of the National Endowment for the Humanities, 
$500,000 above the fiscal year 2016 enacted level. The 
Committee understands the NEH has continued two components of 
the popular ``We the People'' initiative grant opportunities, 
the National Digital Newspapers Program [NDNP] and the 
Landmarks of American History and Culture workshops. The 
Committee encourages NEH to continue providing support to 
projects that focus on our Nation's history and culture. The 
distribution of funds among the agency's various activities is 
displayed in the table that accompanies this statement. The 
distribution of funds among the agency's various activities is 
displayed in the table that accompanies this statement.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to fill 
the need for a permanent agency whose members would be 
qualified to make available to the Government expert opinion on 
questions of art and architecture. The Commission's mission, as 
design proposals are brought before it, is to safeguard and 
improve the appearance and symbolic significance of the city as 
a capital. The Commission provides knowledgeable advice on 
matters pertaining to architecture, landscape architecture, 
sculpture, painting, and the decorative arts to all branches 
and departments of the Federal and District of Columbia 
governments when such matters affect the National Capital. The 
Commission also must approve of the site and design of all 
commemorative works and memorials erected in the District. The 
Commission advises on the design of circulating and 
commemorative coinage and must approve the siting and design 
for national memorials, both in the United States and on 
foreign soil, in accordance with the American Battle Monuments 
Act and the Commemorative Works Act.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $2,653,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       2,762,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,653,000

    The bill provides $2,653,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Commission of Fine Arts, equal to the fiscal year 2016 
enacted level.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs

    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established by Public Law 99-190 to provide grants for general 
operating support to District of Columbia nonprofit arts and 
other cultural organizations. In fiscal year 1988, 
administrative responsibility for the program was transferred 
from the National Endowment for the Humanities to the 
Commission of Fine Arts. Currently, this program helps support 
more than 20 nationally renowned organizations in the Nation's 
Capital by providing funding for operating expenses, jobs, 
exhibits, and performances that might not have been possible 
otherwise.

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $2,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       1,400,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       2,000,000

    The bill provides $2,000,000, the same amount as the fiscal 
year 2016 appropriation, to continue support for the National 
Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program administered by the 
Commission of Fine Arts. The Committee has not received the 
report as required by Public Law 114-113 detailing the 
potential impacts to arts and cultural affairs organizations 
who have previously received funding; therefore the bill does 
not include the requested bill language addressing limitations 
on grant recipients. The Committee expects the program to 
submit this report and encourages its timely completion.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation as an independent 
Federal agency. The Council's mission is to promote the 
preservation, enhancement, and productive use of our Nation's 
historic resources, and advise the President and Congress on 
national historic preservation policy. It also provides a forum 
for discussion of Federal activities, programs, and policies 
that affect historic properties. One of the principal 
responsibilities of the Council is to implement Section 106 of 
the National Historic Preservation Act, which requires that the 
Council be given an opportunity to comment on the impacts of 
projects or actions undertaken by other Federal agencies on 
sites or structures eligible for inclusion in the National 
Register of Historic Places.

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $6,080,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       6,493,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       6,493,000

    The bill provides $6,493,000 for the Advisory Council on 
Historic Preservation, an increase of $413,000 above the 
enacted level.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

    The National Capital Planning Commission [NCPC] was 
established in 1924 as a park planning agency. Two years later, 
the agency's role was expanded to included more comprehensive 
planning. The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated 
the NCPC as the central planning agency for the Federal 
Government in the National Capital Region. Today, major 
functions and responsibilities of the NCPC include 
comprehensive and coordinated planning for the Nation's 
Capital; an annual assessment of all proposed Federal capital 
improvements in the national capital region; the review of 
proposed Federal development projects; and representation of 
the Federal interest in local and regional planning 
initiatives.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $8,348,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       8,099,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       8,099,000

    The bill provides $8,099,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the National Capital Planning Commission, $249,000 below the 
fiscal year 2016 enacted level.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

    The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum was created by 
Congress in 1980 through Public Law 96-388 with the mandate to 
operate and maintain a permanent living memorial museum to the 
victims of the Holocaust; provide appropriate ways for the 
Nation to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust through the 
annual national civic observances known as the Days of 
Remembrance; and carry out the recommendations of the 
President's Commission on the Holocaust. The building that 
houses the museum was constructed with private funds and opened 
to the public in 1993. Since that time, the museum has 
attracted four to five times the number of expected visitors 
and has been highly successful in its fundraising efforts. With 
private contributions comprising nearly 50 percent of its 
annual operating budget, the Holocaust Memorial Museum serves 
as a model for the public-private partnership.

                       holocaust memorial museum

Appropriations, 2016....................................     $54,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................      57,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................      57,000,000

    The bill provides $57,000,000 for operations of the United 
States Holocaust Memorial Museum, $3,000,000 above the enacted 
level.

                Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................      $1,000,000
Budget estimate, 2017...................................       1,800,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................       1,000,000

    The bill provides $1,000,000 for salaries and expenses of 
the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission, equal to the 
enacted level.

                              CONSTRUCTION

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................     $43,000,000
Chairman's recommendation...............................................

    No funds have been provided in the ``Capital Construction'' 
account for the memorial. However, language has been included 
in the bill under title IV, General Provisions, that extends 
the memorial's site authority to September 30, 2017. The 
current authority expires in September 2016.

                 Women's Suffrage Centennial Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2016....................................................
Budget estimate, 2017...................................................
Chairman's recommendation...............................      $2,000,000

    The bill includes $2,000,000 to establish the new Women's 
Suffrage Centennial Commission, as authorized by title VII of 
this act. The Commission shall plan, execute and coordinate 
programs and activities in honor of the 100th anniversary of 
the passage and ratification the Nineteenth Amendment to the 
U.S. Constitution, which guaranteed women the right to vote.

                                TITLE IV

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     (Including Transfers of Funds)

    Title IV of the bill includes the following general 
provisions:
    Sec. 401. Provides that appropriations available in the 
bill shall not be used to produce literature or otherwise 
promote public support of a legislative proposal or regulation 
on which action is not complete or for publicity or propaganda 
purposes in support of administration policies except to the 
executive branch or Congress.
    Sec. 402. Continues a provision providing for annual 
appropriations unless expressly provided otherwise in this act.
    Sec. 403. Continues a provision providing restrictions on 
departmental assessments unless approved by the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 404. Retains the mining patent moratorium carried in 
previous years.
    Sec. 405. Continues a provision regarding the payment of 
contract support costs.
    Sec. 406. Provides that only certain amounts provided in 
this act may be used to fund contract support costs.
    Sec. 407. Continues a provision providing that the 
Secretary of Agriculture shall not be considered in violation 
of certain provisions of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act solely because more than 15 years have 
passed without revision of a forest plan, provided that the 
Secretary is working in good faith to complete the plan 
revision within available funds.
    Sec. 408. Prohibits oil, natural gas, and mining-related 
activities within current national monument boundaries, except 
where such activities are allowed under the presidential 
proclamation establishing the monument.
    Sec. 409. Restricts funding appropriated for acquisition of 
land or interests in land from being used for declarations of 
taking or complaints in condemnation.
    Sec. 410. Addresses timber sales involving Alaska western 
red and yellow cedar.
    Sec. 411. Prohibits modifying definition of waters under 
the jurisdiction of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.
    Sec. 412. Restricts awards of no-bid contracts.
    Sec. 413. Requires the public disclosure of certain 
reports.
    Sec. 414. Provision related to carbon emissions from forest 
biomass.
    Sec. 415. Continues a provision which delineates the grant 
guidelines for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Sec. 416. Continues a provision which delineates the 
program priorities for the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Sec. 417. Prohibits expansion of certain regulations under 
the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act.
    Sec. 418. Retains certain reporting requirements regarding 
the status of appropriations balances.
    Sec. 419. Continues a provision on reporting on the use of 
climate change funds.
    Sec. 420. Continues prohibition of any rules that would 
require the regulation of emissions from livestock.
    Sec. 421. Continues prohibition on EPA using funds to 
implement a mandatory greenhouse gas reporting system for 
manure management systems.
    Sec. 422. Modification of authorities for the Dwight D. 
Eisenhower Memorial Commission.
    Sec. 423. Continues prohibition on regulation of fishing 
tackle and ammunition under the Toxic Substances Control Act.
    Sec. 424. Continues provision regarding grazing permits on 
Forest Service lands
    Sec. 425. Extends existing authority to collect recreation 
fees for 1 year.
    Sec. 426. Stewardship Contracting technical correction.
    Sec. 427. Continues standards for the use of American iron 
and steel for certain infrastructure projects.
    Sec. 428. John F. Kennedy Center 1 year reauthorization.
    Sec. 429. Technical corrections to Good Neighbor Authority.
    Sec. 430. Boundary adjustment to Bob Marshall Wilderness.
    Sec. 431. Prohibits denial of timely access of records to 
Inspectors General.

                                TITLE V

                       WILDFIRE DISASTER FUNDING

    Title V of the bill includes language to create a new cap 
adjustment to the statutory discretionary spending limits for 
wildland fire suppression activities, to combat the most 
severe, complex, and threatening fires, and to serve as a 
contingency reserve. This mechanism is critically needed to 
provide certainty for the Federal agencies tasked with 
preventing and responding to the increasing incidence of 
catastrophic wildfires throughout the country. In addition, the 
language requires specific reporting and cost containment by 
the agencies utilizing this new cap adjustment. Further 
explanation can be found in the front matter of this statement. 
The language in title V is a modification of the proposal 
included in the fiscal year 2017 budget request, which is also 
the subject matter of bipartisan legislation introduced in both 
the House and the Senate.

                                TITLE VI

                      ALASKA LAND USE COUNCIL ACT

    Title VI establishes a revised and modernized Alaska Land 
Use Council [ALUC]. The original ALUC was established in title 
12 of the Alaska National Interest Land Conservation Act 
[ANILCA]. The ALUC sunset in 1990, but the current relationship 
between the State of Alaska, residents of Alaska, and the 
Federal land management agencies make it clear that a 
constructive venue at which to discuss land and resource 
management issues and to facilitate enhanced coordination and 
cooperation is necessary. The purpose of the new ALUC is to 
improve coordination, efficiency, and cooperation among 
Federal, State, and Alaska Native Corporation and Tribal land 
managers in addressing land and resource issues in order to 
fulfill the intent of Congress to balance social, economic, and 
environmental considerations as required by ANILCA.

                               TITLE VII

                 WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION

    Title VII of the bill authorizes a new Women's Suffrage 
Centennial Commission to commemorate the events that led to 
women gaining the right to vote, including the passage and 
ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment which proposes an item of 
appropriation which is not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    Those items are as follows:
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Land Management for 
        management of lands and resources, land acquisition, 
        construction and maintenance, and loans to States.
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Land Management to 
        inventory, manage, and improve rangelands for domestic 
        livestock grazing pursuant to Public Law 95-514, the 
        Public Rangeland Improvement Act of 1978.
  --$237,332,000 for the endangered species program, U.S. Fish 
        and Wildlife Service.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife service for coastal 
        wetlands planning, protection, and restoration.
  --Sums provided for the Yukon River Restoration and 
        Enhancement Fund, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
        pursuant to the Fisheries Act of 1995.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service for the 
        conservation and protection of marine mammals pursuant 
        to Public Law 103-238, the Marine Mammal Protection Act 
        Amendments of 1994.
  --Sums provided for Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration 
        grants.
  --Sums provided to the Fish and Wildlife Service pursuant to 
        the Klamath River Basin Fishery Resources Restoration 
        Act; Fisheries Restoration Irrigation Mitigation Act; 
        and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
        Establishment Act.
  --Sums provided to the U.S. Geological Survey for the 
        National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.
  --Sums provided to the Bureau of Indian Affairs pursuant to 
        The Tribal Colleges or Universities Assistance Act of 
        1978; The Indian Tribal Justice Act; Indian Child 
        Protection and Family Violence Act; and The No Child 
        Left Behind Act.
  --$1,077,784,000 for the Hazardous Substance Superfund.
  --$20,000,000 for State and tribal assistance grants: Alaska 
        Native Villages.
  --$1,350,000,000 for State and tribal assistance grants: 
        Clean Water SRF.
  --$1,020,500,000 for State and tribal assistance grants: 
        Drinking Water SRF.
  --Sums provided pursuant to the Clean Air Act, Radon 
        Abatement Act, Clean Water Act, BEACH Act, Safe 
        Drinking Water Act, Solid Waste Disposal Act [RCRA], 
        Toxic Substances Control Act, Pollution Prevention Act, 
        and the Indian Environmental General Assistance Program 
        Act.
  --$3,000,000 for matching funds for projects of the National 
        Forest Foundation, U.S. Forest Service.
  --$148,449,000 for the National Endowment for the Arts.
  --$148,442,000 for the National Endowment for the Humanities.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(c), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, on June 16, 2016, 
the Committee ordered favorably reported an original bill (S. 
3068) making appropriations for the Department of the Interior, 
environment, and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2017, and for other purposes, provided, that the 
bill be subject to amendment and that the bill be consistent 
with its budget allocation, and provided that the Chairman of 
the Committee or his designee be authorized to offer the 
substance of the original bill as a Committee amendment in the 
nature of a substitute to the House companion measure, by a 
recorded vote of 16-14, a quorum being present. The vote was as 
follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Cochran                    Ms. Mikulski
Mr. McConnell                       Mr. Leahy
Mr. Shelby                          Mrs. Murray
Mr. Alexander                       Mrs. Feinstein
Ms. Collins                         Mr. Durbin
Ms. Murkowski                       Mr. Reed
Mr. Graham                          Mr. Tester
Mr. Kirk                            Mr. Udall
Mr. Blunt                           Mrs. Shaheen
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Merkley
Mr. Hoeven                          Mr. Coons
Mr. Boozman                         Mr. Schatz
Mrs. Capito                         Ms. Baldwin
Mr. Cassidy                         Mr. Murphy
Mr. Lankford
Mr. Daines

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                         TITLE 16--CONSERVATION


  Chapter 1--National Parks, Military Parks, Monuments, and Seashores


           Subchapter LIX-M--Natchez National Historical Park


[Sec. 410oo-6. Authorization of appropriations

    There are hereby authorized to be appropriated not to 
exceed $12,000,000 to carry out this subchapter.] Repealed.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


              Chapter 41--Cooperative Forestry Assistance


Sec. 2113a. Good neighbor authority

(a) Definitions

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(b) Good neighbor agreements

        (1) Good neighbor agreements

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (2) Timber sales

                (A) In general

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                (B) Approval of silviculture prescriptions and 
                marking guides

                    The Secretary shall provide or approve all 
                silviculture prescriptions and marking guides 
                to be applied on Federal land in all timber 
                sale projects conducted under this section.

            (C) Forest development roads.--

                    (i) In general.--Notwithstanding subsection 
                (a)(3)(B), existing roads shall be repaired or 
                reconstructed to a satisfactory condition to 
                perform authorized restoration services 
                including removal of timber.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 Chapter 84--Healthy Forest Restoration


                      Subchapter VI--Miscellaneous


Sec. 6591c. Stewardship end result contracting projects

(a) Definitions

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

(d) Agreements or contracts

        (1) Procurement procedure

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (5) Relation to other laws

            Notwithstanding subsections (d) and (g) of section 
        472a of this title, the Chief may enter into an 
        agreement or contract under subsection (b). 
        Notwithstanding the Materials Act of 1947 (30 U.S.C. 
        602(a)), the Director may enter into an agreement or 
        contract under subsection (b).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

        (7) Fire liability provisions

            Not later than 90 days after February 7, 2014, the 
        Chief [and the Director] shall issue for use in all 
        contracts and agreements under this section fire 
        liability provisions that are in substantially the same 
        form as the fire liability provisions contained in--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


            Chapter 87--Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement


Sec. 6809. Sunset provision

    The authority of the Secretary to carry out this chapter 
shall terminate on [September 30, 2017] September 30, 2018.
                                ------                                


                          TITLE 20--EDUCATION


 Chapter 3--Smithsonian Institution, National Museums and Art Galleries


      Subchapter V--John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


Sec. 76r. Authorization of appropriations

[(a) Maintenance, repair, and security

    [There is authorized to be appropriated to the Board to 
carry out section 76j(a)(1)(H) of this title, $22,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2016.

[(b) Capital projects

    [There is authorized to be appropriated to the Board to 
carry out subparagraphs (F) and (G) of section 76j(a)(1) of 
this title, $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2016.]

    (a) Maintenance, Repair, and Security.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to the Board to carry out section 
4(a)(1)(H), $24,000,000 for fiscal year 2017.

    (b) Capital Projects.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated to the Board to carry out subparagraphs (F) and 
(G) of section 4(a)(1), $13,000,000 for fiscal year 2017.
                                ------                                


             TITLE 40--PUBLIC BUILDING, PROPERTY, AND WORKS


                 SUBTITLE II--PUBLIC BUILDING AND WORKS


                   Part C--Federal Building Complexes


Chapter 63--Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery of Art, and John 
               F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


Sec. 6301. Definition

    In this chapter, the term ``specified buildings and 
grounds'' means--

            (1) Smithsonian institution.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) National gallery of art.--* * *

                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (C) to the line of the face of the south 
                curb of Constitution Avenue Northwest, between 
                Ninth Street Northwest and Seventh Street 
                Northwest; to the line of the face of the west 
                curb of Seventh Street Northwest, between 
                Constitution Avenue Northwest and Madison Drive 
                Northwest; to the line of the face of the north 
                curb of Madison Drive Northwest, between 
                Seventh Street Northwest and the line of the 
                face of the east side of the east retaining 
                wall of the Ninth Street Expressway Northwest; 
                and to the line of the face of the east side of 
                the east retaining wall of the Ninth Street 
                Expressway Northwest, between Madison Drive 
                Northwest and Constitution Avenue Northwest[.]; 
                and

                    (D) all other buildings, service roads, 
                walks, and other areas within the exterior 
                boundaries of any real estate or land or 
                interest in land (including temporary use) that 
                the National Gallery of Art acquires and that 
                the Director of the National Gallery of Art 
                determines to be necessary for the adequate 
                protection of individuals or property in the 
                National Gallery of Art and suitable for 
                administration as a part of the National 
                Gallery of Art.
                                ------                                


 BALANCED BUDGET AND EMERGENCY DEFICIT CONTROL ACT OF 1985, PUBLIC LAW 
                                 99-177


  PART C--EMERGENCY POWERS TO ELIMINATE DEFICITS IN EXCESS OF MAXIMUM 
                             DEFICIT AMOUNT


SEC. 251. ENFORCING DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

    (a) Enforcement.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--

            (1) Concepts and definitions.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) Sequestration reports.--* * *

                    (A) Emergency appropriations; overseas 
                contingency operations/global war on 
                terrorism.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (D) Disaster Funding.--

                            (i) If, for fiscal years 2012 
                        through 2021, appropriations for 
                        discretionary accounts are enacted that 
                        Congress designates as being for 
                        disaster relief in statute, the 
                        adjustment for a fiscal year shall be 
                        the total of such appropriations for 
                        the fiscal year in discretionary 
                        accounts designated as being for 
                        disaster relief, but not to exceed the 
                        total of--

                                    (I) the average funding 
                                provided for disaster relief 
                                over the previous 10 years, 
                                excluding the highest and 
                                lowest years; [and] plus

                                    (II) the amount, for years 
                                when the enacted new 
                                discretionary budget authority 
                                designated as being for 
                                disaster relief for the 
                                preceding fiscal year was less 
                                than the average as calculated 
                                in subclause (I) for that 
                                fiscal year, that is the 
                                difference between the enacted 
                                amount and the allowable 
                                adjustment as calculated in 
                                such subclause for that fiscal 
                                year[.] ; less

                                    (III) the additional new 
                                budget authority provided in an 
                                appropriation Act for wildfire 
                                suppression operations pursuant 
                                to subparagraph (E) for the 
                                preceding fiscal year.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                            (iv) Appropriations considered 
                        disaster relief under this subparagraph 
                        in a fiscal year shall not be eligible 
                        for adjustments under subparagraph (A) 
                        for the fiscal year.

                            (v) Beginning in fiscal year 2019, 
                        and for each fiscal year thereafter, 
                        the calculation of the `average funding 
                        provided for disaster relief over the 
                        previous 10 years' shall include for 
                        each year within that average the 
                        additional new budget authority 
                        provided in an appropriation Act for 
                        wildfire suppression operations 
                        pursuant to subparagraph (E) for the 
                        preceding fiscal year.

                    (E) Wildfire suppression.--

                            (i) Definitions.--In this 
                        subparagraph:

                                    (I) Additional new budget 
                                authority.--The term 
                                `additional new budget 
                                authority' means the amount 
                                provided for a fiscal year in 
                                an appropriation Act that is--

                                            (aa) in excess of 
                                        100 percent of the 
                                        average costs for 
                                        wildfire suppression 
                                        operations over the 
                                        previous 10 years; and

                                            (bb) specified to 
                                        pay for the costs of 
                                        wildfire suppression 
                                        operations.

                                    (II) Wildfire suppression 
                                operations.--The term `wildfire 
                                suppression operations' means 
                                the emergency and unpredictable 
                                aspects of wildland 
                                firefighting, including--

                                            (aa) support, 
                                        response, and emergency 
                                        stabilization 
                                        activities;

                                            (bb) other 
                                        emergency management 
                                        activities; and

                                            (cc) the funds 
                                        necessary to repay any 
                                        transfers needed for 
                                        the costs of wildfire 
                                        suppression operations.

                            (ii) Additional new budget 
                        authority.--If a bill or joint 
                        resolution making appropriations for a 
                        fiscal year is enacted that specifies 
                        an amount for wildfire suppression 
                        operations in the Wildland Fire 
                        Management accounts at the Department 
                        of Agriculture or the Department of the 
                        Interior, then the adjustments for that 
                        fiscal year shall be the amount of 
                        additional new budget authority 
                        provided in that Act for wildfire 
                        suppression operations for that fiscal 
                        year, but shall not exceed--

                                    (I) for fiscal year 2017, 
                                $1,410,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (II) for fiscal year 2018, 
                                $1,460,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (III) for fiscal year 2019, 
                                $1,560,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (IV) for fiscal year 2020, 
                                $1,780,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (V) for fiscal year 2021, 
                                $2,030,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (VI) for fiscal year 2022, 
                                $2,320,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (VII) for fiscal year 2023, 
                                $2,650,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority;

                                    (VIII) for fiscal year 
                                2024, $2,690,000,000 in 
                                additional new budget 
                                authority;

                                    (IX) for fiscal year 2025, 
                                $2,690,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority; and

                                    (X) for fiscal year 2026, 
                                $2,690,000,000 in additional 
                                new budget authority.

                            (iii) Average cost calculation.--
                        The average costs for wildfire 
                        suppression operations over the 
                        previous 10 years shall be calculated 
                        annually and reported in the budget of 
                        the President submitted under section 
                        1105(a) of title 31, United States 
                        Code, for each fiscal year.
                                ------                                


                WASHINGTON PARK WILDERNESS ACT OF 1988, 
                           PUBLIC LAW 100-668


               TITLE I--OLYMPIC NATIONAL PARK WILDERNESS


SEC. 101. DESIGNATION.

    (a) Wilderness.--In furtherance of the purposes of the 
Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.; 78 Stat. 890), certain 
lands in the Olympic National Park, Washington, which--

            (1) * * *

            (2) * * *

are hereby designated as wilderness and therefore as components 
of the National Wilderness Preservation System. Such lands 
shall be known as the [Olympic Wilderness] Daniel J. Evans 
Wilderness.
                                ------                                


   DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2000, PUBLIC LAW 106-79


                               TITLE VIII


                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 8162. Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. (a) Findings.--
Congress finds that--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (m) Authority to Establish Memorial.--

                    (1) In general.--* * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (3) Expiration.--Any reference in section 
                8903(e) of title 40, U.S.C. to the expiration 
                at the end of, or extension beyond, a 7-year 
                period shall be considered to be a reference to 
                an expiration on, or extension beyond, 
                [September 30, 2016] September 30, 2017.

                        BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL


  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Budget authority                 Outlays
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee    Amount  in     Committee    Amount  in
                                                           allocation       bill       allocation       bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with the subcommittee
 allocation for 2017: Subcommittee on Department of the
 Interior, environment, and related agencies:
    Mandatory...........................................           62            62            62         \1\62
    Discretionary.......................................       32,034        32,695        32,797     \1\33,442
        Security........................................  ............  ............           NA            NA
        Nonsecurity.....................................       32,034        32,695            NA            NA
Projections of outlays associated with the
 recommendation:
    2017................................................  ............  ............  ............    \2\22,017
    2018................................................  ............  ............  ............        6,091
    2019................................................  ............  ............  ............        2,647
    2020................................................  ............  ............  ............        1,170
    2021 and future years...............................  ............  ............  ............          651
Financial assistance to State and local governments for            NA         6,655            NA      \2\2,752
 2017...................................................
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
 
NA: Not applicable.
 
NOTE.--Consistent with the funding recommended in the bill as an emergency requirement and in accordance with
  section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the BBEDCA of 1985, the Committee anticipates that the Budget Committee will
  provide a revised 302(a) allocation for the Committee on Appropriations reflecting an upward adjustment of
  $661,000,000 in budget authority plus associated outlays.


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2016 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2017
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                      Chairman's recommendation compared
                                                                                                                                 with (+ or -)
                             Item                                     2016         Budget estimate     Chairman's    -----------------------------------
                                                                  appropriation                      recommendation         2016
                                                                                                                        appropriation    Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
 
                   BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT
 
               Management of Lands and Resources
 
Land Resources:
    Soil, water and air management............................           43,609            45,378            42,734              -875            -2,644
    Rangeland management......................................           79,000            62,832            80,000            +1,000           +17,168
    Grazing administration management.........................  ................           16,500   ................  ................          -16,500
    Grazing administration management offsetting collections..  ................          -16,500   ................  ................          +16,500
    Forestry management.......................................            9,980            10,076            11,980            +2,000            +1,904
    Riparian management.......................................           21,321            22,920            21,321   ................           -1,599
    Cultural resources management.............................           16,131            17,328            16,131   ................           -1,197
    Wild horse and burro management...........................           80,555            80,108            80,555   ................             +447
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          250,596           238,642           252,721            +2,125           +14,079
 
Wildlife and Fisheries:
    Wildlife management.......................................           89,381           108,691           100,066           +10,685            -8,625
    Fisheries management......................................           12,530            12,628            12,530   ................              -98
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          101,911           121,319           112,596           +10,685            -8,723
 
Threatened and endangered species.............................           21,567            21,698            21,567   ................             -131
 
Recreation Management:
    Wilderness management.....................................           18,264            18,392            15,264            -3,000            -3,128
    Recreation resources management...........................           51,197            53,465            53,465            +2,268   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           69,461            71,857            68,729              -732            -3,128
 
Energy and Minerals:
    Oil and gas management....................................           59,671            80,574            67,574            +7,903           -13,000
    Oil and gas permit processing.............................            7,125             6,365             6,365              -760   ................
    Oil and gas inspection and enforcement....................           48,000            48,000            48,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Oil and gas...................................          114,796           134,939           121,939            +7,143           -13,000
 
    Oil and gas permit processing fees........................  ................          -48,000   ................  ................          +48,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, offsetting collections........................  ................          -48,000   ................  ................          +48,000
 
    Coal management...........................................           10,868            10,962            10,868   ................              -94
    Other mineral resources...................................           11,879            10,978            11,879   ................             +901
    Renewable energy..........................................           29,061            29,189            27,061            -2,000            -2,128
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Energy and Minerals...........................          166,604           138,068           171,747            +5,143           +33,679
 
Realty and Ownership Management:
    Alaska conveyance.........................................           22,000            17,327            22,000   ................           +4,673
    Cadastral, lands, and realty management...................           51,252            51,480            51,480              +228   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           73,252            68,807            73,480              +228            +4,673
 
Resource Protection and Maintenance:
    Resource management planning..............................           48,125            65,203            52,125            +4,000           -13,078
    Abandoned mine lands......................................           19,946            20,036            20,036               +90   ................
    Resource protection and law enforcement...................           25,495            25,616            25,495   ................             -121
    Hazardous materials management............................           15,612            15,463            15,463              -149   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          109,178           126,318           113,119            +3,941           -13,199
 
Transportation and Facilities Maintenance:
    Annual maintenance........................................           38,942            39,125            38,942   ................             -183
    Deferred maintenance......................................           31,387            29,201            29,201            -2,186   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           70,329            68,326            68,143            -2,186              -183
 
Workforce and Organizational Support:
    Administrative support....................................           50,942            51,139            50,942   ................             -197
    Bureauwide fixed costs....................................           93,645            92,649            92,649              -996   ................
    Information technology management.........................           25,958            26,077            25,958   ................             -119
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          170,545           169,865           169,549              -996              -316
 
Challenge cost share..........................................            2,413   ................  ................           -2,413   ................
National landscape conservation system, base program..........           36,819            50,645            36,819   ................          -13,826
Communication site management.................................            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................
Offsetting collections........................................           -2,000            -2,000            -2,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Management of lands and resources.............        1,072,675         1,075,545         1,088,470           +15,795           +12,925
 
Mining Law Administration:
    Administration............................................           39,696            39,696            39,696   ................  ................
    Offsetting collections....................................          -56,000           -55,000           -55,000            +1,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mining Law Administration.....................          -16,304           -15,304           -15,304            +1,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Management of Lands and Resources................        1,056,371         1,060,241         1,073,166           +16,795           +12,925
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Land acquisition..............................................           27,014            32,301            21,800            -5,214           -10,501
Emergencies, hardships, and inholdings........................            1,616             1,616             1,616   ................  ................
Acquisition management........................................            2,000             2,042             2,000   ................              -42
Recreational access...........................................            8,000             8,000             8,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land acquisition.................................           38,630            43,959            33,416            -5,214           -10,543
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Oregon and California Grant Lands
 
Western Oregon resources management...........................           95,255            94,445            92,555            -2,700            -1,890
Western Oregon information and resource data systems..........            1,786             1,798             1,786   ................              -12
Western Oregon transportation & facilities maintenance........            9,602             9,628             7,517            -2,085            -2,111
Western Oregon construction and acquisition...................              324               335               335               +11   ................
Western Oregon national monument..............................              767               779               753               -14               -26
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Oregon and California Grant Lands................          107,734           106,985           102,946            -4,788            -4,039
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Range Improvements
 
Current appropriations........................................           10,000            10,000            10,000   ................  ................
 
          Service Charges, Deposits, and Forfeitures
 
Service charges, deposits, and forfeitures....................           31,050            31,050            31,050   ................  ................
Offsetting fees...............................................          -31,050           -31,050           -31,050   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Service Charges, Deposits & Forfeitures..........  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
    Miscellaneous Trust Funds and Permanent Operating Funds
 
Current appropriations........................................           24,000            24,000            24,000   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT........................        1,236,735         1,245,185         1,243,528            +6,793            -1,657
                                                               =========================================================================================
            UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE
 
                      Resource Management
 
Ecological Services:
    Listing...................................................           20,515            22,901            17,411            -3,104            -5,490
    Planning and consultation.................................           99,079           105,650           102,966            +3,887            -2,684
    Conservation and restoration..............................           32,396            34,562            32,396   ................           -2,166
        (National Wetlands Inventory).........................           (3,471)           (4,671)           (3,471)  ................          (-1,200)
        (Coastal Barrier Resources Act).......................           (1,390)           (1,390)           (1,390)  ................  ................
    Recovery..................................................           82,016            89,180            84,559            +2,543            -4,621
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          234,006           252,293           237,332            +3,326           -14,961
 
Habitat conservation:
    Partners for fish and wildlife............................           51,776            54,047            52,547              +771            -1,500
    Coastal programs..........................................           13,375            13,494            13,494              +119   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           65,151            67,541            66,041              +890            -1,500
 
National Wildlife Refuge System:
    Wildlife and habitat management...........................          230,343           240,389           232,584            +2,241            -7,805
    Visitor services..........................................           73,319            80,380            74,043              +724            -6,337
    Refuge law enforcement....................................           38,054            40,712            37,054            -1,000            -3,658
    Conservation planning.....................................            2,523             2,544             2,544               +21   ................
    Refuge maintenance........................................          137,188           142,594           137,175               -13            -5,419
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          481,427           506,619           483,400            +1,973           -23,219
 
Conservation and Enforcement:
    Migratory bird management.................................           47,480            49,961            47,755              +275            -2,206
    Law enforcement...........................................           74,725            75,053            75,053              +328   ................
    International affairs.....................................           14,696            15,816            15,816            +1,120   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          136,901           140,830           138,624            +1,723            -2,206
 
Fish and Aquatic Conservation:
    National fish hatchery system operations..................           53,418            53,759            53,759              +341   ................
    Maintenance and equipment.................................           19,920            22,920            22,920            +3,000   ................
    Aquatic habitat and species conservation..................           74,918            76,150            77,201            +2,283            +1,051
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          148,256           152,829           153,880            +5,624            +1,051
 
Cooperative landscape conservation............................           12,988            17,789            11,988            -1,000            -5,801
 
Science Support:
    Adaptive science..........................................           10,517            11,522             9,517            -1,000            -2,005
    Service science...........................................            6,468             9,057             5,468            -1,000            -3,589
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           16,985            20,579            14,985            -2,000            -5,594
 
General Operations:
    Central office operations.................................           40,722            42,149            40,622              -100            -1,527
    Regional office operations................................           37,722            41,354            37,722   ................           -3,632
    Servicewide bill paying...................................           35,177            35,778            35,177   ................             -601
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.....................            7,022             7,022             7,022   ................  ................
    National Conservation Training Center.....................           22,414            25,129            22,414   ................           -2,715
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          143,057           151,432           142,957              -100            -8,475
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Resource Management..............................        1,238,771         1,309,912         1,249,207           +10,436           -60,705
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Construction and rehabilitation:
    Line item construction projects...........................           14,554            14,554             7,802            -6,752            -6,752
    Bridge and dam safety programs............................            1,972             1,972             1,972   ................  ................
    Nationwide engineering service............................            7,161             7,214             7,161   ................              -53
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................           23,687            23,740            16,935            -6,752            -6,805
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
    Acquisitions..............................................           35,911            35,884            27,406            -8,505            -8,478
    Emergencies, hardships, and inholdings....................            5,351             5,351             5,000              -351              -351
    Exchanges.................................................            1,500             1,500             1,000              -500              -500
    Acquisition management....................................           12,773            12,955            12,000              -773              -955
    Highlands Conservation Act Grants.........................           10,000   ................  ................          -10,000   ................
    Recreational access.......................................            2,500             2,500             2,000              -500              -500
    Land protection planning..................................              465               465               465   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land acquisition.................................           68,500            58,655            47,871           -20,629           -10,784
                                                               =========================================================================================
       Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund
 
Grants and administration:
    Conservation grants.......................................           10,508            12,603            10,508   ................           -2,095
    HCP assistance grants.....................................            9,485             7,390             9,485   ................           +2,095
    Administration............................................            2,702             2,702             2,702   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           22,695            22,695            22,695   ................  ................
 
Land acquisition:
    Species recovery land acquisition.........................           11,162            11,162            11,162   ................  ................
    HCP land acquisition grants to states.....................           19,638            19,638            19,638   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           30,800            30,800            30,800   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Cooperatiave Endangered Species Conservation Fund           53,495            53,495            53,495   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 National Wildlife Refuge Fund
 
Payments in lieu of taxes.....................................           13,228   ................           13,228   ................          +13,228
 
           North American Wetlands Conservation Fund
 
North American Wetlands Conservation Fund.....................           35,145            35,145            38,145            +3,000            +3,000
 
            Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation
 
Migratory bird grants.........................................            3,910             3,910             3,910   ................  ................
 
            Multinational Species Conservation Fund
 
African elephant conservation fund............................            2,582             2,582             2,582   ................  ................
Rhinoceros and tiger conservation fund........................            3,440             3,440             3,440   ................  ................
Asian elephant conservation fund..............................            1,557             1,557             1,557   ................  ................
Great ape conservation fund...................................            1,975             1,975             1,975   ................  ................
Marine turtle conservation fund...............................            1,507             1,507             1,507   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Multinational Species Conservation Fund..........           11,061            11,061            11,061   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
               State and Tribal Wildlife Grants
 
State wildlife grants (formula)...............................           51,000            51,000            53,000            +2,000            +2,000
State wildlife grants (competitive)...........................            5,487             9,981             5,487   ................           -4,494
Tribal wildlife grants........................................            4,084             6,000             4,084   ................           -1,916
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and tribal wildlife grants.................           60,571            66,981            62,571            +2,000            -4,410
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE...................        1,508,368         1,562,899         1,496,423           -11,945           -66,476
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
 
             Operation of the National Park System
 
Park Management:
    Resource stewardship......................................          328,040           340,352           328,071               +31           -12,281
    Visitor services..........................................          251,280           276,206           251,280   ................          -24,926
    Park protection...........................................          355,545           362,082           355,545   ................           -6,537
    Facility operations and maintenance.......................          738,487           842,453           763,487           +25,000           -78,966
    Park support..............................................          515,641           522,537           526,641           +11,000            +4,104
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        2,188,993         2,343,630         2,225,024           +36,031          -118,606
 
External administrative costs.................................          180,603           180,732           180,603   ................             -129
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operation of the National Park System............        2,369,596         2,524,362         2,405,627           +36,031          -118,735
                                                               =========================================================================================
             National Recreation and Preservation
 
Recreation programs...........................................              589               853               589   ................             -264
Natural programs..............................................           13,575            13,659            13,581                +6               -78
Cultural programs.............................................           24,562            26,262            24,562   ................           -1,700
International park affairs....................................            1,648             1,656             1,648   ................               -8
Environmental and compliance review...........................              433               436               433   ................               -3
Grant administration..........................................            2,004             2,079             2,004   ................              -75
Heritage Partnership Programs.................................           19,821             9,447            19,821   ................          +10,374
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Recreation and Preservation.............           62,632            54,392            62,638                +6            +8,246
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Historic Preservation Fund
 
State historic preservation offices...........................           46,925            46,925            47,925            +1,000            +1,000
Tribal grants.................................................            9,985            11,985             9,985   ................           -2,000
Competitive grants............................................            8,500            25,500            10,000            +1,500           -15,500
New Grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities....  ................            3,000   ................  ................           -3,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Historic Preservation Fund.......................           65,410            87,410            67,910            +2,500           -19,500
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
General Program:
    Line item construction and maintenance....................          116,276           153,344           139,959           +23,683           -13,385
    Emergency and unscheduled.................................            3,855             3,855             3,855   ................  ................
    Housing...................................................            2,200             2,203             2,200   ................               -3
    Dam safety................................................            1,248             1,249             1,248   ................               -1
    Equipment replacement.....................................           13,500            17,545            13,500   ................           -4,045
    Planning, construction....................................            7,266            15,518             7,966              +700            -7,552
    Construction program management...........................           36,771            46,431            36,771   ................           -9,660
    General management plans..................................           11,821            11,893            11,821   ................              -72
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................          192,937           252,038           217,320           +24,383           -34,718
                                                               =========================================================================================
Land and Water Conservation Fund (rescission of contract                -28,000           -30,000           -28,000   ................           +2,000
 authority)...................................................
 
Assistance to States:
    State conservation grants (formula).......................           94,839            94,000            94,000              -839   ................
    State conservation grants (competitive)...................           12,000            12,000            12,000   ................  ................
    Administrative expenses...................................            3,161             4,006             4,006              +845   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          110,000           110,006           110,006                +6   ................
 
National Park Service:
    Acquisitions..............................................           33,135            37,314            29,417            -3,718            -7,897
    Recreational access.......................................            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................
    American Battlefield Protection Program...................           10,000            10,000            10,000   ................  ................
    Emergencies, hardships, relocations, and deficiencies.....            3,928             3,928             3,000              -928              -928
    Acquisition management....................................            9,679            10,000             9,000              -679            -1,000
    Inholdings, donations, and exchanges......................            4,928             5,000             5,000               +72   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           63,670            68,242            58,417            -5,253            -9,825
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition and State Assistance............          173,670           178,248           168,423            -5,247            -9,825
                                                               =========================================================================================
Centennial Challenge..........................................           15,000            35,000            20,000            +5,000           -15,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL PARK SERVICE............................        2,851,245         3,101,450         2,913,918           +62,673          -187,532
                                                               =========================================================================================
                UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
 
             Surveys, Investigations, and Research
 
Ecosystems:
    Status and trends.........................................           20,473            22,267            20,473   ................           -1,794
    Fisheries: Aquatic and endangered resources...............           20,886            24,083            19,886            -1,000            -4,197
    Wildlife: Terrestrial and endangered resources............           45,757            46,125            46,007              +250              -118
    Terrestrial, Freshwater and marine environments...........           38,415            43,352            36,224            -2,191            -7,128
    Invasive species..........................................           17,330            19,877            17,580              +250            -2,297
    Cooperative research units................................           17,371            18,234            17,371   ................             -863
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Ecosystems.......................................          160,232           173,938           157,541            -2,691           -16,397
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Climate and Land Use Change:
    Climate variability:
        Climate science centers...............................           26,435            30,908            21,935            -4,500            -8,973
        Climate research and development......................           21,495            22,714            18,995            -2,500            -3,719
        Carbon sequestration..................................            9,359             9,381             8,959              -400              -422
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           57,289            63,003            49,889            -7,400           -13,114
 
    Land Use Change:
        Land remote sensing...................................           72,194            96,506            81,594            +9,400           -14,912
        Land change science...................................           10,492            11,935             8,992            -1,500            -2,943
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           82,686           108,441            90,586            +7,900           -17,855
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Climate and Land Use Change......................          139,975           171,444           140,475              +500           -30,969
 
Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health:
    Mineral and Energy Resources:
        Minerals resources....................................           48,371            48,695            49,921            +1,550            +1,226
        Energy resources......................................           24,695            26,228            24,695   ................           -1,533
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           73,066            74,923            74,616            +1,550              -307
 
    Environmental Health:
        Contaminant biology...................................           10,197            11,465            10,197   ................           -1,268
        Toxic substances hydrology............................           11,248            13,095             9,698            -1,550            -3,397
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal............................................           21,445            24,560            19,895            -1,550            -4,665
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Energy, Minerals, and Environmental Health...           94,511            99,483            94,511   ................           -4,972
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Natural Hazards:
    Earthquake hazards........................................           60,503            62,196            63,003            +2,500              +807
    Volcano hazards...........................................           26,121            26,238            27,121            +1,000              +883
    Landslide hazards.........................................            3,538             4,054             3,538   ................             -516
    Global seismographic network..............................            6,453             7,322             6,453   ................             -869
    Geomagnetism..............................................            1,888             3,598             1,888   ................           -1,710
    Coastal and marine geology................................           40,510            46,293            40,336              -174            -5,957
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Natural Hazards..................................          139,013           149,701           142,339            +3,326            -7,362
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Water Resources:
    Water Availability and Use Science Program................           42,052            54,388            44,052            +2,000           -10,336
    Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program............           71,535            72,957            73,035            +1,500               +78
    National Water Quality Program............................           90,600            94,147            87,600            -3,000            -6,547
    Water Resources Research Act Program......................            6,500             6,500             6,500   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Water Resources..................................          210,687           227,992           211,187              +500           -16,805
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Core Science Systems:
    Science, synthesis, analysis, and research................           24,299            24,930            24,299   ................             -631
    National cooperative geological mapping...................           24,397            24,486            24,397   ................              -89
    National Geospatial Program...............................           62,854            68,979            67,354            +4,500            -1,625
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Core Science Systems.............................          111,550           118,395           116,050            +4,500            -2,345
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Science Support:
    Administration and management.............................           81,981            86,319            81,981   ................           -4,338
    Information services......................................           23,630            24,273            23,630   ................             -643
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science Support..................................          105,611           110,592           105,611   ................           -4,981
                                                               =========================================================================================
 
Facilities:
    Rental payments and operations & maintenance..............           93,141           109,978            93,141   ................          -16,837
    Deferred maintenance and capital improvement..............            7,280             7,280             7,280   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Facilities.......................................          100,421           117,258           100,421   ................          -16,837
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY..................        1,062,000         1,168,803         1,068,135            +6,135          -100,668
                                                               =========================================================================================
               BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT
 
                    Ocean Energy Management
 
Renewable energy..............................................           24,278            23,887            23,887              -391   ................
Conventional energy...........................................           59,869            64,156            58,963              -906            -5,193
Environmental assessment......................................           68,045            68,399            68,045   ................             -354
Executive direction...........................................           18,665            18,696            18,665   ................              -31
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          170,857           175,138           169,560            -1,297            -5,578
 
Offsetting rental receipts....................................          -92,961           -88,487           -88,487            +4,474   ................
Cost recovery fees............................................           -3,661            -6,457            -6,457            -2,796   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, offsetting collections........................          -96,622           -94,944           -94,944            +1,678   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT................           74,235            80,194            74,616              +381            -5,578
                                                               =========================================================================================
        BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT
 
         Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement
 
Environmental enforcement.....................................            8,314             8,314             8,314   ................  ................
Operations, safety and regulation.............................          144,954           145,150           144,954   ................             -196
Administrative operations.....................................           18,268            18,268            18,268   ................  ................
Executive direction...........................................           18,236            18,236            18,236   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          189,772           189,968           189,772   ................             -196
 
Offsetting rental receipts....................................          -49,399           -37,922           -37,922           +11,477   ................
Inspection fees...............................................          -59,000           -65,000           -53,000            +6,000           +12,000
Cost recovery fees............................................           -7,808            -5,608            -5,608            +2,200   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, offsetting collections........................         -116,207          -108,530           -96,530           +19,677           +12,000
 
Rescission of prior year balances.............................  ................  ................          -25,000           -25,000           -25,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Offshore Safety and Environmental Enforcement....           73,565            81,438            68,242            -5,323           -13,196
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Oil Spill Research
 
Oil spill research............................................           14,899            14,899            14,899   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT...           88,464            96,337            83,141            -5,323           -13,196
                                                               =========================================================================================
     OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT
 
                   Regulation and Technology
 
Environmental protection......................................           91,832            90,138            88,832            -3,000            -1,306
    Permit fees...............................................               40             1,900                40   ................           -1,860
    Offsetting collections....................................              -40            -1,900               -40   ................           +1,860
Technology development and transfer...........................           15,205            21,485            15,205   ................           -6,280
Financial management..........................................              505               713               505   ................             -208
Executive direction...........................................           15,711            15,214            15,169              -542               -45
Civil penalties (indefinite)..................................              100               100               100   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          123,353           127,650           119,811            -3,542            -7,839
 
Civil penalties (offsetting collections)......................             -100              -100              -100   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Regulation and Technology........................          123,253           127,550           119,711            -3,542            -7,839
                                                               =========================================================================================
                Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund
 
Environmental restoration.....................................            9,480             9,825             9,480   ................             -345
Technology development and transfer...........................            3,544             6,367             3,544   ................           -2,823
Financial management..........................................            6,396             6,440             6,396   ................              -44
Executive direction...........................................            7,883             7,743             7,714              -169               -29
State grants..................................................           90,000   ................           90,000   ................          +90,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund..................          117,303            30,375           117,134              -169           +86,759
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND                   240,556           157,925           236,845            -3,711           +78,920
       ENFORCEMENT............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
    BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION
 
                 Operation of Indian Programs
 
                     Tribal Budget System
 
Tribal Government:
    Aid to tribal government..................................           24,833            27,118            27,118            +2,285   ................
    Consolidated tribal government program....................           77,088            75,429            75,429            -1,659   ................
    Self governance compacts..................................          162,321           162,346           162,346               +25   ................
    New tribes................................................              464   ................              464   ................             +464
    Small and needy tribes....................................            1,845             3,095             4,645            +2,800            +1,550
    Road maintenance..........................................           26,693            26,783            30,307            +3,614            +3,524
    Tribal government program oversight.......................            8,273            12,377             8,377              +104            -4,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          301,517           307,148           308,686            +7,169            +1,538
 
Human Services:
    Social services...........................................           45,179            57,343            52,343            +7,164            -5,000
    Welfare assistance........................................           74,791            74,773            74,773               -18   ................
    Indian child welfare act..................................           15,641            18,946            18,946            +3,305   ................
    Housing improvement program...............................            8,021             9,708             9,708            +1,687   ................
    Human services tribal design..............................              246               254               254                +8   ................
    Human services program oversight..........................            3,126             3,137             3,137               +11   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          147,004           164,161           159,161           +12,157            -5,000
 
Trust--Natural Resources Management:
    Natural resources, general................................            5,168             7,953             4,953              -215            -3,000
    Irrigation operations and maintenance.....................           11,398            12,905            12,905            +1,507   ................
    Rights protection implementation..........................           37,638            40,161            39,661            +2,023              -500
    Tribal management/development program.....................            9,263            14,266            11,266            +2,003            -3,000
    Endangered species........................................            2,684             3,685             2,685                +1            -1,000
    Cooperative landscape conservation........................            9,955            13,056             9,956                +1            -3,100
    Integrated resource information program...................            2,996             3,996             2,996   ................           -1,000
    Agriculture and range.....................................           30,751            30,769            30,769               +18   ................
    Forestry..................................................           51,914            52,155            54,155            +2,241            +2,000
    Water resources...........................................           10,367            15,000            10,450               +83            -4,550
    Fish, wildlife and parks..................................           13,646            15,658            16,203            +2,557              +545
    Resource management program oversight.....................            6,066             5,993             5,993               -73   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          191,846           215,597           201,992           +10,146           -13,605
 
Trust--Real Estate Services...................................          127,486           136,192           123,092            -4,394           -13,100
 
Education:
    Elementary and secondary programs (forward funded)........          553,458           574,075           569,575           +16,117            -4,500
    (Tribal grant support costs)..............................          (73,276)          (75,335)          (75,335)          (+2,059)  ................
    Post secondary programs (forward funded)..................           74,893            77,207            77,207            +2,314   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, forward funded education......................          628,351           651,282           646,782           +18,431            -4,500
 
    Elementary and secondary programs.........................          134,263           144,295           140,195            +5,932            -4,100
    Post secondary programs...................................           64,602            66,841            60,031            -4,571            -6,810
    Education management......................................           25,151            50,012            27,151            +2,000           -22,861
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Education.....................................          852,367           912,430           874,159           +21,792           -38,271
 
Public Safety and Justice:
    Law enforcement...........................................          347,976           341,281           354,742            +6,766           +13,461
    Tribal courts.............................................           28,173            30,753            30,753            +2,580   ................
    Fire protection...........................................            1,274             1,426             1,426              +152   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          377,423           373,460           386,921            +9,498           +13,461
 
Community and economic development............................           40,619            42,844            41,844            +1,225            -1,000
Executive direction and administrative services...............          229,662           243,954           230,484              +822           -13,470
(No-year funds in bill language)..............................          (43,813)          (47,848)          (47,848)          (+4,035)  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operation of Indian Programs.....................        2,267,924         2,395,786         2,326,339           +58,415           -69,447
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Contract Support Costs
 
Contract support costs........................................          272,000           273,000           273,000            +1,000   ................
Indian self-determination fund................................            5,000             5,000             5,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Contract Support Costs...........................          277,000           278,000           278,000            +1,000   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                         Construction
 
Education.....................................................          138,245           138,257           133,257            -4,988            -5,000
Public safety and justice.....................................           11,306            11,306            11,306   ................  ................
Resources management..........................................           34,488            36,513            36,513            +2,025   ................
General administration........................................            9,934            10,941            10,941            +1,007   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Construction.....................................          193,973           197,017           192,017            -1,956            -5,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
   Indian Land and Water Claim Settlements and Miscellaneous
                      Payments to Indians
 
Settlements and Miscellaneous Payments to Indians.............           49,475            55,155            49,475   ................           -5,680
 
            Indian Guaranteed Loan Program Account
 
Indian guaranteed loan program account........................            7,748             7,757             8,748            +1,000              +991
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS AND INDIAN EDUCATION....        2,796,120         2,933,715         2,854,579           +58,459           -79,136
                                                               =========================================================================================
                     DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES
 
                    Office of the Secretary
 
Leadership and administration.................................          122,885           127,394           121,885            -1,000            -5,509
Management services...........................................           21,365            21,676            21,365   ................             -311
Office of Natural Resources Revenue...........................          125,519           129,306           121,750            -3,769            -7,556
Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT)..............................          452,000   ................  ................         -452,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Secretary..........................          721,769           278,376           265,000          -456,769           -13,376
                                                               =========================================================================================
                        Insular Affairs
 
                   Assistance to Territories
 
Territorial Assistance Office of Insular Affairs..............            9,448             9,863             9,863              +415   ................
    Technical assistance......................................           15,504            21,064            18,064            +2,560            -3,000
    Maintenance assistance fund...............................            1,081             5,000             4,000            +2,919            -1,000
    Brown tree snake..........................................            3,500             3,000             3,000              -500   ................
    Coral reef initiative.....................................            1,000             2,000             1,500              +500              -500
    Empowering Insular Communities............................            2,971             5,000             3,971            +1,000            -1,029
    Compact impact............................................            3,000             3,000             3,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Territorial Assistance........................           36,504            48,927            43,398            +6,894            -5,529
 
American Samoa operations grants..............................           22,752            22,752            22,752   ................  ................
Northern Marianas covenant grants.............................           27,720            27,720            27,720   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Assistance to Territories........................           86,976            99,399            93,870            +6,894            -5,529
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Compact of Free Association
 
Compact of Free Association--Federal services.................            2,818             2,818             2,818   ................  ................
Enewetak support..............................................              500               500               500   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Compact of Free Association...................            3,318             3,318             3,318   ................  ................
 
Compact payments, Palau (Title I, General Provision)..........           13,147   ................           13,147   ................          +13,147
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Compact of Free Association......................           16,465             3,318            16,465   ................          +13,147
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Insular Affairs..................................          103,441           102,717           110,335            +6,894            +7,618
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Office of the Solicitor
 
Legal services................................................           59,091            62,781            59,091   ................           -3,690
General administration........................................            4,971             4,940             4,940               -31   ................
Ethics........................................................            1,738             1,727             1,727               -11   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of the Solicitor..........................           65,800            69,448            65,758               -42            -3,690
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  Office of Inspector General
 
Audit and investigations......................................           37,538            43,263            37,538   ................           -5,725
Administrative services and information management............           12,509            12,648            12,509   ................             -139
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Inspector General......................           50,047            55,911            50,047   ................           -5,864
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Office of Special Trustee for American Indians
 
                    Federal Trust Programs
 
Program operations, support, and improvements.................          136,998           138,335           136,998   ................           -1,337
    (Office of Historical Accounting).........................          (22,120)          (19,632)          (19,632)          (-2,488)  ................
Executive direction...........................................            2,031             2,044             2,031   ................              -13
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Special Trustee for American Indians...          139,029           140,379           139,029   ................           -1,350
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES.............................        1,080,086           646,831           630,169          -449,917           -16,662
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS
 
                   Wildland Fire Management
 
Fire Operations:
    Preparedness..............................................          323,685           332,784           332,784            +9,099   ................
    Fire suppression..........................................          291,673           276,291           395,000          +103,327          +118,709
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Fire operations...............................          615,358           609,075           727,784          +112,426          +118,709
 
Other Operations:
    Fuels management..........................................          170,000           149,089           180,000           +10,000           +30,911
    Resilient landscapes......................................  ................           30,000   ................  ................          -30,000
    Burned area rehabilitation................................           18,970            20,470            20,470            +1,500   ................
    Fire facilities...........................................            6,427            10,000             8,427            +2,000            -1,573
    Joint fire science........................................            5,990             5,990             5,990   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other operations..............................          201,387           215,549           214,887           +13,500              -662
 
Wildland fire management (emergency)..........................  ................  ................          171,291          +171,291          +171,291
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland fire management.........................          816,745           824,624         1,113,962          +297,217          +289,338
                                                               =========================================================================================
          FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Account
 
FLAME wildfire suppression reserve account....................          177,000   ................  ................         -177,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, all wildland fire accounts.......................          993,745           824,624         1,113,962          +120,217          +289,338
                                                               =========================================================================================
Suppression Cap Adjustment....................................  ................          290,000   ................  ................         -290,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland Fire Management with cap adjustment.....          993,745         1,114,624         1,113,962          +120,217              -662
                                                               =========================================================================================
               Central Hazardous Materials Fund
 
Central hazardous materials fund..............................           10,010            13,513            10,010   ................           -3,503
 
            Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund
 
Damage assessments............................................            2,500             2,071             2,500   ................             +429
Program management............................................            2,192             2,438             2,192   ................             -246
Restoration support...........................................            2,075             3,619             2,075   ................           -1,544
Oil Spill Preparedness........................................            1,000             1,101             1,000   ................             -101
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund..........            7,767             9,229             7,767   ................           -1,462
                                                               =========================================================================================
Working Capital Fund..........................................           67,100           111,524            67,100   ................          -44,424
 
                   Payment in Lieu of Taxes
 
Payments to local governments in lieu of taxes................  ................  ................          480,000          +480,000          +480,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENT-WIDE PROGRAMS.........................        1,078,622         1,248,890         1,678,839          +600,217          +429,949
          Appropriations......................................       (1,078,622)         (958,890)       (1,507,548)        (+428,926)        (+548,658)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (171,291)        (+171,291)        (+171,291)
          Disaster Relief cap adjustment......................  ................         (290,000)  ................  ................        (-290,000)
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE I, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR..............       12,016,431        12,242,229        12,280,193          +263,762           +37,964
          Appropriations......................................      (12,044,431)      (12,272,229)      (12,161,902)        (+117,471)        (-110,327)
          Rescissions of contract authority...................         (-28,000)         (-30,000)         (-28,000)  ................          (+2,000)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (171,291)        (+171,291)        (+171,291)
      (Disaster Relief cap adjustment)........................  ................         (290,000)  ................  ................        (-290,000)
                                                               =========================================================================================
           TITLE II--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
 
                    Science and Technology
 
Clean Air and Climate.........................................          116,541           128,154           104,886           -11,655           -23,268
    (Climate protection program)..............................           (8,018)           (8,127)           (7,216)            (-802)            (-911)
Enforcement...................................................           13,669            14,608            13,669   ................             -939
Homeland security.............................................           37,122            37,205            36,765              -357              -440
Indoor air and Radiation......................................            5,997             7,510             5,997   ................           -1,513
IT / Data management / Security...............................            3,089             3,092             3,089   ................               -3
Operations and administration.................................           68,339            78,447            68,339   ................          -10,108
Pesticide licensing...........................................            6,027             5,289             5,289              -738   ................
Research: Air, climate and energy.............................           91,906           101,151            82,715            -9,191           -18,436
Research: Chemical safety and sustainability..................          126,930           134,221           126,058              -872            -8,163
    (Research: Computational toxicology)......................          (21,409)          (25,744)          (21,409)  ................          (-4,335)
    (Research: Endocrine disruptor)...........................          (16,253)          (15,381)          (15,381)            (-872)  ................
Research: National priorities.................................           14,100   ................            5,000            -9,100            +5,000
Research: Safe and sustainable water resources................          107,434           106,257           106,257            -1,177   ................
Research: Sustainable and healthy communities.................          139,975           134,327           134,327            -5,648   ................
Water: Human health protection................................            3,519             3,923             3,519   ................             -404
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Science and Technology...........................          734,648           754,184           695,910           -38,738           -58,274
        (By transfer from Superfund)..........................          (18,850)          (15,496)          (15,496)          (-3,354)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
             Environmental Programs and Management
 
Brownfields...................................................           25,593            25,906            25,593   ................             -313
Clean air and climate.........................................          273,108           340,974           245,797           -27,311           -95,177
    (Climate protection program)..............................          (95,436)         (107,761)          (85,892)          (-9,544)         (-21,869)
Compliance....................................................          101,665           111,270           101,665   ................           -9,605
Enforcement...................................................          240,637           268,118           216,573           -24,064           -51,545
    (Environmental justice)...................................           (6,737)          (15,291)           (6,063)            (-674)          (-9,228)
Environmental protection: National priorities.................           12,700   ................           15,000            +2,300           +15,000
 
Geographic programs:
    Great Lakes Restoration Initiative........................          300,000           250,000           300,000   ................          +50,000
    Chesapeake Bay............................................           73,000            70,000            73,000   ................           +3,000
    San Franciso Bay..........................................            4,819             4,040             4,819   ................             +779
    Puget Sound...............................................           28,000            30,034            28,000   ................           -2,034
    Long Island Sound.........................................            3,940             2,893             5,940            +2,000            +3,047
    Gulf of Mexico............................................            4,482             3,983            11,000            +6,518            +7,017
    South Florida.............................................            1,704             1,339             1,339              -365   ................
    Lake Champlain............................................            4,399             1,399             4,399   ................           +3,000
    Lake Pontchartrain........................................              948               948               948   ................  ................
    Southern New England Estuaries............................            5,000             5,000             5,000   ................  ................
    Other geographic activities...............................            1,445               965               965              -480   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          427,737           370,601           435,410            +7,673           +64,809
 
Homeland security.............................................           10,195            11,518            10,195   ................           -1,323
Indoor air and radiation......................................           27,637            29,908            27,636                -1            -2,272
Information exchange / Outreach...............................          126,538           152,445           118,305            -8,233           -34,140
    (Children and other sensitive populations:
    Agency coordination)......................................           (6,548)           (7,842)           (6,548)  ................          (-1,294)
    (Environmental education).................................           (8,702)          (11,157)           (4,351)          (-4,351)          (-6,806)
International programs........................................           15,400            18,099            17,097            +1,697            -1,002
IT / Data management / Security...............................           90,536           126,974            90,931              +395           -36,043
Legal/science/regulatory/economic review......................          111,414           145,683           100,272           -11,142           -45,411
Operations and administration.................................          482,751           520,316           482,751   ................          -37,565
Pesticide licensing...........................................          102,363           110,896           107,896            +5,533            -3,000
Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).................          104,877           110,708           104,877   ................           -5,831
Toxics risk review and prevention.............................           92,521            99,043            89,298            -3,223            -9,745
    (Endocrine disruptors)....................................           (7,553)           (4,329)           (4,329)          (-3,224)  ................
Underground storage tanks (LUST / UST)........................           11,295            11,612            11,295   ................             -317
 
Water: Ecosystems:
    National estuary program / Coastal waterways..............           26,723            27,191            27,191              +468   ................
    Wetlands..................................................           21,065            23,668            21,065   ................           -2,603
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           47,788            50,859            48,256              +468            -2,603
 
Water: Human health protection................................           98,507           109,437            98,507   ................          -10,930
Water quality protection......................................          210,417           238,526           191,191           -19,226           -47,335
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Environmental Programs and Management............        2,613,679         2,852,893         2,538,545           -75,134          -314,348
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Hazardous Waste Electronic Manifest System Fund
 
E-Manifest System Fund........................................            3,674             7,433             3,674   ................           -3,759
 
                  Office of Inspector General
 
Audits, evaluations, and investigations.......................           41,489            51,527            41,489   ................          -10,038
      (By transfer from Superfund)............................           (9,939)           (8,778)           (8,778)          (-1,161)  ................
 
                   Buildings and Facilities
 
Homeland security: Protection of EPA personnel and                        6,676             7,875             6,676   ................           -1,199
 infrastructure...............................................
Operations and administration.................................           35,641            44,203            31,984            -3,657           -12,219
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Buildings and Facilities.........................           42,317            52,078            38,660            -3,657           -13,418
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 Hazardous Substance Superfund
 
Audits, evaluations, and investigations.......................            9,939             8,778             8,778            -1,161   ................
Compliance....................................................              995             1,099               995   ................             -104
Enforcement...................................................          166,375           175,657           166,375   ................           -9,282
Homeland security.............................................           36,362            32,616            32,589            -3,773               -27
Indoor air and radiation......................................            1,985             2,182             1,985   ................             -197
Information exchange / Outreach...............................            1,328             1,366             1,328   ................              -38
IT /data management/security..................................           14,485            20,141            14,407               -78            -5,734
Legal/science/regulatory/economic review......................            1,253             1,278             1,186               -67               -92
Operations and administration.................................          128,105           130,608           124,787            -3,318            -5,821
Research: Chemical safety and sustainability..................            2,843             2,824             2,824               -19   ................
Research: Sustainable communities.............................           14,032            11,463            11,463            -2,569   ................
 
Superfund cleanup:
    Superfund: Emergency response and removal.................          181,306           185,233           181,306   ................           -3,927
    Superfund: Emergency preparedness.........................            7,636             7,931             7,636   ................             -295
    Superfund: Federal facilities.............................           21,125            26,770            21,125   ................           -5,645
    Superfund: Remedial.......................................          501,000           521,043           501,000   ................          -20,043
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          711,067           740,977           711,067   ................          -29,910
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Hazardous Substance Superfund....................        1,088,769         1,128,989         1,077,784           -10,985           -51,205
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund [LUST]
 
Enforcement...................................................              620               668               620   ................              -48
Operations and administration.................................            1,352             1,669             1,345                -7              -324
Research: Sustainable communities.............................              320               365               320   ................              -45
Underground storage tanks (LUST / UST)........................           89,649            91,583            89,011              -638            -2,572
    (LUST/UST)................................................           (9,240)           (9,322)           (9,240)  ................             (-82)
    (LUST cooperative agreements).............................          (55,040)          (54,402)          (54,402)            (-638)  ................
    (Energy Policy Act grants)................................          (25,369)          (27,859)          (25,369)  ................          (-2,490)
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund......           91,941            94,285            91,296              -645            -2,989
                                                               =========================================================================================
                   Inland Oil Spill Program
 
Compliance....................................................              139               160               139   ................              -21
Enforcement...................................................            2,413             2,492             2,413   ................              -79
Oil...........................................................           14,409            20,461            14,409   ................           -6,052
Operations and administration.................................              584             1,763               584   ................           -1,179
Research: Sustainable communities.............................              664               534               534              -130   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Inland Oil Spill Program.........................           18,209            25,410            18,079              -130            -7,331
                                                               =========================================================================================
           State and Tribal Assistance Grants [STAG]
 
Alaska Native villages........................................           20,000            17,000            20,000   ................           +3,000
Brownfields projects..........................................           80,000            90,000            80,000   ................          -10,000
Clean water state revolving fund [SRF]........................        1,393,887           979,500         1,350,000           -43,887          +370,500
Diesel emissions grants.......................................           50,000            10,000            25,000           -25,000           +15,000
Drinking water state revolving fund [SRF].....................          863,233         1,020,500         1,020,500          +157,267   ................
Mexico border.................................................           10,000             5,000            10,000   ................           +5,000
Targeted airshed grants.......................................           20,000   ................           20,000   ................          +20,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Infrastructure assistance grants..............        2,437,120         2,122,000         2,525,500           +88,380          +403,500
 
Categorical grants:
    Beaches protection........................................            9,549   ................            9,549   ................           +9,549
    Brownfields...............................................           47,745            49,500            47,745   ................           -1,755
    Environmental information.................................            9,646            25,346             9,646   ................          -15,700
    Hazardous waste financial assistance......................           99,693            99,693            99,693   ................  ................
    Lead......................................................           14,049            14,049            14,049   ................  ................
    Nonpoint source (Sec. 319)................................          164,915           164,915           184,915           +20,000           +20,000
    Pesticides enforcement....................................           18,050            18,050            18,050   ................  ................
    Pesticides program implementation.........................           12,701            13,201            12,701   ................             -500
    Pollution control (Sec. 106)..............................          230,806           246,164           230,806   ................          -15,358
    (Water quality monitoring)................................          (17,848)          (17,848)          (17,848)  ................  ................
    Pollution prevention......................................            4,765             4,765             4,765   ................  ................
    Public water system supervision...........................          101,963           109,700           109,700            +7,737   ................
    Radon.....................................................            8,051   ................            8,051   ................           +8,051
    State and local air quality management....................          228,219           268,229           228,219   ................          -40,010
    Toxics substances compliance..............................            4,919             4,919             4,919   ................  ................
    Tribal air quality management.............................           12,829            12,829            12,829   ................  ................
    Tribal general assistance program.........................           65,476            96,375            65,476   ................          -30,899
    Underground injection control (UIC).......................           10,506            10,506            10,506   ................  ................
    Underground storage tanks.................................            1,498             2,498             1,498   ................           -1,000
    Wetlands program development..............................           14,661            17,661            14,661   ................           -3,000
    Multipurpose grants.......................................           21,000   ................  ................          -21,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Categorical grants............................        1,081,041         1,158,400         1,087,778            +6,737           -70,622
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Tribal Assistance Grants...............        3,518,161         3,280,400         3,613,278           +95,117          +332,878
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Subtotal, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY...............        8,152,887         8,247,199         8,118,715           -34,172          -128,484
 
Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Program:
    Administrative Expenses...................................  ................            5,000             5,000            +5,000   ................
    Direct Loan Subsidy.......................................  ................           15,000            25,000           +25,000           +10,000
 
                   Administrative Provisions
 
Cybersecurity.................................................           27,000   ................  ................          -27,000   ................
Rescission....................................................          -40,000   ................          -40,000   ................          -40,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE II, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY........        8,139,887         8,267,199         8,108,715           -31,172          -158,484
          Appropriations......................................       (8,179,887)       (8,267,199)       (8,148,715)         (-31,172)        (-118,484)
          Rescissions.........................................         (-40,000)  ................         (-40,000)  ................         (-40,000)
      (By transfer)...........................................          (28,789)          (24,274)          (24,274)          (-4,515)  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  TITLE III--RELATED AGENCIES
 
                   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
 
                        FOREST SERVICE
 
                 Forest and Rangeland Research
 
Forest inventory and analysis.................................           75,000            77,000            77,000            +2,000   ................
Research and development programs.............................          216,000           214,982           203,000           -13,000           -11,982
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Forest and rangeland research....................          291,000           291,982           280,000           -11,000           -11,982
                                                               =========================================================================================
                  State and Private Forestry
 
Landscape scale restoration...................................           14,000            23,513            14,000   ................           -9,513
 
Forest Health Management:
    Federal lands forest health management....................           58,922            51,382            51,382            -7,540   ................
    Cooperative lands forest health management................           40,678            40,678            40,678   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           99,600            92,060            92,060            -7,540   ................
 
Cooperative Forestry:
    Forest stewardship........................................           23,036            22,398            20,036            -3,000            -2,362
    Forest legacy.............................................           62,347            62,347            61,049            -1,298            -1,298
    (Rescission)..............................................  ................  ................           -8,297            -8,297            -8,297
    Community forest and open space conservation..............            2,000             2,000             2,000   ................  ................
    Urban and community forestry..............................           28,040            23,686            23,686            -4,354   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Cooperative Forestry..........................          115,423           110,431            98,474           -16,949           -11,957
 
International forestry........................................            8,000             8,000             8,000   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, State and Private Forestry.......................          237,023           234,004           212,534           -24,489           -21,470
        (Appropriations)......................................         (237,023)         (234,004)         (220,831)         (-16,192)         (-13,173)
        (Rescission)..........................................  ................  ................          (-8,297)          (-8,297)          (-8,297)
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    National Forest System
 
Land management planning......................................           36,998   ................           32,930            -4,068           +32,930
Inventory and monitoring......................................          147,998   ................          147,998   ................         +147,998
Land management planning, assessment and monitoring...........  ................          183,928   ................  ................         -183,928
Recreation, heritage and wilderness...........................          261,719           263,942           264,595            +2,876              +653
Grazing management............................................           56,856            50,000            56,856   ................           +6,856
    Grazing administration management.........................  ................           15,000   ................  ................          -15,000
    Grazing administration management offsetting collections..  ................          -15,000   ................  ................          +15,000
Forest products...............................................          359,805           359,805           369,805           +10,000           +10,000
Vegetation and watershed management...........................          184,716           184,716           188,716            +4,000            +4,000
Wildlife and fish habitat management..........................          140,466           140,466           138,466            -2,000            -2,000
Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Fund...............           40,000            40,000            40,000   ................  ................
Minerals and geology management...............................           76,423            75,069            81,923            +5,500            +6,854
Landownership management......................................           77,730            71,440            73,730            -4,000            +2,290
Law enforcement operations....................................          126,653           131,630           124,653            -2,000            -6,977
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Forest System...........................        1,509,364         1,500,996         1,519,672           +10,308           +18,676
                                                               =========================================================================================
              Capital Improvement and Maintenance
 
Facilities:
    Maintenance...............................................           55,369            55,369            55,369   ................  ................
    Construction..............................................           16,021            16,231            14,231            -1,790            -2,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           71,390            71,600            69,600            -1,790            -2,000
 
Roads:
    Maintenance...............................................          145,454           126,840           150,454            +5,000           +23,614
    Construction..............................................           26,640            23,160            28,640            +2,000            +5,480
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          172,094           150,000           179,094            +7,000           +29,094
 
Trails:
    Maintenance...............................................           69,777            70,597            69,777   ................             -820
    Construction..............................................            7,753             7,933             5,053            -2,700            -2,880
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           77,530            78,530            74,830            -2,700            -3,700
 
Deferred maintenance..........................................            3,150             3,150             3,150   ................  ................
Legacy road and trail remediation.............................           40,000            40,000            29,000           -11,000           -11,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Capital improvement and maintenance...........          364,164           343,280           355,674            -8,490           +12,394
 
Deferral of road and trail fund payment.......................          -16,000           -17,000           -16,000   ................           +1,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Capital improvement and maintenance..............          348,164           326,280           339,674            -8,490           +13,394
                                                               =========================================================================================
                       Land Acquisition
 
Acquisitions..................................................           44,685            49,703            38,525            -6,160           -11,178
Acquisition management........................................            8,500             8,500             7,200            -1,300            -1,300
Cash equalization.............................................              250               750               700              +450               -50
Recreational access...........................................            8,000             4,700             5,000            -3,000              +300
Critical inholdings/wilderness................................            2,000             2,000             3,313            +1,313            +1,313
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Land Acquisition.................................           63,435            65,653            54,738            -8,697           -10,915
                                                               =========================================================================================
Acquisition of land for national forests, special acts........              950               950               950   ................  ................
Acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges...............              216               216               216   ................  ................
Range betterment fund.........................................            2,320             2,320             2,320   ................  ................
Gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland                       45                45                45   ................  ................
 research.....................................................
Management of national forest lands for subsistence uses......            2,500             2,441             2,500   ................              +59
 
                   Wildland Fire Management
 
Fire operations:
    Wildland fire preparedness................................        1,082,620         1,082,620         1,082,620   ................  ................
    Wildland fire suppression operations......................          811,000           873,904         1,248,000          +437,000          +374,096
    Additional suppression funding (Public Law 114-53)........          700,000   ................  ................         -700,000   ................
        Wildland fire management (emergency)..................  ................  ................          490,000          +490,000          +490,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Fire operations...........................        2,593,620         1,956,524         2,820,620          +227,000          +864,096
 
Other operations:
    Hazardous fuels...........................................          375,000           384,126           390,000           +15,000            +5,874
        (Hazardous Fuels Base Program)........................         (360,000)         (369,126)         (375,000)         (+15,000)          (+5,874)
        (Biomass Grants)......................................          (15,000)          (15,000)          (15,000)  ................  ................
    Fire plan research and development........................           19,795            19,795            19,795   ................  ................
    Joint fire sciences program...............................            6,914   ................            6,914   ................           +6,914
    State fire assistance.....................................           78,000            78,000            80,000            +2,000            +2,000
    Volunteer fire assistance.................................           13,000            13,000            15,000            +2,000            +2,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other operations..............................          492,709           494,921           511,709           +19,000           +16,788
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Wildland Fire Management......................        3,086,329         2,451,445         3,332,329          +246,000          +880,884
          Appropriations......................................       (3,086,329)       (2,451,445)       (2,842,329)        (-244,000)        (+390,884)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (490,000)        (+490,000)        (+490,000)
 
          FLAME Wildfire Suppression Reserve Account
 
FLAME wildfire suppression reserve account....................          823,000   ................  ................         -823,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, all wildland fire accounts.......................        3,909,329         2,451,445         3,332,329          -577,000          +880,884
                                                               =========================================================================================
Suppression cap adjustment....................................  ................          864,096   ................  ................         -864,096
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Wildland Fire Management with cap adjustment.....        3,909,329         3,315,541         3,332,329          -577,000           +16,788
                                                               =========================================================================================
      Total, Forest Service without Wildland Fire Management..        2,455,017         2,424,887         2,412,649           -42,368           -12,238
          Appropriations......................................       (2,455,017)       (2,424,887)       (2,412,649)         (-42,368)         (-12,238)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (490,000)        (+490,000)        (+490,000)
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, FOREST SERVICE...................................        6,364,346         5,740,428         5,744,978          -619,368            +4,550
          Appropriations......................................       (6,364,346)       (4,876,332)       (5,263,275)      (-1,101,071)        (+386,943)
          Rescissions.........................................  ................  ................          (-8,297)          (-8,297)          (-8,297)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (490,000)        (+490,000)        (+490,000)
          Disaster Relief cap adjustment......................  ................         (864,096)  ................  ................        (-864,096)
                                                               =========================================================================================
            DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
 
                     INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE
 
                    Indian Health Services
 
Clinical Services:
    Hospital and health clinics...............................        1,857,225         1,979,998         1,890,303           +33,078           -89,695
    Dental health.............................................          178,286           186,829           180,923            +2,637            -5,906
    Mental health.............................................           82,100           111,143           108,331           +26,231            -2,812
    Alcohol and substance abuse...............................          205,305           233,286           225,750           +20,445            -7,536
    Purchased/referred care...................................          914,139           962,331           914,139   ................          -48,192
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................        3,237,055         3,473,587         3,319,446           +82,391          -154,141
 
Preventive Health:
    Public health nursing.....................................           76,623            82,040            78,312            +1,689            -3,728
    Health education..........................................           18,255            19,545            18,562              +307              -983
    Community health representatives..........................           58,906            62,428            58,906   ................           -3,522
    Immunization (Alaska).....................................            1,950             2,062             2,062              +112   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          155,734           166,075           157,842            +2,108            -8,233
 
Other services:
    Urban Indian health.......................................           44,741            48,157            45,741            +1,000            -2,416
    Indian health professions.................................           48,342            49,345            49,345            +1,003   ................
    Tribal management grant program...........................            2,442             2,488             2,442   ................              -46
    Direct operations.........................................           72,338            69,620            69,620            -2,718   ................
    Self-governance...........................................            5,735             5,837             5,735   ................             -102
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................          173,598           175,447           172,883              -715            -2,564
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Health Services...........................        3,566,387         3,815,109         3,650,171           +83,784          -164,938
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    Contract Support Costs
 
Contract support..............................................          717,970           800,000           800,000           +82,030   ................
 
                   Indian Health Facilities
 
Maintenance and improvement...................................           73,614            76,981            76,981            +3,367   ................
Sanitation facilities construction............................           99,423           103,036           103,036            +3,613   ................
Health care facilities construction...........................          105,048           132,377           115,048           +10,000           -17,329
Facilities and environmental health support...................          222,610           233,858           226,005            +3,395            -7,853
Equipment.....................................................           22,537            23,654            22,537   ................           -1,117
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Indian Health Facilities.........................          523,232           569,906           543,607           +20,375           -26,299
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE............................        4,807,589         5,185,015         4,993,778          +186,189          -191,237
                                                               =========================================================================================
                 NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences...........           77,349            77,349            77,349   ................  ................
 
       AGENCY FOR TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND DISEASE REGISTRY
 
Toxic substances and environmental public health..............           74,691            74,691            74,691   ................  ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES..........        4,959,629         5,337,055         5,145,818          +186,189          -191,237
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    OTHER RELATED AGENCIES
 
               EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT
 
Council on Environmental Quality and Office of Environmental              3,000             3,015             3,000   ................              -15
 Quality......................................................
 
        CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           11,000            12,436            11,000   ................           -1,436
 
          OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           15,000            15,431            15,431              +431   ................
 
  INSTITUTE OF AMERICAN INDIAN AND ALASKA NATIVE CULTURE AND
                       ARTS DEVELOPMENT
 
Payment to the Institute......................................           11,619            11,835            15,212            +3,593            +3,377
 
                    SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
 
                     Salaries and Expenses
 
Museum and Research Institutes:
    National Air and Space Museum.............................           18,937            19,853            19,603              +666              -250
    Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory.....................           24,141            24,393            24,393              +252   ................
    Major scientific instrumentation..........................            4,118             6,118             4,118   ................           -2,000
    Universe Center...........................................              184               184               184   ................  ................
    National Museum of Natural History........................           48,503            49,205            49,205              +702   ................
    National Zoological Park..................................           26,382            27,252            26,752              +370              -500
    Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.................            3,956             4,171             4,171              +215   ................
    Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute...................           14,166            14,344            14,344              +178   ................
    Biodiversity Center.......................................            1,523             4,230             1,530                +7            -2,700
    Arthur M. Sackler Gallery/Freer Gallery of Art............            6,111             6,197             6,197               +86   ................
    Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.................            2,581             3,122             3,039              +458               -83
    Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.....................            4,810             5,105             4,869               +59              -236
    Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.....................            4,414             4,913             4,477               +63              -436
    National Museum of African Art............................            4,263             4,576             4,496              +233               -80
    World Cultures Center.....................................              284               792               284   ................             -508
    Anacostia Community Museum................................            2,116             2,329             2,329              +213   ................
    Archives of American Art..................................            1,880             2,005             1,909               +29               -96
    National Museum of African American History and Culture...           41,347            41,564            41,564              +217   ................
    National Museum of American History.......................           23,122            26,142            24,630            +1,508            -1,512
    National Museum of the American Indian....................           31,726            32,341            32,117              +391              -224
    National Portrait Gallery.................................            6,064             6,460             6,339              +275              -121
    Smithsonian American Art Museum...........................            9,587            10,115             9,920              +333              -195
    American Experience Center................................              595               596               596                +1   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Museums and Research Institutes...............          280,810           296,007           287,066            +6,256            -8,941
 
Mission enabling:
 
Program support and outreach:
    Outreach..................................................            9,229             9,214             9,214               -15   ................
    Communications............................................            2,594             2,632             2,632               +38   ................
    Institution-wide programs.................................           14,784            14,984            13,284            -1,500            -1,700
    Office of Exhibits Central................................            3,009             3,057             3,057               +48   ................
    Museum Support Center.....................................            1,866             1,890             1,890               +24   ................
    Museum Conservation Institute.............................            3,277             3,320             3,320               +43   ................
    Smithsonian Institution Archives..........................            2,203             2,316             2,316              +113   ................
    Smithsonian Institution Libraries.........................           10,654            11,275            11,146              +492              -129
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Program support and outreach..................           47,616            48,688            46,859              -757            -1,829
 
Office of Chief Information Officer...........................           50,400            54,641            51,371              +971            -3,270
Administration................................................           34,554            37,526            34,941              +387            -2,585
Inspector General.............................................            3,451             3,499             3,499               +48   ................
 
Facilities services:
    Facilities maintenance....................................           73,985            89,227            76,327            +2,342           -12,900
    Facilities operations, security and support...............          205,229           229,636           217,996           +12,767           -11,640
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Facilities services...........................          279,214           318,863           294,323           +15,109           -24,540
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Mission enabling..............................          415,235           463,217           430,993           +15,758           -32,224
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses............................          696,045           759,224           718,059           +22,014           -41,165
                                                               =========================================================================================
                      Facilities Capital
 
Revitalization................................................           92,788            83,650            71,884           -20,904           -11,766
Facilities planning and design................................           51,410            29,350            20,300           -31,110            -9,050
Construction..................................................  ................           50,000            50,000           +50,000   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Facilities Capital...............................          144,198           163,000           142,184            -2,014           -20,816
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION..........................          840,243           922,224           860,243           +20,000           -61,981
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART
 
                     Salaries and Expenses
 
Care and utilization of art collections.......................           41,581            45,418            44,778            +3,197              -640
Operation and maintenance of buildings and grounds............           33,858            35,011            34,554              +696              -457
Protection of buildings, grounds and contents.................           22,643            24,231            23,495              +852              -736
General administration........................................           26,906            31,141            30,134            +3,228            -1,007
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and Expenses............................          124,988           135,801           132,961            +7,973            -2,840
                                                               =========================================================================================
        Repair, Restoration and Renovation of Buildings
 
Base program..................................................           22,564            22,600            22,564   ................              -36
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART..........................          147,552           158,401           155,525            +7,973            -2,876
                                                               =========================================================================================
        JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
 
Operations and maintenance....................................           21,660            22,260            22,260              +600   ................
Capital repair and restoration................................           14,740            13,000            13,000            -1,740   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, JOHN F. KENNEDY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS...           36,400            35,260            35,260            -1,140   ................
                                                               =========================================================================================
       WOODROW WILSON INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR SCHOLARS
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................           10,500            10,400            10,500   ................             +100
 
      NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES
 
                National Endowment for the Arts
 
                   Grants and Administration
 
Grants:
    Direct grants.............................................           63,420            63,906            63,266              -154              -640
    Challenge America grants..................................            7,600             7,600             7,600   ................  ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           71,020            71,506            70,866              -154              -640
 
    State partnerships:
    State and regional........................................           37,262            37,517            36,919              -343              -598
    Underserved set-aside.....................................           10,084            10,154             9,992               -92              -162
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal................................................           47,346            47,671            46,911              -435              -760
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants........................................          118,366           119,177           117,777              -589            -1,400
 
Program support...............................................            1,780             1,950             1,950              +170   ................
Administration................................................           27,803            28,722            28,722              +919   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Arts.............................................          147,949           149,849           148,449              +500            -1,400
                                                               =========================================================================================
             National Endowment for the Humanities
 
                   Grants and Administration
 
Grants:
    Special Initiative: The Common Good.......................            5,500            10,190             7,500            +2,000            -2,690
    Federal/State partnership.................................           43,040            43,040            43,540              +500              +500
    Preservation and access...................................           15,200            14,385            14,625              -575              +240
    Public programs...........................................           13,454            12,730            12,945              -509              +215
    Research programs.........................................           14,536            13,755            13,990              -546              +235
    Education programs........................................           13,040            12,000            12,550              -490              +550
    Program development.......................................              500               500               500   ................  ................
    Digital humanities initiatives............................            4,480             4,600             4,600              +120   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Grants........................................          109,750           111,200           110,250              +500              -950
 
Matching Grants:
    Treasury funds............................................            2,400             2,200             2,244              -156               +44
    Challenge grants..........................................            8,500             8,500             8,000              -500              -500
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Matching grants...............................           10,900            10,700            10,244              -656              -456
 
Administration................................................           27,292            27,948            27,948              +656   ................
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Humanities.......................................          147,942           149,848           148,442              +500            -1,406
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE                    295,891           299,697           296,891            +1,000            -2,806
       HUMANITIES.............................................
                                                               =========================================================================================
                    COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            2,653             2,762             2,653   ................             -109
 
          NATIONAL CAPITAL ARTS AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS
 
Grants........................................................            2,000             1,400             2,000   ................             +600
 
           ADVISORY COUNCIL ON HISTORIC PRESERVATION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            6,080             6,493             6,493              +413   ................
 
             NATIONAL CAPITAL PLANNING COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            8,348             8,099             8,099              -249   ................
 
            UNITED STATES HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM
 
Holocaust Memorial Museum.....................................           54,000            57,000            57,000            +3,000   ................
 
           DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................            1,000             1,800             1,000   ................             -800
Capital construction..........................................  ................           43,000   ................  ................          -43,000
                                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER MEMORIAL COMMISSION.........            1,000            44,800             1,000   ................          -43,800
                                                               =========================================================================================
            WOMEN'S SUFFRAGE CENTENNIAL COMMISSION
 
Salaries and expenses.........................................  ................  ................            2,000            +2,000            +2,000
                                                               =========================================================================================
      TOTAL, TITLE III, RELATED AGENCIES......................       12,769,261        12,666,736        12,373,103          -396,158          -293,633
          Appropriations......................................      (12,769,261)      (11,802,640)      (11,891,400)        (-877,861)         (+88,760)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (490,000)        (+490,000)        (+490,000)
          (Disaster Relief cap adjustment)....................  ................         (864,096)  ................  ................        (-864,096)
 
      GRAND TOTAL.............................................       32,925,579        33,176,164        32,762,011          -163,568          -414,153
          Appropriations......................................      (32,993,579)      (32,052,068)      (32,202,017)        (-791,562)        (+149,949)
          Rescissions.........................................         (-40,000)  ................         (-73,297)         (-33,297)         (-73,297)
          Rescissions of contract authority...................         (-28,000)         (-30,000)         (-28,000)  ................          (+2,000)
          Emergency appropriations............................  ................  ................         (661,291)        (+661,291)        (+661,291)
      Disaster Relief cap adjustment..........................  ................       (1,154,096)  ................  ................      (-1,154,096)
      (By transfer)...........................................          (28,789)          (24,274)          (24,274)          (-4,515)  ................
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