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111th Congress 
 1st Session                                                     Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 111-89
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010

                               __________

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                              to accompany

                            S. CON. RES. 13




                 April 27, 2009.--Ordered to be printed
111th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                     111-89

======================================================================



 
        CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010

                                _______
                                

                 April 27, 2009.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Spratt, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                     [To accompany S. Con. Res. 13]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the House to the concurrent 
resolution (S. Con. Res. 13), setting forth the congressional 
budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2010, 
revising the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal year 2009, 
and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal 
years 2011 through 2014, having met, after full and free 
conference, have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their 
respective Houses as follows:
      That the Senate recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the House and agree to the same with an amendment 
as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by the 
House amendment, insert the following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2010.

      (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that this resolution 
is the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2010 
and that this resolution sets forth the appropriate budgetary 
levels for fiscal years 2009 and 2011 through 2014.
      (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2010.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Social Security.
Sec. 103. Postal Service discretionary administrative expenses.
Sec. 104. Major functional categories.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

Sec. 201. Reconciliation in the Senate.
Sec. 202. Reconciliation in the House.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

                    Subtitle A--Senate Reserve Funds

Sec. 301. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to transform and modernize 
          America's health care system.
Sec. 302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to invest in clean energy and 
          preserve the environment.
Sec. 303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for higher education.
Sec. 304. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child nutrition and WIC.
Sec. 305. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for investments in America's 
          infrastructure.
Sec. 306. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote economic stabilization 
          and growth.
Sec. 307. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for America's veterans and 
          wounded servicemembers.
Sec. 308. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for judicial pay and judgeships, 
          postal retiree assistance, and certain pension obligations.
Sec. 309. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for defense acquisition and 
          Federal contracting reform.
Sec. 310. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for investments in our Nation's 
          counties and schools.
Sec. 311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Food and Drug 
          Administration.
Sec. 312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a comprehensive investigation 
          into the current financial crisis.
Sec. 313. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for increased transparency at the 
          Federal Reserve.
Sec. 314. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 21st century community 
          learning centers.
Sec. 315. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for provision of critical 
          resources to firefighters and fire departments.
Sec. 316. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote tax equity for States 
          without personal income taxes, and other selected tax relief 
          policies.
Sec. 317. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote individual savings and 
          financial security.
Sec. 318. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase FDIC and NCUA 
          borrowing authority.
Sec. 319. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for improving the well-being of 
          children.
Sec. 320. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a 9/11 health program.

                     Subtitle B--House Reserve Funds

Sec. 321. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for health care reform.
Sec. 322. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for college access, 
          affordability, and completion.
Sec. 323. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for increasing energy 
          independence.
Sec. 324. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for America's veterans and 
          wounded servicemembers.
Sec. 325. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for certain tax relief.
Sec. 326. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a 9/11 health program.
Sec. 327. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child nutrition.
Sec. 328. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for structural unemployment 
          insurance reforms.
Sec. 329. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child support.
Sec. 330. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Affordable Housing Trust 
          Fund.
Sec. 331. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for home visiting.
Sec. 332. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for low-income home energy 
          assistance program trigger.
Sec. 333. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for county payments legislation.
Sec. 334. Reserve fund for the surface transportation reauthorization.

                        TITLE IV--BUDGET PROCESS

                      Subtitle A--Senate Provisions

                       PART I--Budget Enforcement

Sec. 401. Discretionary spending limits, program integrity initiatives, 
          and other adjustments.
Sec. 402. Point of order against advance appropriations.
Sec. 403. Emergency legislation.
Sec. 404. Point of order against legislation increasing short-term 
          deficit.
Sec. 405. Point of order against certain legislation related to surface 
          transportation funding.

                        PART II--Other Provisions

Sec. 411. Oversight of Government performance.
Sec. 412. Budgetary treatment of certain discretionary administrative 
          expenses.
Sec. 413. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.
Sec. 414. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.
Sec. 415. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                Subtitle B--House Enforcement Provisions

Sec. 421. Adjustments for direct spending and revenues.
Sec. 422. Adjustments to discretionary spending limits.
Sec. 423. Costs of overseas deployments and emergency needs.
Sec. 424. Point of order against advance appropriations.
Sec. 425. Oversight of government performance.
Sec. 426. Budgetary treatment of certain discretionary administrative 
          expenses.
Sec. 427. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.
Sec. 428. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.
Sec. 429. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                             TITLE V--POLICY

Sec. 501. Policy on middle-class tax relief and revenues.
Sec. 502. Policy on defense priorities.

                     TITLE VI--SENSE OF THE CONGRESS

Sec. 601. Sense of the Congress on veterans' and servicemembers' health 
          care.
Sec. 602. Sense of the Congress on homeland security.
Sec. 603. Sense of the Congress on promoting American innovation and 
          economic competitiveness.
Sec. 604. Sense of the Congress regarding pay parity.
Sec. 605. Sense of the Congress on college affordability and student 
          loan reform.
Sec. 606. Sense of the Congress on Great Lakes restoration.
Sec. 607. Sense of the Congress regarding the importance of child 
          support enforcement.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

    The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014:
            (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution:
                    (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $1,532,571,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $1,653,682,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $1,929,625,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $2,129,601,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $2,291,120,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $2,495,781,000,000.
                    (B) The amounts by which the aggregate 
                levels of Federal revenues should be changed 
                are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $0.
            Fiscal year 2010: -$12,304,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: -$159,006,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: -$230,792,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: -$224,217,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: -$137,877,000,000.
            (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total new budget authority are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $3,675,927,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $2,888,691,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $2,844,910,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $2,848,117,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $3,012,193,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $3,188,847,000,000.
            (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total budget outlays are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $3,356,270,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $3,001,311,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $2,967,908,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $2,881,842,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $3,019,375,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $3,174,814,000,000.
            (4) Deficits (on-budget).--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the amounts of the 
        deficits are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $1,823,699,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $1,347,629,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $1,038,283,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $752,241,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $728,255,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $679,033,000,000.
            (5) Debt subject to limit.--Pursuant to section 
        301(a)(5) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
        appropriate levels of the public debt are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $12,016,335,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $13,233,246,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $14,349,372,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $15,277,119,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $16,159,829,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $17,022,631,000,000.
            (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate 
        levels of debt held by the public are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $7,728,718,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $8,778,081,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $9,683,425,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $10,345,343,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $10,930,977,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $11,499,230,000,000.

SEC. 102. SOCIAL SECURITY.

    (a) Social Security Revenues.--For purposes of Senate 
enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of revenues of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $653,117,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $668,208,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $694,864,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $726,045,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $766,065,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $802,166,000,000.
    (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of Senate 
enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of outlays of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009: $513,029,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010: $544,140,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011: $564,523,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012: $586,897,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013: $612,017,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014: $639,054,000,000.
    (c) Social Security Administrative Expenses.--In the 
Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and budget outlays 
of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and 
the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund for administrative 
expenses are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $5,296,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $4,945,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,072,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $5,934,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,568,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,433,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012:
                    (A) New budget authority, $6,895,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $6,809,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013:
                    (A) New budget authority, $7,223,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $7,148,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014:
                    (A) New budget authority, $7,599,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $7,517,000,000.

SEC. 103. POSTAL SERVICE DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

    In the Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and 
budget outlays of the Postal Service for discretionary 
administrative expenses are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2009:
                    (A) New budget authority, $253,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $253,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2010:
                    (A) New budget authority, $262,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $262,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2011:
                    (A) New budget authority, $267,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $267,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2012:
                    (A) New budget authority, $272,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $272,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2013:
                    (A) New budget authority, $277,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $277,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2014:
                    (A) New budget authority, $283,000,000.
                    (B) Outlays, $283,000,000.

SEC. 104. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

    Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
2009 through 2014 for each major functional category are:
            (1) National Defense (050):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $618,057,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $646,810,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $562,033,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $606,043,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $570,107,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $587,945,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $579,135,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $576,023,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $589,895,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $584,670,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $603,828,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $595,476,000,000.
            (2) International Affairs (150):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $40,885,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $37,797,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $47,866,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $44,668,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $51,505,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $50,423,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,205,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $52,078,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,553,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $52,899,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $54,928,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $52,777,000,000.
            (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $35,389,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $30,973,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $31,139,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $32,467,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $33,993,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $34,532,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $34,246,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $33,532,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $34,473,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $33,823,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $34,841,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $34,141,000,000.
            (4) Energy (270):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $43,919,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $2,952,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $4,989,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $6,275,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $5,037,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,089,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $4,995,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,760,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $5,272,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,758,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $5,280,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,121,000,000.
            (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $56,009,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $36,834,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $37,587,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $40,557,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $37,859,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $39,889,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $38,579,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $39,535,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $38,718,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $39,191,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $39,338,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $39,322,000,000.
            (6) Agriculture (350):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,974,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,070,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,690,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,951,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,726,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $24,025,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,640,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,545,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,449,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,026,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,116,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,090,000,000.
            (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $694,439,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $665,437,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $61,113,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $85,750,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,181,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $38,016,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $9,561,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $8,649,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,247,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $5,585,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,226,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$2,500,000,000.
            (8) Transportation (400):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $122,457,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $87,784,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $88,151,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $95,695,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $89,071,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $96,474,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $90,047,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $95,851,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $90,866,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $96,150,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $91,809,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $96,793,000,000.
            (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,811,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $29,983,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $18,308,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $29,303,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,232,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $27,530,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,311,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $24,767,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,202,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $21,945,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,270,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $19,147,000,000.
            (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $164,276,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $73,219,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $94,430,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $140,624,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $107,858,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $141,412,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $117,121,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $118,480,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $115,931,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $118,911,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $125,788,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $120,959,000,000.
            (11) Health (550):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $380,158,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $354,397,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $384,309,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $388,885,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $363,778,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $367,412,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $367,840,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $367,391,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $386,483,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $382,172,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $395,248,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $396,541,000,000.
            (12) Medicare (570):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $427,076,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $426,736,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $449,668,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $449,798,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $504,895,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $504,721,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $505,686,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $505,436,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $540,017,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $540,146,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $593,421,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $593,233,000,000.
            (13) Income Security (600):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $520,123,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $503,020,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $536,740,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $540,202,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $509,101,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $512,335,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $451,472,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $452,176,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $455,310,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $455,184,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $455,984,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $454,858,000,000.
            (14) Social Security (650):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $31,820,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $31,264,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $20,255,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $20,378,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,380,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,513,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,478,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,628,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $29,529,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $29,679,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $32,728,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $32,728,000,000.
            (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $97,705,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $94,831,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $106,498,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $105,578,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $112,977,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $112,520,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $108,839,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $108,242,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $113,942,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $113,293,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $116,163,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $115,624,000,000.
            (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $55,783,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $49,853,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,400,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $52,043,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,892,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $55,589,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,738,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $55,468,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $53,569,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $54,537,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $54,247,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $54,058,000,000.
            (17) General Government (800):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $30,405,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $24,629,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,979,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,757,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,264,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,099,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,620,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,689,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,396,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,196,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,898,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,167,000,000.
            (18) Net Interest (900):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $288,952,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $288,952,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $284,153,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $284,153,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $323,325,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $323,325,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $387,488,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $387,488,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $470,412,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $470,412,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $558,265,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $558,265,000,000.
            (19) Allowances (920):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $7,150,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $1,788,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $1,157,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $2,548,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$14,278,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$8,066,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$14,914,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$13,147,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$16,126,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$14,979,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$16,670,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$15,235,000,000.
            (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$78,206,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$78,206,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$68,774,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$68,774,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$71,993,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$71,993,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$74,970,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$74,970,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$77,945,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$77,945,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$79,861,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$79,861,000,000.
            (21) Overseas Deployments and Other Activities 
        (970):
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $90,745,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $24,147,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2010:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $130,000,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $98,410,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2011:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,000,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $76,118,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2012:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,000,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $65,221,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2013:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,000,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $56,722,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2014:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,000,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $52,110,000,000.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

SEC. 201. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Committee on Finance.--The Senate Committee on Finance 
shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction to reduce 
the deficit by $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
2009 through 2014.
    (b) Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.--
The Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions 
shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction to reduce 
the deficit by $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
2009 through 2014.
    (c) Submissions.--In the Senate, not later than October 15, 
2009, the Senate committees named in subsections (a) and (b) 
shall submit their recommendations to the Senate Committee on 
the Budget. Upon receiving all such recommendations, the Senate 
Committee on the Budget shall report to the Senate a 
reconciliation bill carrying out all such recommendations 
without any substantive revision.

SEC. 202. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE.

    (a) Health Care Reform.--
            (1) The House Committee on Energy and Commerce 
        shall report changes in laws to reduce the deficit by 
        $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2009 
        through 2014.
            (2) The House Committee on Ways and Means shall 
        report changes in laws to reduce the deficit by 
        $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2009 
        through 2014.
            (3) The House Committee on Education and Labor 
        shall report changes in laws to reduce the deficit by 
        $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2009 
        through 2014.
    (b) Investing in Education.--The House Committee on 
Education and Labor shall report changes in laws to reduce the 
deficit by $1,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014.
    (c) Submissions.--In the House, not later than October 15, 
2009, the House committees named in subsections (a) and (b) 
shall submit their recommendations to the House Committee on 
the Budget. Upon receiving all such recommendations, the House 
Committee on the Budget shall report to the House a 
reconciliation bill carrying out all such changes without any 
substantive revision.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

                    Subtitle A--Senate Reserve Funds

SEC. 301. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO TRANSFORM AND MODERNIZE 
                    AMERICA'S HEALTH CARE SYSTEM.

    (a) Transform and Modernize America's Health Care System.--
The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may revise 
the allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and 
other appropriate levels and limits in this resolution, and 
make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger that are deficit-
neutral over 11 years, for one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports that 
are deficit-neutral, reduce excess cost growth in health care 
spending and are fiscally sustainable over the long term, and--
            (1) protect families' financial health including 
        restraining the growth of health premiums and other 
        health-related costs;
            (2) make health coverage affordable to businesses 
        (in particular to small business and individuals who 
        are self-employed), households, and governments, 
        including by reducing wasteful and inefficient spending 
        in the health care system with periodic reports on 
        savings achieved through these efforts, and by moving 
        forward with improvements to the health care delivery 
        system, including Medicare;
            (3) aim for quality, affordable health care for all 
        Americans;
            (4) provide portability of coverage and assurance 
        of coverage with appropriate consumer protections;
            (5) guarantee choice of health plans and health 
        care providers to Americans;
            (6) invest in prevention and wellness and address 
        issues of health disparities;
            (7) improve patient safety and quality care, 
        including the appropriate use of health information 
        technology and health data, and promote transparency in 
        cost and quality information to Americans; or
            (8) maintain long-term fiscal sustainability and 
        pays for itself by reducing health care cost growth, 
        improving productivity, or dedicating additional 
        sources of revenue;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (b) Other Revisions.--The chairman of the Senate Committee 
on the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits 
in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that--
            (1) increase the reimbursement rate for physician 
        services under section 1848(d) of the Social Security 
        Act and that include financial incentives for 
        physicians to improve the quality and efficiency of 
        items and services furnished to Medicare beneficiaries 
        through the use of consensus-based quality measures;
            (2) include measures to encourage physicians to 
        train in primary care residencies and ensure an 
        adequate supply of residents and physicians;
            (3) improve the Medicare program for beneficiaries 
        and protect access to outpatient therapy services 
        (including physical therapy, occupational therapy, and 
        speech-language pathology services) through measures 
        such as repealing the current outpatient therapy caps 
        while protecting beneficiaries from associated premium 
        increases; or
            (4) promote payment policies that address the 
        systemic inequities of Medicare and Medicaid 
        reimbursement that lead to access problems in rural 
        areas, including access to primary care and outpatient 
        services, hospitals, and an adequate supply of 
        providers in the workforce or that reward quality and 
        efficient care and address geographic variations in 
        spending in the Medicare program;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 302. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INVEST IN CLEAN ENERGY AND 
                    PRESERVE THE ENVIRONMENT.

    (a) Investing in Clean Energy and Preserving the 
Environment.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on the 
Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that would--
            (1) reduce our Nation's dependence on imported 
        energy;
            (2) produce green jobs;
            (3) promote renewable energy development (including 
        expediting research on the viability of using higher 
        ethanol blends at the service station pump);
            (4) authorize long-term contracts for procurement 
        of alternative fuels from domestic sources, provided 
        that such procurement is consistent with section 526 of 
        the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 
        (Public Law 110-140);
            (5) accelerate the research, development, 
        demonstration, and deployment of advanced technologies 
        to capture and store carbon dioxide emissions from 
        coal-fired power plants and other industrial emission 
        sources and to use coal in an environmentally 
        acceptable manner;
            (6) strengthen and retool manufacturing supply 
        chains;
            (7) create a clean energy investment fund;
            (8) improve electricity transmission;
            (9) encourage conservation and efficiency;
            (10) make improvements to the Low-Income Home 
        Energy Assistance Program;
            (11) set aside additional funding from the Oil 
        Spill Liability Trust Fund for Arctic oil spill 
        research;
            (12) implement water settlements;
            (13) provide additional resources for wildland fire 
        management activities (including the removal of the 
        requirement for State matching funds); or
            (14) preserve or protect public lands, oceans or 
        coastal areas;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019. The legislation may include tax provisions.
    (b) Climate Change Legislation.--The chairman of the Senate 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations of a 
committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels and limits in this resolution for one or more bills, 
joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports 
that would--
            (1) invest in clean energy technology initiatives;
            (2) decrease greenhouse gas emissions;
            (3) create new jobs in a clean technology economy;
            (4) strengthen the manufacturing competitiveness of 
        the United States;
            (5) diversify the domestic clean energy supply to 
        increase the energy security of the United States;
            (6) protect consumers (including policies that 
        address regional differences);
            (7) provide incentives for cost-savings achieved 
        through energy efficiencies;
            (8) provide voluntary opportunities for agriculture 
        and forestry communities to contribute to reducing the 
        levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere; and
            (9) help families, workers, communities, and 
        businesses make the transition to a clean energy 
        economy;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 303. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HIGHER EDUCATION.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that make higher 
education more accessible and affordable while maintaining a 
competitive private sector role in the student loan program, 
which may include legislation to expand and strengthen student 
aid, such as Pell Grants, or increase college enrollment and 
completion rates for low-income students, by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019. The 
legislation may include tax provisions.

SEC. 304. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR CHILD NUTRITION AND WIC.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that would 
reauthorize child nutrition programs or the Special 
Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children 
(the WIC program), by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 305. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INVESTMENTS IN AMERICA'S 
                    INFRASTRUCTURE.

    (a) Infrastructure.--The chairman of the Senate Committee 
on the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits 
in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that provide for a 
robust Federal investment in America's infrastructure, which 
may include projects for public housing, energy, water, 
transportation, freight and passenger rail, or other 
infrastructure projects, by the amounts provided in that 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (b) Surface Transportation.--The chairman of the Senate 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations of a 
committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels and limits in this resolution for one or more bills, 
joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports 
that provide new contract authority paid out of the Highway 
Trust Fund for surface transportation programs to the extent 
such new contract authority is offset by an increase in 
receipts to the Highway Trust Fund (excluding transfers from 
the general fund of the Treasury into the Highway Trust Fund 
not offset by a similar increase in receipts), provided further 
that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 
2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 
2019.
    (c) Multimodal Transportation Projects.--The chairman of 
the Senate Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations 
of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels and limits in this resolution for one or more bills, 
joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports 
that would authorize multimodal transportation projects that--
            (1) provide a set of performance measures;
            (2) require a cost-benefit analysis be conducted to 
        ensure accountability and overall project goals are 
        met; and
            (3) provide flexibility for States, cities, and 
        localities to create strategies that meet the needs of 
        their communities;
by the amounts provided in that legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.
    (d) Flood Control Projects and Insurance Reform.--The 
chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may revise the 
allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and other 
appropriate levels and limits in this resolution for one or 
more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that provide for levee modernization, 
maintenance, repair, and improvement, or provide for flood 
insurance reform and modernization, by the amounts provided in 
that legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 306. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE ECONOMIC 
                    STABILIZATION AND GROWTH.

    (a) Manufacturing.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits 
in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports, including tax 
legislation, that would revitalize and strengthen the United 
States domestic manufacturing sector by increasing Federal 
research and development, by expanding the scope and 
effectiveness of manufacturing programs across the Federal 
Government, by increasing efforts to train and retrain 
manufacturing workers, by enhancing workers' technical skills 
in the use of the new advanced manufacturing technologies to 
produce competitive energy efficient products, by increasing 
support for sector workforce training, by increasing support 
for the redevelopment of closed manufacturing plants, by 
increasing support for development of alternative fuels and 
leap-ahead automotive and energy technologies such as advanced 
batteries, or by establishing tax incentives to encourage the 
continued production in the United States of advanced 
technologies and the infrastructure to support such 
technologies, by the amounts provided in that legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (b) Tax Relief.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution by the amounts provided by one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports that 
would provide tax relief, including but not limited to 
extensions of expiring and expired tax relief, or refundable 
tax relief, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (c) Tax Reform.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that would reform 
the Internal Revenue Code to ensure a sustainable revenue base 
that would lead to a fairer and more efficient tax system and 
to a more competitive business environment for United States 
enterprises, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (d) Trade.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on the 
Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports related to trade by the amounts provided in 
such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (e) Housing Assistance.--The chairman of the Senate 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations of a 
committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels and limits in this resolution for one or more bills, 
joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports 
related to housing assistance, which may include low income 
rental assistance, or assistance provided through the Housing 
Trust Fund created under section 1131 of the Housing and 
Economic Recovery Act of 2008, by the amounts provided in such 
legislation for those purposes, provided that such legislation 
would not increase the deficit over either the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the 
total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (f) Unemployment Mitigation.--The chairman of the Senate 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations of a 
committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports that 
reduce the unemployment rate or provide assistance to the 
unemployed, particularly in the states and localities with the 
highest rates of unemployment, or improve the implementation of 
the unemployment compensation program, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 307. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR AMERICA'S VETERANS AND 
                    WOUNDED SERVICEMEMBERS.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that would--
            (1) expand the number of disabled military retirees 
        who receive both disability compensation and retired 
        pay;
            (2) accelerate the phase-in of concurrent receipt;
            (3) reduce or eliminate the offset between Survivor 
        Benefit Plan annuities and Veterans' Dependency and 
        Indemnity Compensation;
            (4) enhance or maintain the affordability of health 
        care for military personnel, military retirees, or 
        veterans;
            (5) improve disability benefits or evaluations for 
        wounded or disabled military personnel or veterans 
        (including measures to expedite the claims process);
            (6) enhance servicemember education benefits for 
        members of the National Guard and Reserve by ensuring 
        those benefits keep pace with the national average cost 
        of tuition; or
            (7) expand veterans' benefits (including for 
        veterans living in rural areas);
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 308. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR JUDICIAL PAY AND JUDGESHIPS, 
                    POSTAL RETIREE ASSISTANCE, AND CERTAIN PENSION 
                    OBLIGATIONS.

    (a) Judicial Pay and Judgeships.--The chairman of the 
Senate Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations of a 
committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels and limits in this resolution for one or more bills, 
joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports 
that would authorize salary adjustments for justices and judges 
of the United States, or increase the number of Federal 
judgeships, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (b) Postal Retirees.--The chairman of the Senate Committee 
on the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports relating to 
adjustments to funding for postal retiree health coverage, by 
the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.
    (c) Pension Obligations.--The chairman of the Senate 
Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations of a 
committee or committees, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports that 
would authorize funding to cover the full cost of pension 
obligations for current and past employees of laboratories and 
environmental cleanup sites under the jurisdiction of the 
Department of Energy (including benefits paid to security 
personnel) in a manner that does not impact the missions of 
those laboratories and environmental cleanup sites, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 309. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR DEFENSE ACQUISITION AND 
                    FEDERAL CONTRACTING REFORM.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that--
            (1) provide funding to the Department of Defense 
        for additional activities to reduce waste, fraud, abuse 
        and overpayments in defense contracting;
            (2) enhance the capability of the Federal 
        acquisition or contracting workforce to achieve better 
        value for taxpayers;
            (3) reduce the use of no-bid and cost-plus 
        contracts;
            (4) reform Department of Defense processes for 
        acquiring weapons systems or services in order to 
        reduce costs, improve cost and schedule estimation, 
        enhance developmental testing of weapons, enhance 
        oversight, or increase the rigor of reviews of programs 
        that experience critical cost growth;
            (5) reduce the award of contracts to contractors 
        with seriously delinquent tax debts;
            (6) reduce the use of non-competitive contracts and 
        the continuation of task orders for logistics support;
            (7) reduce the use of contracts for acquisition, 
        oversight, and management support services;
            (8) enhance the capability of auditors and 
        inspectors general to oversee Federal acquisition and 
        procurement;
            (9) reform the processes for payment of bonuses to 
        contractors and government executives responsible for 
        over-budget projects and programs that fail to meet 
        basic performance requirements; or
            (10) achieve savings by requiring that Federal 
        departments and agencies eliminate improper payments 
        and increase the use of recovery audits;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 310. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INVESTMENTS IN OUR NATION'S 
                    COUNTIES AND SCHOOLS.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that provide for the 
reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self 
Determination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-393) or make changes 
to the Payments in Lieu of Taxes Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-
565), or both, by the amounts provided by that legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 311. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE FOOD AND DRUG 
                    ADMINISTRATION.

    (a) Regulation.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that authorize the 
Food and Drug Administration to regulate products and assess 
user fees on manufacturers and importers of those products to 
cover the cost of the Food and Drug Administration's regulatory 
activities, by the amounts provided in that legislation for 
those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.
    (b) Drug Importation.--The chairman of the Senate Committee 
on the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that permit the safe 
importation of prescription drugs approved by the Food and Drug 
Administration from a specified list of countries, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.
    (c) Food Safety.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget may revise the allocations of a committee or 
committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits 
in this resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that would improve 
the safety of the food supply in the United States, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for these purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 312. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR A COMPREHENSIVE 
                    INVESTIGATION INTO THE CURRENT FINANCIAL CRISIS.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that provide 
resources for a comprehensive investigation to determine the 
cause of the current financial crisis, hold those responsible 
accountable, and provide recommendations to prevent another 
financial crisis of this magnitude from occurring again by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 313. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INCREASED TRANSPARENCY AT 
                    THE FEDERAL RESERVE.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this 
resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
amendments, motions, or conference reports that increase 
transparency at the Federal Reserve System, including audits of 
the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the 
Federal reserve banks, to include--
            (1) an evaluation of the appropriate number and the 
        associated costs of Federal reserve banks;
            (2) publication on its website, with respect to all 
        lending and financial assistance facilities created by 
        the Board to address the financial crisis, of--
                    (A) the nature and amounts of the 
                collateral that the central bank is accepting 
                on behalf of American taxpayers in the various 
                lending programs, on no less than a monthly 
                basis;
                    (B) the extent to which changes in 
                valuation of credit extensions to various 
                special purpose vehicles, such as Maiden Lane 
                I, Maiden Lane II, and Maiden Lane III, are a 
                result of losses on collateral which will not 
                be recovered;
                    (C) the number of borrowers that 
                participate in each of the lending programs and 
                details of the credit extended, including the 
                extent to which the credit is concentrated in 
                one or more institutions; and
                    (D) information on the extent to which the 
                central bank is contracting for services of 
                private sector firms for the design, pricing, 
                management, and accounting for the various 
                lending programs and the terms and nature of 
                such contracts and bidding processes; and
            (3) including the identity of each entity to which 
        the Board has provided all loans and other financial 
        assistance since March 24, 2008, the value or amount of 
        that financial assistance, and what that entity is 
        doing with such financial assistance;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 314. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY 
                    LEARNING CENTERS.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other levels and limits in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that would increase funding for the 21st 
Century Community Learning Centers program by the amounts 
provided in such legislation for such purpose, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 315. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR PROVISION OF CRITICAL 
                    RESOURCES TO FIREFIGHTERS AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other levels and limits in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that would provide firefighters and fire 
departments with critical resources under the Assistance to 
Firefighters Grant and the Staffing for Adequate Fire and 
Emergency Response Firefighters Grant of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, by the amounts provided in such legislation 
for such purpose, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 316. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE TAX EQUITY FOR STATES 
                    WITHOUT PERSONAL INCOME TAXES, AND OTHER SELECTED 
                    TAX RELIEF POLICIES.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that would extend permanently the deduction 
for State and local sales taxes, extend incentives for enhanced 
charitable giving from individual retirement accounts, 
including life-income gifts, or enhance the employer-provided 
child care credit and the dependent care tax credit, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 317. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO PROMOTE INDIVIDUAL SAVINGS 
                    AND FINANCIAL SECURITY.

    The chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the aggregates, allocations, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports that 
promote financial security through financial literacy, 
retirement planning, and savings incentives, including 
individual development accounts and child savings accounts, 
provided that such legislation does not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total fiscal years 2009 through 
2014 or the period of the total fiscal years 2009 through 2019.

SEC. 318. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO INCREASE FDIC AND NCUA 
                    BORROWING AUTHORITY.

    The chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
may revise the aggregates, allocations, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for one or more bills, joint 
resolutions, amendments, motions, or conference reports to 
increase the borrowing authority of the Federal Deposit 
Insurance Corporation and the National Credit Union 
Administration, provided that such legislation does not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total fiscal 
years 2009 through 2014 or the period of the total fiscal years 
2009 through 2019.

SEC. 319. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR IMPROVING THE WELL-BEING OF 
                    CHILDREN.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that--
            (1) make improvements to child welfare programs, 
        including strengthening the recruitment and retention 
        of foster families, or make improvements to the child 
        support enforcement program;
            (2) improve the Federal foster care payment system 
        to better support children, improve family support, 
        family preservation, family reunification services, 
        address the needs of children prior to removal, during 
        removal, and post placement or address the needs of 
        children who have been abused or neglected; or
            (3) provide funds to states for a program of home 
        visits to low-income mothers-to-be and low-income 
        families that will produce sizeable, sustained 
        improvements in the health, well-being, or school 
        readiness of children or their parents;
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

SEC. 320. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR A 9/11 HEALTH PROGRAM.

    The chairman of the Senate Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports that would establish a program, including 
medical monitoring and treatment, addressing the adverse health 
impacts linked to the September 11, 2001 attacks, by the 
amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2009 
through 2019.

                    Subtitle B--House Reserve Funds

SEC. 321. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH CARE REFORM.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that makes improvements to 
health care in America, which may include making affordable 
health coverage available for all, improving the quality of 
health care, reducing rising health care costs, building on and 
strengthening existing public and private insurance coverage, 
including employer-sponsored coverage, and preserving choice of 
provider and plan by the amounts provided in such measure if 
such measure would not increase the deficit or decrease the 
surplus for either time period provided in clause 10 of rule 
XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 322. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR COLLEGE ACCESS, 
                    AFFORDABILITY, AND COMPLETION.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that makes college more 
affordable or accessible or that increases college enrollment 
and completion through reforms to the Higher Education Act of 
1965 or other legislation, including increasing the maximum 
Pell grant award annually by an amount equal to one percentage 
point more than the Consumer Price Index, or student loan 
reform, by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure 
would not increase the deficit or decrease the surplus for 
either time period provided in clause 10 of rule XXI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, and minimize disruption 
to schools, students, and the employees of the student loan 
originating and servicing industry.

SEC. 323. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR INCREASING ENERGY 
                    INDEPENDENCE.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that--
            (1) provides tax incentives for or otherwise 
        encourages the production of renewable energy or 
        increased energy efficiency;
            (2) encourages investment in emerging energy or 
        vehicle technologies or carbon capture and 
        sequestration;
            (3) limits and provides for reductions in 
        greenhouse gas emissions;
            (4) assists businesses, industries, States, 
        communities, the environment, workers, or households as 
        the United States moves toward reducing and offsetting 
        the impacts of greenhouse gas emissions; or
            (5) facilitates the training of workers for these 
        industries (``green collar jobs'');
by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure would 
not increase the deficit or decrease the surplus for either 
time period provided in clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.

SEC. 324. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR AMERICA'S VETERANS AND 
                    WOUNDED SERVICEMEMBERS.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for 
any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or conference report 
that would:
            (1) expand the number of disabled military retirees 
        who receive both disability compensation and retired 
        pay (concurrent receipt);
            (2) accelerate the phase-in of concurrent receipt;
            (3) reduce or eliminate the offset between Survivor 
        Benefit Plan annuities and Veterans' Dependency and 
        Indemnity Compensation;
            (4) enhance or maintain the affordability of health 
        care for military personnel, military retirees or 
        veterans;
            (5) improve disability benefits or evaluations for 
        wounded or disabled military personnel or veterans 
        (including measures to expedite the claims process);
            (6) enhance servicemember education benefits for 
        members of the National Guard and Reserve by ensuring 
        those benefits keep pace with the national average cost 
        of tuition; or
            (7) expand veterans' benefits (including for 
        veterans living in rural areas);
by the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
or decrease the surplus for either time period provided in 
clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

SEC. 325. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR CERTAIN TAX RELIEF.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that provides for tax relief 
that supports working families (such as expanding the 
refundable child credit), businesses, States, or communities, 
by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure would 
not increase the deficit or decrease the surplus for either 
time period provided in clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.

SEC. 326. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR A 9/11 HEALTH PROGRAM.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that would establish a program, 
including medical monitoring and treatment, addressing the 
adverse health impacts linked to the September 11, 2001, 
attacks by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure 
would not increase the deficit or decrease the surplus for 
either time period provided in clause 10 of rule XXI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 327. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR CHILD NUTRITION.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that reauthorizes, expands, or 
improves child nutrition programs by the amounts provided in 
such measure if such measure would not increase the deficit or 
decrease the surplus for either time period provided in clause 
10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 328. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR STRUCTURAL UNEMPLOYMENT 
                    INSURANCE REFORMS.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that makes structural reforms 
to make the unemployment insurance system respond better to 
serious economic downturns by the amounts provided in such 
measure if such measure would not increase the deficit or 
decrease the surplus for either time period provided in clause 
10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 329. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR CHILD SUPPORT.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that increases parental support 
for children, particularly from non-custodial parents, 
including legislation that results in a greater share of 
collected child support reaching the child, by the amounts 
provided in such measure if such measure would not increase the 
deficit or decrease the surplus for either time period provided 
in clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

SEC. 330. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING TRUST 
                    FUND.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that capitalizes the existing 
Affordable Housing Trust Fund by the amounts provided in such 
measure if such measure would not increase the deficit or 
decrease the surplus for either time period provided in clause 
10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 331. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HOME VISITING.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that provides funds to states 
for a program of home visits to low-income mothers-to-be and 
low-income families which will produce sizeable, sustained 
improvements in the health, well-being, or school readiness of 
children or their parents, by the amounts provided in such 
measure if such measure would not increase the deficit or 
decrease the surplus for either time period provided in clause 
10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 332. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR LOW-INCOME HOME ENERGY 
                    ASSISTANCE PROGRAM TRIGGER.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that makes the Low-Income Home 
Energy Assistance Program more responsive to energy price 
increases by the amounts provided in such measure if such 
measure would not increase the deficit or decrease the surplus 
for either time period provided in clause 10 of rule XXI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 333. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR COUNTY PAYMENTS LEGISLATION.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that provides for the 
reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self 
Determination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-393) or makes changes 
to the Payments in Lieu of Taxes Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-
565) by the amounts provided in such measure if such measure 
would not increase the deficit or decrease the surplus for 
either time period provided in clause 10 of rule XXI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 334. RESERVE FUND FOR THE SURFACE TRANSPORTATION REAUTHORIZATION.

    The chairman of the House Committee on the Budget may 
revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
levels in this resolution for any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report that reauthorizes surface 
transportation programs or that authorizes other 
transportation-related spending by providing new contract 
authority by the amounts provided in such measure if such 
measure establishes or maintains a solvent Highway Trust Fund 
over the period of fiscal years 2009 through 2015. ``Solvency'' 
is defined as a positive cash balance. Such measure may include 
a transfer into the Highway Trust Fund from other Federal 
funds, as long as the transfer of Federal funds is fully 
offset.

                        TITLE IV--BUDGET PROCESS

                     Subtitle A--Senate Provisions

                       PART I--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

SEC. 401. DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS, PROGRAM INTEGRITY INITIATIVES, 
                    AND OTHER ADJUSTMENTS.

    (a) Senate Point of Order.--
            (1) In general.--Except as otherwise provided in 
        this section, it shall not be in order in the Senate to 
        consider any bill or joint resolution (or amendment, 
        motion, or conference report on that bill or joint 
        resolution) that would cause the discretionary spending 
        limits in this section to be exceeded.
            (2) Supermajority waiver and appeals.--
                    (A) Waiver.--This subsection may be waived 
                or suspended in the Senate only by the 
                affirmative vote of three-fifths of the 
                Members, duly chosen and sworn.
                    (B) Appeals.--Appeals in the Senate from 
                the decisions of the Chair relating to any 
                provision of this subsection shall be limited 
                to 1 hour, to be equally divided between, and 
                controlled by, the appellant and the manager of 
                the bill or joint resolution. An affirmative 
                vote of three-fifths of the Members of the 
                Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall be 
                required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of 
                the Chair on a point of order raised under this 
                subsection.
    (b) Senate Discretionary Spending Limits.--In the Senate 
and as used in this section, the term ``discretionary spending 
limit'' means--
            (1) for fiscal year 2009, $1,391,471,000,000 in new 
        budget authority and $1,220,843,000,000 in outlays; and
            (2) for fiscal year 2010, $1,082,250,000,000 in new 
        budget authority and $1,269,471,000,000 in outlays;
as adjusted in conformance with the adjustment procedures in 
subsection (c).
    (c) Adjustments in the Senate.--
            (1) In general.--After the reporting of a bill or 
        joint resolution relating to any matter described in 
        paragraph (2), or the offering of an amendment thereto 
        or the submission of a conference report thereon--
                    (A) the chairman of the Senate Committee on 
                the Budget may adjust the discretionary 
                spending limits, budgetary aggregates, and 
                allocations pursuant to section 302(a) of the 
                Congressional Budget Act of 1974, by the amount 
                of new budget authority in that measure for 
                that purpose and the outlays flowing therefrom; 
                and
                    (B) following any adjustment under 
                subparagraph (A), the Senate Committee on 
                Appropriations may report appropriately revised 
                suballocations pursuant to section 302(b) of 
                the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to carry 
                out this subsection.
            (2) Matters described.--Matters referred to in 
        paragraph (1) are as follows:
                    (A) Continuing disability reviews and ssi 
                redeterminations.--
                            (i) In general.--If a bill or joint 
                        resolution is reported making 
                        appropriations for fiscal year 2010 
                        that appropriates $273,000,000 for 
                        continuing disability reviews and 
                        Supplemental Security Income 
                        redeterminations for the Social 
                        Security Administration, and provides 
                        an additional appropriation of up to 
                        $485,000,000 for continuing disability 
                        reviews and Supplemental Security 
                        Income redeterminations for the Social 
                        Security Administration, then the 
                        discretionary spending limits, 
                        allocation to the Senate Committee on 
                        Appropriations, and aggregates may be 
                        adjusted by the amounts provided in 
                        such legislation for that purpose, but 
                        not to exceed $485,000,000 in budget 
                        authority and outlays flowing therefrom 
                        for fiscal year 2010.
                            (ii) Asset verification.--The 
                        additional appropriation of 
                        $485,000,000 may also provide that a 
                        portion of that amount, not to exceed 
                        $34,000,000, instead may be used for 
                        asset verification for Supplemental 
                        Security Income recipients, but only if 
                        and to the extent that the Office of 
                        the Chief Actuary estimates that the 
                        initiative would be at least as cost 
                        effective as the redeterminations of 
                        eligibility described in subparagraph 
                        (i).
                    (B) Internal revenue service tax 
                enforcement.--If a bill or joint resolution is 
                reported making appropriations for fiscal year 
                2010 that appropriates $7,100,000,000 for the 
                Internal Revenue Service for enhanced tax 
                enforcement to address the Federal tax gap 
                (taxes owed but not paid) and provides an 
                additional appropriation of up to $890,000,000 
                for the Internal Revenue Service for enhanced 
                tax enforcement to address the Federal tax gap, 
                then the discretionary spending limits, 
                allocation to the Senate Committee on 
                Appropriations, and aggregates may be adjusted 
                by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
                that purpose, but not to exceed $890,000,000 in 
                budget authority and outlays flowing therefrom 
                for fiscal year 2010.
                    (C) Health care fraud and abuse control.--
                If a bill or joint resolution is reported 
                making appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that 
                appropriates up to $311,000,000 to the Health 
                Care Fraud and Abuse Control program at the 
                Department of Health and Human Services, then 
                the discretionary spending limits, allocation 
                to the Senate Committee on Appropriations, and 
                aggregates may be adjusted by the amounts 
                provided in such legislation for that purpose, 
                but not to exceed $311,000,000 in budget 
                authority and outlays flowing therefrom for 
                fiscal year 2010.
                    (D) Unemployment insurance improper payment 
                reviews.--If a bill or joint resolution is 
                reported making appropriations for fiscal year 
                2010 that appropriates $10,000,000 for in-
                person reemployment and eligibility assessments 
                and unemployment insurance improper payment 
                reviews, and provides an additional 
                appropriation of up to $50,000,000 for in-
                person reemployment and eligibility assessments 
                and unemployment insurance improper payment 
                reviews, then the discretionary spending 
                limits, allocation to the Senate Committee on 
                Appropriations, and aggregates may be adjusted 
                by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
                that purpose, but not to exceed $50,000,000 in 
                budget authority and outlays flowing therefrom 
                for fiscal year 2010.
            (3) Low-income home energy assistance program 
        (liheap).--If a bill or joint resolution is reported 
        making appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that 
        appropriates $3,200,000,000 in funding for the Low-
        Income Home Energy Assistance Program and provides an 
        additional appropriation of up to $1,900,000,000 for 
        that program, then the discretionary spending limits, 
        allocation to the Senate Committee on Appropriations, 
        and aggregates may be adjusted by the amounts provided 
        in such legislation for that purpose, but not to exceed 
        $1,900,000,000 in budget authority and outlays flowing 
        therefrom for fiscal year 2010.
            (4) Adjustments to support ongoing overseas 
        deployments and other activities.--The chairman of the 
        Senate Committee on the Budget may adjust the 
        discretionary spending limits, allocations to the 
        Senate Committee on Appropriations, and aggregates for 
        one or more--
                    (A) bills reported by the Senate Committee 
                on Appropriations or passed by the House of 
                Representatives;
                    (B) joint resolutions or amendments 
                reported by the Senate Committee on 
                Appropriations;
                    (C) amendments between the Houses received 
                from the House of Representatives or Senate 
                amendments offered by the authority of the 
                Senate Committee on Appropriations; or
                    (D) conference reports;
        making appropriations for fiscal years 2009 and 2010 
        for overseas deployments and other activities by the 
        amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes 
        (and so designated pursuant to this paragraph), up to 
        the amounts of budget authority specified in section 
        104(21) for fiscal years 2009 and 2010 and the new 
        outlays flowing therefrom.
            (5) Revised appropriations for fiscal year 2010.--
                    (A) In general.--If after adoption of this 
                resolution by the Congress, the President 
                submits his budget pursuant to section 1105(a) 
                of title 31, United States Code, and the 
                Congressional Budget Office (CBO) re-estimates 
                the budget, the chairman of the Senate 
                Committee on the Budget may adjust the 
                discretionary spending limits, budgetary 
                aggregates, and allocations pursuant to section 
                302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
                by the aggregate difference for discretionary 
                appropriations and related outlays between the 
                CBO re-estimate and the President's Budget.
                    (B) Suballocations.--Following any 
                adjustment under subparagraph (A), the Senate 
                Committee on Appropriations may report 
                appropriately revised suballocations pursuant 
                to section 302(b) of the Congressional Budget 
                Act of 1974 to carry out this paragraph.
    (d) Inapplicability.--In the Senate, subsections (a), (b), 
(c), and (d) of section 312 of S. Con. Res. 70 (110th Congress) 
shall no longer apply.

SEC. 402. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) In General.--
            (1) Point of order.--Except as provided in 
        subsection (b), it shall not be in order in the Senate 
        to consider any bill, joint resolution, motion, 
        amendment, or conference report that would provide an 
        advance appropriation.
            (2) Definition.--In this section, the term 
        ``advance appropriation'' means any new budget 
        authority provided in a bill or joint resolution making 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that first becomes 
        available for any fiscal year after 2010, or any new 
        budget authority provided in a bill or joint resolution 
        making general appropriations or continuing 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2011, that first becomes 
        available for any fiscal year after 2011.
    (b) Exceptions.--Advance appropriations may be provided--
            (1) for fiscal years 2011 and 2012 for programs, 
        projects, activities, or accounts identified in the 
        joint explanatory statement of managers accompanying 
        this resolution under the heading ``Accounts Identified 
        for Advance Appropriations'' in an aggregate amount not 
        to exceed $28,852,000,000 in new budget authority in 
        each year;
            (2) for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting; 
        and
            (3) for the Department of Veterans Affairs for the 
        Medical Services, Medical Support and Compliance, and 
        Medical Facilities accounts of the Veterans Health 
        Administration.
    (c) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal.--
            (1) Waiver.--In the Senate, subsection (a) may be 
        waived or suspended only by an affirmative vote of 
        three-fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (2) Appeal.--An affirmative vote of three-fifths of 
        the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, shall 
        be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the 
        Chair on a point of order raised under subsection (a).
    (d) Form of Point of Order.--A point of order under 
subsection (a) may be raised by a Senator as provided in 
section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    (e) Conference Reports.--When the Senate is considering a 
conference report on, or an amendment between the Houses in 
relation to, a bill, upon a point of order being made by any 
Senator pursuant to this section, and such point of order being 
sustained, such material contained in such conference report 
shall be deemed stricken, and the Senate shall proceed to 
consider the question of whether the Senate shall recede from 
its amendment and concur with a further amendment, or concur in 
the House amendment with a further amendment, as the case may 
be, which further amendment shall consist of only that portion 
of the conference report or House amendment, as the case may 
be, not so stricken. Any such motion in the Senate shall be 
debatable. In any case in which such point of order is 
sustained against a conference report (or Senate amendment 
derived from such conference report by operation of this 
subsection), no further amendment shall be in order.
    (f) Inapplicability.--In the Senate, section 313 of S. Con. 
Res. 70 (110th Congress) shall no longer apply.

SEC. 403. EMERGENCY LEGISLATION.

    (a) Authority To Designate.--In the Senate, with respect to 
a provision of direct spending or receipts legislation or 
appropriations for discretionary accounts that Congress 
designates as an emergency requirement in such measure, the 
amounts of new budget authority, outlays, and receipts in all 
fiscal years resulting from that provision shall be treated as 
an emergency requirement for the purpose of this section.
    (b) Exemption of Emergency Provisions.--Any new budget 
authority, outlays, and receipts resulting from any provision 
designated as an emergency requirement, pursuant to this 
section, in any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report shall not count for purposes of sections 302 
and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, section 201 of 
S. Con. Res. 21 (110th Congress) (relating to pay-as-you-go), 
section 311 of S. Con. Res. 70 (110th Congress) (relating to 
long-term deficits), and sections 401 and 404 of this 
resolution (relating to discretionary spending and short-term 
deficits). Designated emergency provisions shall not count for 
the purpose of revising allocations, aggregates, or other 
levels pursuant to procedures established under section 
301(b)(7) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 for deficit-
neutral reserve funds and revising discretionary spending 
limits set pursuant to section 301 of this resolution.
    (c) Designations.--If a provision of legislation is 
designated as an emergency requirement under this section, the 
committee report and any statement of managers accompanying 
that legislation shall include an explanation of the manner in 
which the provision meets the criteria in subsection (f).
    (d) Definitions.--In this section, the terms ``direct 
spending'', ``receipts'', and ``appropriations for 
discretionary accounts'' mean any provision of a bill, joint 
resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report that 
affects direct spending, receipts, or appropriations as those 
terms have been defined and interpreted for purposes of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    (e) Point of Order.--
            (1) In general.--When the Senate is considering a 
        bill, resolution, amendment, motion, or conference 
        report, if a point of order is made by a Senator 
        against an emergency designation in that measure, that 
        provision making such a designation shall be stricken 
        from the measure and may not be offered as an amendment 
        from the floor.
            (2) Supermajority waiver and appeals.--
                    (A) Waiver.--Paragraph (1) may be waived or 
                suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative 
                vote of three-fifths of the Members, duly 
                chosen and sworn.
                    (B) Appeals.--Appeals in the Senate from 
                the decisions of the Chair relating to any 
                provision of this subsection shall be limited 
                to 1 hour, to be equally divided between, and 
                controlled by, the appellant and the manager of 
                the bill or joint resolution, as the case may 
                be. An affirmative vote of three-fifths of the 
                Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, 
                shall be required to sustain an appeal of the 
                ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised 
                under this subsection.
            (3) Definition of an emergency designation.--For 
        purposes of paragraph (1), a provision shall be 
        considered an emergency designation if it designates 
        any item as an emergency requirement pursuant to this 
        subsection.
            (4) Form of the point of order.--A point of order 
        under paragraph (1) may be raised by a Senator as 
        provided in section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget 
        Act of 1974.
            (5) Conference reports.--When the Senate is 
        considering a conference report on, or an amendment 
        between the Houses in relation to, a bill, upon a point 
        of order being made by any Senator pursuant to this 
        section, and such point of order being sustained, such 
        material contained in such conference report shall be 
        deemed stricken, and the Senate shall proceed to 
        consider the question of whether the Senate shall 
        recede from its amendment and concur with a further 
        amendment, or concur in the House amendment with a 
        further amendment, as the case may be, which further 
        amendment shall consist of only that portion of the 
        conference report or House amendment, as the case may 
        be, not so stricken. Any such motion in the Senate 
        shall be debatable. In any case in which such point of 
        order is sustained against a conference report (or 
        Senate amendment derived from such conference report by 
        operation of this subsection), no further amendment 
        shall be in order.
    (f) Criteria.--
            (1) In general.--For purposes of this section, any 
        provision is an emergency requirement if the situation 
        addressed by such provision is--
                    (A) necessary, essential, or vital (not 
                merely useful or beneficial);
                    (B) sudden, quickly coming into being, and 
                not building up over time;
                    (C) an urgent, pressing, and compelling 
                need requiring immediate action;
                    (D) subject to paragraph (2), unforeseen, 
                unpredictable, and unanticipated; and
                    (E) not permanent, temporary in nature.
            (2) Unforeseen.--An emergency that is part of an 
        aggregate level of anticipated emergencies, 
        particularly when normally estimated in advance, is not 
        unforeseen.
    (g) Inapplicability.--In the Senate, section 204(a) of S. 
Con. Res. 21 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the 
budget for fiscal year 2008, shall no longer apply.

SEC. 404. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST LEGISLATION INCREASING SHORT-TERM 
                    DEFICIT.

    (a) Point of Order.--It shall not be in order in the Senate 
to consider any bill, joint resolution, amendment, motion, or 
conference report (except measures within the jurisdiction of 
the Committee on Appropriations) that would cause a net 
increase in the deficit in excess of $10,000,000,000 in any 
fiscal year provided for in the most recently adopted 
concurrent resolution on the budget unless it is fully offset 
over the period of all fiscal years provided for in the most 
recently adopted concurrent resolution on the budget.
    (b) Supermajority Waiver and Appeal in the Senate.--
            (1) Waiver.--This section may be waived or 
        suspended only by the affirmative vote of three-fifths 
        of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (2) Appeal.--An affirmative vote of three-fifths of 
        the Members, duly chosen and sworn, shall be required 
        to sustain an appeal of the ruling of the Chair on a 
        point of order raised under this section.
    (c) Limitation.--The provisions of this section shall not 
apply to any bills, joint resolutions, amendments, motions, or 
conference reports for which the chairman of the Senate 
Committee on the Budget has made adjustments to the 
allocations, levels or limits contained in this resolution 
pursuant to Section 301(a) of this resolution.
    (d) Determinations of Budget Levels.--For purposes of this 
section, the levels shall be determined on the basis of 
estimates provided by the Senate Committee on the Budget.
    (e) Sunset.--This section shall expire on September 30, 
2018.
    (f) Inapplicability.--In the Senate, section 315 of S. Con. 
Res. 70 (110th Congress), the concurrent resolution in the 
budget for fiscal year 2009, shall no longer apply.

SEC. 405. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST CERTAIN LEGISLATION RELATED TO SURFACE 
                    TRANSPORTATION FUNDING.

    (a) Point of Order.--It shall not be in order in the Senate 
to consider any bill, joint resolution, amendment, motion, or 
conference report that extends the authority or reauthorizes 
surface transportation programs that appropriates budget 
authority from sources other than the Highway Trust Fund, 
including the Mass Transit Account of such fund.
    (b) Supermajority Waiver and Appeals in the Senate.--
            (1) Waiver.--This section may be waived or 
        suspended only by an affirmative vote of three-fifths 
        of the Members, duly chosen and sworn.
            (2) Appeals.--An affirmative vote of three-fifths 
        of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and sworn, 
        shall be required to sustain an appeal of the ruling of 
        the Chair on a point of order raised under this 
        section.
    (c) Sunset.--This section shall expire on September 30, 
2018.

                       PART II--OTHER PROVISIONS

SEC. 411. OVERSIGHT OF GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE.

    In the Senate, all committees are directed to review 
programs within their jurisdiction to root out waste, fraud, 
and abuse in program spending, giving particular scrutiny to 
issues raised by Government Accountability Office reports. 
Based on these oversight efforts and committee performance 
reviews of programs within their jurisdiction, committees are 
directed to include recommendations for improved governmental 
performance in their annual views and estimates reports 
required under section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 to the Senate Committee on the Budget.

SEC. 412. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF CERTAIN DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE 
                    EXPENSES.

    In the Senate, notwithstanding section 302(a)(1) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, section 13301 of the Budget 
Enforcement Act of 1990, and section 2009a of title 39, United 
States Code, the joint explanatory statement accompanying the 
conference report on any concurrent resolution on the budget 
shall include in its allocations under section 302(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to the Senate Committee on 
Appropriation amounts for the discretionary administrative 
expenses of the Social Security Administration and of the 
Postal Service.

SEC. 413. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

    (a) Application.--In the Senate, any adjustments of 
allocations and aggregates made pursuant to this resolution 
shall--
            (1) apply while that measure is under 
        consideration;
            (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
            (3) be published in the Congressional Record as 
        soon as practicable.
    (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 as allocations and aggregates contained in 
this resolution.
    (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
resolution the levels of new budget authority, outlays, direct 
spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, deficits, and 
surpluses for a fiscal year or period of fiscal years shall be 
determined on the basis of estimates made by the Senate 
Committee on the Budget.
    (d) Adjustments.--The chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget may adjust the aggregates, allocations, and other 
levels and limits in this resolution for legislation which has 
received final Congressional approval in the same form by the 
House of Representatives and the Senate, but has yet to be 
presented to or signed by the President at the time of final 
consideration of this resolution.

SEC. 414. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.

    Upon the enactment of a bill or joint resolution providing 
for a change in concepts or definitions, the chairman of the 
Senate Committee on the Budget may make adjustments to the 
levels and allocations in this resolution in accordance with 
section 251(b) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985 (as in effect prior to September 30, 2002).

SEC. 415. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

    The Senate adopts the provisions of this subtitle--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the 
        Senate, and as such they shall be considered as part of 
        the rules of the Senate and such rules shall supersede 
        other rules only to the extent that they are 
        inconsistent with such other rules; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional 
        right of the Senate to change those rules at any time, 
        in the same manner, and to the same extent as is the 
        case of any other rule of the Senate.

                Subtitle B--House Enforcement Provisions

SEC. 421. ADJUSTMENTS FOR DIRECT SPENDING AND REVENUES.

    (a) Adjustments for Current Policy.--
            (1) In general.--For the policies set forth in and 
        not to exceed the amounts in paragraph (2), and subject 
        to the condition specified in paragraph (3), when the 
        chairman of the House Committee on the Budget evaluates 
        the budgetary effects of any provision in a bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report for the 
        purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, this 
        concurrent resolution, or the Rules of the House of 
        Representatives relative to baseline estimates 
        consistent with section 257 of the Balanced Budget and 
        Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, he may exclude 
        from his evaluation the budgetary effects of such 
        provisions if such effects would have been reflected in 
        a baseline adjusted for current policy.
            (2) Policies and amounts.--Paragraph (1) shall 
        apply only to the following provisions:
                    (A) Medicare improvements.--An increase in 
                the deficit of not to exceed $38,000,000,000 in 
                fiscal years 2010 through 2014 and of not to 
                exceed $38,000,000,000 in fiscal years 2010 
                through 2019 by reforming the Medicare payment 
                system for physicians to--
                            (i) change incentives to encourage 
                        efficiency and higher quality care in a 
                        way that supports fiscal 
                        sustainability;
                            (ii) improve payment accuracy to 
                        encourage efficient use of resources 
                        and ensure that primary care receives 
                        appropriate compensation;
                            (iii) improve coordination of care 
                        among all providers serving a patient 
                        in all appropriate settings; or
                            (iv) hold providers accountable for 
                        their utilization patterns and quality 
                        of care.
                    (B) Middle class tax relief.--A decrease in 
                revenues (or increase in outlays, as 
                appropriate) of an amount not to exceed 
                $512,165,000,000 in fiscal years 2010 through 
                2014 and of an amount not to exceed 
                $1,294,476,000,000 in fiscal years 2010 through 
                2019, resulting from extending certain 
                provisions of the Economic Growth and Tax 
                Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 and the Jobs 
                and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 
                2003 for middle class tax relief, including--
                            (i) the 10 percent individual 
                        income tax bracket;
                            (ii) marriage penalty relief;
                            (iii) the child credit at $1,000 
                        and partial refundability of the 
                        credit;
                            (iv) education incentives;
                            (v) other incentives for middle 
                        class families and children;
                            (vi) other reductions to individual 
                        income tax brackets; and
                            (vii) small business tax relief.
                    (C) Reform of the alternative minimum 
                tax.--A decrease in revenues of an amount not 
                to exceed $214,433,000,000 in fiscal years 2010 
                through 2014 and fiscal years 2010 through 2019 
                resulting from reform of the AMT so that tens 
                of millions of working families will not become 
                subject to it.
                    (D) Reform of the estate and gift tax.--A 
                decrease in revenues of an amount not to exceed 
                $72,033,000,000 in fiscal years 2010 through 
                2014 and of an amount not to exceed 
                $256,244,000,000 in fiscal years 2010 through 
                2019 resulting from reform of the Estate and 
                Gift Tax so that only a minute fraction of 
                estates owe tax, by extending the law as in 
                effect for 2009 for the Estate and Gift Tax.
            (3) Condition.--Subsection (a) shall apply only if 
        the House of Representatives has previously passed a 
        bill to impose statutory pay-as-you-go requirements or 
        the measure containing the provision being evaluated by 
        the chairman of the House Committee on the Budget 
        imposes such requirements and such bill is designated 
        as providing statutory pay-as-you-go-requirements under 
        this subsection.
            (4) Revisions.--The chairman of the House Committee 
        on the Budget may revise or adjust the allocations, 
        aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
        resolution to reflect current policy adjustments made 
        pursuant to this section.
    (b) Deposit Insurance.--When the chairman of the House 
Committee on the Budget evaluates the budgetary effects of a 
provision of a bill, joint resolution, amendment, or conference 
report for the purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974, this resolution, or the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, the chairman shall exclude the budgetary 
effects of any provision that affects the full funding of the 
deposit insurance guarantee commitment in effect on the date of 
enactment of Public Law 110-343, the Emergency Economic 
Stabilization Act of 2008.

SEC. 422. ADJUSTMENTS TO DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

    (a) Program Integrity Initiatives.--
            (1) Social security administration program 
        integrity initiatives.--
                    (A) In general.--In the House, prior to 
                consideration of any bill, joint resolution, 
                amendment, or conference report making 
                appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that 
                appropriates $273,000,000 for continuing 
                disability reviews and Supplemental Security 
                Income redeterminations for the Social Security 
                Administration and (except as provided in 
                subparagraph (B)) provides an additional 
                appropriation of up to $485,000,000, and that 
                amount is designated for continuing disability 
                reviews and Supplemental Security Income 
                redeterminations for the Social Security 
                Administration, the allocation to the House 
                Committee on Appropriations shall be increased 
                by the amount of the additional budget 
                authority and outlays resulting from that 
                budget authority for fiscal year 2010.
                    (B) Asset verification.--The additional 
                appropriation of $485,000,000 may also provide 
                that a portion of that amount, not to exceed 
                $34,000,000, instead may be used for asset 
                verification for Supplemental Security Income 
                recipients, but only if and to the extent that 
                the Office of the Chief Actuary estimates that 
                the initiative would be at least as cost 
                effective as the redeterminations of 
                eligibility described in subparagraph (A).
            (2) Internal revenue service tax compliance.--In 
        the House, prior to consideration of any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report making 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that appropriates 
        $4,904,000,000 to the Internal Revenue Service for 
        Enforcement and provides an additional appropriation of 
        up to $600,000,000 for Enforcement to address the 
        Federal tax gap, and provides that such sums as may be 
        necessary shall be available from the Operations 
        Support account in the Internal Revenue Service to 
        fully support these Enforcement activities, the 
        allocation to the House Committee on Appropriations 
        shall be increased by the amount of the additional 
        budget authority and outlays resulting from that budget 
        authority for fiscal year 2010.
            (3) Health care fraud and abuse control program.--
        In the House, prior to consideration of any bill, joint 
        resolution, amendment, or conference report making 
        appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that appropriates 
        up to $311,000,000, and the amount is designated to the 
        health care fraud and abuse control program at the 
        Department of Health and Human Services, the allocation 
        to the House Committee on Appropriations shall be 
        increased by the amount of additional budget authority 
        and outlays resulting from that budget authority for 
        fiscal year 2010.
            (4) Unemployment insurance program integrity 
        activities.--In the House, prior to consideration of 
        any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or conference 
        report making appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that 
        appropriates $10,000,000 for in-person reemployment and 
        eligibility assessments and unemployment insurance 
        improper payment reviews for the Department of Labor 
        and provides an additional appropriation of up to 
        $50,000,000, and the amount is designated for in-person 
        reemployment and eligibility assessments and 
        unemployment insurance improper payment reviews for the 
        Department of Labor, the allocation to the House 
        Committee on Appropriations shall be increased by the 
        amount of additional budget authority and outlays 
        resulting from that budget authority for fiscal year 
        2010.
            (5) Procedure for adjustments.--Prior to 
        consideration of any bill, joint resolution, amendment, 
        or conference report, the chairman of the House 
        Committee on the Budget shall make the adjustments set 
        forth in this subsection for the incremental new budget 
        authority in that measure and the outlays resulting 
        from that budget authority if that measure meets the 
        requirements set forth in this subsection.
    (b) Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP).--In 
the House, prior to consideration of any bill, joint 
resolution, amendment, or conference report making 
appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that appropriates 
$3,200,000,000 in funding for the Low-Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program and provides additional appropriations of up 
to $1,900,000,000 for that program, if a mandatory trigger for 
LIHEAP is not enacted, the chairman of the House Committee on 
the Budget may allocate such additional budget authority and 
outlays resulting from that budget authority to the House 
Committee on Appropriations.
    (c) Revised Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2010.--
            (1) In general.--If after adoption of this 
        resolution by the Congress, the President submits his 
        budget pursuant to section 1105(a) of title 31, United 
        States Code, and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) 
        re-estimates the budget, the chairman of the House 
        Committee on the Budget may adjust the discretionary 
        spending limits, budgetary aggregates, and the 
        allocation to the House Committee on Appropriations by 
        the aggregate difference for discretionary 
        appropriations and related outlays between the CBO re-
        estimate and the President's Budget.
            (2) Suballocations.--Following any adjustment under 
        subparagraph (A), the House Committee on Appropriations 
        may report appropriately revised suballocations 
        pursuant to section 302(b) of the Congressional Budget 
        Act of 1974 to carry out this paragraph.

SEC. 423. COSTS OF OVERSEAS DEPLOYMENTS AND EMERGENCY NEEDS.

    (a) Overseas Deployments and Other Activities.--
            (1) In the House, if any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, or conference report makes appropriations 
        for fiscal year 2009 or fiscal year 2010 for overseas 
        deployments and other activities and such amounts are 
        so designated pursuant to this paragraph, then the 
        allocation to the House Committee on Appropriations may 
        be adjusted by the amounts provided in such legislation 
        for that purpose up to the amounts of budget authority 
        specified in section 104(21) for fiscal year 2009 or 
        fiscal year 2010 and the new outlays resulting 
        therefrom.
            (2) In the House, if any bill, joint resolution, 
        amendment, or conference report makes appropriations 
        for fiscal year 2009 or fiscal year 2010 for overseas 
        deployments and other activities above the amounts of 
        budget authority and new outlays specified in paragraph 
        (1) and such amounts are so designated pursuant to this 
        paragraph, then new budget authority, outlays, or 
        receipts resulting therefrom shall not count for the 
        purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 or 
        this resolution.
    (b) Emergency Needs.--If any bill, joint resolution, 
amendment, or conference report makes appropriations for 
discretionary amounts and such amounts are designated as 
necessary to meet emergency needs pursuant to this subsection, 
then new budget authority and outlays resulting therefrom shall 
not count for the purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974 or this resolution.

SEC. 424. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) In General.--In the House, except as provided in 
subsection (b), any bill, joint resolution, amendment, or 
conference report making a general appropriation or continuing 
appropriation may not provide for advance appropriations.
    (b) Exceptions.--Advance appropriations may be provided--
            (1) for fiscal year 2011 for programs, projects, 
        activities, or accounts identified in the joint 
        explanatory statement of managers to accompany this 
        resolution under the heading ``Accounts Identified for 
        Advance Appropriations'' in an aggregate amount not to 
        exceed $28,852,000,000 in new budget authority, and for 
        2012, accounts separately identified under the same 
        heading; and
            (2) for the Department of Veterans Affairs for the 
        Medical Services, Medical Support and Compliance, and 
        Medical Facilities accounts of the Veterans Health 
        Administration.
    (c) Definition.--In this section, the term ``advance 
appropriation'' means any new discretionary budget authority 
provided in a bill or joint resolution making general 
appropriations or any new discretionary budget authority 
provided in a bill or joint resolution making continuing 
appropriations for fiscal year 2010 that first becomes 
available for any fiscal year after 2010.

SEC. 425. OVERSIGHT OF GOVERNMENT PERFORMANCE.

    In the House, all committees are directed to conduct 
rigorous oversight hearings to root out waste, fraud, and abuse 
in all aspects of Federal spending and Government operations, 
giving particular scrutiny to issues raised by the Federal 
Office of the Inspector General or the Comptroller General of 
the United States. Based upon these oversight efforts, the 
committees are directed to make recommendations to reduce 
wasteful Federal spending to promote deficit reduction and 
long-term fiscal responsibility. Such recommendations should be 
submitted to the House Committee on the Budget in the views and 
estimates reports prepared by committees as required under 
301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

SEC. 426. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF CERTAIN DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE 
                    EXPENSES.

    (a) In General.--In the House, notwithstanding section 
302(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, section 
13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, and section 4001 
of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, the joint 
explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on any 
concurrent resolution on the budget shall include in its 
allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 to the House Committee on Appropriations amounts for 
the discretionary administrative expenses of the Social 
Security Administration and of the Postal Service.
    (b) Special Rule.--For purposes of applying section 302(f) 
of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, estimates of the level 
of total new budget authority and total outlays provided by a 
measure shall include any off-budget discretionary amounts.

SEC. 427. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

    (a) Application.--In the House, any adjustments of 
allocations and aggregates made pursuant to this resolution 
shall--
            (1) apply while that measure is under 
        consideration;
            (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
            (3) be published in the Congressional Record as 
        soon as practicable.
    (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 as allocations and aggregates included in 
this resolution.
    (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
resolution, the levels of new budget authority, outlays, direct 
spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, deficits, and 
surpluses for a fiscal year or period of fiscal years shall be 
determined on the basis of estimates made by the House 
Committee on the Budget.
    (d) Adjustments.--The chairman of the House Committee on 
the Budget may adjust the aggregates, allocations, and other 
levels in this resolution for legislation which has received 
final Congressional approval in the same form by the House of 
Representatives and the Senate, but has yet to be presented to 
or signed by the President at the time of final consideration 
of this resolution.

SEC. 428. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND DEFINITIONS.

    Upon the enactment of any bill or joint resolution 
providing for a change in budgetary concepts or definitions, 
the chairman of the House Committee on the Budget shall adjust 
any appropriate levels and allocations in this resolution 
accordingly.

SEC. 429. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

    The House adopts the provisions of this subtitle--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the 
        House of Representatives and as such they shall be 
        considered as part of the rules of the House, and these 
        rules shall supersede other rules only to the extent 
        that they are inconsistent with other such rules; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional 
        right of the House of Representatives to change those 
        rules at any time, in the same manner, and to the same 
        extent as in the case of any other rule of the House of 
        Representatives.

                            TITLE V--POLICY

SEC. 501. POLICY ON MIDDLE-CLASS TAX RELIEF AND REVENUES.

    It is the policy of this resolution to minimize fiscal 
burdens on working families and their children and 
grandchildren. It is the policy of this resolution to extend 
the following tax relief consistent with current policy--
            (1) relief for the tens of millions of middle-
        income households who would otherwise be subject to the 
        Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) under current law;
            (2) middle-class tax relief; and
            (3) elimination of estate taxes on all but a minute 
        fraction of estates.
In total, this resolution supports the extension of over 
$1,750,000,000,000 in tax relief to individuals and families 
relative to current law. This resolution supports additional, 
deficit-neutral tax relief, including the extension of AMT 
relief, expanding the eligibility for the refundable child 
credit, the research and experimentation tax credit, the 
deduction for State and local sales taxes, the enactment of a 
tax credit for school construction bonds, and other tax relief 
for working families. The cost of enacting such policies may be 
offset by reforms within the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 that 
produce higher rates of tax compliance to close the ``tax gap'' 
and reduce taxpayer burdens through tax simplification. The 
President's budget proposes a variety of other revenue offsets. 
Unless expressly provided, this resolution does not assume any 
of the specific revenue offset proposals provided for in the 
President's budget. Decisions about specific revenue offsets 
are made by the House Committee on Ways and Means and the 
Senate Committee on Finance, which are the tax-writing 
committees.

SEC. 502. POLICY ON DEFENSE PRIORITIES.

    It is the policy of this resolution that--
            (1) there is no higher priority than the defense of 
        our Nation, and therefore the Administration and 
        Congress will make the necessary investments and 
        reforms to strengthen our military so that it can 
        successfully meet the threats of the 21st century;
            (2) acquisition reform is needed at the Department 
        of Defense to end excessive cost growth in the 
        development of new weapons systems and to ensure that 
        weapons systems are delivered on time and in adequate 
        quantities to equip our servicemen and servicewomen;
            (3) the Department of Defense should review defense 
        plans to ensure that weapons developed to counter Cold 
        War-era threats are not redundant and are applicable to 
        21st century threats;
            (4) sufficient resources should be provided for the 
        Department of Defense to aggressively address the 758 
        unimplemented recommendations made by the Government 
        Accountability Office (GAO) since 2001 to improve 
        practices at the Department of Defense, which could 
        save billions of dollars that could be applied to 
        priorities identified in this section;
            (5) the Department of Defense should review the 
        role that contractors play in its operations, including 
        the degree to which contractors are performing 
        inherently governmental functions, to ensure it has the 
        most effective mix of government and contracted 
        personnel;
            (6) the Department of Defense report to Congress on 
        its assessment of Cold War-era weaponry, its progress 
        on implementing GAO recommendations, and its review of 
        contractors at the Department as outlined in paragraphs 
        (3), (4), and (5) by a date to be determined by the 
        appropriate committees;
            (7) the GAO provide a report to the appropriate 
        congressional committees by December 31, 2009, on the 
        Department of Defense's progress in implementing its 
        audit recommendations;
            (8) ballistic missile defense technologies that are 
        not proven to work through adequate testing and that 
        are not operationally viable should not be deployed, 
        and that no funding should be provided for the research 
        or development of space-based interceptors;
            (9) cooperative threat reduction and other 
        nonproliferation programs (securing ``loose nukes'' and 
        other materials used in weapons of mass destruction), 
        which were highlighted as high priorities by the 9/11 
        Commission, need to be funded at a level that is 
        commensurate with the evolving threat;
            (10) readiness of our troops, particularly the 
        National Guard and Reserves, is a high priority, and 
        that continued emphasis is needed to ensure adequate 
        equipment and training;
            (11) improving military health care services and 
        ensuring quality health care for returning combat 
        veterans is a high priority;
            (12) military pay and benefits should be enhanced 
        to improve the quality of life for military personnel 
        and their families;
            (13) the Department of Defense should make every 
        effort to investigate the national security benefits of 
        energy independence, including those that may be 
        associated with alternative energy sources and energy 
        efficiency conversions;
            (14) the Administration's budget requests should 
        continue to comply with section 1008, Public Law 109-
        364, the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act 
        for Fiscal Year 2007, and that to the extent 
        practicable overseas military operations should no 
        longer be funded through emergency supplemental 
        appropriations; and
            (15) when assessing security threats and reviewing 
        the programs and funding needed to counter these 
        threats, the Administration should do so in a 
        comprehensive manner that includes all agencies 
        involved in our national security.

                    TITLE VI--SENSE OF THE CONGRESS

SEC. 601. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS ON VETERANS' AND SERVICEMEMBERS' HEALTH 
                    CARE.

    It is the sense of the Congress that--
            (1) the Congress supports excellent health care for 
        current and former members of the United States Armed 
        Services--they have served well and honorably and have 
        made significant sacrifices for this Nation;
            (2) the President's budget will improve health care 
        for veterans by increasing appropriations for VA by 10 
        percent more than the 2009 level, increasing VA's 
        appropriated resources for every year after 2010, and 
        restoring health care eligibility to additional 
        nondisabled veterans with modest incomes;
            (3) VA is not and should not be authorized to bill 
        private insurance companies for treatment of health 
        conditions that are related to veterans' military 
        service;
            (4) VA may find it difficult to realize the level 
        of increase in medical care collections estimated in 
        the President's budget for 2010 using existing 
        authorities, and increases to veterans beneficiary 
        travel reimbursement are important; therefore, this 
        resolution provides $673,000,000 more for Function 700 
        (Veterans Benefits and Services) than the President's 
        budget to safeguard the provision of health care to 
        veterans;
            (5) it is important to continue providing 
        sufficient and timely funding for veterans' and 
        servicemembers' health care; and
            (6) this resolution provides additional funding 
        above the 2009 levels for VA to research and treat 
        mental health, post-traumatic stress disorder, and 
        traumatic brain injury.

SEC. 602. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS ON HOMELAND SECURITY.

    It is the sense of the Congress that because making the 
country safer and more secure is such a critical priority, the 
resolution therefore provides robust resources in the four 
budget functions--Function 400 (Transportation), Function 450 
(Community and Regional Development), Function 550 (Health), 
and Function 750 (Administration of Justice)--that fund most 
nondefense homeland security activities that can be used to 
address our key security priorities, including--
            (1) safeguarding the Nation's transportation 
        systems, including rail, mass transit, ports, and 
        airports;
            (2) continuing with efforts to identify and to 
        screen for threats bound for the United States;
            (3) strengthening border security;
            (4) enhancing emergency preparedness and training 
        and equipping first responders;
            (5) helping to make critical infrastructure more 
        secure and resilient against the threat of terrorism 
        and natural disasters;
            (6) making the Nation's cyber infrastructure 
        resistive to attack; and
            (7) increasing the preparedness of the public 
        health system.

SEC. 603. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS ON PROMOTING AMERICAN INNOVATION AND 
                    ECONOMIC COMPETITIVENESS.

    It is the sense of the Congress that--
            (1) the Congress should provide sufficient 
        investments to enable our Nation to continue to be the 
        world leader in education, innovation, and economic 
        growth as envisioned in the goals of the America 
        COMPETES Act;
            (2) this resolution builds on significant funding 
        provided in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 
        for scientific research and education in Function 250 
        (General Science, Space and Technology), Function 270 
        (Energy), Function 300 (Natural Resources and 
        Environment), Function 500 (Education, Training, 
        Employment, and Social Services), and Function 550 
        (Health);
            (3) the Congress also should pursue policies 
        designed to ensure that American students, teachers, 
        businesses, and workers are prepared to continue 
        leading the world in innovation, research, and 
        technology well into the future; and
            (4) this resolution recognizes the importance of 
        the extension of investments and tax policies that 
        promote research and development and encourage 
        innovation and future technologies that will ensure 
        American economic competitiveness.

SEC. 604. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING PAY PARITY.

    It is the sense of the Congress that rates of compensation 
for civilian employees of the United States should be adjusted 
at the same time, and in the same proportion, as are rates of 
compensation for members of the uniformed services.

SEC. 605. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS ON COLLEGE AFFORDABILITY AND STUDENT 
                    LOAN REFORM.

    It is the Sense of the Congress that--
            (1) nothing in the resolution should be construed 
        to reduce any assistance that makes college more 
        affordable and accessible for students, including but 
        not limited to student aid programs and services 
        provided by nonprofit State agencies and private 
        lenders;
            (2) private and non-profit lenders, originators, 
        and loan servicers help students plan for, apply to, 
        and pay for post-secondary education and training;
            (3) any reform of the federal student loan programs 
        to ensure that students have reliable and efficient 
        access to federal loans should include some future role 
        for the currently involved private and non-profit 
        entities, including state non-profits with 100% FFEL 
        lending in the State, and capitalize on the current 
        infrastructure provided by private and non-profit 
        entities, in order both to provide employment to many 
        Americans during this time of economic distress and to 
        maintain valuable services that make post-secondary 
        education more accessible and attainable for many 
        Americans; and
            (4) therefore, pursuant to any changes to the 
        student loan programs, loan processing, administration, 
        and servicing should continue to be performed, as 
        needed, by for-profit and non-profit entities.

SEC. 606. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS ON GREAT LAKES RESTORATION.

    It is the sense of the Congress that this resolution 
recognizes the need to address significant and long-standing 
problems affecting the major large scale aquatic, estuarine, 
and coastal ecosystems nationwide. This resolution includes 
funding for a new interagency initiative to address such 
regional ecosystems. It also includes funding to work with 
Great Lakes States, tribes, local communities, and 
organizations to more effectively address issues prioritized in 
the Great Lakes Regional Collaborative. This initiative could 
address issues such as invasive species, habitat restoration 
and conservation, non-point source pollution, and contaminated 
sediment. The resolution also supports the President's proposal 
to use outcome-oriented performance goals and measures to 
target the most significant problems and track progress in 
addressing these ecosystems.

SEC. 607. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING THE IMPORTANCE OF CHILD 
                    SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT.

    It is the sense of the Congress that--
            (1) additional legislative action is needed to 
        ensure that States have the necessary resources to 
        collect all child support that is owed to families and 
        to allow them to pass 100 percent of support on to 
        families without financial penalty; and
            (2) when 100 percent of child support payments are 
        passed to the child, rather than administrative 
        expenses, program integrity is improved and child 
        support participation increases.
    And the House agree to the same.

                                   John M. Spratt, Jr.,
                                   Rosa L. DeLauro,
                                   Allen Boyd,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Kent Conrad,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.

       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendment of the House to the concurrent resolution (S. 
Con. Res. 13), setting forth the congressional budget for the 
United States Government for fiscal year 2010, revising the 
appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal year 2009, and setting 
forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2011 
through 2014, submit the following joint statement to the House 
and the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action 
agreed upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
conference report:
      The House amendment struck all of the Senate concurrent 
resolution after the resolving clause and inserted the House-
passed concurrent resolution on the budget (H. Con. Res. 85) as 
a substitute text.
      The Senate recedes from its disagreement to the amendment 
of the House with an amendment that is a substitute for the 
Senate concurrent resolution and the House amendment. The 
differences between the Senate concurrent resolution, the House 
amendment, and the substitute agreed to in conference are noted 
below, except for clerical corrections, conforming changes made 
necessary by agreements reached by the conferees, and minor 
drafting and clarifying changes.

                          DISPLAYS AND AMOUNTS

      The required contents of concurrent budget resolutions 
are set forth in section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974. The years in this document are fiscal years unless 
otherwise noted.
      The treatment of budget function levels in the House-
passed and Senate-passed budget resolutions and the conference 
report is as follows:
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate concurrent resolution includes all of the 
items required under section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget 
Act.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution includes all of the items required 
as part of a concurrent budget resolution under section 301(a) 
of the Congressional Budget Act other than the spending and 
revenue levels for Social Security (which are not required for 
the House, but are used to enforce a point of order applicable 
only in the Senate).
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes all of the items 
required by section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget Act.

                     AGGREGATE AND FUNCTION LEVELS

      Pursuant to section 301(a)(4) of the Congressional Budget 
Act, the budget resolution must set appropriate levels for each 
major functional category based on the 302(a) allocations and 
the budgetary totals.
      The respective levels of the Senate concurrent 
resolution, the House concurrent resolution, and conference 
agreement for each major budget function, as well as revenue 
totals, are discussed in the section after the numerical 
tables. A summary of the overall budget policy is as follows:
      Total spending is $3.444 trillion in budget authority 
(BA) and $3.555 trillion in outlays in 2010, and $17.783 
trillion in BA and $18.031 trillion in outlays over 2010-2014.
      Discretionary spending totals $1.226 trillion in BA and 
$1.376 trillion in outlays in 2010, and $5.958 trillion in BA 
and $6.521 trillion in outlays over 2010-2014. Excluding 
funding for overseas deployments and other activities, and for 
disasters accounted for in Function 920, discretionary spending 
for 2010 totals $1.086 trillion in BA and $1.273 trillion in 
outlays. These aggregate amounts (minus cap adjustments for 
program integrity initiatives and the Low-Income Home Energy 
Assistance Program) are allocated to the Appropriations 
Committees to be suballocated among their respective 
appropriations subcommittees.
      Mandatory spending totals $2.218 trillion in BA and 
$2.178 trillion in outlays in 2010, and $11.825 trillion in BA 
and $11.510 trillion in outlays over 2010-2014. This includes 
$2 billion in reconciled savings over 2009-2014. These savings 
are reflected in Function 920 and will be determined by the 
committees of jurisdiction. (The resolution assumes the 
instructions will be used for health care reform and investing 
in education.)
      Revenue totals $2.322 trillion in 2010, and $14.157 
trillion over five years. Specific policies will be determined 
by the Committee on Finance in the Senate and the Committee on 
Ways and Means in the House.
      The conference agreement uses the Congressional Budget 
Office (CBO) March 2009 baseline.
      The conference agreement reduces the budget deficit from 
$1.233 trillion in 2010 to $523 billion in 2014.
      The following section describes the conference 
agreement's revenue levels and spending according to the 
budget's functional categories.


                                REVENUES

Summary
      The revenue component of the budget resolution reflects 
all of the federal government's tax receipts that are 
classified as ``on-budget.'' This includes individual income 
taxes; corporate income taxes; excise taxes, such as the 
gasoline tax; and other taxes, such as estate and gift taxes. 
Taxes collected for the Social Security system--the Old Age and 
Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI) payroll tax--are 
``off-budget.'' The Hospital Insurance payroll tax portion of 
Medicare, the Federal Unemployment Tax Act payroll tax, 
railroad retirement and other retirement systems are all ``on-
budget.'' Customs duties, tariffs, and other miscellaneous 
receipts are also included in the revenue component. Pursuant 
to the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and the Budget 
Enforcement Act of 1990, Social Security payroll taxes are not 
included in the budget resolution.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate budget resolution includes $1.6 trillion in 
on-budget revenues for 2010, and $10.4 trillion over 2010-2014. 
(The corresponding revenue figures on a unified basis are $2.3 
trillion for 2010 and $14.1 trillion over five years.)
      The revenue level in the Senate resolution is $825.0 
billion below the levels in the CBO baseline over 2010-2014.
      The Senate resolution provides substantial tax relief for 
the middle class. Consistent with the President's budget, the 
Senate resolution assumes: the 10 percent bracket, child tax 
credit, marriage penalty relief are made permanent, as well as 
the related expansions of the child tax credit and the earned 
income tax credit included in the economic recovery package are 
extended; the American Opportunity Tax Credit providing a 
$2,500 credit for higher education is made permanent; an 
expansion of the existing ``savers credit'' and a new policy to 
require employers that do not offer 401(k)s to offer automatic 
enrollment in IRAs. The Senate resolution also follows the 
President's proposals to extend other 2001 and 2003 tax changes 
for couples with incomes under $250,000 and singles with 
incomes under $200,000, including the 25 percent and 28 percent 
brackets and the preferential rates for capital gains and 
dividend income.
      The Senate resolution assumes three years of alternative 
minimum tax relief, through 2012, without offsets. It calls for 
permanent reform of the estate tax, reflecting continuation of 
the 2009 estate tax parameters, with an exemption of $3.5 
million ($7 million for a couple) indexed to inflation and a 
top rate of 45 percent. The Senate resolution would extend 
through 2011 those tax provisions that are slated to expire in 
2009 or 2010, but that have been routinely extended in the 
past. These provisions (referred to as ``extenders'') include, 
among others, the research and experimentation tax credit, the 
deduction for state and local sales taxes, the deduction for 
teacher classroom expenses, and the exception for active 
financing income.
      The Senate resolution calls for small business tax 
relief. It assumes the permanent extension of the section 179 
expensing provision for small businesses. In addition, it 
includes a new proposal to eliminate capital gains taxes for 
small businesses, going beyond the current 75 percent 
exclusion. It also calls for expanding the net operating loss 
carryback rules.
      The Senate resolution includes several reserve funds that 
provide for tax relief, including refundable tax relief and the 
extension of expired and expiring tax relief, as long as the 
costs of these provisions are offset. One reserve fund would 
provide for comprehensive tax reform that would ensure a 
sustainable revenue base in a tax system that promotes 
simplicity, fairness, and competitiveness. Additional reserve 
funds address specific tax issues, such as extending the 
deduction for state and local sales taxes and the incentives 
for promoting charitable donations from individual retirement 
account funds, enhancing the employer-provided child care 
credit and the dependent care tax credit, among other things.
      Finally, the Senate resolution assumes enactment of 
loophole closers and other revenue-raising provisions 
consistent with levels in the President's budget. The 
resolution assumes that the Finance Committee will work closely 
with the Administration to develop the proposals to achieve the 
revenue levels assumed in the resolution. To help close the tax 
gap and bolster Internal Revenue Service (IRS) enforcement, the 
resolution provides additional resources available through a 
discretionary cap adjustment that directs $890 million to IRS 
enforcement activities.
House-passed Resolution
      The House budget resolution calls for reducing the 
revenues provided under CBO's baseline forecast by $613.2 
billion over the 2009-2014 period and by $1,480.2 billion over 
the 2010-19 period. This reduction in revenues reflects the 
House budget resolution's extension of the elements of the 
2001-2003 tax cuts benefitting middle class families 
(including, but not limited to the child tax credit, marriage 
penalty relief, the 10 percent bracket, education incentives, 
other benefits for families with children, reductions in other 
individual income tax brackets, and small business tax relief). 
The House resolution also extends the estate tax at 2009 
levels--eliminating estate taxes on all but a minute fraction 
of estates by reforming and substantially increasing the 
unified tax credit. It also includes a one-year patch of the 
Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). The House resolution also 
accommodates additional AMT relief in a deficit-neutral manner. 
The House resolution further accommodates deficit-neutral 
extension of other expiring tax provisions and other proposals 
that support working families, businesses, states, or 
communities. It also accommodates other high priority deficit-
neutral revenue adjustments, such as tax incentives for energy 
efficiency and renewable energy, the deduction for State and 
local taxes, and a tax credit for construction of public 
schools. Decisions about specific revenue offsets are made by 
the Ways and Means Committee, which has a significant range of 
offsets that it can consider. However, unless expressly 
indicated otherwise, the House resolution does not assume any 
of the specific revenue offset proposals provided for in the 
President's budget.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes $1.654 trillion in on-
budget revenues for 2010, and $10.500 trillion over 2010-2014. 
(The corresponding revenue figures on a unified basis are 
$2.322 trillion for 2010 and $14.157 trillion over five years.) 
The conference agreement provides for three additional years of 
AMT relief, without offset, a two-year extension of expired and 
expiring tax provisions, and a new incentive for retirement 
savings. The agreement supports the permanent extension of tax 
relief first enacted in 2001 and 2003 to benefit middle-income 
individuals and families--including extension of the child tax 
credit, the 10-percent bracket, and marriage penalty relief--
and provides for estate tax reform. In addition, the agreement 
assumes the extension of other 2001 and 2003 tax changes for 
middle-income taxpayers, including the 25 percent and 28 
percent brackets and the preferential rates for investment 
income. Further, the agreement includes several deficit-neutral 
reserve funds that accommodate a range of additional tax reform 
and tax relief proposals, such as expanding eligibility for the 
refundable child credit, among the most effective tax relief 
vehicles for working families with children.
      The revenue level in the conference agreement is $764 
billion below the levels under current law over 2009-2014. 
Revenue legislation is subject to House and Senate pay-as-you-
go rules. In the House, section 421 of the conference agreement 
allows the chairman of the Budget Committee to make current 
policy adjustments before evaluating the costs of tax 
legislation for compliance with House budget rules and 
procedures, assuming the condition stated in that section is 
met.

                     NATIONAL DEFENSE: FUNCTION 050

Function Summary
      The National Defense function includes the military 
activities of the Department of Defense (DoD), the nuclear 
weapons-related activities of the Department of Energy (DOE) 
and the National Nuclear Security Administration, and the 
national security activities of several other agencies such as 
the Selective Service, Coast Guard, and Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. The programs in this function include: the pay 
and benefits of active, Guard, and reserve military personnel; 
DoD operations including training, maintenance of equipment, 
and facilities; health care for military personnel and 
dependents; procurement of weapons; research and development; 
construction of military facilities, including housing; 
research on nuclear weapons; and the cleanup of nuclear weapons 
production facilities.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution fully funds the President's core 
defense budget request over the five-year budget window. Total 
national defense discretionary funding in the Senate resolution 
is $556.1 billion. This includes $533.7 billion in 2010 for the 
Department of Defense, $20.3 billion more than the 2009 enacted 
level exclusive of war funding and defense spending in the 
economic recovery package.
      The Senate resolution reflects the President's request 
for additional 2009 overseas contingency operations funding of 
$75.5 billion for the Defense Department. If enacted, this will 
bring total war funding for 2009 to $152.6 billion. Under 
President Bush, the total cost of the wars reached $864 
billion. The Senate resolution also provides for the 2010 war 
request of $130 billion. Including requested war funds and 
mandatory spending, the Senate resolution provides $691.7 
billion in BA for defense in 2010.
      The Obama Administration has demonstrated its commitment 
to budgetary transparency when it comes to funding for overseas 
contingency operations. The Bush Administration failed to honor 
its commitment to include war costs in its budget request and 
obscured the fiscal situation by seeking war funding as an 
emergency even after five years of war in Iraq. The Obama 
Administration, on the other hand, has provided a good faith 
estimate of war costs for 2010 and an annual allowance of $50 
billion for potential future costs of overseas contingency 
operations from 2011 onward. These amounts are reflected in the 
Senate resolution.
      In keeping with how the past two budget resolutions have 
handled war costs, the Senate resolution includes a $130 
billion cap adjustment provision for 2010 that allows the 
Chairman to revise the discretionary spending cap for non-
emergency appropriations related to overseas contingency 
operations such as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. The Senate 
resolution assumes the use of this cap adjustment and allocates 
the amounts to the National Defense function. However, the cap 
adjustment would not prevent further war funding on an 
emergency basis if war costs exceed the allotted level.
      The Senate resolution includes a reserve fund to 
facilitate enactment of the President's proposal to expand 
``concurrent receipt'' of military retired pay and veterans 
disability compensation to retirees who were medically retired 
from active service. While full programmatic details will be 
provided later, the administration has indicated that the 
budget funds the expansion of the Army and Marine Corps in 
order to enhance military readiness and reduce the strain of 
multiple, extended deployments on current servicemembers. 
Additionally, the President's request includes funding to 
modernize military barracks and dormitories, and to improve 
medical care and housing for wounded servicemembers. The Senate 
resolution supports these objectives.
      The Senate resolution also recognizes the serious 
inequity in how the military death benefits system treats 
widows and orphans whom our servicemembers and veterans leave 
behind. The Senate resolution provides a deficit-neutral 
reserve fund to facilitate the repeal of the law that requires 
a dollar-for-dollar reduction in Department of Defense Survivor 
Benefit Plan (SBP) annuity benefit payments by benefits 
received under the Department of Veterans Affairs Dependency 
and Indemnity Compensation (DIC) program. Repeal of the offset 
would allow the widows and orphans whom our servicemembers and 
veterans leave behind to receive the full SBP amount due to 
them. Congress recognized the injustice of the SBP-DIC offset 
in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 
when it authorized a special payment to SBP-DIC-affected 
survivors, but this payment is far below the full amount that 
is offset.
      The ability of the United States military to project 
power worldwide depends on the aerial refueling tanker fleet. 
The backbone of this fleet is the KC-135, which is rapidly 
approaching its 50th year in service. Further postponement of 
the tanker re-capitalization program will have an adverse 
effect on our ability to achieve the requirements of the 
National Military Strategy. Accordingly, the Senate resolution 
assumes that the Air Force will receive not less than $2.37 
billion in 2010, and not less than $13 billion across the 
Future Years Defense Plan to fund the development and 
procurement of a next generation aerial refueling tanker.
      The National Guard has a long history of outstanding 
service to our nation, and our nation's reliance on the Guard 
has only increased since September 11, 2001. The Senate 
resolution encourages the Appropriations Committee to identify 
additional resources within the defense budget to address needs 
for National Guard equipment.
      The Senate resolution also assumes no less than $5.55 
billion in funding for the Defense Environmental Cleanup 
account. The environmental management program is charged with 
efficiently cleaning up the environmental damage resulting from 
50 years of nuclear weapons production. The Senate resolution 
provides for increased funding at several major sites addressed 
under this program including Hanford, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, 
and Savannah River. This increase brings total environmental 
management funding for nuclear site cleanup (including amounts 
in other budget functions) to $6.5 billion.
      Defense funding remains at record levels, even after 
adjusting for inflation. The Department of Defense has had 
serious trouble with cost growth in its weapons acquisition 
programs. The Government Accountability Office has found that 
the total acquisition cost of the Pentagon's 2007 portfolio of 
major programs has exceeded initial estimates by nearly $300 
billion.
      The Obama Administration has announced that it will make 
reform of the acquisition process a top priority in order to 
get the best possible value for defense spending. The Senate 
resolution supports that reform effort by including a reserve 
fund for defense contracting reform. Additionally, the Senate 
resolution assumes not less than $500 million for the 
Acquisition Workforce Development Fund, which is already 
showing great promise as a mechanism for enhancing the 
capability of the Department of Defense to oversee acquisition 
programs and get better value for our defense dollar. While the 
Senate resolution does not project savings from acquisition 
reform or the contracting reform initiatives announced by the 
President, successful implementation of those initiatives could 
result in significant savings in future years that should be 
reserved for deficit reduction.
      The Senate resolution also includes a program integrity 
cap adjustment dedicated to reducing waste in defense 
contracting. The cap adjustment allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to increase the discretionary spending cap by 
up to $100 million to accommodate legislation appropriating 
funding for the Department of Defense for additional activities 
to reduce waste, fraud, abuse and overpayments in defense 
contracting or to enhance the capability of the defense 
acquisition or contracting workforce to save taxpayer 
resources. When billions of dollars are wasted due to poor 
contracting practices, ordering of unneeded spare parts, or 
other waste, fraud and abuse, it is our troops that suffer.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution reflects a total of $562.0 billion 
in BA and $606.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and $2.9 trillion 
in BA and $3.0 trillion in outlays over five years.
      There is no higher priority than the defense of our 
nation, and therefore this resolution makes the necessary 
investments and calls for the necessary reforms to ensure the 
country is able to meet the security challenges of the 21st 
century.
      The House resolution includes specific defense policy 
assumptions in Title V, section 502. It recognizes that as the 
country faces its worst economic crisis since the Great 
Depression, DoD needs to get the most out of every dollar it 
spends by making tough but necessary tradeoffs to ensure 
resources are applied to the most effective and operationally 
viable programs, and by assessing national security needs in a 
comprehensive manner that includes all agencies involved in our 
national security.
      The National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the 
United States (commonly referred to as the 9/11 Commission) 
identified terrorists with weapons of mass destruction as our 
number one threat. Consequently, it is the policy of the House 
resolution that non-proliferation programs, such as the 
Cooperative Threat Reduction program and the nonproliferation 
programs at the Department of Energy, be funded at a level that 
is commensurate with the evolving threat.
      The House resolution recognizes that our most important 
security resource is our men and women who serve in uniform. To 
honor their service, it is the policy of the House resolution 
to not only ensure that they are properly equipped and trained 
to perform their mission, but that they also have the proper 
support in terms of health care, pay, and support for their 
families. The House resolution also includes a deficit-neutral 
reserve fund for an expansion of eligibility to permit 
additional disabled military retirees to receive both 
disability compensation and retired pay.
      In recent years, cost overruns on major weapons programs 
have worsened. According to the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO), the cost of major weapon systems on DoD's books 
as of 2007 increased nearly $300 billion above initial 
estimates. As a result, our military is not able to purchase 
equipment in adequate quantities to equip our servicemen and 
servicewomen. To put our defense plans on a sustainable path 
and to meet our military's equipment requirements, the House 
resolution affirms the Administration's calls to make 
acquisition reform a top priority.
      According to GAO, government-wide spending on contractor 
services has more than doubled over the last ten years. DoD has 
expanded the use of contractors in its acquisition process to 
aid in program management functions and has relied heavily on 
contractors to carry out operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. 
This trend has implications for DoD in terms of accountability, 
operational effectiveness, and cost. Consequently, it is the 
policy of the House resolution that DoD review the role that 
contractors play in its operations, including the degree to 
which contractors are performing inherently governmental 
functions, to ensure it has the most effective mix of 
government and contracted personnel.
      GAO has performed numerous audits and has produced 
numerous recommendations regarding DoD's programs and processes 
that have produced billions of dollars of savings. According to 
a GAO report released in December 2008, DoD implemented 1,682 
recommendations made by GAO from 2001 to 2007 that have 
resulted in financial benefits exceeding $89 billion. There are 
still 758 recommendations made over that period that DoD has 
not yet implemented that could yield billions of dollars in 
further savings. The House resolution continues to highlight 
the need for DoD to continue to make implementation of GAO 
recommendations a top priority and, to the extent possible, 
encourages DoD to use savings resulting from implemented GAO 
recommendations toward any upfront investments needed to 
implement the remaining 758 recommendations.
      The House resolution encourages the committees with 
jurisdiction over defense to continue to conduct vigorous 
oversight with the objective of ferreting out wasteful 
practices, fraud, and abuse. It encourages the committees to 
require DoD to report to Congress on its progress in 
implementing GAO recommendations, the role contractors play in 
its operations, its assessment of the applicability of Cold 
War-era weapons to meet 21st century threats, and how well 
DoD's comprehensive Financial Improvement and Audit Readiness 
(FIAR) plan is moving the Department toward achieving a clean 
audit.
      DoD spends billions of dollars on fuel and electricity 
for its planes, ships, vehicles and facilities each year and 
increasing world demand for energy could therefore have 
significant consequences for our military in the future. As a 
result, the House resolution calls on DoD to investigate the 
benefit of alternative energy sources and energy efficiency 
conversions. The Department should pursue those technologies 
that could reduce its energy needs, enhance expeditionary 
operations, achieve savings, and reduce dependence on 
unreliable energy sources.
      The House resolution continues to recognize the need for 
the DoD to develop a shipbuilding plan that is viable in terms 
of providing an adequate number of ships for the Navy to 
perform its mission and that is viable in terms of sustaining 
the industrial base.
      Our national security is not solely dependent on our 
military, and other agencies and programs are important to 
effectively address the threats of today and mitigate the 
possibility of future threats. Therefore, it is the policy of 
the House resolution that coordination is needed to ensure that 
all of our agencies involved in our national security work in a 
complementary way, and that when assessing security threats and 
the funding needed to counter them, the Administration should 
do so in a comprehensive manner that includes all agencies 
involved in our national security.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement for Function 050 includes a 
total of $562.0 billion in BA and $606.0 billion in outlays in 
2010, and $2.9 trillion in BA and $3.0 trillion in outlays over 
five years. Consistent with both the House- and Senate-passed 
resolutions, the conference agreement affirms the importance of 
reforming the defense acquisition and contracting processes to 
achieve better value for the American taxpayer.
      For mandatory programs, the conference agreement provides 
$5.9 billion in BA and $6.0 billion in outlays in 2010, and 
$28.3 billion in BA and $28.4 billion in outlays over five 
years.
      The conference agreement reflects the cost of overseas 
deployments and other activities in Function 970, as in the 
House-passed resolution. Consistent with the Senate resolution, 
the conference agreement allows the discretionary spending caps 
to be adjusted to accommodate appropriations for such costs.
      The conference agreement includes deficit-neutral reserve 
funds addressing defense-related matters. Both chambers have 
deficit neutral reserve funds to accommodate initiatives 
related to meeting our commitments to the nation's military 
personnel, veterans, and survivors. The Department of Defense 
and congressional committees of jurisdiction are encouraged to 
reverse the decision to eliminate credit toward DOD retirement 
pay for service in the Alaska Territorial Guard during World 
War II.
      The conference agreement also includes a Senate deficit-
neutral reserve fund providing for legislation that would 
reform defense contracting and acquisition policy in order to 
achieve better value for taxpayer resources. The reserve fund 
would accommodate legislation that provided for additional 
activities to reduce waste, fraud, abuse, and overpayments in 
defense contracting or to enhance the capability of the defense 
acquisition or contracting workforce, among other purposes.
      The conference agreement includes a statement of policy 
on defense issues (section 502) that outlines key priorities to 
be funded within the defense allocation and the need for the 
Department of Defense to reform its acquisition process and to 
do a better job of reining in wasteful spending, particularly 
with regard to contracting practices and continuing funding of 
Cold War-era weapons systems that may not be as effective 
against today's threats. It also highlights the need for DoD to 
place greater emphasis on implementing GAO recommendations, 
which could yield billions of dollars in savings.

                  INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS: FUNCTION 150

Function Summary
      Function 150 covers funding for U.S. international 
activities, including: operating and securing U.S. embassies 
and consulates throughout the world; providing military 
assistance to allies; assisting refugees; aiding developing 
nations; dispensing economic assistance to fledgling 
democracies; promoting U.S. exports abroad; making U.S. 
payments to international organizations; and contributing to 
international peacekeeping efforts. The major agencies in this 
function include the Departments of State, Agriculture, and the 
Treasury; the U.S. Agency for International Development; and 
the Millennium Challenge Corporation.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The President's request for international affairs 
activities, as re-estimated by CBO, is $53.8 billion. This 
represents an increase of $15.6 billion above the non-emergency 
2009 level. However, the size of the year-over-year increase 
requested by the President's budget reflects a change in 
concept, as the President seeks to transfer international 
affairs funding in support of overseas contingency operations 
and programs with predictable and recurring funding 
requirements that have previously been funded in supplementals 
to the base budget. This more transparent budgeting is 
commendable.
      Typically, the baseline used for year-over-year 
comparisons in the Congressional budget resolution excludes all 
supplementals and emergency funding. Therefore, the President's 
decision to reduce or eliminate emergency requests for 
international affairs in 2010 artificially inflates the year-
over-year increase. A more realistic comparison, including 
enacted bridge funding in the 2009 level, shows a year-over-
year increase of $11.5 billion for the President's request.
      The Senate resolution calls for $53.8 billion for the 
international affairs function and assumes that the top 
priorities in allocating the increase for international affairs 
will be related to core national security concerns such as 
counter-proliferation and anti-terrorism, as well as enhancing 
the capacity of the State Department and USAID to assume 
responsibilities that have been taken on by the military.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $45.3 billion 
in BA and $43.5 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $271.8 
billion in BA and $259.3 billion in outlays over five years. 
The total BA level for 2010 reflects discretionary BA of $48.5 
billion and mandatory BA of -$3.1 billion. This function has 
negative mandatory BA and outlay levels. These levels reflect 
receipts of the foreign military sales trust fund, the 
repayment of loans and credits by foreign nations, and the 
liquidation of economic assistance loans, foreign military 
financing loans, Export-Import Bank loans, and housing and 
other credit guaranty programs.
      The 2009 level of discretionary BA includes $4.5 billion 
in enacted supplemental appropriations. It does not include an 
additional $7.1 billion in supplemental appropriations for 2009 
that the President has requested for international affairs, 
which is included under Function 970 (Overseas Deployments and 
Other Activities).
      For 2010, the House resolution provides $10.2 billion 
(26.8 percent) more discretionary BA than the 2009 level, 
excluding supplemental funding, and $5.8 billion (13.6 percent) 
more funding than total enacted funding for 2009 so far. The 
House resolution provides $5.4 billion (9.9 percent) less than 
the President's 2010 budget, which includes his proposal to 
provide in the regular budget request funding that has in 
recent years been requested and appropriated as supplemental 
funding. Pursuant to the House resolution, funding designated 
as an emergency or for overseas deployments and other 
activities does not count against the House Appropriations 
Committee's allocation provided in this resolution.
      The House shares the President's commitment to reduce 
global hunger and poverty. The House resolution provides 
funding in this function to help achieve the goal of cutting it 
in half by no later than 2015.
      The House notes the strong support for H.R. 44, the Guam 
World War II Loyalty Recognition Act, which the House approved 
on February 23, 2009. The House also approved this legislation 
during the 110th Congress (H.R. 1595). The bill authorizes 
compensation to the Guamanian victims of the Imperial Japanese 
military occupation during World War II.
Conference Agreement
      International Affairs discretionary spending under the 
conference agreement totals $51.0 billion in BA and $47.5 
billion in outlays for 2010. This represents an increase of 
$12.8 billion in BA above the non-emergency 2009 level and $8.7 
billion above the 2009 level adjusted to include enacted 
supplemental funding (other than American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act funding).
      Including negative mandatory spending, the conference 
agreement provides an overall total of $47.9 billion in BA and 
$44.7 billion in outlays for 2010, and $260 billion in BA and 
$253 billion in outlays over five years.

                 GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY:

                              FUNCTION 250

Function Summary
      The General Science, Space, and Technology function 
includes funding for the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration (NASA), except aviation programs, the National 
Science Foundation (NSF), as well as programs in the Department 
of Energy (DOE) Office of Science.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution provides an increase above the 
President's requested level over the five-year window by 
providing $31.1 billion in BA and $32.5 billion in outlays for 
2010, and $171.9 billion in BA and $170.3 billion in outlays 
over five years.
      The Senate resolution funds the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration (NASA) at $18.7 billion for 2010. This 
level of funding recognizes the importance of our nation's 
space program and endorses the agency's balanced goals of 
exploration, science, and aeronautics. This level of funding 
also reflects the vital role our space program plays in driving 
scientific and technological advancements critical to our 
economy.
      NASA currently intends to retire its Space Shuttles at 
the end of 2010. The criteria for Shuttle retirement, however, 
remains the completion of scheduled flights, and a fixed 
retirement date could create dangerous scheduling pressures. 
Consequently, the Senate resolution recognizes the possibility 
that currently planned Shuttle missions may continue beyond the 
end of 2010, and provides $2.5 billion above the President's 
request for 2011 with additional resources for NASA in the 
outyears.
      Currently, NASA projects a five-year gap in U.S. human 
space flight capability. During that gap the United States will 
need to purchase space flight services from Russia, costing in 
excess of $500 million. The Senate resolution recognizes the 
strategic importance of uninterrupted access to space and 
supports efforts to reduce or eliminate this five-year gap in 
U.S. human space flight.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $31.1 billion 
in BA and $32.5 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $166.1 
billion in BA and $165.8 billion in outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution total for this function 
equals the level requested by the President for FY 2010, and 
for all five years in the budget window. Funding for scientific 
research and education is also included in Function 270 
(Energy), Function 300 (Environment and Natural Resources), 
Function 350 (Agriculture), Function 370 (Commerce and Housing 
Credit), Function 400 (Transportation), Function 500 
(Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services), and 
Function 550 (Health). This funding will support the science 
and technology goals of the House Leadership's Innovation 
Agenda and the America COMPETES Act: to put NSF funding on a 
path toward doubling, to train more qualified science and math 
teachers, and to invest in basic research on energy 
technologies.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes $31.1 billion in BA and 
$32.5 billion in outlays in 2010, and $168.7 billion in BA and 
$168.5 billion in outlays over five years.
      The conference agreement provides additional resources 
throughout the five year budget window, as requested by the 
President, for COMPETES Act and other Innovation programs in 
Function 250 as well as in other functions.
      The conference agreement recognizes the scientific and 
technological contributions of our nation's manned and unmanned 
space program and the strategic importance of uninterrupted 
human access to space, and supports efforts to reduce the 
impending gap in U.S. human spaceflight. The conference 
agreement matches the President's request for NASA in 2010 
(while acknowledging that an additional $400 million was 
appropriated for NASA exploration in the 2009 American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act) and provides $2.5 billion above the 
President's request in 2011. The additional funding is provided 
in 2011 in anticipation that the funding is needed for the 
remaining eight space shuttle missions to safely fly and to 
complete the construction and equipping of the international 
space station.

                          ENERGY: FUNCTION 270

Function Summary
      Function 270 covers energy-related programs including 
research and development, environmental clean-up, and rural 
utility loans. Most of these programs are within the Department 
of Energy (DOE). This function covers a portion of the 
appropriated funding for DOE but does not include DOE's 
national security activities, which are in Function 050 
(National Defense), or its basic research and science 
activities, which are in Function 250 (General Science, Space 
and Technology). This function also includes the Department of 
Agriculture's Rural Utilities Service, the Tennessee Valley 
Authority, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $4.5 billion 
in BA and $6.2 billion in outlays for 2010, and $22.5 billion 
in BA and $31.6 billion in outlays over five years.
      Our nation's economic and national security are directly 
linked to our energy policy. We must confront the challenges of 
global climate change and our nation's addiction to foreign 
oil. By doing so, we can also create the green jobs that will 
drive our nation's economic recovery. To meet these challenges, 
President Obama and the Congress have responded with a historic 
investment of resources in a strategy to reduce our dependence 
on imported energy.
      The economic recovery package included $38.7 billion to 
fund important energy priorities such as modernizing the 
electric grid, renewable energy and transmission loan 
guarantees, local government energy efficiency and conservation 
grants, weatherization assistance, carbon capture and 
sequestration technology, energy efficiency and renewable 
energy research and development, and advanced battery 
development. When the emergency funding provided in the 
stimulus and other bills is included, overall funding for the 
Department of Energy climbed from approximately $24 billion in 
2008 to $73 billion in 2009. This $73 billion 2009 funding 
level represents the largest budget in the history of the 
Department of Energy.
      The Senate resolution builds on the investments in the 
economic recovery package by fully funding the President's 
request for 2010 energy discretionary funding. The energy 
funding level in the Senate resolution will provide increases 
for the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy program. These 
increases will accommodate investments in important priorities 
such as wind, solar, geothermal, biomass and biorefinery R&D;, 
hydrogen, vehicle/building technologies and the weatherization 
assistance program. The Senate resolution supports increased 
funding for the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant 
Program. The resolution also includes increases to invest in 
the development of low carbon coal technologies such as carbon 
capture and sequestration. The resolution supports continued 
funding increases for the Department of Energy's loan guarantee 
program.
      The Senate resolution would increase funding for 
electricity delivery and energy reliability. The funding 
increase could be used to modernize the electric grid, enhance 
security and reliability of energy infrastructure, and 
facilitate recovery from disruptions to energy supply.
      The Senate resolution supports the reclassification of 
receipts for the annual operating expenses of Southeastern, 
Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations (PMAs). By 
reclassifying the receipts from mandatory to discretionary, 
power rates will become more closely linked to the annual 
appropriations they fund. This direct link will promote long-
term planning and improve the overall efficiency and 
reliability of the Federal power program.
      The Senate resolution includes an energy reserve fund to 
accommodate legislation that advances important priorities such 
as reducing our Nation's dependence on imported energy, 
producing green jobs, promoting renewable energy development, 
improving electricity transmission, creating a clean energy 
investment fund, and encouraging conservation and efficiency. 
The legislation could also include energy tax proposals. This 
reserve fund could be used for legislation such as a proposal 
to extend the permissible term of power purchase agreements 
used by federal agencies to acquire renewable energy. It could 
also be used for a proposal to expand the economic recovery 
package's investments in transmission infrastructure and smart 
grid technology. Additionally, the reserve fund could 
accommodate a proposal to create a Clean Energy Investment 
Fund. That type of proposal could aid in the transition to a 
low-carbon economy by using financing tools such as direct 
loans and loan guarantees to invest in clean energy 
technologies.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $5.5 billion in 
BA and $7.3 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $29.1 billion 
in BA and $54.6 billion in outlays over five years. The total 
BA level for 2010 reflects discretionary BA of $6.7 billion and 
mandatory BA of -$1.2 billion.
      The 2009 level of discretionary BA includes $39.4 billion 
in emergency appropriations from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act and other legislation. The House resolution 
for 2010 builds on this funding for renewable energy, energy 
efficiency, emerging energy and vehicle technologies, and other 
important investments to increase the United States' energy 
independence and create new jobs. The House resolution provides 
$1.0 billion (18.4 percent) more in appropriated funding for 
2010 than the 2009 level of regular appropriations. The House 
resolution recognizes the importance of continuing adequate 
funding for the Weatherization Assistance Program, which helps 
lower-income families to reduce their energy bills and increase 
the comfort and safety of their homes.
      The House urges the Appropriations Committee to include 
language in its appropriations bill to implement a ``net zero'' 
policy for the annual expenses of the Power Marketing 
Administrations (PMAs). The President's budget also supports 
this proposal. Reclassifying these receipts would more closely 
link the PMAs' annual appropriations with payments from their 
customers.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement provides a total of $5.0 billion 
in BA and $6.3 billion in outlays for 2010, and $25.6 billion 
in BA and $50.0 billion in outlays over five years. The 
conference agreement provides $6.2 billion in 2010 for 
discretionary programs in this function. This is $500 million 
more than the President's proposed discretionary funding level 
for 2010. (The total BA and outlay levels are lower than the 
discretionary BA and outlay levels because this function has 
negative mandatory BA and outlay levels, reflecting the fact 
that the U.S. government collects more money than it spends 
marketing federally produced power and collects fees from 
commercial nuclear reactors.)
      The conference agreement includes a significant 
commitment of resources to invest in emerging energy 
technologies, promote renewable energy and energy efficiency, 
and reduce our nation's dependence on imported energy. The 
conference agreement includes deficit-neutral reserve funds to 
accommodate energy legislation. Like the Senate-passed and 
House-passed resolutions, the conference agreement supports 
reclassifying the receipts of the Power Marketing 
Administrations (PMAs) to more closely link the PMAs' annual 
appropriations with payments from their customers.

            NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT: FUNCTION 300

Function Summary
      The Natural Resources and Environment function consists 
of funding for water resources, conservation, land management, 
pollution control and abatement, and recreational resources. 
Major departments and agencies in this function are the 
Department of the Interior (including the National Park 
Service, the Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of 
Reclamation, the Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Minerals 
Management Service), conservation-oriented and land management 
agencies within the Department of Agriculture (including the 
Forest Service), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration at the Department of Commerce, the Army Corps of 
Engineers, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $37.7 billion 
in BA and $40.7 billion in outlays for 2010, and $190.8 billion 
in BA and $197.7 billion in outlays over five years.
      The Senate resolution recognizes that we have an 
obligation to current and future generations to take meaningful 
action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The resolution 
includes a reserve fund to accommodate legislation that would 
invest in clean energy technology initiatives, decrease 
greenhouse gas emissions, or help families, workers, 
communities, and businesses make the transition to a clean 
energy economy. The resolution includes no specific assumptions 
regarding the policy details of such a proposal. The details of 
the proposal will be left to the committees of jurisdiction and 
the legislative process.
      If climate change legislation brings new revenues into 
the Treasury, the Senate resolution would support the 
President's proposal to invest $15 billion per year in a 
variety of clean energy technology initiatives. These 
initiatives would accelerate the widespread deployment of 
energy efficient technologies, increase our reliance on clean 
and renewable energy sources, and move America forward on the 
path to energy security.
      The Senate resolution fully funds the President's request 
for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The resolution 
includes $3.9 billion for EPA's Clean Water and Drinking Water 
State Revolving Funds. The overall EPA funding level could 
accommodate significant increases for Superfund, the 
brownfields program and a variety of other EPA programs. The 
resolution would accommodate increases for water infrastructure 
priorities at the Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of 
Reclamation.
      The Senate resolution recognizes the importance of the 
Bureau of Reclamation rural water program to support ongoing 
Municipal, Rural, and Industrial (MR&I;) systems for the Great 
Plains Region. The Bureau of Reclamation supplies drinking 
water to 2.6 million people in the Great Plains region and is 
encouraged to prioritize the completion of the Pick Sloan-
Missouri Basin Program--Garrison Diversion Unit, Mni Wiconi, 
Lewis and Clark, Perkins County, Fort Peck Reservation/Dry 
Prairie, and Rocky Boys/North Central rural water system 
projects. The Senate resolution supports funding these vital 
rural water development projects at a level that is as close to 
$292 million as possible.
      The Senate resolution includes increases for the Army 
Corps of Engineers and the Department of Interior which are 
sufficient to fully fund ongoing Everglades Restoration 
activities, including construction of authorized projects 
contained in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan and 
the Everglades National Park Expansion Act.
      The funding levels in the Senate resolution allow for 
increases for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA). In addition, the resolution includes a 
reserve fund which would accommodate legislation to preserve or 
protect oceans or coastal areas.
      The Senate resolution assumes increases for the 
Department of the Interior and the Forest Service. The 
resolution also includes the President's proposal to increase 
funding for land acquisition programs. The Senate-passed 
resolution includes a reserve fund which could be used for 
legislation that preserves or protects public lands. This could 
include, but is not limited to, legislation that protects 
national parks, national monuments, wilderness areas, wild and 
scenic rivers, and national recreation areas.
      The Senate resolution fully funds wildfire suppression 
activities at the Forest Service and the Department of the 
Interior. The resolution commends the President for taking 
steps to budget for growing annual fire suppression costs. It 
provides the 10-year average for fire suppression costs and 
assumes that an additional $357 million will be provided if 
appropriated funds are exhausted and the severity of the fire 
season requires additional funding. The Senate resolution also 
included increases in funding for hazardous fuel reduction.
      The Senate resolution recognizes the need to address 
significant and long-standing problems affecting the major 
large scale aquatic, estuarine, and coastal ecosystems 
nationwide. The Senate resolution includes funding for a new 
interagency initiative to address such regional ecosystems. It 
assumes the President's request of $475 million to work with 
Great Lakes states, tribes, and local communities and 
organizations to address issues prioritized in the Great Lakes 
Regional Collaborative. This initiative could address issues 
such as invasive species, non-point source pollution, habitat 
restoration and contaminated sediment. The resolution also 
supports the President's proposal to use outcome-oriented 
performance goals and measures to target the most significant 
problems and track progress in addressing these ecosystems.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $37.4 billion 
in BA and $40.5 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $194.6 
billion in BA and $200.5 billion in outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution matches the President's total 
discretionary funding request for this function, and provides 
increased resources for programs such as the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund, the EPA's Clean Water and Drinking Water 
State Revolving Funds, and other EPA programs. The House 
recognizes the need for maintaining and upgrading water 
infrastructure in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands and other U.S. territories, and encourages relevant 
federal agencies to work with territory governments on this 
issue. The House resolution also allows for additional funding 
for other programs at NOAA, the Department of the Interior, and 
the Forest Service.
      For mandatory spending, the House resolution assumes 
levels provided by current law.
      The House resolution includes a deficit-neutral reserve 
fund that accommodates legislation to increase investments in 
renewable energy and energy independence, encourage new 
technological development, take steps to provide for reductions 
in greenhouse gas emissions, and help families, businesses, the 
environment and industries adapt to the new energy economy.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes a total of $37.6 
billion in BA and $40.6 billion in outlays for 2010, and $192.1 
billion in BA and $198.5 billion in outlays over five years. 
The conference agreement provides $35.3 billion in 2010 for 
discretionary programs in this function. This is $200 million 
more than the President's proposed discretionary funding level 
for 2010.
      The conference agreement includes significant increases 
for natural resources and environment programs, including a 
variety of programs at the Environmental Protection Agency. The 
agreement provides additional resources for agencies such as 
the Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Reclamation to 
invest in national water infrastructure priorities. It also 
increases funding for a number of other programs throughout the 
Department of the Interior, the Forest Service, and the 
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The funding 
levels in the conference agreement include the President's 
proposal to provide additional funding for wildland fire 
suppression activities at the Forest Service and the Department 
of the Interior. The conference agreement could also 
accommodate increases in funding for hazardous fuel reduction 
activities. The conference agreement includes deficit-neutral 
reserve funds which could be used for legislation to reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions.

                       AGRICULTURE: FUNCTION 350

Function Summary
      The Agriculture function includes farm income 
stabilization, agricultural research, and other services 
administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The 
discretionary programs include research and education programs, 
economics and statistics services, administration of the farm 
support programs, farm loan programs, meat and poultry 
inspection, and a portion of the Public Law 480 international 
food aid program. The mandatory programs include commodity 
programs, crop insurance, and certain farm loans.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution reflects a total of $23.6 billion 
in BA and $23.9 billion in outlays for 2010, and $114.9 billion 
in BA and $109.0 billion in outlays over five years. During 
Committee consideration, an amendment was adopted assuming $70 
million in savings per year in crop insurance over the next 
five years. The amendment dedicated $175 million for child 
nutrition and $175 million for deficit reduction. Besides these 
changes, the Senate resolution leaves all other nutrition, 
conservation, renewable energy, and farm safety net 
improvements included in the 2008 Farm Bill unchanged.
      Given our current fiscal situation, the Senate resolution 
recognizes that all areas of the federal budget need to be 
examined for savings. Even though the 2008 Farm Bill received 
over 80 votes in the Senate and was fully paid for, the Senate 
resolution would support targeted savings in agriculture, 
including some savings in the Environmental Quality Incentives 
Program and the federal crop insurance program.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $23.7 billion 
in BA and $24.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $115.7 
billion in BA and $109.7 billion in outlays over five years. 
The House resolution provides resources for commodity support, 
agricultural research, and the Animal and Plant Health 
Inspection Service, including activities to support eradication 
of the Asian Longhorn Beetle.
      For mandatory spending, the House resolution assumes 
levels provided by current law. For discretionary programs, the 
House resolution matches the levels in the President's budget.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement calls for a total of $23.7 
billion in BA and $24.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and for 
$115.6 billion in BA and $109.6 billion in outlays over five 
years. For discretionary spending, the conference agreement 
assumes $6.1 billion in BA and $6.2 billion in outlays for 
2010. For mandatory spending, the agreement matches CBO's 
baseline estimate for March 2009 (assuming levels provided by 
current law), leaving all of the nutrition, conservation, 
renewable energy, and farm safety net improvements made in the 
2008 Farm Bill unchanged.

               COMMERCE AND HOUSING CREDIT: FUNCTION 370

Function Summary
      The Commerce and Housing Credit function includes 
mortgage credit, the Postal Service, deposit insurance, and 
other advancement of commerce (the majority of the 
discretionary and mandatory spending in this function). The 
mortgage credit component of this function includes housing 
assistance through the Federal Housing Administration, the 
Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie Mae), the Federal 
Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac), the Government 
National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), and rural housing 
programs of the Department of Agriculture. The function also 
includes net Postal Service spending and spending for deposit 
insurance activities of banks, thrifts, and credit unions. Most 
of the Commerce Department is provided for in this function, 
including the International Trade Administration, the Bureau of 
Economic Analysis, the Patent and Trademark Office, the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National 
Telecommunications and Information Administration, and the 
Bureau of the Census. Finally, the function also includes 
funding for independent agencies such as the Securities and 
Exchange Commission, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, 
the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications 
Commission, and the majority of the Small Business 
Administration.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $64.4 billion 
in unified BA and $89.1 billion in unified outlays for 2010, 
and $129.6 billion in unified BA and $139.8 billion in unified 
outlays over five years. (The corresponding on-budget figures 
are $61.1 billion in BA and $85.8 billion in outlays for 2010, 
and $124.3 billion in BA over five years and $134.6 billion in 
outlays over five years.) The Senate resolution includes a 
deficit-neutral reserve fund that would allow for additional 
investments in housing assistance, including low-income rental 
assistance and assistance provided through the Affordable 
Housing Trust Fund. The Senate resolution provides $880 million 
for the Small Business Administration and adopts the 
Administration's budget level for the Manufacturing Extension 
Program (MEP), which is authorized in the America COMPETES Act.
House-passed Resolution
      For the unified budget, the House resolution calls for a 
total of $64.2 billion in BA and $88.9 billion in outlays for 
2010, and for $130.4 billion in BA and $140.6 billion in 
outlays over five years. (The budget resolution provides only 
the on-budget amounts, which are $60.9 billion in BA and $85.6 
billion in outlays for 2010, and $125.1 billion in BA and 
$135.3 billion in outlays over five years.)
      The discretionary function total for 2010 includes 
significantly increased funding to ensure that the Bureau of 
the Census has the necessary resources to hire workers and to 
complete the 2010 Census. The 2010 total also fully accounts 
for funding to support Federal Housing Administration (FHA) and 
other mortgage credit programs in order to respond to the 
current housing crisis.
      The House notes that the goal of the Treasury's Troubled 
Assets Relief Program is to help stabilize credit and housing 
markets, not to use eventual returns to support additional, 
non-related spending. Proceeds from the sale of troubled 
assets, repayments of loans, or other resulting revenues to the 
Treasury from Federal assistance provided under the Emergency 
Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, Public Law 110-343, should 
be available to reduce the Federal deficit and the public debt.
Conference Agreement
      For the unified budget, the conference agreement calls 
for a total of $64.4 billion in BA and $89.0 billion in outlays 
for 2010, and for $130.6 billion in BA and $140.8 billion in 
outlays over five years. (The conference agreement provides 
only the on-budget amounts, which are $61.1 billion in BA and 
$85.8 billion in outlays for 2010, and $125.3 billion in BA and 
$135.5 billion in outlays over five years.) The discretionary 
function total includes significantly increased funding for the 
Bureau of the Census, reflecting execution of the 2010 census, 
and continues to support the Small Business Administration and 
the Manufacturing Extension Program. The 2010 total also fully 
accounts for funding to support Federal Housing Administration 
(FHA) and other mortgage credit programs in order to respond to 
the current housing crisis.
      The conference agreement supports efforts to provide 
additional investment in and oversight of housing assistance. 
Both the Senate and the House include reserve funds that allow 
for investments in the Affordable Housing Trust Fund. The 
Senate economic stabilization reserve fund also allows for 
additional investments in low-income rental assistance. The 
conference agreement also supports efforts to increase the 
capacity of HUD's Inspector General to investigate cases of FHA 
loan fraud. The HUD Inspector General's office has not expanded 
even as the number of FHA-approved lenders has doubled over the 
past two years.
      The conference agreement notes that the goal of the 
Treasury's Troubled Assets Relief Program is to help stabilize 
credit and housing markets, not to use eventual returns to 
support additional, non-related spending. Proceeds from the 
sale of troubled assets, repayments of loans, or other 
resulting revenues to the Treasury from Federal assistance 
provided under the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 
2008, Public Law 110-343, should be available to reduce the 
Federal deficit and the public debt.

                      TRANSPORTATION: FUNCTION 400

Function Summary
      The Transportation function consists mostly of the 
programs administered by the Department of Transportation, 
including programs for highways, mass transit, aviation, and 
maritime activities. This function also includes two components 
of the Department of Homeland Security: the Coast Guard and the 
Transportation Security Administration. In addition, this 
function includes several small transportation-related agencies 
and the research program for civilian aviation at NASA.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $75.2 billion 
in BA and $95.7 billion in outlays for 2010, and $377.8 billion 
in BA and $477.0 billion in outlays over five years. The Senate 
resolution includes an infrastructure reserve fund that would 
be available for surface transportation programs and multimodal 
transportation projects. The reserve fund anticipates that 
future surface transportation investments will be paid for and 
the solvency of the Highway Trust Fund will be maintained for 
the length of the surface transportation authorization. The 
Senate resolution understands that the surface transportation 
reauthorization will augment current investments, and provides 
funding levels for highways, transit, and safety programs which 
will be adjusted when a reauthorization bill is reported. The 
Senate resolution does not adopt the administration's proposed 
change to scoring of contract authority. The Senate resolution 
continues the unprecedented commitment to high speed rail made 
in the economic recovery package by providing $1 billion for 
high speed rail in 2010.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $88.2 billion 
in BA and $95.7 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $449.9 
billion in BA and $481.0 billion in outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution recognizes that 
transportation programs are charged with helping to pull the 
economy out of the recession. The American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act made significant investments in highway 
construction, mass transit, passenger rail, and aviation. In 
addition, as the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU) 
expires, the House will craft a new highway and transit bill 
for the 2010-2015 period.
      The House's task of reauthorizing highway construction 
programs is made more difficult by a large set of current law 
rescissions to contract authority, a form of mandatory budget 
authority. Beginning in 2010, the House resolution restores the 
mandatory baseline for the federal-aid highway program so that 
its funding authority is in line with current projections of 
obligation limitations. The House resolution retains current 
scorekeeping practices for contract authority programs.
      In order to address the highway and transit programs 
during reauthorization, the House resolution includes a surface 
transportation reserve fund that provides further increases to 
highway and transit contract authority if the future 
legislation maintains a solvent Highway Trust Fund.
      Finally, as a part of the reauthorization of the Federal 
Aviation Administration, the House resolution accommodates 
increases to the Airport Improvement Program (AIP).
Conference Agreement
      The Conference agreement calls for a total of $88.2 
billion in BA and $95.7 billion in outlays for 2010, and $449.9 
billion in BA and $481.0 billion in outlays over five years. 
The conference agreement recognizes that this year's economic 
recovery package made significant investments in highway 
construction, mass transit, passenger rail, and aviation that 
will create badly needed jobs to help sustain the recovery. The 
conference agreement recognizes that continued investment in 
infrastructure programs is important and includes House and 
Senate infrastructure reserve funds to accommodate legislation 
to reauthorize surface transportation programs and ensure the 
solvency of the Highway Trust Fund for the length of the 
surface transportation authorization.
      The task of reauthorizing highway construction programs 
is made more difficult by a large set of current law 
rescissions to contract authority, a form of mandatory budget 
authority. Beginning in 2010, the conference agreement restores 
the mandatory baseline for the federal-aid highway program so 
that its funding authority is in line with current projections 
of obligation limitations. In the Senate, it will not be in 
order for legislation that extends or reauthorizes surface 
transportation bills to appropriate budget authority for those 
programs outside of the Highway Trust Fund. The conference 
agreement also does not adopt the administration's proposed 
change to scoring of contract authority and does not assume 
increases to fuel taxes.
      The Senate infrastructure reserve fund would also 
accommodate legislation that makes additional investments in 
multimodal transportation projects, passenger and freight rail 
and could also accommodate legislation regarding the Denali 
Commission, an independent federal agency focusing on rural 
Alaskan communities.
      The conference agreement continues the unprecedented 
commitment to high speed rail made in the economic recovery 
package by providing $1 billion for high speed rail in 2010. 
Finally, as a part of the reauthorization of the Federal 
Aviation Administration, the conference agreement accommodates 
increases to the Airport Improvement Program (AIP).

            COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT: FUNCTION 450

Function Summary
      The Community and Regional Development function includes 
federal programs to improve community economic conditions, 
promote rural development, and assist in federal preparations 
for and response to disasters. This function provides 
appropriated funding for the Community Development Block Grant, 
Department of Agriculture rural development programs, the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA) (including homeland security grants), 
and other disaster mitigation and community development-related 
programs. It also provides mandatory funding for the federal 
flood insurance program.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $16.3 billion 
in BA and $28.9 billion in outlays for 2010, and $80.8 billion 
in BA and $114.3 billion in outlays over five years.
      The Senate resolution recognizes the importance of 
providing investments in our communities and protecting the 
homeland. The Senate resolution includes increased funding for 
the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), the largest 
source of federal grant assistance in support of state and 
local government housing and community development efforts, and 
for grants to local governments to revitalize closed 
manufacturing plants. The Senate resolution also supports 
funding for Department of Homeland Security grant programs and 
BIA programs.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $18.3 billion 
in BA and $29.3 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $103.3 
billion in BA and $129.5 billion in outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution provides increased funding to 
accommodate urgent community development and homeland security 
needs, which could include full funding for the Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG), similar to the President's 
budget. Function 450 also accommodates funding for a new 
National Infrastructure Bank, capitalized with federal funds, 
to direct public and private dollars towards infrastructure 
investments of national or regional significance. However, 
because a National Infrastructure Bank is not yet authorized, 
the House resolution includes initial funding in 2010 and 
larger amounts over the 2011-2014 period.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes a total of $18.3 
billion in BA and $29.3 billion in outlays for 2010, and $88.3 
billion in BA and $122.7 billion in outlays over five years.
      The conference agreement provides increased funding 
levels that will provide needed investments in our communities 
and homeland security. The agreement provides increased 
funding, which could include full funding for the Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG), and for grants to local 
governments to revitalize closed manufacturing plants. The 
conference agreement also includes $2.0 billion in 2010 and 
$5.0 billion in 2011 for a National Infrastructure Bank, if 
authorized, with an understanding that at least one quarter of 
the funding would be targeted to rural areas. The conference 
agreement also supports funding for Department of Homeland 
Security grant programs and BIA programs.

   EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND SOCIAL SERVICES: FUNCTION 500

Function Summary
      The Education, Training, Employment and Social Services 
function includes funding for the Department of Education, as 
well as programs in the Department of Health and Human Services 
(HHS) and the Department of Labor. This function provides 
funding for elementary and secondary, career and technical, and 
post-secondary educational programs; job training and 
employment services; children and family services; and 
statistical analysis and research related to these areas. It 
also contains funding for the Library of Congress and 
independent research and arts agencies.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $94.4 billion 
in BA and $140.6 billion in outlays for 2010, and $561.1 
billion in BA and $640.4 billion in outlays over five years.
      Building on the investments in education and training 
provided in the economic recovery package, the Senate 
resolution fully funds the President's request for education 
and training programs over the five-year budget window. 
Investments in education and training programs have sound 
economic benefits and the Senate-passed resolution provides 
Americans a complete and competitive education from cradle to 
career.
      There is increasing evidence that investing in high 
quality early childhood education programs, such as Head Start, 
is a solid investment, yielding $10 in reduced social costs for 
every dollar invested. Despite these benefits, many preschool 
students do not have access to quality early education 
programs. The Senate-passed resolution provides expanded 
resources to invest in the long-term returns of early 
education.
      Moreover, decreased federal funding for education has 
implications at the state and local level. When the federal 
government reduces its share of funding for the Individuals 
with Disabilities Education Act, state and local governments 
have to cut programs to cover the decreasing share of special 
education.
      The Senate resolution calls for a significant investment 
to build our human capital through programs targeting low-
income students, such as Title I, and for innovative and 
effective strategies to reduce achievement gaps and improve 
student learning in grade schools, middle schools, and high 
schools. The competitive educational advantage we used to 
enjoy, relative to other nations, has eroded significantly in 
recent years.
      The Senate resolution proposes to reduce barriers to 
higher education by including provisions that could accommodate 
the President's student aid proposals, such as expanding Pell 
grants. The President has challenged our students to commit to 
at least one year of post-secondary study. However, many low- 
and moderate-income high school graduates who are fully 
prepared to go to college do not because of financial barriers. 
Employers indicate that we are not producing enough trained 
workers with the skills for the modern workplace, particularly 
in high-growth sectors such as health care and green energy 
technologies. Increasingly, these sectors require some form of 
post-secondary education or job re-training.
      The Senate resolution recognizes that effective education 
and training programs are necessary to restart U.S. economic 
growth and allow our citizens to compete in the global economy. 
It makes this effort a high priority. The Senate resolution 
also provides the President's requested level for the 
Corporation for National and Community Service to encourage 
Americans to serve their community and country.
      The Senate resolution provides a deficit-neutral reserve 
fund for higher education to facilitate enactment of 
legislation to make college more accessible and affordable.
      The Senate resolution adopted three amendments to the 
Higher Education reserve fund which would maintain a 
competitive student loan program; facilitate expanded funding 
for programs that provide need-based grants and community work-
study programs; and facilitate expanded funding for programs 
that provide outreach to low-income students to prepare for 
college. The Senate also adopted an amendment to the Economic 
Stabilization and Growth reserve fund to provide specialized 
training for workers in emerging industries. In addition the 
Senate adopted an amendment to provide a reserve fund for 
after-school programs.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $93.7 billion 
in BA and $140.3 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $560.4 
billion in BA and $639.6 billion in outlays over five years.
      The 2010 House resolution supports the President's 
investments in education from early childhood through post-
secondary education and training and shares the President's 
goal of improving American education and creating a workforce 
that is prepared to compete and succeed in the global economy. 
The House resolution supports the President's plan to make a 
new investment in early childhood education, improve student 
achievement in elementary and secondary education through both 
proven strategies and innovative approaches, and increase the 
number of high school graduates that attend and complete higher 
education by making college more affordable and accessible. The 
House resolution also accommodates the President's support for 
strong job training services that will prepare Americans for 
stable and high-paying jobs.
      The 111th Congress has already made significant new 
investments in education in the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act, which provided about $100 billion that states 
will use primarily to maintain elementary, secondary, and 
higher education services. The American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act targeted significant funds to Title I 
(Education for the Disadvantaged), Head Start, and special 
education, where the funding can be used to train more teachers 
to provide needed services in the future. The House budget 
resolution builds upon that start by providing the level of 
funding in the President's request for education, job training, 
and social services for 2010.
      The House resolution's funding could support services 
that will help students meet high standards and will provide 
effective teachers and principals, including investments in key 
programs such as Head Start and the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act. It also could support the No Child 
Left Behind Act programs that work to close the achievement gap 
and ensure that all children learn, including Impact Aid and 
after-school services. The funding could be used as a down 
payment on a comprehensive literacy initiative for the nation 
that encompasses early childhood, elementary, and secondary 
education.
      This year Congress increased the maximum Pell Grant award 
by $619--the largest annual increase for a program that helps 
more than seven million students pay for college. The House 
resolution provides discretionary funding to support the 
President's Pell grant increase for 2010. Going forward, the 
House resolution could accommodate the President's proposals to 
provide additional assistance to help more low-income high 
school graduates attend and complete college, provided they are 
enacted in a fiscally responsible way. Further assistance could 
include expanding access to Historically Black Colleges and 
Universities as well as Hispanic-serving institutions and other 
minority-serving institutions, which continue to make important 
contributions towards increasing the percentage of minority 
students gaining a college degree.
      The House urges the Committee on Education and Labor to 
review options for the student loan program that will maintain 
a role for FFELP lenders in the student loan program, and to 
look to ways to achieve savings that capitalize on current 
infrastructure and minimize the disruption to students and the 
employees of FFELP lenders who currently serve 75 percent of 
loans at American colleges, universities, and community 
colleges.
      The House resolution continues to support two-year 
advance funding for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, 
and recognizes that public television and radio stations are 
experiencing financial distress as a result of the recession.
      The House resolution contains a reserve fund to 
accommodate legislation that makes college more affordable, 
consistent with the House pay-as-you-go rule. It also contains 
fiscally responsible reconciliation instructions directing the 
Committee on Education and Labor to report a bill that invests 
in education while reducing the deficit by $1 billion over the 
2009-2014 period.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement calls for a total of $94.4 
billion in BA and $140.6 billion in outlays for 2010, and for 
$561.1 billion in BA and $640.4 billion in outlays over five 
years.
      The conference agreement recognizes the importance of 
investing in education and training programs to build a highly 
skilled workforce that can compete in the global marketplace 
and provides the President's requested level for education, 
training and social service programs in every year over the 
five-year budget window. The increased funding will assist 
Americans from cradle to career with job training programs, 
access to higher education through Pell grants and state 
programs targeted to low-income students, elementary and 
secondary education programs such as Title I and IDEA, and 
expanded resources for Head Start and other early education 
programs.
      The conference agreement contains deficit-neutral reserve 
funds for higher education legislation in both the House and 
Senate. It also includes a Senate reserve fund for 21st Century 
Learning Centers.
      The conference agreement includes a Sense of Congress 
provision on college affordability and student loan reform that 
reaffirms the importance of the student aid services provided 
by both non-profit and for-profit entities in the student loan 
program, as well as the employment they provide across the 
country.

                          HEALTH: FUNCTION 550

Function Summary
      The Health function includes most direct health care 
service programs as well as funding for anti-bioterrorism 
activities, national biomedical research, protecting the health 
of the general population and workers in their places of 
employment, providing health services for under-served 
populations, and promoting training for the health care 
workforce. The major programs in this function include 
Medicaid, the State Children's Health Insurance Program 
(SCHIP), health benefits for federal workers and retirees, the 
National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA), the Health Resources and Services 
Administration (HRSA), the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration (SAMHSA), the Indian Health Service 
(IHS), and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $385.4 billion 
in BA and $389.2 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $1.9 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      The Senate resolution includes increased funding above 
the 2010 baseline level consistent with the President's health 
priorities for NIH, HRSA, CDC, IHS, and FDA. Significant 
increases for Community Health Centers, health professions, and 
the National Health Service Corps within HRSA are also 
included. Increases above the President's request are also 
included for the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant, the 
organ transplantation program, and several other programs.
      In addition, the Senate resolution contains several 
health care related deficit-neutral reserve funds, including 
reserve funds for health care reform legislation and for 
improvements at the FDA.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $383.9 billion 
in BA and $388.7 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $1.9 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      The discretionary resources for Function 550 for 2010 
match the President's 2010 request and increase funding over 
the 2010 baseline level, enabling support of the President's 
priorities for cancer research, food safety, and other 
important programs. The House resolution provides critical 
resources for public health, which includes programs focused on 
addressing health promotion and disease prevention. 
Preventative health care measures and disease management have 
the potential to lead to more efficient use of health care 
spending, and reduced illness, as well as an improvement in the 
health of the public.
      Programs in Function 550 are also addressed in the House 
resolution's deficit-neutral reserve funds for health care 
reform and the 9/11 health program.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes a total of $384.3 
billion in BA and $388.9 billion in outlays for 2010, and $1.9 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      Discretionary funding levels for Function 550 include 
increased funding above the 2010 baseline level consistent with 
the President's health priorities for NIH, HRSA, CDC, IHS, and 
FDA. In addition, the conference agreement assumes significant 
increases for Community Health Centers, health professions, and 
the National Health Service Corps within HRSA as well as food 
safety efforts at FDA. Increases are also included for the 
Maternal and Child Health Block Grant and the organ 
transplantation program as well as additional funding for IHS 
to help meet the needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.
      The conference agreement provides critical resources for 
public health, which includes programs focused on addressing 
health promotion and disease prevention. Preventative health 
care measures and disease management have the potential to lead 
to more efficient use of health care spending, and reduced 
illness, as well as an improvement in the health of the public.
      In addition, programs in Function 550 are also addressed 
in several health care related deficit-neutral reserve funds, 
including a reserve fund for health care reform legislation.

                         MEDICARE: FUNCTION 570

Function Summary
      The Medicare function includes funding to administer and 
to provide benefits under the Medicare program. Medicare is a 
federal health insurance program that currently covers 45 
million Americans aged 65 and older, as well as younger adults 
who are disabled or suffer from end-stage renal disease.
      Congress provides an annual appropriation for the costs 
of administering Medicare, including resources to conduct 
program integrity activities to guard against improper 
payments, fraud, and abuse. The remainder of spending in this 
function is mandatory and reflects payments to health care 
providers and private insurance plans, as well as beneficiary 
premiums and other receipts and payments to the Medicare trust 
funds, under the Part A Hospital Insurance (HI) program, the 
Part B Supplementary Medical Insurance (SMI) program, the Part 
C Medicare Advantage program, and the Part D Prescription Drug 
program.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $442.8 billion 
in BA and $443.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and $2.6 trillion 
in BA and $2.6 trillion in outlays over five years. The 
mandatory spending levels in the Senate resolution are at the 
CBO baseline level in all years covered by the resolution. In 
addition, the Senate resolution includes a deficit-neutral 
reserve fund in Sec. 201(b) for legislation that increases the 
reimbursement rate for Medicare physician services (and 
overrides a large payment rate cut that would otherwise go into 
effect on January 1, 2010) and addresses other Medicare benefit 
and payment issues. In addition, the Senate resolution also 
contemplates Medicare physician payment reform as a component 
of comprehensive health reform and subject to the flexibility 
of the reserve fund in Sec. 201(a).
      The discretionary spending levels in the Senate 
resolution assume $25 million over the period 2010 to 2012 to 
begin addressing the administrative costs associated with 
legislation that would reduce the potential for identity theft 
by requiring the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to 
remove Social Security numbers from Medicare cards.
      For 2010, the discretionary funding levels in this 
function include a discretionary cap adjustment of up to $311 
million for program integrity activities of the Health Care 
Fraud and Abuse Control (HCFAC program) to address improper 
payments, fraud, and abuse in the Medicare program.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $449.7 billion 
in BA and $449.8 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $2.6 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution function level for Medicare 
assumes that the payment rates in effect for physicians for 
2009 will stay in effect through 2019. This assumption is 
consistent with the President's budget and is based on 
Congressional actions in recent years to prevent cuts in 
physician payments that would otherwise be required by the 
Sustainable Growth Rate formula. However, like the President's 
budget, the House budget resolution does not intend this 
assumption as a reflection of future policy. Instead, the 
assumption represents a realistic and meaningful benchmark 
against which to measure the fiscal effects of legislation 
reforming the Medicare physician payment system. The House 
resolution includes a reserve fund (Sec. 314) to accommodate 
legislation for improvements in Medicare's system for paying 
physicians.
      The House resolution provides a discretionary cap 
adjustment of $311 million for additional activities aimed at 
detecting and preventing Medicare fraud and other improper 
payments. The Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control program is a 
joint effort of the Department of Health and Human Services, 
the HHS Office of the Inspector General, and the Department of 
Justice.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement reflects a total of $449.7 
billion in BA and $449.8 billion in outlays in 2010, and $2.6 
trillion in BA and $2.6 trillion in outlays over five years.
      For 2010, the discretionary spending levels in this 
function are $5 million above the President's request. Over 
five years, the discretionary funding in this function assumes 
$25 million to begin addressing the administrative costs 
associated with legislation that would reduce the potential for 
identity theft by requiring the Centers for Medicare and 
Medicaid Services to remove Social Security numbers from 
Medicare cards.
      The mandatory spending levels in this function assume $38 
billion above the CBO baseline level, which reflects Medicare 
payment rates in effect for physicians for 2009 staying in 
effect through 2010, 2011, and at least part of 2012. However, 
the conference agreement does not intend this assumption as a 
reflection of future policy. In the Senate, legislation that 
would freeze physician payments at current levels, provide a 
positive update for physician payments, or reform the Medicare 
physician payment system, whether on a temporary or permanent 
basis, must be compliant with Sec. 301(a) or Sec. 301(b) in 
this conference agreement. In the House, Sec. 421 of the 
conference agreement allows the chairman of the Budget 
Committee to treat the additional $38 billion as a current 
policy adjustment before evaluating the costs of legislation 
affecting Medicare physician payments for compliance with House 
budget rules and procedures, assuming the condition stated in 
that section is met.
      The conference agreement includes a Senate reserve fund 
(Sec. 301) and a House reserve fund (Sec. 321) to accommodate 
comprehensive health reform legislation and related provisions, 
including legislation for improvements in Medicare's system for 
paying physicians.

                     INCOME SECURITY: FUNCTION 600

Function Summary
      The Income Security function contains a range of income 
security programs including: (1) major cash and in-kind means-
tested entitlements; (2) general retirement, disability, and 
pension programs excluding Social Security and veterans' 
compensation programs; (3) federal and military retirement 
programs; (4) unemployment compensation; (5) low-income housing 
programs; and (6) other low-income support programs. Major 
federal entitlement programs in this function include 
unemployment insurance, food stamps, child nutrition, Temporary 
Assistance to Needy Families (TANF), foster care, child support 
enforcement, child care, Supplemental Security Income, and 
spending for the refundable portion of the Earned Income 
Credit.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $536.6 billion 
in BA and $539.9 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $2.4 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      The resolution provides increased funding for the Low-
Income Home Energy Assistance Program. These funds for LIHEAP 
will help to continue providing heating and cooling assistance 
to over five million low-income households, including the 
working poor, disabled persons, elderly, and families with 
young children. The Senate resolution continues to support 
funding for the Public Housing Capital Fund, Hope VI Distressed 
Housing Program, Housing for the Disabled, Housing for the 
Elderly, and the Section 8 tenant-based Housing Choice Voucher 
program and the project-based Section 8 program. The resolution 
includes increases for the Special Supplemental Nutrition 
Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC).
      In addition, the Senate resolution includes deficit-
neutral reserve funds for improvements to child welfare, child 
support enforcement, foster care financing, and LIHEAP, as well 
as for the reauthorization of the child nutrition and WIC 
programs, and for establishing or expanding early childhood 
home visitation programs.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $536.2 billion 
in BA and $539.9 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $2.5 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution matches the President's 
increase in discretionary funding for Function 600 in order to 
invest in children and meet urgent needs of low-income families 
and elderly and disabled people in difficult economic times. 
These resources will build upon the recently enacted American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which provided increases in 
mandatory and discretionary funding for child care, child 
support, and assistance to needy families.
      The House shares the President's commitment to ending 
childhood hunger in the United States by 2015, and funding to 
move toward that goal is provided here. The House resolution 
accommodates continued economically-driven increases in 
participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for 
Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which is currently 
projected to have 9.8 million participants in 2010. The House 
resolution also includes a deficit-neutral reserve fund and 
additional funding to accommodate a reauthorization of child 
nutrition programs that will improve meal quality and access.
      The House resolution provides the necessary funding to 
continue rental housing assistance to families, elderly, and 
disabled people who rely on assistance from the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The House also recognizes 
the unmet need for affordable housing, both by including a 
deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Affordable Housing Trust 
Fund, and by providing additional discretionary resources for 
affordable housing preservation.
      The House resolution also accommodates the President's 
proposal to make the Low-income Home Energy Assistance Program 
(LIHEAP) more quickly responsive to rising energy costs, 
coupled with an increase in regular discretionary funding to 
allow the program to reach families in need.
      In addition to the policies mentioned above, mandatory 
programs in Function 600 are also addressed in deficit-neutral 
reserve funds for home visiting, structural reform of extended 
unemployment benefits, and child support.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes a total of $536.7 
billion in BA and $540.2 billion in outlays for 2010, and $2.4 
trillion in BA and outlays over five years.
      The conference agreement provides discretionary funding 
increases consistent with the President's budget request for 
Function 600 in order to invest in children and meet urgent 
needs of low-income families and elderly and disabled people. 
The conference agreement supports the President's request of 
$3.2 billion for LIHEAP in 2010. However, the agreement also 
includes a discretionary cap adjustment for an additional $1.9 
billion, for a total LIHEAP funding level of $5.1 billion if 
the President's funding level of $3.2 billion is included in an 
appropriations measure. These funds for LIHEAP will help to 
continue providing heating and cooling assistance to over five 
million low-income households, including the working poor, 
disabled persons, elderly, and families with young children.
      The conference agreement accommodates funding for 
increases in participation in the Special Supplemental 
Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), which 
is currently projected to have 9.8 million participants in 
2010. The conference agreement also continues to support 
funding for important housing assistance programs for low-
income families, the elderly, and the disabled.
      In addition, the conference agreement includes deficit-
neutral reserve funds for improvements to child welfare, child 
support enforcement, foster care financing, and LIHEAP, as well 
as for the reauthorization of the child nutrition and WIC 
programs to help meet the President's goal of ending childhood 
hunger in the United States, and for establishing or expanding 
home visitation programs.

                     SOCIAL SECURITY: FUNCTION 650

Function Summary
      The Social Security function includes funding for the 
Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) programs, 
which provide earned Social Security benefits to over 52 
million eligible retired workers, disabled persons, and their 
spouses and survivors. In addition, this function provides 
funding to the Social Security Administration (SSA) and the 
Office of the Inspector General (OIG) to administer the Social 
Security program and ensure program integrity.
      Under provisions of the Congressional Budget Act and the 
Budget Enforcement Act, the Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 
(OASI) trust fund and the Disability Insurance (DI) trust fund 
are off-budget and do not appear in the budget resolution 
totals. A small portion of spending in Function 650, the 
general fund transfer of income taxes on Social Security 
benefits to the trust funds and outlays resulting from funding 
authorized in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009, is considered on-budget and appears in the budget 
resolution totals.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for $20.3 billion in on-
budget BA and $20.4 billion in on-budget outlays for 2010, and 
$132.4 billion in on-budget BA and $132.9 billion in on-budget 
outlays over five years. (The corresponding figures on a 
unified basis are $703.4 billion in BA and $701.4 billion in 
outlays for 2010 and $3.8 trillion in BA and outlays over five 
years.) This spending reflects the general fund transfer of 
income taxes on Social Security benefits to the trust funds and 
the outlay effect of funding for the Social Security 
Administration (SSA) that was authorized in the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.
      For 2010, the Senate resolution provides $6.1 billion in 
BA and $5.9 billion in off-budget discretionary outlays for SSA 
administrative expenses, as outlined in section 102(c) of the 
resolution, which matches the President's budget request. When 
combined with funding resources in Function 570 (Medicare) and 
Function 600 (Income Security), the total administrative budget 
for SSA assumed in the Senate resolution is $11.6 billion. This 
substantial increase over the FY09 level is intended to help 
address the serious and unacceptable backlog of Social Security 
disability claims and hearings, as well as other backlog 
workloads for which additional resources are needed.
      The discretionary funding levels in the Senate resolution 
assume a discretionary cap adjustment of $485 million to fund 
additional continuing disability reviews and Supplemental 
Security Income redeterminations, if appropriators provide a 
base funding level for these program integrity initiatives of 
$273 million.
House-passed Resolution
      For the unified budget, the House resolution calls for a 
total of $703.4 billion in BA and $701.4 billion in outlays for 
2010, and for $3.8 trillion in BA and outlays over five years. 
(The budget resolution provides only the on-budget amounts, 
which are $20.3 billion in BA and $20.4 billion in outlays for 
2010, and $132.4 billion in BA and $132.9 billion in outlays 
over five years.)
      The administrative budget for the SSA includes resources 
in Function 570 (Medicare) and Function 600 (Income Security) 
as well as Function 650. The House resolution assumes an $11.6 
billion funding level for the administrative expenses at the 
SSA, the same as the President's budget level. The increased 
resources will enable SSA to address the rising number of 
disability and retirement claims, as well as address the 
serious backlog of disability claims and hearings and provide 
for improved service to the American public.
      Included in the total funding level above are resources 
to accommodate $485 million through an adjustment of the 
discretionary allocation for program integrity initiatives. The 
adjustment allows the SSA to conduct an increasing number of 
Continuing Disability Reviews (CDRs) and Supplemental Security 
Income (SSI) redeterminations. The language also allows funding 
of up to $34 million of the $485 million allocation adjustment 
to be used for asset verification for SSI recipients, but only 
if it has a return on investment at least as high as a low-
priority SSI redetermination of eligibility, at a 4:1 return.
Conference Agreement
      For the unified budget, the conference agreement calls 
for $703.4 billion in BA and $701.4 billion in outlays for 
2010, and $3.8 trillion in BA and outlays over five years. (The 
conference agreement provides only the on-budget amounts, which 
are $20.3 billion in BA and $20.4 billion in outlays for 2010, 
and $132.4 billion in BA and $132.9 billion in outlays over 
five years.)
      For 2010, the conference agreement provides total net 
discretionary resources for the administrative expenses of SSA 
(across all relevant functions) of $11.6 billion, meeting the 
President's requested level. The total SSA funding level in the 
conference agreement assumes the President's full request for a 
cap adjustment for program integrity efforts (including CDRs, 
SSI redeterminations and SSI asset verification). It also 
reflects the President's full request for more resources to 
address the serious backlog of disability claims and hearings, 
as well as other backlog workloads for which additional 
resources are needed.

              VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES: FUNCTION 700

Function Summary
      Function 700 covers the programs of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA), including veterans' medical care, 
compensation and pensions, education and rehabilitation 
benefits, and housing programs. It also includes the Department 
of Labor's Veterans' Employment and Training Service, the 
United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims, and the 
American Battle Monuments Commission. More than 99 percent of 
appropriated veterans' funding goes to VA, and more than 85 
percent of this funding is for VA medical care and hospital 
services.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $106.5 billion 
in BA and $105.6 billion in outlays for 2010, and $557.6 
billion in BA and $554.5 billion in outlays over five years. 
The Senate resolution provides a $5.6 billion increase for the 
VA in 2010, and continues that commitment by increasing funding 
for the VA by $27 billion over the next five years. The Senate 
resolution also provides additional resources to the VA so that 
veterans' insurance need not be billed for service-connected VA 
care and for increased beneficiary travel reimbursement. Once 
again, the Senate resolution recognizes the deep debt our 
nation owes to those who have served in defending our country 
and continues to provide critical resources to ensure that they 
get the quality health care they deserve.
      In addition, the Senate resolution understands that there 
is an urgent need for funding of grants for State Veterans 
Cemeteries with the aging of the WWII generation. 
Unfortunately, funding levels have not kept up with need. 
Therefore, the Senate resolution supports adequate funding that 
can address the costs of constructing new cemeteries as well as 
the needs of existing State Veterans Cemeteries.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $106.4 billion 
in BA and $105.5 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $557.7 
billion in BA and $554.6 billion in outlays over five years. 
The total BA level for 2010 includes discretionary BA of $53.3 
billion.
      The 2009 level of discretionary BA includes $1.6 billion 
in emergency appropriations from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act and other legislation. For 2010, the House 
resolution provides $5.5 billion (11.5 percent) more 
discretionary BA than the 2009 level (excluding emergency 
funding) and $540 million (1.0 percent) more than the 
President's 2010 budget.
      The House resolution emphasizes the high priority that 
the House places on continuing to provide sufficient and timely 
funding for veterans' health care. The House resolution 
provides full funding to support excellent health care for 
veterans. It includes funding to restore health care 
eligibility to additional non-disabled veterans with modest 
incomes (Priority Group 8), consistent with the President's 
budget. In addition, the House resolution provides funding 
above the 2009 levels for VA to research and treat mental 
health, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and traumatic 
brain injury. In particular, the House resolution recognizes 
the importance of ensuring adequate funding for 
neuropsychiatric-PTSD staff and research.
      The House resolution affirms that VA is not and should 
not be authorized to bill private insurance companies for 
treatment of health conditions that are related to veterans' 
military service. VA already is authorized to bill such 
companies for treatment of conditions that are not service-
connected. The House resolution adds $540 million to the 
President's strong budget for veterans to safeguard the 
provision of health care if, using existing authorities, VA 
does not realize the level of increase in these medical care 
collections that is estimated in the President's budget.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement calls for a total of $106.5 
billion in BA and $105.6 billion in outlays for 2010, and 
$558.4 billion in BA and $555.3 billion in outlays over five 
years. The conference agreement provides an 11.7 percent 
increase for discretionary BA for veterans' health care and 
other services (excluding emergency funding), and continues 
that commitment by increasing discretionary funding for the 
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and related agencies by 
more than $27 billion over the next five years. The decrease in 
mandatory BA and outlays between 2011 and 2012 reflects the 
timing of monthly benefit payments--primarily, disability 
compensation and pensions--in any given fiscal year. It is not 
the result of any reduction in benefits. As a result, 2011 
includes 13 benefit payment dates, while 2012 contains only 11 
benefit payment dates.
      The conference agreement includes funding to restore 
health care eligibility to additional non-disabled veterans 
with modest incomes (Priority Group 8), consistent with the 
President's budget. In addition, the agreement provides funding 
above the 2009 levels for VA to research and treat mental 
health, post-traumatic stress disorder, and traumatic brain 
injury. The conference agreement supports increasing the number 
of healthcare professionals in the Veterans Health 
Administration (VHA) to meet the needs of the expanding number 
of veterans and to fill vacant healthcare professional 
positions at VHA. The conference agreement supports enhanced 
incentives for healthcare professionals of the VHA who serve in 
rural areas and increases to veterans beneficiary travel 
reimbursement. The conference agreement also provides 
additional resources to the VA so that veterans' private 
insurance need not be billed for service-connected VA care, and 
the agreement affirms that VA is not and should not be 
authorized to bill private insurance companies for treatment of 
health conditions that are related to veterans' military 
service.
      In addition, the conference agreement recognizes that 
there is an urgent need to open new national and State Veterans 
Cemeteries with the aging of the WWII generation. 
Unfortunately, funding levels for grants for State Veterans 
Cemeteries have not kept up with the need. Therefore, the 
conference agreement supports adequate funding that can address 
the costs of constructing new cemeteries as well as the needs 
of existing State Veterans Cemeteries.
      Sections 402 and 424 of the conference agreement include 
language exempting the following VA accounts from a point of 
order against advance appropriations: Medical Services, Medical 
Support and Compliance, and Medical Facilities.

                ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE: FUNCTION 750

Function Summary
      The Administration of Justice function includes funding 
for federal law enforcement activities at the Department of 
Justice (DOJ) including criminal investigations by the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug Enforcement Agency 
(DEA). The function also includes funding for border 
enforcement by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). 
Additionally, the function includes funding for civil rights 
enforcement and prosecution; federal block, categorical, and 
formula law enforcement grant programs to state and local 
governments; prison construction and operation; the United 
States Attorneys; and the federal judiciary.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $53.5 billion 
in BA and $52.1 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $260.6 
billion in BA and $264.4 billion in outlays over five years.
      The Senate resolution recognizes the important role the 
partnership between federal, state, and local law enforcement 
entities plays in maintaining safe communities. For example, 
the Community Oriented Policing Service (COPS) grant program 
provides funding that is critical in many urban and rural areas 
in maintaining police presence, carrying out criminal 
investigations, combating methamphetamine, and in training and 
equipping law enforcement officers. This and other support for 
local law enforcement remain a priority.
      The Senate resolution includes funding to protect 
children by funding Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act 
programs. The Senate resolution also provides resources to 
support the Administration's efforts to combat drug, gun, and 
cash smuggling by cartels and for addressing potential 
spillover violence along the Southern border.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $52.9 billion 
in BA and $51.6 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $268.3 
billion in BA and $271.2 billion in outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution provides significant 
resources for our federal and local law enforcement programs, 
matching the level in the President's budget. The House 
resolution provides increased funding for the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) as it meets the country's domestic crime 
fighting, financial fraud investigation, and national security 
needs. In addition, the House resolution supports the 
Department of Justice's programs and initiatives that hire and 
equip police officers, combat drugs, protect juveniles, and 
that provide other important services to our communities. For 
example, the Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) 
program includes hiring grants for new police officers, the 
Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (Byrne JAG) 
provides flexible resources to our communities to meet a 
variety of their criminal justice needs, and the State Criminal 
Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP) reimburses states and 
localities for their incarceration costs--and the House 
resolution recognizes the importance of these and other 
programs.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement calls for a total of $53.4 
billion in BA and $52.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and for 
$268.8 billion BA and $271.7 billion in outlays over five 
years. The conference agreement provides significant resources 
for federal and local law enforcement programs. The conference 
agreement provides increased funding for the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) as it meets the country's domestic crime 
fighting, financial fraud investigation, and national security 
needs.
      The conference agreement supports the Department of 
Justice's programs and initiatives that hire and equip police 
officers and that provide other important services to our 
communities. For example, the conference agreement supports 
drug control efforts in urban and rural areas by including 
funding for High Intensity Drug Areas (HIDTA) programs and drug 
interdiction efforts carried out by both the Departments of 
Justice and Homeland Security. In addition, the Community 
Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program includes hiring 
grants and grants to combat methamphetamine, the Edward Byrne 
Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (Byrne JAG) provides flexible 
resources to our communities to meet a variety of their 
criminal justice needs, the State Criminal Alien Assistance 
Program (SCAAP) reimburses states and localities for their 
incarceration costs, and Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety 
Act programs prevents crimes against children.
      The conference agreement includes funding for Violence 
Against Women Act (VAWA) and Family Violence Prevention and 
Services Act. These funds supplement support for violence 
prevention and services activities. In particular, the 
conference agreement supports the VAWA Long-Term Stability/
Housing for Victims Program, which builds collaborations 
between domestic violence service providers, housing providers, 
and developers to leverage existing resources and create 
housing solutions that meet victims' need for long-term 
housing. Helping victims remain safe and stable over time is 
critical since victims of domestic violence often return to 
their abusers because they cannot find long-term housing.
      Finally, the conference agreement provides additional 
funding to support the President's initiative to combat 
violence along the U.S.-Mexico border.

                    GENERAL GOVERNMENT: FUNCTION 800

Function Summary
      The General Government function consists of the 
activities of the Legislative Branch, the Executive Office of 
the President, general tax collection and fiscal operations of 
the Department of the Treasury (including the IRS), the Office 
of Personnel Management, the property and personnel costs of 
the General Services Administration, and general purpose fiscal 
assistance to states, localities, the District of Columbia, and 
U.S. territories.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of $22.3 billion 
in BA and $23.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and $112.8 billion 
in BA and $116.5 billion in outlays over five years.
      The Senate resolution supports enhanced Internal Revenue 
Service (IRS) tax enforcement to address the tax gap. The 
resolution fully funds the President's budget request for the 
IRS and includes the President's request for additional 
resources for IRS enforcement. By including a discretionary cap 
adjustment of $890 million, the budget resolution would direct 
approximately $8 billion to IRS enforcement activities. A 
similar cap adjustment was included in the 2009 budget 
resolution.
      The Senate resolution assumes that rates of compensation 
for civilian employees of the United States should be adjusted 
at the same time, and in the same proportion, as are rates of 
compensation for members of the uniformed services.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $22.0 billion 
in BA and $22.8 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $113.2 
billion in BA and $116.8 billion in outlays over five years.
      The House budget resolution includes a program integrity 
initiative to increase IRS tax compliance efforts to collect 
unpaid taxes. In a change from previous years, the amounts 
included within the House resolution's adjustments for this 
purpose focus solely on amounts in IRS's Enforcement account. 
The House resolution assumes the full level for IRS activities 
proposed by the President.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes $22.0 billion in BA and 
$22.8 billion in outlays for 2010, and $112.2 billion in BA and 
$115.9 billion in outlays over five years. It fully funds the 
President's budget request for IRS enforcement activities, 
including additional resources available through a 
discretionary cap adjustment. The Senate retains an $890 
million discretionary cap adjustment, which would require 
approximately $8 billion for IRS enforcement related 
activities. The House reflects an equivalent amount for 
enforcement activities using a cap adjustment for the 
Enforcement account and additional funding from related 
accounts.

                       NET INTEREST: FUNCTION 900

Function Summary
      The Net Interest function is entirely mandatory with no 
discretionary components. It consists primarily of the interest 
paid by the federal government to private and foreign 
government holders of U.S. Treasury securities. It includes the 
interest on the public debt after deducting the interest income 
received by the federal government from trust fund investments, 
loans and cash balances, and earnings of the National Railroad 
Retirement Investment Trust.
Senate-passed Resolution
      For the unified budget, the Senate resolution calls for 
BA and outlays of $168.8 billion for 2010 and $1.4 trillion 
over five years. (The budget resolution provides only the on-
budget amounts, which total $284.6 billion in BA and outlays 
for 2010 and $2.0 trillion in BA and outlays over five years.)
House-passed Resolution
      For the unified budget, the House resolution calls for a 
total of $168.3 billion in BA and outlays for 2010, and for 
$1.4 trillion in BA and outlays over five years. (The budget 
resolution provides only the on-budget amounts, which are 
$284.1 billion in BA and outlays for 2010, and $2.0 trillion in 
BA and outlays over five years.)
Conference Agreement
      For the unified budget, the conference agreement calls 
for BA and outlays of $168.4 billion for 2010 and $1.4 trillion 
over five years. (The on-budget amounts are $284.2 billion in 
BA and outlays for 2010 and $2.0 trillion in BA and outlays 
over five years.)

                        ALLOWANCES: FUNCTION 920

Function Summary
      The Allowances function is used for planning purposes to 
address the budgetary effects of proposals or assumptions that 
cross several budget functions. Once such changes are enacted, 
the budgetary effects are distributed to the appropriate budget 
function.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for a total of -$16.0 billion 
in BA and -$7.0 billion in outlays for 2010, and -$89.4 billion 
in BA and -$78.8 billion in outlays over five years.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution calls for a total of $9.4 billion in 
BA and $4.9 billion in outlays for 2010, and for $33.4 billion 
in BA and $22.6 billion in outlays over five years.
      Function 920 includes a placeholder to recognize the 
potential costs of disasters over the resolution period. It 
also includes a variety of savings, including savings related 
to program integrity initiatives, savings pursuant to 
reconciliation instructions, and savings to offset program 
initiatives in other budget functions.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement calls for a total of $1.2 
billion in BA and $2.5 billion in outlays for 2010, and -$60.8 
billion in BA and -$48.9 billion in outlays over five years. 
These funding levels include a placeholder for 2009 and 2010 to 
recognize the potential costs of disasters. Offsetting these 
amounts are other non-security discretionary adjustments, 
savings pursuant to reconciliation instructions, and offsets 
for policy in other budget functions.

            UNDISTRIBUTED OFFSETTING RECEIPTS: FUNCTION 950

Function Summary
      The Undistributed Offsetting Receipts function includes 
major offsetting receipt items that would distort the funding 
levels of other functional categories if they were distributed 
to them. Examples of such items include the employer share of 
federal employee retirement benefits, outer continental shelf 
rents and royalties, and the sale of major assets.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution calls for unified undistributed 
offsetting receipts of -$83.6 billion in BA and outlays for 
2010 and -$456.2 billion in BA and outlays over five years. 
(The on-budget totals for BA and outlays are -$68.4 billion for 
2010 and -$371.8 billion over five years.) The Senate 
resolution matches the CBO's baseline estimate of undistributed 
offsetting receipts.
House-passed Resolution
      For the unified budget, the House resolution calls for a 
total of -$83.9 billion in BA and outlays for 2010, and for 
-$458.0 billion in BA and outlays over five years. (The budget 
resolution provides only the on-budget amounts, which are 
-$68.8 billion in BA and outlays for 2010, and -$373.5 billion 
in BA and outlays over five years.)
      The negative spending in Function 950 represents CBO's 
baseline estimate of undistributed offsetting receipts and the 
impact of concurrent receipt policy.
Conference Agreement
      For the unified budget, the conference agreement includes 
undistributed offsetting receipts of -$83.9 billion in BA and 
outlays for 2010 and -$458.0 billion in BA and outlays over 
five years. (The on-budget amounts are -$68.8 billion in BA and 
outlays for 2010 and -$373.5 billion in BA and outlays over 
five years.)

        OVERSEAS DEPLOYMENTS AND OTHER ACTIVITIES: FUNCTION 970

Function Summary
      This function includes funding for overseas deployments 
and other activities.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution did not include Function 970.
House-passed Resolution
      The House resolution includes amounts equal to the 
President's budget to account for any future House 
consideration of appropriations for overseas deployments and 
other activities.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes Function 970 to account 
for the President's pending supplemental request, other 
Presidential requests, and an estimate of potential future 
costs of overseas deployments.

                             RECONCILIATION

Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution did not include any reconciliation 
instructions.
House-passed Resolution
      Title II of the House resolution includes reconciliation 
instructions. The instructions direct committees to make 
changes in laws under its jurisdiction that affect revenues or 
direct spending to achieve a specified budgetary result. The 
legislation used to implement those instructions is reported as 
a reconciliation bill.
      Section 201 of the House resolution includes 
reconciliation instructions to committees assumed to be used 
for health care reform and for education, but not for other 
policies. In section 201(a), entitled Health Care Reform, the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce and the Committee on Ways and 
Means each are instructed to report changes in laws by 
September 29, 2009, to reduce the deficit by $1 billion for the 
period of fiscal years 2009 through 2014. In section 201(b), 
entitled Investments in Education, the Committee on Education 
and Labor is instructed to report changes in laws by September 
30, 2009, to reduce the deficit by $1 billion for the period of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014. Reconciliation instructions do 
not preclude the consideration of legislation in these policy 
areas under regular order.
      Procedural language included in section 201(c) of the 
House resolution permits but does not require the Clerk of the 
House to join two separate reconciliation measures that meet 
the above descriptions, once one such measure has passed the 
House, for the purpose of forming a single engrossed 
reconciliation bill within the meaning of section 310 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
      The House has adopted a rule relating to reconciliation 
instructions (clause 7 of rule XXI) that requires that any 
reconciliation instruction must not increase the deficit or 
reduce the surplus over the time periods specified in the House 
pay-as-you-go rule. The reconciliation instructions provided in 
title II of the House resolution satisfy the requirement of 
clause 7 of rule XXI of the House of Representatives.
Conference Agreement
      The conference agreement includes reconciliation 
instructions.
      For the Senate, Sec. 201 of the conference agreement 
provides reconciliation instructions to the Committee on 
Finance and Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions 
to report changes in laws within their jurisdiction that reduce 
the deficit by $1,000,000,000 each for the period of fiscal 
years 2009 through 2014. The deadline for these committees to 
report legislation complying with their instructions is October 
15, 2009.
      For the House, Sec. 202 of the conference agreement 
provides two sets of reconciliation instructions, one intended 
for health reform and one intended for education. The deadline 
for affected committees to report legislation complying with 
each set of instructions is October 15, 2009. The committees 
shall report reconciliation legislation directly to the House 
Committee on the Budget.
      Sec. 202(a), for health reform, instructs the Committee 
on Ways and Means, the Committee on Energy and Commerce, and 
the Committee on Education and Labor to report changes in laws 
to reduce the deficit by $1.0 billion for the period of fiscal 
years 2009 through 2014. Because of overlapping committee 
jurisdictions in the House with respect to health programs and 
related policies, the House Committee on the Budget assumes 
that legislation reported pursuant to Sec. 201(a) by the three 
named committees will, in combination, result in total net 
deficit reduction of at least $1.0 billion for the period of 
fiscal years 2009 through 2014.
      Sec. 202(b), for education, instructs the Committee on 
Education and Labor to report changes in laws to reduce the 
deficit by $1.0 billion for the period of fiscal years 2009 
through 2014.
      It is assumed that reconciliation will not be used for 
changes in legislation related to global climate change.

                             RESERVE FUNDS

      The Senate and House use reserve funds in connection with 
consideration of legislation that complies with each chamber's 
rules. The conference agreement therefore contains reserve 
funds for the House and for the Senate to address the rules and 
procedures that apply in each chamber.
Senate-passed Resolution
            Sec. 201. Transform and modernize America's health care 
                    system
      (a) Transform and Modernize America's Health Care System: 
The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one or 
more pieces of health reform legislation that expand affordable 
coverage, improve health care quality and health outcomes, and 
constrain costs, provided that such legislation is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2019, reduces excess cost growth 
in health care spending, and is fiscally-sustainable over the 
long-term. The reserve fund reflects the eight principles for 
health reform outlined in the President's budget and provides 
maximum flexibility to the authorizing Committees to determine 
the appropriate level of spending and the offsets that may be 
required to pay for these investments.
      (b) Other Revisions: The Senate-passed resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in 
the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation in the 
following areas, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total 
of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019:
      (1) Physician Payments--legislation that increases the 
reimbursement rate for physician services under Medicare Part 
B.
      (2) Physician Training--legislation to encourage 
physicians to train in primary care residencies and ensure an 
adequate supply of residents and physicians.
      (3) Medicare Outpatient Therapy--legislation to improve 
the Medicare program for beneficiaries and protect access to 
outpatient therapy services (including physical therapy, 
occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services) 
while protecting beneficiaries from associated premium 
increases.
      (4) Geographic Variation--legislation to promote Medicare 
payment policies that reward quality and efficient care and 
address geographic variation in spending.
      (5) Medicare Advantage Enrollees--legislation to protect 
Medicare Advantage enrollees from premium increases and benefit 
reductions in their Medicare Advantage plans that would result 
from estimates in the 2010 Medicare Advantage Call Letter.
            Sec. 202. Investing in clean energy and preserving the 
                    environment
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a deficit-neutral 
reserve fund allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to 
revise the levels in the resolution for legislation in the 
following areas, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 
2019.
      (a) Investing in Clean Energy and Preserving the 
Environment: Legislation that would reduce our Nation's 
dependence on imported energy including through expanded 
offshore oil and gas production in the Outer Continental Shelf, 
produce green jobs, promote renewable energy development, 
strengthen and retool manufacturing supply chains, create a 
clean energy investment fund, improve electricity transmission, 
encourage conservation and efficiency (including through 
industrial energy efficiency programs), make improvements to 
the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, set aside 
additional funding from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund for 
Arctic oil spill research conducted by the Oil Spill Recovery 
Institute, implement water settlements, or preserve or protect 
public lands, oceans or coastal areas, by the amounts provided 
in such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
legislation would not increase the cost of producing energy 
from domestic sources, including oil and gas from the Outer 
Continental Shelf or other areas; would not increase the cost 
of energy for American families; would not increase the cost of 
energy for domestic manufacturers, farmers, fishermen, or other 
domestic industries; and would not enhance foreign 
competitiveness against U.S. businesses. The legislation may 
include tax provisions.
      (b) Climate Change Legislation: Legislation that would 
invest in clean energy technology initiatives, decrease 
greenhouse gas emissions (without regulating carbon dioxide, 
nitrogen oxide, water vapor, or methane emissions from 
biological processes associated with livestock production), 
create new jobs in a clean technology economy, strengthen the 
manufacturing competitiveness of the United States, diversify 
the domestic clean energy supply to increase the energy 
security of the United States, protect consumers (including 
policies that address regional differences), provide incentives 
for cost-savings achieved through energy efficiencies, provide 
voluntary opportunities for agriculture and forestry 
communities to contribute to reducing the levels of greenhouse 
gases in the atmosphere, and help families, workers, 
communities, and businesses make the transition to a clean 
energy economy, without increasing electricity or gasoline 
prices or increasing the overall burden on consumers, through 
the use of revenues and policies provided in such legislation.
      (c) Allocations: The Chairman of the Senate Committee on 
the Budget shall not revise the allocations in this resolution 
if the legislation provided for in subsections (a) or (b) is 
reported from any committee pursuant to section 310 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
            Sec. 203. Higher education
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
make higher education more accessible and more affordable while 
maintaining a competitive student loan program that provides 
students and institutions of higher education with a 
comprehensive choice of loan products and services which may 
include legislation to expand and strengthen student aid, such 
as Pell grants, or increase college enrollment and completion 
rates for low income students such as by investing in programs 
that provide need-based grants and community work study 
programs or provide outreach to low-income students to prepare 
for college, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019. This may include tax legislation.
            Sec. 204. Child nutrition and WIC
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would reauthorize child 
nutrition programs and/or the Special Supplemental Nutrition 
Program for Women, Infants, and Children (the WIC program), 
provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 205. Investments in America's infrastructure
      (a) Infrastructure: The Senate-passed resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels and 
limits in the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation 
that would provide a sustained robust federal investment in 
infrastructure, which may include public housing, energy, 
water, transportation, including freight and passenger rail, or 
other infrastructure projects, provided it is deficit-neutral 
over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      The Senate-passed resolution also allows the Chairman of 
the Budget Committee to revise the allocations to allow funding 
for the Denali Commission for each applicable fiscal year at a 
level equal to not less than the level of funding made 
available for the Denali Commission during 2006.
      (b) Surface Transportation: The Senate resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels and 
limits in the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation 
that would provide new budget authority for surface 
transportation programs to the extent such new budget authority 
is offset by an increase in receipts to the Highway Trust Fund 
(excluding transfers from the general fund of the Treasury into 
the Highway Trust Fund not offset by a similar increase in 
receipts), provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (c) Multimodal Transportation Projects: The Senate 
resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget Committee to 
revise the levels and limits in the resolution for one or more 
pieces of legislation that would authorize multimodal 
transportation projects that--
          (1) provide a set of performance measures;
          (2) require a cost-benefit analysis be conducted to 
        ensure accountability and overall project goals are 
        met; and
          (3) provide flexibility for States, cities, and 
        localities to create strategies that meet the needs of 
        their communities

--provided the legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (d) Flood Control Projects: The Senate resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels and 
limits in the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation 
that provide for levee modernization, maintenance, repair, and 
improvement, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (e) Allowing Amtrak Passengers to Securely Transport 
Firearms on Passenger Trains: The Senate resolution states that 
none of amounts made available in the reserve fund authorized 
under this section may be used to provide financial assistance 
for the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) unless 
Amtrak passengers are allowed to securely transport firearms in 
their checked baggage.
            Sec. 206. Promote economic stabilization and growth
      (a) Manufacturing: The Senate-passed resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels and 
limits in the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation 
that would revitalize and strengthen the United States domestic 
manufacturing sector by increasing Federal research and 
development, by expanding the scope and effectiveness of 
manufacturing programs across the Federal Government, by 
increasing efforts to train and retrain manufacturing workers, 
by enhancing workers' technical skills in the use of the new 
advanced manufacturing technologies to produce competitive 
energy efficient products, by increasing support for sector 
workforce training, by increasing support for the redevelopment 
of closed manufacturing plants, by increasing support for 
development of alternative fuels and leap-ahead automotive and 
energy technologies such as advanced batteries, or by 
establishing tax incentives to encourage the continued 
production in the United States of advanced technologies and 
the infrastructure to support such technologies, provided it is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (b) Tax Relief: The Senate resolution allows the Chairman 
of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution 
for legislation that would provide tax relief including, but 
not limited to, extensions of expiring and expired tax relief 
provisions, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (c) Tax Reform: The Senate resolution allows the Chairman 
of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution 
for legislation that would reform the Internal Revenue Code to 
ensure a sustainable revenue base that would lead to a fairer 
and more efficient tax system and to a more competitive 
business environment for United States enterprises, provided it 
is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (d) Flood Insurance Reform: The Senate resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in 
the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
provide for flood insurance reform and modernization, provided 
it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-
2019.
      (e) Trade: The Senate resolution allows the Chairman of 
the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
one or more pieces of legislation related to trade, provided it 
is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (f) Housing Assistance: The Senate resolution allows the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels and 
limits in the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation 
related to housing assistance, which may include low income 
rental assistance and assistance provided through the Housing 
Trust Fund created under section 1131 of the Housing and 
Economic Recovery Act of 2008, and legislation that allows for 
a temporary suspension of the 10 percent tax penalty on early 
withdrawal from qualified retirement accounts, provided it is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (g) Unemployment Mitigation: The Senate resolution allows 
the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in 
the resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
reduce the unemployment rate or provide assistance to the 
unemployed, particularly in the states and localities with the 
highest rates of unemployment, or improve the implementation of 
the unemployment compensation program, provided it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 207. America's veterans and wounded servicemembers
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would expand the 
number of disabled military retirees who receive both 
disability compensation and retired pay, accelerate the phase-
in of concurrent receipt, eliminate the offset between Survivor 
Benefit Plan annuities and Veterans' Dependency and Indemnity 
Compensation, enhance servicemember education benefits for 
members of the National Guard and Reserve by ensuring those 
benefits keep pace with the national average cost of tuition, 
provide for the payment of retired pay for members of the 
Alaska Territorial Guard who served in the Alaska Territorial 
Guard during and after World War II, or expand veterans' 
benefits (including for veterans living in rural areas), 
provided such legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2008-2013 and 2008-2018.
            Sec. 208. Judicial pay and judgeships and postal retiree 
                    assistance
      (a) Judicial Pay and Judgeships: The Senate-passed 
resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget Committee to 
revise the levels in the resolution for one or more pieces of 
legislation that authorize salary adjustments for justices and 
judges of the United States or increases the number of federal 
judgeships, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (b) Postal Retirees: The Senate resolution allows the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation relating to 
funding adjustments for United States Postal Service retiree 
health coverage, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total 
of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 209. Defense acquisition and contracting reform
      The Senate resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one or 
more pieces of legislation that would--
          (1) enhance the capability of the Federal acquisition 
        or contracting workforce to achieve better value for 
        taxpayers;
          (2) reduce the use of no-bid and cost-plus contracts;
          (3) reform Department of Defense processes for 
        acquiring weapons systems in order to reduce costs, 
        improve cost and schedule estimation, enhance 
        developmental testing of weapons, or increase the rigor 
        of reviews of programs that experience critical cost 
        growth;
          (4) reduce the award of contracts to contractors with 
        seriously delinquent tax debts;
          (5) reduce the use of contracts, including the 
        continuation of task orders, awarded under the 
        Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP) III;
          (6) reform Department of Defense processes for 
        acquiring services in order to reduce costs, improve 
        costs and schedule estimation, enhance oversight, or 
        increase the rigor of reviews of programs that 
        experience critical cost growth;
          (7) reduce the use of contracts for acquisition, 
        oversight, and management support services; or
          (8) enhance the capability of auditors and inspectors 
        general to oversee Federal acquisition and procurement;

--provided the legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 210. Investments in our nation's counties and schools
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would reauthorize the Secure 
Rural Schools and Community Self Determination Act of 2000 
(Public Law 106-393), make changes to the Payments in Lieu of 
Taxes Act of 1976 (Public Law 94-565), or both, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of 2009 through 2014 or the period of the 
total of 2009 through 2019.
            Sec. 211. The Food and Drug Administration
      (a) Regulation: The Senate-passed resolution allows the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
authorize the Food and Drug Administration to regulate products 
and assess user fees on manufacturers and importers of those 
products to cover the cost of the Food and Drug 
Administration's regulatory activities, provided it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (b) Drug Importation: The Senate resolution allows the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
permit the safe importation of prescription drugs approved by 
the Food and Drug Administration from a specified list of 
countries, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
      (c) Food Safety: The Senate resolution allows the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the levels in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
improve the safety of the food supply in the United States, 
provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 212. Bipartisan Congressional Sunset Commission
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that--
            (1) provide for a bipartisan congressional sunset 
        commission that will review Federal programs, focusing 
        on unauthorized and nonperforming programs;
            (2) provide for a process that will help abolish 
        obsolete and duplicative Federal programs;
            (3) provide for improved government accountability 
        and greater openness in government decision-making; and
            (4) provide for a process that ensures that 
        Congress will consider the commission's reports and 
        recommendations

--provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of 2009 through 2019.
            Sec. 213. Improving domestic fuels security
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would achieve domestic fuels 
security by authorizing the Department of Defense to procure 
alternative fuels from domestic sources under contracts for up 
to 20 years, provided that procurement is consistent with 
section 526 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 
(Public Law 110-140), and provided that such legislation would 
not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 
2019.
            Sec. 214. Comprehensive investigation into the current 
                    financial crisis
      The Senate resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to revise the levels and limits in the resolution for 
one or more pieces of legislation that provide resources for a 
comprehensive investigation to determine the cause of the 
current financial crisis, hold those responsible accountable, 
and provide recommendations to prevent another financial crisis 
of this magnitude from occurring again, provided it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 215. Increased transparency at the federal reserve
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that increase 
transparency at the Federal Reserve System, including audits of 
the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the 
Federal reserve banks, to include--
            (1) an evaluation of the appropriate number and the 
        associated costs of Federal reserve banks;
            (2) publication on its website, with respect to all 
        lending and financial assistance facilities created by 
        the Board to address the financial crisis, of--
                    (a) the nature and amounts of the 
                collateral that the central bank is accepting 
                on behalf of American taxpayers in the various 
                lending programs, on no less than a monthly 
                basis;
                    (b) the extent to which changes in 
                valuation of credit extensions to various 
                special purpose vehicles, such as Maiden Lane 
                I, Maiden Lane II, and Maiden Lane III, are a 
                result of losses on collateral which will not 
                be recovered;
                    (c) the number of borrowers that 
                participate in each of the lending programs and 
                details of the credit extended, including the 
                extent to which the credit is concentrated in 
                one or more institutions; and
                    (d) information on the extent to which the 
                central bank is contracting for services of 
                private sector firms for the design, pricing, 
                management, and accounting for the various 
                lending programs and the terms and nature of 
                such contracts and bidding processes; and
            (3) including the identity of each entity to which 
        the Board has provided all loans and other financial 
        assistance since March 24, 2008, the value or amount of 
        that financial assistance, and what that entity is 
        doing with such financial assistance

--provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 
and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 216. Improving child welfare
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would make improvements to 
child welfare programs, including strengthening the recruitment 
and retention of foster families, or make improvements to the 
child support enforcement program, provided it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 217. Long-term stability/housing for victims
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
fully fund the Long-Term Stability/Housing for Victims Program 
under the Violence Against Women Act, by the amounts provided 
in that legislation for those purposes, provided it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 218. Providing a tax credit for the purchase of a 
                    principal residence
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would provide a 
non-refundable tax credit in the amount of the lesser of 
$15,000 or 10 percent of the purchase price for the purchase of 
a principal residence for the period of one year, provided such 
legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 219. Monitoring of FHA-insured lending
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
increase the capacity of the Inspector General of the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development to investigate 
cases of mortgage fraud of Federal Housing Administration 
loans, provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-
2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 220. Address the systemic inequities of Medicare and 
                    Medicaid reimbursement that lead to access problems 
                    in rural areas
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that address the systemic 
inequities of Medicare and Medicaid reimbursement that lead to 
access problems in rural areas, including access to primary 
care and outpatient services, hospitals, and an adequate supply 
of providers in the workforce, provided that it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 221. Carbon capture and storage and advanced clean 
                    coal power generation research, development, 
                    demonstration, and deployment
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would accelerate the 
research, development, demonstration, and deployment of 
advanced technologies to capture and store carbon dioxide 
emissions from coal-fired power plants and other industrial 
emission sources and to use coal in an environmentally 
acceptable manner, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 
2019.
            Sec. 222. Expenditure of remaining TARP funds
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that reaffirm 
that the remaining Troubled Asset Relief Program funds shall be 
used to save homes, save small businesses, help the municipal 
bond market, make credit more widely available, and provide 
additional resources for the Special Inspector General for the 
Troubled Asset Relief Program, the Congressional Oversight 
Panel, and the Government Accountability Office for vigorous 
audit and evaluation of all expenditures and commitments made 
under the Troubled Asset Relief Program, by the amounts 
provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 223. Prohibiting undeserved contracting performance 
                    bonuses
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
prohibit federally funded bonuses awarded to contractors and 
government executives responsible for over budget projects and 
programs that fail to meet basic performance requirements, 
provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 224. Eliminating wasteful programs
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would achieve 
savings by eliminating wasteful, inefficient, and duplicative 
programs, provided that such legislation is deficit-neutral 
over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 225. Violence Against Women Act and the Family 
                    Violence Prevention and Service Act
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would provide 
resources for programs administered through the Violence 
Against Women Act and the Family Violence Prevention and 
Services Act, and other related programs, provided that such 
legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 226. Ending abusive no-bid contracts
      The Senate resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one or 
more pieces of legislation that would end abusive no-bid 
contracts by requiring all Federal contracts over $25,000 to be 
competitively bid provided the legislation is deficit-neutral 
over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 227. Home visitation programs
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would provide funds to 
States to establish or expand quality programs of early 
childhood home visitation that increase school readiness, child 
abuse and neglect prevention, and early identification of 
developmental and health delays, provided it is deficit-neutral 
over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 228. 21st Century learning centers
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would 
increase funding for the 21st Century Community Learning 
Centers program, provided that such legislation is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 229. Extending top tax brackets for individuals with 
                    majority small business income
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would extend the 
top tax brackets of 33 percent and 35 percent for individuals 
receiving more than 50 percent of income from small business, 
provided such legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 230. Pension coverage for employees of Department of 
                    Energy laboratories and environmental cleanup sites
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a deficit-neutral 
reserve fund allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to 
revise the levels in the resolution for legislation that would 
authorize funding to cover the full cost of pension obligations 
for current and past employees of laboratories and 
environmental cleanup sites under the jurisdiction of the 
Department of Energy (including benefits paid to security 
personnel) in a manner that does not impact the missions of 
those laboratories and environmental cleanup sites.
            Sec. 231. Resources for firefighters and fire departments
      The Senate resolution allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to revise the levels and limits in the resolution for 
one or more pieces of legislation that provide firefighters and 
fire departments with critical resources under FEMA Assistance 
to Firefighters Grant and Staffing for Adequate Fire and 
Emergency Response Firefighters Grant programs, provided it is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 232. Increased use of recovery audits
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would achieve 
savings by requiring agencies to increase their use of recovery 
audits and use those savings to reduce the deficit.
            Sec. 233. Repealing 1993 income tax on Social Security 
                    benefits
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would repeal the 
1993 increase in the income tax on social security benefits, 
provided such legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 
2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 234. Increasing the amount of capital losses allowed 
                    to individuals
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would increase 
the amount of capital losses allowed to individuals, provided 
such legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 
and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 235. Foster care financing reform
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would--
          (1) change the Federal foster care payment system;
          (2) promote and improve family support, family 
        preservation and time-limited family unification 
        services;
          (3) provide for subsidies and support programs that 
        are available to support the needs of the children 
        prior to removal, during removal, and post placement;
          (4) promote innovation and best practice at the State 
        level; and
          (5) guarantee that public funds are used to 
        effectively meet the needs of children who have been 
        abused or neglected

--provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 
and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 236. Healthcare professionals for the Veterans Health 
                    Administration
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels and limits in the 
resolution for one or more pieces of legislation that would--
          (1) increase the number of healthcare professionals 
        in the Veterans Health Administration to meet the needs 
        of the expanding number of veterans and to fill 
        healthcare professional positions in the Veterans 
        Health Administration that are currently vacant; and
          (2) provide enhanced incentives for healthcare 
        professionals of the Veterans Health Administration who 
        serve in rural areas

--provided it is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 
and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 237. Repealing deductions from mineral revenue 
                    payments to states
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
legislation that would repeal the requirement to deduct certain 
amounts from mineral revenues payable to States, provided that 
such legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
period of the total of 2009 through 2014 or the period of the 
total of 2009 through 2019.
            Sec. 238. Promoting tax equity for states without personal 
                    income taxes
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would provide for 
the permanent extension of the deduction for state and local 
sales taxes in order to promote tax equity for states without 
personal income taxes, provided such legislation is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 239. Setting performance standards to identify failing 
                    government programs
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would set 
performance standards to identify failing government programs, 
provided that such legislation is deficit neutral over the 
total 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 240. Expediting research on viability of using higher 
                    ethanol blends at service stations
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
legislation that would expedite research at the Department of 
Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency on the viability 
of the use of higher ethanol blends at the service station 
pump, provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of 2009 through 
2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 2019.
            Sec. 241. Enhanced drug-control efforts
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would increase 
the number of counties designated as High Intensity Drug 
Trafficking Areas to provide coordination, equipment, 
technology, and additional resources to combat drug trafficking 
or legislation that increases drug interdiction funding at the 
Department of Homeland Security, provided that such legislation 
is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 242. Promoting individual savings and financial 
                    security
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would promote 
financial security through financial literacy, retirement 
planning, and savings incentives, provided such legislation is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 243. National Health Services Corps
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would provide the National 
Health Service Corps with $235 million for 2010, provided it is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 244. Improving the animal health and disease program
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would fully fund 
the animal health and disease program, provided that such 
legislation is deficit neutral over the total 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 245. Increase in the end strength for active duty 
                    personnel of the Army
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would reduce the strain on 
the United States Armed Forces by authorizing an increase in 
the end strength for active duty personnel of the Army to a 
level not less than 577,400 persons provided the legislation is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 246. Wildland fire management activities
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
legislation that would--
          (1) allow wildland fire management funds for 
        hazardous fuels reduction and hazard mitigation 
        activities in areas at high risk of catastrophic 
        wildfire to be distributed to areas demonstrating 
        highest priority needs, as determined by the Chief of 
        the Forest Service, and
          (2) provide that no State matching funds are required 
        for the activities described in paragraph (1)

--provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
over either the period of the total of 2009 through 2014 or the 
period of the total of 2009 through 2019.
            Sec. 247. Increasing the estate tax exemption and lowering 
                    the maximum estate tax rate
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a reserve fund 
allowing the Chairman of the Budget Committee to revise the 
levels in the resolution for legislation that would establish 
the estate tax exemption at $5 million, indexed for inflation, 
set the maximum estate tax rate at 35 percent, and provide for 
reunification of the estate and gift credits and the 
portability of exemption between spouses, provided such 
legislation is deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 
2009-2019.
            Sec. 248. Point of order against legislation that provides 
                    additional relief for the estate tax beyond the 
                    levels assumed in the budget resolution unless an 
                    equal amount of additional tax relief is provided 
                    to middle class taxpayers
      The Senate-passed resolution included a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would provide additional 
relief for the estate tax beyond the levels assumed in the 
budget resolution of $7 million per married couple and a 
graduated rate ending at a rate less than 45 percent unless an 
equal amount of tax relief is provided to taxpayers earning 
less than $100,000 per year and such relief is in addition to 
the amounts assumed in the budget resolution. The point of 
order could be waived with 60 votes.
            Sec. 249. Increase FDIC and NCUA borrowing authority
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would increase the borrowing 
authority of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation and the 
National Credit Union Administration, provided it is deficit-
neutral over the total of 2009-2019.
            Sec. 250. Innovative Loan Guarantee Program at the 
                    Department of Energy
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
legislation that would authorize an additional $50,000,000,000 
for use to provide loan guarantees for eligible projects under 
title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16511 et 
seq.), provided that such legislation would not increase the 
deficit over either the period of the total of 2009 through 
2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 2019.
            Sec. 251. Nuclear research and development
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
legislation that would authorize nuclear research and 
development activities, including the Generation IV program, 
the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, and the Light Water Reactor 
Sustainability program, provided that such legislation would 
not increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 
2019.
            Sec. 252. 2012 completion of Food and Drug Administration 
                    facilities
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for one 
or more pieces of legislation that would provide sufficient 
funding for the General Services Administration to complete 
construction of the Food and Drug Administration White Oak 
Campus in Silver Spring, Maryland by 2012, provided it is 
deficit-neutral over the total of 2009-2014 and 2009-2019.
            Sec. 253. Energy Star for Small Business Program
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to revise the levels in the resolution for 
legislation that would set aside, from amounts made available 
for the Energy Star Program of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, at least 2 percent for the Energy Star for Small 
Business Program, provided that such legislation would not 
increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
2009 through 2014 or the period of the total of 2009 through 
2019.
      Throughout this subtitle, the use of the word ``limits'' 
refers to the discretionary spending limits in the Senate.
House-passed Resolution
            Sec. 301. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for health care 
                    reform
      The reserve fund supports the President's goal of 
fiscally responsible health reform legislation. The reserve 
fund accommodates legislation that addresses the common goals 
of making affordable health coverage available to all, 
improving the quality of health care, and reducing rising 
health care costs, while building on and strengthening existing 
public and private insurance coverage and preserving choice of 
provider and plan, consistent with the pay-as-you-go principle.
      As part of health care reform, the House supports 
measures to ensure that payments to providers are appropriate 
and equitable and are designed to encourage efficiency, higher 
quality care, coordination of care, and accountability.
            Sec. 302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for college access, 
                    affordability, and completion
      The reserve fund accommodates changes in laws that will 
increase assistance or benefits to college students, consistent 
with the pay-as-you-go principle. This reserve fund will 
provide committees maximum flexibility in finding offsets for 
legislation to help more students afford and complete college.
            Sec. 303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for increasing 
                    energy independence
      The reserve fund accommodates legislation to increase 
U.S. energy independence, consistent with the pay-as-you-go 
principle. This reserve fund covers legislation that provides 
tax incentives for or otherwise encourages the production of 
renewable energy or increased energy efficiency; encourages 
investment in emerging energy or vehicle technologies or carbon 
capture and sequestration; limits and provides for reductions 
in greenhouse gas emissions; assists businesses, industries, 
states, communities, the environment, workers, or households as 
the United States moves toward reducing and offsetting the 
impacts of greenhouse gas emissions; or facilitates the 
training of workers for these industries (``green collar 
jobs'').
            Sec. 304. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for America's 
                    veterans and servicemembers
      The reserve fund accommodates legislation to change 
health care and benefits for veterans, servicemembers, or their 
families, consistent with the pay-as-you-go principle. This 
reserve fund covers legislation that enhances health care for 
military personnel or veterans; maintains the affordability of 
health care for military retirees or veterans; improves 
disability benefits or evaluations for wounded or disabled 
military personnel or veterans (including measures to expedite 
the claims process); expands eligibility to permit additional 
disabled military retirees to receive both disability 
compensation and retired pay (concurrent receipt); or 
eliminates the offset between Survivor Benefit Plan annuities 
and veterans' dependency and indemnity compensation. The 
reserve fund shall not accommodate legislation authorizing the 
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to bill private insurance 
companies for treatment of health conditions that are related 
to veterans' military service. VA already is authorized to bill 
such companies for treatment of conditions that are not 
service-connected.
            Sec. 305. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for certain tax 
                    relief
      The reserve fund for tax relief accommodates legislation 
to reduce tax burdens on working families, businesses, States, 
or communities if it complies with the pay-as-you-go principle. 
This reserve fund could therefore accommodate individual tax 
relief supporting working families, higher education, and 
raising participation in retirement saving vehicles, among 
other purposes. It could also accommodate tax relief and 
investment incentives for businesses, States, or communities.
            Sec. 306. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a 
                    9/11 health program
      The reserve fund accommodates legislation that would 
establish a program, including medical monitoring and 
treatment, addressing the adverse health impacts linked to the 
attacks of September 11, 2001, consistent with the pay-as-you-
go principle. Last year, the House and Senate included this 
deficit neutral reserve fund as part of the Conference 
Agreement.
            Sec. 307. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child nutrition
      This reserve fund accommodates legislation to 
reauthorize, expand, or improve the child nutrition programs, 
including, but not limited to, the school lunch and school 
breakfast programs, after-school and summer food programs, the 
Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and 
Children (WIC), and the child and adult care food program, 
consistent with the pay-as-you-go principle.
            Sec. 308. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for structural 
                    unemployment insurance reforms
      This reserve fund accommodates legislation consistent 
with the pay-as-you-go principle that builds on the provisions 
of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and continues 
modernizing the unemployment system to better meet the 
challenges of the 21st century workforce, in particular by 
improving its response to economic downturns.
            Sec. 309. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child support
      This reserve fund accommodates legislation to increase 
parental support for children, including efforts to ensure that 
children receive 100 percent of the child support that they are 
owed and that is paid by non-custodial parents, as well as 
other efforts to provide more parental support for children, 
consistent with the pay-as-you-go principle.
            Sec. 310. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Affordable 
                    Housing Trust Fund
      The reserve fund accommodates funding for the existing 
Affordable Housing Trust Fund that provides grants to states, 
communities, and other entities to provide or rehabilitate 
housing for low-income families, consistent with the pay-as-
you-go principle. The reserve fund provides committees with 
flexibility to find offsets for legislation that capitalizes 
the trust fund, which is already authorized.
            Sec. 311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for home visiting
      This reserve fund accommodates legislation to provide 
mandatory funding for a home visiting program or programs 
serving low-income mothers-to-be and low-income families, 
consistent with the pay-as-you-go principle. The House 
anticipates that the legislation will fund evidence-based 
programs that have been tested in well-designed randomized 
controlled trials and are likely to produce future budget 
savings by improving child and family health and well-being. 
Research studies on providing nurse home visiting services to 
low-income families, for example, have documented between three 
and six dollars in savings for every dollar invested in the 
home visits.
            Sec. 312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Low-income Home 
                    Energy Assistance Program trigger
      This reserve fund accommodates legislation to ensure that 
the Low-income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) responds 
more quickly and efficiently to energy price increases, so long 
as the legislation is consistent with the pay-as-you-go 
principle.
            Sec. 313. Reserve fund for the surface transportation 
                    reauthorization
      The reserve fund accommodates additional contract 
authority for the reauthorization of highway construction, 
highway safety and mass transit programs or other 
transportation-related legislation on the condition that the 
Highway Trust Fund continues to fully meet its obligations. 
While the eventual funding needs for the upcoming highway and 
transit bill are not yet known, the reserve fund will provide 
flexibility to adjust the Transportation and Infrastructure 
Committee's allocation provided that the solvency of the 
Highway Trust Fund is maintained.
            Sec. 314. Current policy reserve fund for Medicare 
                    improvements
      The reserve fund accommodates additional mandatory 
spending to reform the Medicare physician payment system. The 
reserve fund supports legislation to change incentives to 
encourage efficiency and higher quality care in a way that 
supports fiscal sustainability, to improve payment accuracy to 
encourage efficient use of resources and ensure that primary 
care receives appropriate compensation, to improve coordination 
of care among all providers serving a patient in all 
appropriate settings, or to hold providers accountable for 
their utilization patterns and quality of care.
      The reserve fund allows Medicare physician payment reform 
legislation's costs to be measured against current policy, that 
is assuming the payment rates in effect for physicians for 2009 
will stay in effect through 2019. This assumption is consistent 
with the President's budget and is based on Congressional 
actions in recent years to prevent cuts in physician payments 
that would otherwise be required by the Sustainable Growth Rate 
(SGR) formula. However, like the President's budget, the budget 
resolution does not intend this assumption as a reflection of 
future policy. Instead, the assumption represents a realistic 
and meaningful benchmark against which to measure the fiscal 
effects of legislation reforming the Medicare physician payment 
system.
      After the House has adopted a measure to impose statutory 
pay-as-you-go requirements, or when a bill utilizing this 
reserve fund includes provisions to impose statutory pay-as-
you-go requirements, Section 401(a) of the House resolution 
directs the chairman of the Budget Committee to make current 
policy adjustments before evaluating the costs of the Medicare 
bill for compliance with House budget rules and procedures. The 
adjustments may be made only for the purposes and in the 
amounts provided in this reserve fund.
      The SGR formula limits how much total physician 
compensation can grow every year. The SGR formula has required 
payment rate cuts every year since 2002. Since 2003, Congress 
has enacted legislation to prevent these rate cuts from taking 
effect, one or two years at a time. Consequently, history has 
shown that the current statutory baseline as it relates to 
Medicare physician payments is unrealistic. Under current law, 
physicians face a 21 percent cut in their Medicare payment rate 
in 2010, and further cuts for several years after that. Cuts of 
this magnitude could destabilize the Medicare program and 
present serious access problems for Medicare beneficiaries.
            Sec. 315. Current policy reserve fund for middle class tax 
                    relief
      The reserve fund allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to adjust the House resolution aggregates and 
allocations to reflect current policy for certain provisions of 
the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 for middle class tax relief. 
The reserve fund supports the extension of middle class tax 
relief such as the 10 percent individual income tax bracket, 
marriage penalty relief, the child credit at $1,000 and partial 
refundability of the credit, education incentives, other 
incentives for middle class families and children, and other 
reductions or adjustments to individual income tax brackets, as 
well as small business tax relief.
      After the House has adopted a measure to impose statutory 
pay-as-you-go requirements, or when a bill utilizing this 
reserve fund includes provisions to impose statutory pay-as-
you-go requirements, Section 401(a) of the House resolution 
directs the chairman of the Budget Committee to make current 
policy adjustments to the baseline before evaluating the costs 
of the tax bill for compliance with House budget rules and 
procedures. The adjustments may be made only for the purposes 
and in the amounts provided in this reserve fund.
            Sec. 316. Current policy reserve fund for reform of the 
                    alternative minimum tax (AMT)
      The reserve fund allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to adjust the resolution aggregates and allocations 
to reflect current policy for the alternative minimum tax (AMT) 
for one additional year. The reserve fund would support 
immediate AMT relief so that tens of millions of working 
families will not become subject to it in tax year 2010. 
Without reform, the number of taxpayers subject to the AMT will 
rise from 4 million in 2010 to 28 million in 2010, according to 
the Congressional Budget Office. The House resolution would 
accommodate further, deficit-neutral relief from the AMT.
      After the House has adopted a measure to impose statutory 
pay-as-you-go requirements, or when a bill utilizing this 
reserve fund includes provisions to impose statutory pay-as-
you-go requirements, Section 401(a) of the House resolution 
directs the chairman of the Budget Committee to make current 
policy adjustments to the baseline before evaluating the costs 
of the tax bill for compliance with House budget rules and 
procedures. The adjustments may be made only for the purposes 
and in the amounts provided in this reserve fund.
            Sec. 317. Current policy reserve fund for reform of the 
                    Estate and Gift Tax
      The reserve fund allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to adjust the resolution aggregates and allocations 
to reflect current policy by extending the law as in effect for 
2009 for the Estate and Gift Tax. The reserve fund supports 
continuation of 2009 policy so that only a minute fraction of 
estates will owe tax.
      After the House has adopted a measure to impose statutory 
pay-as-you-go requirements, or when a bill utilizing this 
reserve fund includes provisions to impose statutory pay-as-
you-go requirements, Section 401(a) of the House resolution 
directs the chairman of the Budget Committee to make current 
policy adjustments to the baseline before evaluating the costs 
of the tax bill for compliance with House budget rules and 
procedures. The adjustments may be made only for the purposes 
and in the amounts provided in this reserve fund.
Conference Agreement
      Title III of the conference agreement contains reserve 
funds.
            Subtitle A: Senate reserve funds
      Subtitle A of the conference agreement contains the 
following reserve funds that apply only in the Senate:
            Sec. 301. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to transform 
        and modernize America's health care system (Secs. 201 
        and 220 of the Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to invest in 
        clean energy and preserve the environment (Secs. 202, 
        213, 221, 240 and 246 of the Senate-passed resolution, 
        as modified)
            Sec. 303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for higher 
        education (Sec. 203 of the Senate-passed resolution, as 
        modified)
            Sec. 304. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child 
        nutrition and WIC (Sec. 204 of the Senate-passed 
        resolution)
            Sec. 305. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        investments in America's infrastructure (Secs. 205 and 
        206(d) of the Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 306. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote 
        economic stabilization and growth (Sec. 206 of the 
        Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 307. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        America's veterans and wounded servicemembers (Sec. 207 
        of the Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 308. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for judicial 
        pay and judgeships, postal retiree assistance, and 
        certain pension obligations (Secs. 208 and 230 of the 
        Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 309. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for defense 
        acquisition and Federal contracting reform (Secs. 209, 
        223, 232 and 301(c)(2)(E) of the Senate-passed 
        resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 310. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        investments in our Nation's counties and schools (Sec. 
        210 of the Senate-passed resolution)
            Sec. 311. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Food 
        and Drug Administration (Sec. 211 of the Senate-passed 
        resolution)
            Sec. 312. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a 
        comprehensive investigation into the current financial 
        crisis (Sec. 214 of the Senate-passed resolution)
            Sec. 313. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        increased transparency at the Federal Reserve (Sec. 215 
        of the Senate-passed resolution)
            Sec. 314. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 21st 
        Century community learning centers (Sec. 228 of the 
        Senate-passed resolution)
            Sec. 315. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        provision of critical resources to firefighters and 
        fire departments (Sec. 231 of the Senate-passed 
        resolution)
            Sec. 316. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote 
        tax equity for States without personal income taxes, 
        and other selected tax relief policies (combines Sec. 
        238 and provisions from Sec. 206 of the Senate-passed 
        resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 317. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to promote 
        individual savings and financial security (Sec. 242 of 
        the Senate-passed resolution)
            Sec. 318. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to increase 
        FDIC and NCUA borrowing authority (Sec. 249 of the 
        Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 319. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        improving the well-being of children (Secs. 216, 227 
        and 235 of the Senate-passed resolution, as modified, 
        and Sec. 311 of the House-passed resolution, as 
        modified)
            Sec. 320. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a 9/11 
        health program (Sec. 306 of the House-passed 
        resolution, as modified)
            Subtitle B: House reserve funds
      Subtitle B of the conference agreement contains the 
following reserve funds that apply only in the House:
            Sec. 321. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for health 
        care reform (Sec. 301 of the House-passed resolution)
            Sec. 322. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for college 
        access, affordability, and completion (Sec. 302 of the 
        House-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 323. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        increasing energy independence (Sec. 303 of the House-
        passed resolution)
            Sec. 324. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        America's veterans and wounded servicemembers (Sec. 304 
        of the House-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 325. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for certain 
        tax relief (Sec. 305 of the House-passed resolution, as 
        modified)
            Sec. 326. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for a 9/11 
        health program (Sec. 306 of the House-passed 
        resolution)
            Sec. 327. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child 
        nutrition (Sec. 307 of the House-passed resolution)
            Sec. 328. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for 
        structural unemployment insurance reforms (Sec. 308 of 
        the House-passed resolution)
            Sec. 329. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for child 
        support (Sec. 309 of the House-passed resolution)
            Sec. 330. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the 
        Affordable Housing Trust Fund (Sec. 310 of the House-
        passed resolution)
            Sec. 331. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for home 
        visiting (Sec. 311 of the House-passed resolution, as 
        modified, and Sec. 227 of the Senate resolution, as 
        modified)
            Sec. 332. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for low-
        income home energy assistance program trigger (Sec. 312 
        of the House-passed resolution)
            Sec. 333. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for county 
        payments legislation (Sec. 210 of the Senate-passed 
        resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 334. Reserve fund for the surface 
        transportation reauthorization (Sec. 313 of the House-
        passed resolution)
      Each House reserve fund references the time periods in 
clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives. This citation references the House pay-as-you-
go rule, as opposed to specific years. As long as the 
legislation described in the reserve fund complies with the 
House pay-as-you-go rule, the chairman may make the applicable 
adjustment.
      The House-passed budget resolution included current 
policy adjustments in Sections 314, 315, 316, and 317. The 
adjustments provided for in those reserve funds are addressed 
in the conference agreement in the budget process title under 
Section 421 (Adjustments for Direct Spending and Revenues).

                             BUDGET PROCESS

      The Senate and the House use enforcement provisions to 
ensure that legislation is consistent with the budget plan set 
forth in the budget resolution. The conference agreement 
contains enforcement provisions for the Senate and House to 
accommodate the procedures that apply to consideration of 
legislation in each chamber.
Senate-passed Resolution
      The FY2008 and FY2009 budget resolutions included many 
important enforcement provisions which remain in effect in the 
Senate. These include:
2008 Budget Resolution (S. Con. Res. 21)
             The Senate pay-as-you-go point of order 
        (Sec. 201);
             The 60-vote point of order against 
        reconciliation increasing the deficit (Sec 202); and
             Continued 60-vote enforcement of budgetary 
        points of order in the Senate (Sec. 205).
2009 Budget Resolution (S. Con. Res. 70)
             The 60-vote point of order against 
        legislation increasing long-term deficits (Sec. 311); 
        and
             The 60-vote point of order against 
        provisions of appropriations legislation that 
        constitute changes in mandatory programs (Sec. 314).
      The Senate-passed resolution for 2010, S. Con. Res. 13, 
continues the strong budget enforcement practices of the last 
two budget resolutions with the following modifications.
            Subtitle A--Budget Enforcement
            Sec. 301. Discretionary spending caps
      The Senate-passed resolution would strengthen fiscal 
responsibility by establishing discretionary spending limits 
for 2009 and 2010, and enforcing them with a point of order in 
the Senate that could only be waived with 60 votes. For 2009, 
it provides a cap of $1,391.5 billion in budget authority and 
$1,220.8 billion in outlays. For 2010, it sets a cap of 
$1,079.1 billion in budget authority and $1,268.1 billion in 
outlays. As in past years, the Senate-passed resolution permits 
adjustments to the discretionary spending limits in 2010 for 
program integrity initiatives, such as Social Security 
Administration continuing disability reviews (CDRs) and 
Supplemental Security Income redeterminations, enhanced 
Internal Revenue Service tax enforcement to address the tax 
gap, appropriations for Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control 
(HCFAC) program at the Department of Health and Human Services, 
and unemployment insurance improper payments reviews at the 
Department of Labor. It also provides for adjustments in 2010 
for expenses related to overseas contingency operations.
      The Senate-passed resolution also includes a program 
integrity cap adjustment dedicated to reducing waste in defense 
contracting by recovering overpayments to defense contractors, 
reducing wasteful spending that undermines our ability to 
purchase equipment needed for U.S. troops and combating fraud. 
It allows the Chairman of the Budget Committee to increase the 
discretionary spending cap by up to $100 million to accommodate 
legislation appropriating funding for the Department of Defense 
for additional activities to reduce waste, fraud, abuse and 
overpayments in defense contracting or to enhance the 
capability of the defense acquisition or contracting workforce 
to save taxpayer resources.
      The Senate-passed resolution permits the Chairman to 
adjust the discretionary spending limits, budget aggregates, 
and allocations, if the CBO re-estimates the President's 2010 
request for discretionary spending at an aggregate level 
different from the CBO preliminary estimate dated March 20, 
2009.
            Sec. 302. Advance appropriations
      As in past years, the Senate-passed resolution provides a 
supermajority point of order in the Senate against 
appropriations in 2010 bills that would first become effective 
in any year after 2010, and against appropriations in 2011 
bills that would first become effective in any year after 2011. 
It does not apply against appropriations for the Corporation 
for Public Broadcasting or Department of Veterans Affairs for 
the Medical Services, Medical Administration, Medical 
Facilities, and Medical and Prosthetic Research accounts of the 
Veterans Health Administration, nor does it apply against 
changes in mandatory programs or deferrals of mandatory budget 
authority from one year to the next. There is an exemption for 
each of 2010 and 2011 of up to $28.852 billion (the same level 
as provided for in the 2009 Budget Resolution) for the 
following:

      ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE SENATE

      Labor, HHS:
            Employment and Training Administration
            Job Corps
            Education for the Disadvantaged
            School Improvement
            Children and Family Services (Head Start)
            Special Education
            Career, Technical, and Adult Education
      Financial Services and General Government: Payment to 
Postal Service
      Transportation, Housing and Urban Development: Tenant-
based Rental Assistance Project-based Rental Assistance
            Sec. 303. Emergency legislation
      The Senate-passed resolution makes technical changes in 
the emergency legislation designation to provide consistent 
treatment for emergency legislation with respect to enforcement 
of various points of order and revisions pursuant to deficit-
neutral reserve funds.
            Sec. 304. Point of order against legislation increasing 
                    short-term deficit
      The Senate-passed resolution updates the expiration date 
in the point of order against legislation that increases the 
short-term deficit.
            Sec. 305. Point of order against appropriations legislation 
                    that includes provisions affecting the crime 
                    victims fund
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a new 60-vote point 
of order that applies to appropriations legislation containing 
one or more provisions that constitute a change in a mandatory 
program that affects the Crime Victims Fund, section 1402 of 
the Victims of Crime Act of 1984 (42 U.S.C. 10601).
            Sec. 306. Point of order against increasing revenues beyond 
                    the levels set in the budget resolution through a 
                    widespread tax increase on taxpayers with incomes 
                    below $200,000 or married couples with incomes 
                    below $250,000
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would cause revenues to 
exceed the levels set in the budget resolution and include a 
tax increase that would have widespread applicability on 
taxpayers with incomes below $200,000 or married couples with 
incomes below $250,000. The point of order could be waived with 
60 votes.
            Sec. 307. Point of order against increasing certain federal 
                    income tax rates
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would increase certain 
federal tax rates. The point of order could be waived with 60 
votes.
            Sec. 308. Point of order against legislation increasing 
                    energy taxes on middle-income taxpayers
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would increase energy taxes 
on middle-income taxpayers. The point of order could be waived 
with 60 votes.
            Sec. 309. Point of order against legislation imposing a 
                    marriage tax penalty
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would result in a greater 
Federal income tax liability for taxpayers filing a joint 
return than if such taxpayers were unmarried and had filed 
individual tax returns. The point of order could be waived with 
60 votes.
            Sec. 310. Point of order against legislation causing 
                    revenues to increase above the levels set in the 
                    budget resolution
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would cause revenues to be 
more than the level of revenues established in the budget 
resolution. The point of order could be waived with 60 votes.
            Sec. 311. Point of order against increasing taxes while 
                    unemployment rate is above 5.8 percent
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against considering legislation that would increase 
taxes if the unemployment rate exceeds 5.8 percent. The point 
of order could be waived with 60 votes.
            Sec. 312. Point of order against legislation that causes 
                    significant job loss
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would cause revenues to be 
more than the level of revenues set forth for the applicable 
years in the resolution or would cause significant job loss in 
manufacturing or coal dependent regions of the United States.
            Sec. 313. Point of order against legislation that would 
                    permit the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to recover 
                    from a private health insurer of a disabled veteran 
                    amounts paid for treatment of such disability
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would permit the Secretary 
of Veterans Affairs to recover from a private health insurer of 
a disabled veteran amounts paid for treatment of such 
disability.
            Sec. 314. Point of order against legislation weakening 
                    terrorism laws
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that would weaken or eliminate 
anti-terrorism tools or investigative methods.
            Sec. 315. Restrictions on unfunded mandates on state and 
                    local governments
      This section of the Senate-passed resolution increases 
from a simple majority to three-fifths of all members duly 
sworn and chosen the number of Senators necessary to waive a 
point of order under section 424(a)(1) of the Congressional 
Budget Act.
            Sec. 316. Point of order on legislation that eliminates the 
                    ability of Americans to keep their health plan or 
                    their choice of doctor
      The Senate-passed resolution includes a point of order in 
the Senate against legislation that eliminates the ability of 
Americans to keep their health plan or their choice of doctor 
as determined by the Congressional Budget Office. The point of 
order could be waived with 60 votes.
            Subtitle B--Other Provisions
            Sec. 321. Oversight of government performance
      The Senate-passed resolution continues the provision 
instructing Committees of the Senate to review programs within 
their jurisdiction to root out waste, fraud, and abuse in 
program spending, giving particular scrutiny to issues raised 
by Government Accountability Office reports, and include 
recommendations for improved governmental performance in their 
annual views and estimates reports required under section 
301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to the Senate 
Committee on the Budget.
            Sec. 322. Budgetary treatment of certain discretionary 
                    administrative expenses
      The Senate-passed resolution continues the provision 
requiring that all budget resolutions include the 
Administrative Expenses of the Social Security Administration 
and of the Postal Service in the 302(a) allocations of the 
Appropriations Committee.
            Sec. 323. Application and effect of changes in allocations 
                    and aggregates
      The Senate-passed resolution details the adjustment 
procedures required to accommodate legislation provided for in 
this resolution, and requires adjustments made to be printed in 
the Congressional Record. For purposes of enforcement, the 
levels resulting from adjustments made pursuant to this 
resolution will have the same effect as if adopted in the 
levels of Title I of this resolution. The Committee on the 
Budget determines the budgetary levels and estimates required 
to enforce budgetary points of order, including those pursuant 
to this resolution and the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
            Sec. 324. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and 
                    definitions
      The Senate-passed resolution allows the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget to adjust levels in this resolution 
upon the enactment of legislation that changes concepts or 
definitions.
            Secs. 325 and 326. Debt disclosure
      These sections reflect an amendment adopted in the 
Committee on the Budget regarding the levels of debt assumed in 
the budget resolution and to require budget resolutions to 
contain a debt disclosure section.
            Sec. 327. Exercise of rulemaking powers
      This section of the Senate-passed resolution recognizes 
that the provisions of this resolution are adopted pursuant to 
the rulemaking power of the Senate, and also recognizes the 
Constitutional right of the Senate to change those rules as 
they apply to the Senate.
House-passed Resolution
            Sec. 401. Adjustments for Direct Spending and Revenues
      After the House has acted upon a measure to impose 
statutory pay-as-you-go requirements, or when a bill listed in 
a current policy reserve fund includes provisions to impose 
statutory pay-as-you-go requirements, subsection (a) of this 
section of the House resolution directs the chairman of the 
Budget Committee to make current policy adjustments to the 
baseline before evaluating the costs of certain measures for 
compliance with House budget rules and procedures. The 
adjustments may be made only for the purposes and in the 
amounts provided in a current policy reserve fund. Four current 
policy reserve funds appear in title III of the House 
resolution as sections 314, 315, 316, and 317.
      Subsection (b) allows the chairman of the House Budget 
Committee to adjust the 302(a) allocation to the Appropriations 
Committee if changes to the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance 
Program (reflected in the House resolution's mandatory spending 
totals) are not funded in an authorization bill and are 
included instead in an appropriations measure.
      Subsection (c) updates and reinstates a provision of the 
Budget Enforcement Act of 1990. The chairman of the House 
Budget Committee is directed to exempt from the calculation of 
the cost of any measure any budgetary effects of legislative 
provisions that affect the full funding of the federal deposit 
insurance guarantee.
            Sec. 402. Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits
      Section 402 of the House resolution provides for specific 
allocation adjustments for the Committee on Appropriations when 
the Committee reports legislation that includes increased 
appropriations for the following program integrity initiatives: 
(1) program integrity initiatives at the Social Security 
Administration; (2) Internal Revenue Service tax compliance; 
(3) the health care fraud and abuse control program at the 
Department of Health and Human Services; and (4) unemployment 
insurance in-person reemployment and eligibility assessments 
and improper payment reviews. In addition, a new program 
integrity adjustment has been added this year to create the 
Partnership Fund for Program Integrity at the Office of 
Management and Budget for program integrity pilot initiatives 
across federal agencies. This adjustment is intended to develop 
new ideas to promote administrative efficiency gains and 
reductions in erroneous payments.
      The adjustments under this section are primarily intended 
to provide additional administrative funding for current 
program integrity activities to eliminate errors or fraud in 
the operation of a number of federal programs and to promote 
compliance with federal tax laws. For example, the adjustment 
for unemployment compensation programs is provided to increase 
limited administrative funding for current program integrity 
activities, and not to finance other proposals that would 
adversely affect workers who have received unemployment 
benefits. The section outlines procedures for these allocation 
adjustments.
      This section also incorporates a procedure whereby 
provisions or measures reported by the Committee on 
Appropriations will be exempt in certain circumstances from 
compliance with titles III and IV of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974 and the budget resolution. Such an exemption 
applies if: (1) the Committee on Appropriations determines and 
designates that amounts appropriated are necessary for overseas 
deployments and related activities; or (2) the Committee on 
Appropriations provides discretionary appropriations and 
designates those amounts as necessary to meet emergency needs.
            Sec. 403. Advance Appropriations
      Section 403 of the House resolution limits the amount and 
type of advance appropriations for fiscal years 2011 and 2012. 
Under this section, advance appropriations for fiscal year 2011 
are restricted to $28.852 billion for the programs, projects, 
activities, or accounts listed below. Advances for 2012 are 
listed separately. The section defines advance appropriations 
as any new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill or 
joint resolution making general or continuing appropriations 
for fiscal year 2010 that first becomes available for any 
fiscal year after 2010.
      Advance Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2011:
            Employment and Training Administration
            Office of Job Corps
            Education for the Disadvantaged
            School Improvement Programs
            Special Education
            Career, Technical and Adult Education
            Payment to Postal Service
            Tenant-based Rental Assistance
            Project-based Rental Assistance
            Advance Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2012:
            The Corporation for Public Broadcasting
            Sec. 404. Oversight of Government Performance
      Section 404 of the House resolution encourages all 
committees of the House to conduct rigorous oversight hearings 
to root out waste, fraud, and abuse in federal programs, with 
particular attention to issues raised by the Office of the 
Inspector General or the Government Accountability Office. 
Based on these oversight efforts, such recommendations should 
be included in the views and estimates reports submitted to the 
Budget Committee under section 301(d) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974.
            Sec. 405. Budgetary Treatment of Certain Discretionary 
                    Administrative Expenses
      Section 405 of the House resolution provides that 
administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration 
and of the Postal Service shall be part of the annual 
appropriations process by including those expenses in the 
allocation to the Committee on Appropriations pursuant to 
section 302 of the Congressional Budget Act.
            Sec. 406. Application and Effect of Changes in Allocations 
                    and Aggregates
      Section 406 of the House resolution details the 
allocation and aggregate adjustment procedures that are 
required to accommodate legislation for the reserve funds and 
program integrity initiatives in the House resolution. This 
section provides that the adjustments shall apply while the 
legislation is under consideration and take effect upon 
enactment of the legislation. In addition, the section requires 
the adjustments to be printed in the Congressional Record.
      The section also notes that, for purposes of enforcement, 
aggregate and allocation levels resulting from adjustments made 
pursuant to the House resolution will have the same effect as 
if adopted in the original levels of Title I of this budget 
resolution. This section also provides that the Committee on 
the Budget shall determine the budgetary levels and estimates 
which are required to enforce points of order under the 
Congressional Budget Act.
            Sec. 407. Adjustments to Reflect Changes in Concepts and 
                    Definitions
      Section 407 of the House resolution requires the chairman 
of the Committee on the Budget to adjust levels and allocations 
in the budget resolution upon enactment of legislation that 
changes concepts or definitions.
            Sec. 408. Exercise of Rulemaking Powers
      Section 408 of the House resolution provides that, once 
adopted, the provisions of the budget resolution are 
incorporated into the rules of the House of Representatives and 
shall supersede inconsistent rules. The section recognizes the 
constitutional right of the House of Representatives to change 
those rules at any time.
Conference Agreement
      Title IV contains the following budget process and 
enforcement provisions:
            Subtitle A--Senate Provisions
      The FY2008 and FY2009 budget resolutions included many 
important enforcement provisions which remain in effect in the 
Senate. These include:
      2008 Budget Resolution (S. Con. Res. 21)
               The Senate pay-as-you-go point of order 
        (Sec. 201);
               The 60-vote point of order against 
        reconciliation increasing the deficit (Sec 202); and
               Continued 60-vote enforcement of 
        budgetary points of order in the Senate (Sec. 205).
      2009 Budget Resolution (S. Con. Res. 70)
               The 60-vote point of order against 
        legislation increasing long-term deficits (Sec. 311); 
        and
               The 60-vote point of order against 
        provisions of appropriations legislation that 
        constitute changes in mandatory programs (Sec. 314).
Part I--Budget Enforcement
            Sec. 401. Discretionary spending limits, program integrity 
                    initiatives, and other adjustments (Sec. 301 of the 
                    Senate-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 402. Point of order against advance appropriations 
                    (Sec. 302 of the Senate-passed resolution, as 
                    modified)

      ACCOUNTS IDENTIFIED FOR ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS IN THE SENATE

      Labor, HHS:
              Employment and Training Administration
              Job Corps
              Education for the Disadvantaged
              School Improvement
            Children and Family Services (Head Start)
              Special Education
              Career, Technical, and Adult Education
      Financial Services and General Government: Payment to 
Postal Service
      Transportation, Housing and Urban Development: Tenant-
based Rental Assistance, Project-based Rental Assistance
            Sec. 403. Emergency legislation (Sec. 303 of the Senate-
                    passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 404. Point of order against legislation increasing 
                    short-term deficit (Sec. 304 of the Senate-passed 
                    resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 405. Point of order against certain legislation 
                    related to surface transportation funding
Part II--Other Provisions
            Sec. 411. Oversight of Government performance (Sec. 321 of 
                    the Senate-passed resolution)
      To support the President's commitment to eliminate 
ineffective or duplicative federal programs, the Senate adopted 
amendments to set standards to identify failing federal 
programs and to review inefficient programs. This section 
retains the requirement of the Senate-passed resolution 
requiring that committees of the Senate review programs to root 
out waste, fraud, and abuse, giving particular scrutiny to 
issues raised by Government Accountability Office reports.
            Sec. 412. Budgetary treatment of certain discretionary 
                    administrative expenses (Sec. 322 of the Senate-
                    passed resolution)
            Sec. 413. Application and effect of changes in allocations 
                    and aggregates (Sec. 323 of the Senate-passed 
                    resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 414. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and 
                    definitions (Sec. 324 of the Senate-passed 
                    resolution)
            Sec. 415. Exercise of rulemaking powers (Sec. 302 of the 
                    Senate-passed resolution)
            Subtitle B--House Enforcement Provisions
            Sec. 421. Adjustments for direct spending and revenues--
            Sec. 421(a).--Adjustments for current policy
      This subsection provides that after the House has adopted 
a measure to impose statutory paygo requirements (or if such 
measure is included as part of the legislation under 
consideration), the Chairman of the House Budget Committee may 
make current policy adjustments to the baseline before 
evaluating the costs of certain measures for compliance with 
House budget rules and procedures. The adjustments may only be 
made for the purposes and in the amounts provided in paragraph 
(a)(2). This subsection, as revised, replaces sections 314, 
315, 316 and 317 of the House-passed resolution. Subsection 
(a)(4) allows the chairman of the House Budget Committee to 
adjust the 302(a) allocations and aggregates as may be 
necessary to reflect the current policy adjustments.
            Sec. 421(b).--Deposit insurance (Sec. 401(c) of the House-
                    passed resolution)
            Sec. 422. Adjustments to discretionary spending (Sec. 402 
                    of the House-passed resolution, as modified)
            Sec. 423. Costs of overseas deployments and emergency needs 
                    (Sec. 402(b) of the House-passed resolution, as 
                    modified)
            Sec. 424. Point of order against advance appropriations 
                    (Sec. 403 of the House-passed resolution, as 
                    modified)
      Accounts identified for advance appropriations in the 
House:
      Sec. 424(b)(1) Advance Appropriations for Fiscal Year 
2011:
              Employment and Training Administration
              Office of Job Corps
              Education for the Disadvantaged
              School Improvement Programs
              Special Education
              Career, Technical and Adult Education
              Payment to Postal Service
              Tenant-based Rental Assistance
              Project-based Rental Assistance
      Sec. 424(b)(1) Advance Appropriations for Fiscal Year 
2012:
              The Corporation for Public Broadcasting
      Sec. 424(b)(2) Advance Appropriations for Fiscal Year 
2011:
              VA--Medical Services
              VA--Medical Support and Compliance
              VA--Medical Facilities
            Sec. 425. Oversight of Government Performance (Sec. 404 of 
                    the House-passed resolution)
            Sec. 426. Budgetary Treatment of Certain Discretionary 
                    Administrative Expenses (Sec. 405 of the House-
                    passed resolution)
            Sec. 427. Application and Effects of Changes in Allocations 
                    and Aggregates (Sec. 406 of the House-passed 
                    resolution)
            Sec. 428. Adjustments to Reflect Changes In Concepts and 
                    Definitions (Sec. 407 of the House-passed 
                    resolution)
            Sec. 429. Exercise of Rulemaking Powers (Sec. 408 of the 
                    House-passed resolution)

                                 POLICY

Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate-passed resolution did not contain a policy 
statement title.
House-passed Resolution
      Title V of the House-passed resolution contains the 
following policy sections:
              Sec. 501. Policy on middle-class tax relief and 
        revenues 
              Sec. 502. Policy on defense priorities 
Conference Agreement
      Title V of the conference agreement contains the 
following policy sections, which apply to both Houses:
              Sec. 501. Policy on middle-class tax relief and 
        revenues (Sec. 501 of the House-passed resolution, as 
        modified)
              Sec. 502. Policy on defense priorities (Sec. 502 
        of the House-passed resolution, as modified)

                SENSE OF THE SENATE, HOUSE AND CONGRESS

Senate-passed Resolution
      The Senate resolution did not contain a sense of the 
Senate title.
House-passed Resolution
      Title VI of the House-passed resolution contains the 
following Sense of the House sections:
              Sec. 601. Sense of the House on veterans' and 
        servicemembers' health care
              Sec. 602. Sense of the House on homeland security
              Sec. 603. Sense of the House on promoting 
        American innovation and economic competitiveness
              Sec. 604. Sense of the House regarding pay parity
              Sec. 605. Sense of the House on college 
        affordability
              Sec. 606. Sense of the House on Great Lakes 
        restoration
              Sec. 607. Sense of the House regarding the 
        importance of child support enforcement
Conference Agreement
      Title VI of the conference agreement contains the 
following Sense of Congress provisions:
              Sec. 601. Sense of the Congress on veterans' and 
        servicemembers' health care (Sec. 601 of the House-
        passed resolution, as modified)
              Sec. 602. Sense of the Congress on homeland 
        security (Sec. 602 of the House-passed resolution, as 
        modified)
              Sec. 603. Sense of the Congress on promoting 
        American innovation and economic competitiveness (Sec. 
        603 of the House-passed resolution, as modified)
              Sec. 604. Sense of the Congress regarding pay 
        parity (Sec. 604 of the House-passed resolution, as 
        modified)
              Sec. 605. Sense of the Congress on college 
        affordability and student loan reform (Sec. 605 of the 
        House-passed resolution, as modified)
              Sec. 606. Sense of the Congress on Great Lakes 
        restoration (Sec. 606 of the House-passed resolution, 
        as modified)
              Sec. 607. Sense of the Congress regarding the 
        importance of child support enforcement (Sec. 607 of 
        the House-passed resolution, as modified)

                          ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS

      Section 301(g)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires that the joint explanatory statement accompanying a 
conference report on a budget resolution set forth the common 
economic assumptions upon which the joint statement and 
conference report are based. The conference agreement is built 
upon the economic forecasts developed by the Congressional 
Budget Office, as updated in March 2009 to include the 
forecasted economic effects of the fiscal stimulus package.
Senate-passed Resolution
      CBO's economic assumptions were used.
House-passed Resolution
      CBO's economic assumptions were used.
Conference Agreement
      CBO's economic assumptions were used.

                                  ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS OF THE BUDGET RESOLUTION
                                                [Calendar Years]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   2009    2010    2011    2012    2013    2014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Real GDP, Percent Change, Year Over Year........................    -3.0     2.9     4.0     4.1     4.0     3.5
GDP Price Index, Percent Change, Year Over Year.................     1.5     0.8     0.5     0.6     0.6     0.9
Consumer Prices, Percent Change, Year Over Year.................    -0.7     1.4     1.2     1.0     1.0     1.2
Unemployment Rate, Percent, Yearly Average......................     8.8     9.0     7.7     6.6     5.7     5.1
3-Month Treasury Bill Rate, Percent, Yearly Average.............     0.3     0.9     1.8     3.0     3.9     4.4
10-Year Treasury Bond Rate, Percent, Yearly Average.............     2.9     3.4     4.0     4.6     5.0     5.3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              ALLOCATIONS

      As required in section 302 of the Congressional Budget 
Act, the joint statement of managers includes an allocation, 
based on the conference agreement, of total budget authority 
and total budget outlays among each of the appropriate 
committees. The allocations are as follows:


   PAY-AS-YOU-GO SCORECARD FOR THE SENATE REFLECTING LEVELS FOR THE 
                          CONFERENCE AGREEMENT

      Period of the current fiscal year, the budget year, and 
the four fiscal years following the budget year: $0.
      Period of the current fiscal year, the budget year, and 
the nine fiscal years following the budget year: $0.

        RULE XXVIII OF THE RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

      The adoption of this conference agreement by the two 
houses would result in the engrossment of a House joint 
resolution changing the statutory limit on the public debt 
pursuant to clause 3 of rule XXVIII of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives. The rule requires a joint resolution in the 
following form:

      Resolved, by the Senate and the House of Representatives 
of the United States in Congress assembled, that subsection (b) 
of section 3101 of title 31, United States Code, is amended by 
striking out the dollar limitation contained in such subsection 
and inserting in lieu thereof $13,029,000,000,000.

      Legislative jurisdiction over the public debt remains 
with the Finance Committee in the Senate and the Committee on 
Ways and Means in the House.
                                   John M. Spratt, Jr.,
                                   Rosa L. DeLauro,
                                   Allen Boyd,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Kent Conrad,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.