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111th Congress 
 1st Session                     SENATE                          Report
                                                                  111-7
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                        Calendar No. 30

 
    FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2009

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                   COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND

                          GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

                          UNITED STATES SENATE

                              to accompany

                                 S. 303


TO REAUTHORIZE AND IMPROVE THE FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT 
                        IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 1999






                 March 11, 2009.--Ordered to be printed

        COMMITTEE ON HOMELAND SECURITY AND GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

               JOSEPH I. LIEBERMAN, Connecticut, Chairman
CARL LEVIN, Michigan                 SUSAN M. COLLINS, Maine
DANIEL K. AKAKA, Hawaii              TOM COBURN, Oklahoma
THOMAS R. CARPER, Delaware           JOHN McCAIN, Arizona
MARK L. PRYOR, Arkansas              GEORGE V. VOINOVICH, Ohio
MARY L. LANDRIEU, Louisiana          JOHN ENSIGN, Nevada
CLAIRE McCASKILL, Missouri           LINDSEY GRAHAM, South Carolina
JON TESTER, Montana
ROLAND W. BURRIS, Illinois
MICHAEL BENNET, Colorado

                  Michael L. Alexander, Staff Director
                     Kevin J. Landy, Chief Counsel
                    Beth M. Grossman, Senior Counsel
                 Elyse F. Greenwald, Research Assistant
     Brandon L. Milhorn, Minority Staff Director and Chief Counsel
                    Lisa M. Nieman, Minority Counsel
Tara L. Shaw, Minority Counsel, Subcommittee on Oversight of Government 
    Management, the Federal Workforce, and the District of Columbia
                  Trina Driessnack Tyrer, Chief Clerk
                                                        Calendar No. 30
111th Congress
                                 SENATE
                                                                 Report
 1st Session                                                      111-7

======================================================================




    FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 2009

                                _______
                                

                 March 11, 2009.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Lieberman, from the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
                    Affairs, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 303]

    The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
Affairs, to which was referred the bill (S. 303) to reauthorize 
and improve the Federal Financial Assistance Management 
Improvement Act of 1999, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon without amendment, and recommends that the 
bill do pass.

                                CONTENTS

  I. Purpose and Summary..............................................1
 II. Background and Need for the Legislation..........................2
III. Legislative History..............................................4
 IV. Section-by-Section Analysis......................................5
  V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact..................................6
 VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................7
VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............7

                         I. Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of S. 303 is to reauthorize and improve the 
Federal Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act of 1999 
(``FFAMIA'' or ``Act''),\1\ which sought to improve the 
effectiveness and performance of federal financial assistance 
programs and reduce the burden on applicants by, among other 
things, simplifying application and reporting requirements. S. 
303 updates and expands the provisions of the FFAMIA. It 
requires that the Director of the Office of Management and 
Budget (OMB) and federal agencies continue to work together and 
with the nonfederal entities that receive federal financial 
assistance to streamline federal grants administration; 
provides that the OMB Director develop a strategic plan for 
achieving such streamlining and for other improvements; and 
requires biennial reports from the Director of OMB and from 
federal agencies to ensure progress towards implementing the 
strategic plan and meeting the goals of the FFAMIA.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\Pub. L. No. 106-107 (31 U.S.C. Sec. 6101 note).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

              II. Background and Need for the Legislation

    There are in excess of 1,000 different federal grant 
programs, administered by more than two dozen federal 
agencies.\2\ Traditionally, each agency has had its own 
distinct processes and requirements for grant applications and 
reporting. Individual grant programs have sometimes imposed 
unique requirements as well. As a result, state, local, and 
tribal governments, nonprofit organizations and others seeking 
assistance from multiple federal sources have faced 
duplicative, burdensome and even conflicting requirements. 
Additionally, these entities have spent resources meeting 
unnecessarily burdensome requirements that could otherwise have 
gone towards carrying out the public purposes for which the 
grants are intended.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\Office of Management and Budget, Report to Congress on the 
Benefits of the President's E-Government Initiatives (Fiscal Year 
2008), p. 12 (hereinafter, ``E-Government Report''); See also: U.S. 
Government Accountability Office, Grants Management Additional Actions 
Needed to Streamline and Simplify Processes, GAO-05-335 p. 1 
(hereinafter, ``2005 GAO Report'').
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    To address these concerns, Congress enacted the FFAMIA in 
1999. The Act was intended to improve the effectiveness and 
performance of federal grant and other assistance programs, 
simplify federal financial assistance application and reporting 
requirements, improve the delivery of services to the public 
and facilitate greater coordination among the federal agencies 
and their non-federal partners responsible for delivering such 
services.\3\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\Pub. L. No. 106-107, Sec. 3.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Specifically, the FFAMIA required federal agencies, in 
consultation with non-federal entities, to develop and 
implement plans to streamline and simplify the application, 
administrative and reporting procedures for federal financial 
assistance programs and use common applications and reporting 
systems for those programs.\4\ The Act also called for the 
development of electronic applications and reports on the use 
of federal financial assistance, and it required the OMB 
Director to direct, coordinate and assist federal agencies in 
establishing common applications and reporting systems.\5\ The 
Act provided that it would sunset eight years after enactment, 
in November 2007.\6\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \4\Pub. L. No. 106-107, Sec. 5.
    \5\Pub. L. No. 106-107, Sec. 6.
    \6\Pub. L. No. 106-107, Sec. 11.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    The FFAMIA has led to a number of improvements in the 
management and transparency of the federal grants process. The 
most notable and visible of these is the creation of a web 
portal for federal grant applicants at www.grants.gov 
(``Grants.gov''). Currently, there are over 1,000 grants, from 
26 federal agencies, listed on Grants.gov; these grants 
represent more than $450 billion in federal government awards 
to state, local, and tribal governments, nonprofit 
organizations, and others.\7\ According to OMB, the Grants.gov 
website benefits the federal government by allowing agencies to 
reduce operating costs associated with posting grants and to 
improve operational effectiveness through increased data 
accuracy and reduced processing times.\8\ Equally importantly, 
Grants.gov has the potential to reduce the burden on the state, 
local, and tribal governments, nonprofits and others who apply 
for federal grants, by serving as a ``one-stop shop'' for grant 
information and applications for grantees.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \7\E-Government Report, p. 12. OMB reports that within these grant 
programs, over 2,900 application packages (or all but an exempted 291 
of the total application packages) were posted online (E-Government 
Report, p. 13), and that over 180,000 applications were submitted 
through Grants.gov in FY 2007 (E-Government Report, p. ii).
    \8\E-Government Report, p. 13.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In 2005, the Government Accountability Office (``GAO''), as 
required by section 7 of the FFAMIA, assessed and reported on 
the effectiveness of the Act,\9\ and in 2006, it issued a 
second report.\10\ In these reports, GAO noted that federal 
agencies had made some progress in streamlining aspects of the 
grants life cycle.\11\ Grants.gov, for example, was developed 
to help potential grantees identify grant opportunities more 
easily and apply for grants electronically.\12\ In addition, 
efforts were undertaken to consolidate grant management systems 
across agencies,\13\ and a standard format for the announcement 
of grant opportunities was developed.\14\ By May 2006, GAO 
reported, all but two agencies had provided the capability for 
grantees to apply for grants using the Grants.gov website.\15\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \9\2005 GAO Report.
    \10\U.S. Government Accountability Office, Grants Management 
Grantees' Concerns with Efforts to Streamline and Simplify Processes, 
GAO 06-566 (hereinafter, ``2006 GAO Report'').
    \11\2005 GAO Report, p. 3.
    \12\2005 GAO Report, p. 8.
    \13\2005 GAO Report, p. 3.
    \14\2005 GAO Report, p. 3.
    \15\2006 GAO Report, p. 10.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    GAO, however, also noted that efforts to develop common 
electronic reporting systems had not progressed.\16\ In fact, 
although FFAMIA required the development of a common system, 
including electronic processes, through which a grantee could 
apply for, manage, and report on the use of funding,\17\ 
systems for any grant phase beyond the application phase had 
not been developed.\18\ In addition to a lack of common 
reporting systems, GAO found that federal agencies operated 
nine different systems to distribute grant funding, some of 
which were unreliable and antiquated.\19\ Some grantees also 
commented to GAO that each grant they were awarded required 
separate certifications and assurance forms, which they 
considered an unnecessary burden because the forms did not vary 
widely among programs.\20\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \16\2005 GAO Report, p. 16.
    \17\Pub. L. No. 106-107, Sec. 6.
    \18\2006 GAO Report, p. 13. GAO noted that in 2004, OMB started to 
create end-to-end grants management systems, with a goal of moving all 
agencies to common systems by 2011. 2006 GAO Report, p. 11.
    \19\2006 GAO Report, p. 14.
    \20\2006 GAO Report, p. 15.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Finally, GAO noted that agency coordination with the 
grantee community was limited.\21\ GAO reported that federal 
agencies solicited input from the grantee community during the 
early planning stages to implement the FFAMIA but did not 
coordinate with the grantee community on an ongoing basis.\22\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \21\2005 GAO Report, p. 3.
    \22\2005 GAO Report, p. 18.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Ultimately, GAO concluded that additional work was needed 
to streamline the administration of federal financial 
assistance programs and that the momentum established pursuant 
to the FFAMIA needed to continue past the law's November 2007 
sunset.\23\ GAO recommended that ``Congress should consider 
reauthorizing the law to make certain that federal agencies 
have clear requirements to continue . . . efforts and the 
momentum for progress in streamlining grant administration 
continues.''\24\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \23\2006 GAO Report, p. 26.
    \24\2006 GAO Report, p. 27.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    In his responses to questions for the record following his 
January 14, 2009, confirmation hearing before the Senate 
Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, OMB 
Director Peter Orszag indicated his support for efforts to 
streamline grant administration, stating ``I believe that 
improving grants management should be a priority, and that we 
should work towards simplifying the process and creating more 
integrity and transparency in the grant-making process. The 
enactment of the Federal Funding Accountability and 
Transparency Act (FFATA) [P.L. 109-282] was a critical step 
toward greater transparency of grant awards, but significant 
work remains in carrying out the full vision of this law. The 
reauthorization of the Federal Financial Assistance Management 
Improvement Act of 1999 would complement FFATA by enabling us 
to achieve, along with transparency enhancements, process 
improvements that lower costs and reduce burden on government 
agencies and Federal funding recipients.''\25\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \25\Additional Questions for the Record following the Nomination 
Hearing for Peter Orszag, submitted by Senator George V. Voinovich, 
January 14, 2009.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    S. 303 would reauthorize the FFAMIA by eliminating the 2007 
sunset date. In addition, it would address many of the issues 
raised by GAO in 2005 and 2006. Specifically, the bill seeks to 
codify and enhance the use of Grants.gov, requiring the OMB 
Director to maintain a public website that allows grant 
applicants to search and apply for grants; to manage, track, 
and report on the use of grants; and to provide required 
certifications and assurances for grants. It would further 
instruct the OMB Director to develop a strategic plan that 
provides plans, timelines, and cost estimates for developing an 
electronic capability for managing federal financial 
assistance; creating common applications and reporting forms 
and requirements; developing common certifications and 
assurances; and minimizing the number of different systems used 
to disburse federal financial assistance. S. 303 would also 
require the OMB Director to report biennially to Congress for 
the next 15 years on progress made in implementing the Act and 
the strategic plan, and each federal agency would have to 
report biennially to OMB for a period of 15 years on its 
progress towards achieving its objectives in furtherance of the 
strategic plan.

                        III. Legislative History

    On January 22, 2009, S. 303 was introduced by Senators 
Voinovich, Lieberman, and Carper and was referred to the 
Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. A 
previous version of the bill, S. 3341, introduced by Senators 
Voinovich and Lieberman in the 110th Congress, passed the 
Senate by unanimous consent. No action was taken on S. 3341 in 
the House of Representatives.
    On February 11, 2009, the Committee on Homeland Security 
and Governmental Affairs considered S. 303 and ordered the bill 
reported favorably without amendment by voice vote. The members 
present were Lieberman, Levin, Carper, Pryor, Landrieu, 
McCaskill, Tester, Burris, Bennet, Collins, McCain, and 
Voinovich.

                    IV. Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short title

    This section establishes the title of the act as the 
``Federal Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act of 
2009''.

Section 2. Reauthorization

    This section eliminates the sunset provision originally 
included in section 11 of the 1999 Act, effectively 
reauthorizing that Act indefinitely.

Section 3. Website relating to federal grants

    This section redesignates sections 6(e) and 6(f) as 6(f) 
and 6(g), respectively, and inserts a new section 6(e) into the 
FFAMIA. This new section requires the OMB Director to establish 
and maintain a public website to serve as a central point of 
information and access for applicants for federal grants. At a 
minimum, for each federal grant, the website is to include, to 
the maximum extent possible, grant announcements; statements of 
eligibility; application requirements; purposes of the funding; 
the name of the funding agency; and application and award 
deadlines. This section further requires that, to the greatest 
extent practical, the website allow grant applicants to search 
for all federal grants by various criteria; apply for grants; 
manage, track, and report on the use of grants; and provide 
required certifications and assurances for grants.
    The section further makes a technical amendment to section 
6(g) to clarify that the requirement that provisions be carried 
out within 18 months of the enactment of the original 1999 Act 
does not apply to the new website provisions of section 6(e).

Section 4. Report on implementation

    This section strikes section 7 of the 1999 Act, which 
required GAO to evaluate the effectiveness of the Act, and 
inserts a new section 7 that would require the OMB Director to 
report to Congress within 9 months of enactment, and biennially 
thereafter for a period of 15 years, on progress made in 
implementing the FFAMIA. Each report would have to list all 
grants that can be applied for using the website required under 
section 6(e); list all agencies that provide federal financial 
assistance; list all agencies that have complied with the 
requirements of the Act and the extent of their compliance; 
list all agencies exempted from the requirements of the Act 
with an explanation of the exemption and certification that the 
basis for the exemption still exists; list all common 
application forms that allow non-federal entities to apply for 
multiple federal financial assistance programs; list all common 
forms and requirements that allow non-federal entities to 
report on the use of funding from multiple federal financial 
assistance programs; describe federal efforts to communicate 
and collaborate with non-federal entities during the 
implementation of the FFAMIA; describe efforts of the OMB 
Director to work with federal agencies to meet the goals of the 
Act; and describe all systems used to disburse federal 
financial assistance to non-federal entities. Subsequent 
reports must also detail progress made by the federal 
government in meeting the goals of the FFAMIA and compile 
agency reports on their actions in furtherance of the Act.

Section 5. Strategic plan

    This section amends the FFAMIA by redesignating sections 8, 
9, 10 and 11 as sections 9, 10, 11 and 12, respectively, and 
inserts a new section 8 that requires the OMB Director to 
submit a strategic plan to Congress within 18 months. The 
strategic plan is required to identify federal financial 
assistance programs, or aspects of such programs, that are 
suitable for common applications or common reporting forms or 
requirement; and to identify changes in law needed to achieve 
the FFAMIA's goals. The strategic plan is also required to 
include plans, timelines, and cost estimates for developing an 
entirely electronic, web-based process that allows grantees to 
manage various aspects of federal financial assistance; for 
ensuring full agency compliance with the requirements of the 
Act; for creating common applications, common financial and 
performance reporting forms and requirements, and common 
certifications and assurances for federal financial assistance 
programs or aspects of such programs; for ensuring 
compatibility between federal and state administration systems; 
and for minimizing the number of payment systems used to 
disburse federal financial assistance.
    In addition, this section requires the OMB Director to 
consult with non-federal entities and federal agencies in 
developing and implementing the strategic plan.
    This section further requires each federal agency to 
prepare a plan within 6 months of the date OMB submits its 
strategic plan to Congress that describes how the agency will 
carry out its responsibilities under OMB's strategic plan. Each 
agency's plan must include performance objectives, timelines 
for agency action, and plans to improve communication and 
collaboration with representatives of non-federal entities as 
the requirements of the FFAMIA are carried out.
    This section further provides that each federal agency must 
consult with non-federal entities during the development and 
implementation of the agency's plan and must report to OMB 
biennially for a period of 15 years on the agency's progress in 
carrying out its planned objectives.
    This section also makes a technical amendment to section 
5(d) of the FFAMIA to clarify that once a federal agency begins 
providing the biennial reports required by new section 8 of the 
Act, the agency no longer needs to provide the annual reports 
required by the original 1999 Act.

                   V. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact

    Pursuant to the requirement of paragraph 11(b)(1) of rule 
XXVI of the Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee has 
considered the regulatory impact of this bill. The 
Congressional Budget Office (CBO) states that there are no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and no costs on State, local, or 
tribal governments. The legislation contains no other 
regulatory impact.

             VI. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                                 February 19, 2009.
Hon. Joseph I. Lieberman,
Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs, U.S. 
        Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 303, the Federal 
Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act of 2009.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Matthew 
Pickford.
            Sincerely,
                                              Douglas W. Elmendorf.
    Enclosure.

S. 303--Federal Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act of 2009

    S. 303 would permanently reauthorize and amend the Federal 
Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act of 1999. The 
legislation would require the government to maintain a public 
Web site containing information regarding federal grants and 
require the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and various 
federal agencies to improve the administrative procedures for 
providing grants.
    The federal government has an Internet site for federal 
grants (www.grants.gov) that includes information on more than 
$500 billion in grants from 1,000 programs administered by 26 
agencies. OMB reports that the Web site cost about $12 million 
to operate in 2008. CBO estimates that continuing this level of 
effort would cost about $60 million over the 2010-2014 period, 
assuming the availability of appropriated funds. (That estimate 
reflects the 2008 spending level, adjusted for anticipated 
inflation.)
    S. 303 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act. The 
bill would benefit state, local, and tribal governments by 
reducing the costs they incur to apply and report on federal 
grants.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Matthew 
Pickford. This estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

       VII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the following changes in existing 
law made by the bill, as reported, are shown as follows: 
(existing law proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

                           UNITED STATES CODE

                      TITLE 31--MONEY AND FINANCE

             Subtitle V--General Assistance Administration

                    CHAPTER 61--PROGRAM INFORMATION


SEC. 6101. DEFINITIONS.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


NOTES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 1999

    Pub. L. 106-107, Sec. Sec. 1 to 11, Nov. 20, 1999, 113 
Stat. 1486, as amended Pub. L. 108-271, Sec. 8(b), July 7, 
2004, 118 Stat. 814, provided that:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 5. DUTIES OF FEDERAL AGENCIES.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    (d) Submission of Plan.--Each Federal agency shall submit 
the plan developed under subsection (a) to the Director and 
Congress and report annually thereafter on the implementation 
of the plan and performance of the agency in meeting the goals 
and objectives specified under subsection (a)(7), until the 
date on which the Federal agency submits the first report by 
the Federal agency required under section 8(c)(3). Such report 
may be included as part of any of the general management 
reports required under law.

SEC. 6. DUTIES OF THE DIRECTOR.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    (e) Website Relating to Federal Grants.--
          (1) In general.--The Director shall establish and 
        maintain a public website that serves as a central 
        point of information and access for applicants for 
        Federal grants.
          (2) Contents.--To the maximum extent possible, the 
        website established under this subsection shall 
        include, at a minimum, for each Federal grant--
                  (A) the grant announcement;
                  (B) the statement of eligibility relating to 
                the grant;
                  (C) the application requirements for the 
                grant;
                  (D) the purposes of the grant;
                  (E) the Federal agency funding the grant; and
                  (F) the deadlines for applying for and 
                awarding of the grant.
          (3) Use by applicants.--The website established under 
        this subsection shall, to the greatest extent 
        practical, allow grant applicants to--
                  (A) search the website for all Federal grants 
                by type, purpose, funding agency, program 
                source, and other relevant criteria;
                  (B) apply for a Federal grant using the 
                website;
                  (C) manage, track, and report on the use of 
                Federal grants using the website; and
                  (D) provide all required certifications and 
                assurances for a Federal grant using the 
                website.
    [(e)] (f) Report on Recommended Changes in Law.--Not later 
than 18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
Director shall submit to Congress a report containing 
recommendations for changes in law to improve the 
effectiveness, performance, and coordination of Federal 
financial assistance programs.
    [(f)] (g) Deadline.--[All actions]Except for actions 
relating to establishing the website required under subsection 
(e), all actions required under this section shall be carried 
out not later than 18 months after the date of the enactment of 
this Act.

[SEC. 7. EVALUATION.

    [(a) In General.--The Government Accountability Office 
shall evaluate the effectiveness of this Act. Not later than 6 
years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
evaluation shall be submitted to the lead agency, the Director, 
and Congress. The evaluation shall be performed with input from 
State, local, and tribal governments, and nonprofit 
organizations.
    [(b) Contents.--The evaluation under subsection (a) shall--
          [(1) assess the effectiveness of this Act in meeting 
        the purposes of this Act and make specific 
        recommendations to further the implementation of this 
        Act;
          [(2) evaluate actual performance of each agency in 
        achieving the goals and objectives stated in agency 
        plans; and
          [(3) assess the level of coordination among the 
        Director, Federal agencies, State, local, and tribal 
        governments, and nonprofit organizations in 
        implementing this Act.]

SEC. 7. EVALUATION OF IMPLEMENTATION.

    (a) In General.--Not later than 9 months after the date of 
enactment of the Federal Financial Assistance Management 
Improvement Act of 2009, and every 2 years thereafter until the 
date that is 15 years after the date of enactment of the 
Federal Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act of 
2009, the Director shall submit to Congress a report regarding 
the implementation of this Act.
    (b) Contents.--
          (1) In general.--Each report under subsection (a) 
        shall include, for the applicable period--
                  (A) a list of all grants for which an 
                applicant may submit an application using the 
                website established under section 6(e);
                  (B) a list of all Federal agencies that 
                provide Federal financial assistance to non-
                Federal entities;
                  (C) a list of each Federal agency that has 
                complied, in whole or in part, with the 
                requirements of this Act;
                  (D) for each Federal agency listed under 
                subparagraph (C), a description of the extent 
                of the compliance with this Act by the Federal 
                agency;
                  (E) a list of all Federal agencies exempted 
                under section 6(d);
                  (F) for each Federal agency listed under 
                subparagraph (E)--
                          (i) an explanation of why the Federal 
                        agency was exempted; and
                          (ii) a certification that the basis 
                        for the exemption of the Federal agency 
                        is still applicable;
                  (G) a list of all common application forms 
                that have been developed that allow non-Federal 
                entities to apply, in whole or in part, for 
                multiple Federal financial assistance programs 
                (including Federal financial assistance 
                programs administered by different Federal 
                agencies) through a single common application;
                  (H) a list of all common forms and 
                requirements that have been developed that 
                allow non-Federal entities to report, in whole 
                or in part, on the use of funding from multiple 
                Federal financial assistance programs 
                (including Federal financial assistance 
                programs administered by different Federal 
                agencies);
                  (I) a description of the efforts made by the 
                Director and Federal agencies to communicate 
                and collaborate with representatives of non-
                Federal entities during the implementation of 
                the requirements under this Act;
                  (J) a description of the efforts made by the 
                Director to work with Federal agencies to meet 
                the goals of this Act, including a description 
                of working groups or other structures used to 
                coordinate Federal efforts to meet the goals of 
                this Act; and
                  (K) identification and description of all 
                systems being used to disburse Federal 
                financial assistance to non-Federal entities.
          (2) Subsequent reports.--The second report submitted 
        under subsection (a), and each subsequent report 
        submitted under subsection (a), shall include--
                  (A) a discussion of the progress made by the 
                Federal Government in meeting the goals of this 
                Act, including the amendments made by the 
                Federal Financial Assistance Management 
                Improvement Act of 2009, and in implementing 
                the strategic plan submitted under section 8, 
                including an evaluation of the progress of each 
                Federal agency that has not received an 
                exemption under section 6(d) towards 
                implementing the strategic plan; and
                  (B) a compilation of the reports submitted 
                under section 8(c)(3) during the applicable 
                period.
    (c) Definition of Applicable Period.--In this section, the 
term `applicable period' means--
          (1) for the first report submitted under subsection 
        (a), the most recent full fiscal year before the date 
        of the report; and
          (2) for the second report submitted under subsection 
        (a), and each subsequent report submitted under 
        subsection (a), the period beginning on the date on 
        which the most recent report under subsection (a) was 
        submitted and ending on the date of the report.

SEC. 8. STRATEGIC PLAN.

    (a) In General.--Not later than 18 months after the date of 
enactment of the Federal Financial Assistance Management 
Improvement Act of 2009, the Director shall submit to Congress 
a strategic plan that--
          (1) identifies Federal financial assistance programs 
        that are suitable for common applications based on the 
        common or similar purposes of the Federal financial 
        assistance;
          (2) identifies Federal financial assistance programs 
        that are suitable for common reporting forms or 
        requirements based on the common or similar purposes of 
        the Federal financial assistance;
          (3) identifies common aspects of multiple Federal 
        financial assistance programs that are suitable for 
        common application or reporting forms or requirements;
          (4) identifies changes in law, if any, needed to 
        achieve the goals of this Act; and
          (5) provides plans, timelines, and cost estimates 
        for--
                  (A) developing an entirely electronic, web-
                based process for managing Federal financial 
                assistance, including the ability to--
                          (i) apply for Federal financial 
                        assistance;
                          (ii) track the status of applications 
                        for and payments of Federal financial 
                        assistance;
                          (iii) report on the use of Federal 
                        financial assistance, including how 
                        such use has been in furtherance of the 
                        objectives or purposes of the Federal 
                        financial assistance; and
                          (iv) provide required certifications 
                        and assurances;
                  (B) ensuring full compliance by Federal 
                agencies with the requirements of this Act, 
                including the amendments made by the Federal 
                Financial Assistance Management Improvement Act 
                of 2009;
                  (C) creating common applications for the 
                Federal financial assistance programs 
                identified under paragraph (1), regardless of 
                whether the Federal financial assistance 
                programs are administered by different Federal 
                agencies;
                  (D) establishing common financial and 
                performance reporting forms and requirements 
                for the Federal financial assistance programs 
                identified under paragraph (2), regardless of 
                whether the Federal financial assistance 
                programs are administered by different Federal 
                agencies;
                  (E) establishing common applications and 
                financial and performance reporting forms and 
                requirements for aspects of the Federal 
                financial assistance programs identified under 
                paragraph (3), regardless of whether the 
                Federal financial assistance programs are 
                administered by different Federal agencies;
                  (F) developing mechanisms to ensure 
                compatibility between Federal financial 
                assistance administration systems and State 
                systems to facilitate the importing and 
                exporting of data;
                  (G) developing common certifications and 
                assurances, as appropriate, for all Federal 
                financial assistance programs that have common 
                or similar purposes, regardless of whether the 
                Federal financial assistance programs are 
                administered by different Federal agencies; and
                  (H) minimizing the number of different 
                systems used to disburse Federal financial 
                assistance.
    (b) Consultation.--In developing and implementing the 
strategic plan under subsection (a), the Director shall consult 
with representatives of non-Federal entities and Federal 
agencies that have not received an exemption under section 
6(d).
    (c) Federal Agencies.--
          (1) In general.--Not later than 6 months after the 
        date on which the Director submits the strategic plan 
        under subsection (a), the head of each Federal agency 
        that has not received an exemption under section 6(d) 
        shall develop a plan that describes how the Federal 
        agency will carry out the responsibilities of the 
        Federal agency under the strategic plan, which shall 
        include--
                  (A) clear performance objectives and 
                timelines for action by the Federal agency in 
                furtherance of the strategic plan; and
                  (B) the identification of measures to improve 
                communication and collaboration with 
                representatives of non-Federal entities on an 
                on-going basis during the implementation of 
                this Act.
          (2) Consultation.--The head of each Federal agency 
        that has not received an exemption under section 6(d) 
        shall consult with representatives of non-Federal 
        entities during the development and implementation of 
        the plan of the Federal agency developed under 
        paragraph (1).
          (3) Reporting.--Not later than 2 years after the date 
        on which the head of a Federal agency that has not 
        received an exemption under section 6(d) develops the 
        plan under paragraph (1), and every 2 years thereafter 
        until the date that is 15 years after the date of 
        enactment of the Federal Financial Assistance 
        Management Improvement Act of 2009, the head of the 
        Federal agency shall submit to the Director a report 
        regarding the progress of the Federal agency in 
        achieving the objectives of the plan of the Federal 
        agency developed under paragraph (1).

SEC. [8] 9. COLLECTION OF INFORMATION.

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SEC. [9] 10. JUDICIAL REVIEW.

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SEC. [10] 11. STATUTORY REQUIREMENTS.

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SEC. [11] 12. EFFECTIVE DATE[ AND SUNSET].

    This Act shall take effect on the date of the enactment of 
this Act[ and shall cease to be effective 8 years after such 
date of enactment].