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111th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    111-248

======================================================================



 
            WIND ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2009

                                _______
                                

 September 8, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3165]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 3165) to provide for a program of wind 
energy research, development, and demonstration, and for other 
purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon 
with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do 
pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Bill............................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................3
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................3
  IV. Hearing Summary.................................................4
   V. Committee Actions...............................................5
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................6
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis.....................................7
VIII. Committee Views.................................................7
  IX. Cost Estimate...................................................8
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate.......................9
  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4...............................10
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............10
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........10
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................10
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................10
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................10
XVII. Earmark Identification.........................................10
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........10

 XIX. Committee Recommendations......................................10
  XX. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup.........................11
 XXI. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................27

                                I. Bill

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Wind Energy Research and Development 
Act of 2009''.

SEC. 2. WIND ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--The Secretary of Energy shall carry out a program of 
research and development to--
          (1) improve the energy efficiency, reliability, and capacity 
        of wind turbines;
          (2) optimize the design and adaptability of wind energy 
        systems to the broadest practical range of atmospheric 
        conditions; and
          (3) reduce the cost of construction, generation, and 
        maintenance of wind energy systems.
  (b) Program.--The program under this section shall focus on research 
and development of--
          (1) new materials and designs to make larger, lighter, less 
        expensive, and more reliable rotor blades;
          (2) technologies to improve gearbox performance and 
        reliability;
          (3) automation, materials, and assembly of large-scale 
        components to reduce manufacturing costs;
          (4) low-cost transportable towers greater than 100 meters in 
        height to capitalize on improved wind conditions at higher 
        elevations;
          (5) advanced computational modeling tools to improve--
                  (A) the reliability of aeroelastic simulations of 
                wind energy systems;
                  (B) understanding of the interaction between each 
                wind turbine component;
                  (C) siting of wind energy systems to maximize 
                efficiency and minimize variable generation;
                  (D) integration of wind energy systems into the 
                existing electric grid to ensure reliability; and
                  (E) understanding of the wake effect between upwind 
                and downwind turbine operations;
          (6) advanced control systems and blade sensors to improve 
        performance and reliability under a wide variety of wind 
        conditions;
          (7) advanced generators, including--
                  (A) medium-speed and low-speed generators;
                  (B) direct-drive technology; and
                  (C) the use of advanced magnets in generator rotors;
          (8) wind technology for offshore applications;
          (9) methods to assess and mitigate the effects of wind energy 
        systems on radar and electromagnetic fields;
          (10) wind turbines with a maximum electric power production 
        capacity of 100 kilowatts or less;
          (11) technical processes to enable--
                  (A) scalability of transmission from remotely located 
                renewable resource rich areas; and
                  (B) optimization of advanced infrastructure design, 
                including high voltage transmission; and
          (12) other research areas as determined by the Secretary.

SEC. 3. WIND ENERGY DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--The Secretary of Energy shall conduct a wind energy 
demonstration program. In carrying out this section, the Secretary 
shall ensure that--
          (1) the program is of sufficient size and geographic 
        diversity to measure wind energy system performance under the 
        full productive range of wind conditions in the United States;
          (2) demonstration projects carried out under this program 
        are--
                  (A) conducted in collaboration with industry and, as 
                appropriate, with academic institutions; and
                  (B) located in various geographic areas representing 
                various wind class regimes; and
          (3) data collected from demonstration projects carried out 
        under this program is useful for carrying out section 2(b).
  (b) Cost-Sharing.--The Secretary shall carry out the program under 
this section in compliance with section 988(a) through (d) and section 
989 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 16352(a) through (d) 
and 16353).

SEC. 4. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY.

  In carrying out this Act, the Secretary of Energy shall--
          (1) coordinate with the Office of Minority Economic Impact 
        and with the Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business 
        Utilization; and
          (2) provide special consideration to applications submitted 
        by institutions, businesses, or entities containing majority 
        representation by individuals identified in section 33 or 34 of 
        the Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 
        1885a or 1885b).

SEC. 5. COMPETITIVE AWARDS.

  Awards under section 2 and section 3 shall be made on a competitive 
basis with an emphasis on technical merit.

SEC. 6. COORDINATION AND NONDUPLICATION.

  To the maximum extent practicable the Secretary of Energy shall 
coordinate activities under this Act with other programs of the 
Department of Energy and other Federal research programs.

SEC. 7. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Energy to 
carry out this Act $200,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2010 
through 2014.

                              II. Purpose

    The purpose of H.R. 3165, sponsored by Representative Paul 
Tonko, is to authorize a comprehensive research, development, 
and demonstration program to advance wind energy technologies.

              III. Background and Need for the Legislation

    According to a Department of Energy (DOE) report published 
in May 2008 entitled 20% Wind Energy by 2030, a much greater 
proportion of the nation's demand for electrical energy could 
be provided by exploiting our land-based and offshore wind 
resources. Factoring in environmental and other relevant land 
use exclusions, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 
determined that the top 12 states in wind energy potential 
could theoretically produce more than double the U.S.'s current 
annual generation of electricity. In order of their theoretical 
potential, these states are: North Dakota, Texas, Kansas, South 
Dakota, Montana, Nebraska, Wyoming, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, 
Colorado, and New Mexico.
    However, to expand from today's proportion of electric 
generation from wind (less than 2 percent) to a scenario where 
the U.S. generates 20 percent or more of its power from wind 
energy requires several significant advances including: 
improved wind turbine technology, improved wind forecasting 
capability, improved energy storage, and expansion of 
transmission systems to deliver wind power from resource 
centers to centers of population. In turn, these changes in the 
power generation and delivery process may involve changes in 
manufacturing, policy development, and environmental 
regulation.
    Overall performance of wind energy systems can be 
substantially improved to become more efficient, cost-
effective, and reliable. Fundamental technical issues remain 
even while wind power is competitive with coal and other 
conventional forms of energy in some markets. As a follow-up to 
DOE's wind energy report, the American Wind Energy Association 
(AWEA) Research and Development Committee produced a detailed 
Action Plan to 20% Wind Energy by 2030 in March 2009. This plan 
proposed $217 million in annual federal funding combined with a 
$224 million industry/state cost share to support specific 
research and development programs which the AWEA Committee 
believes are necessary to meet a goal of providing 20 percent 
of America's electricity from wind by 2030.
    This would be a significant increase from the DOE wind 
program's current annual budget of roughly $50 million, 
notwithstanding the one-time expenditure of $118 million 
currently identified by the Department for additional wind 
research and development activities from the American Recovery 
and Reinvestment Act of 2009. In recent years much of the 
federal wind program has focused on testing and evaluation of 
commercial turbines rather than advanced research, leading to 
gaps in our national wind R&D; portfolio. There is broad 
consensus among government, academic, and industry leaders that 
research areas in which greater federal support could have a 
considerable impact include:
           new materials and designs to make larger, 
        lighter, less expensive, and more reliable rotor 
        blades;
           advanced generators to improve the 
        efficiency of converting blade rotation to electric 
        power;
           automation, production materials, and 
        assembly of large-scale components to reduce 
        manufacturing costs;
           low-cost transportable towers greater than 
        100 meters in height to capitalize on improved wind 
        conditions at higher elevations;
           advanced computational tools to improve the 
        reliability of aeroelastic simulations of wind energy 
        systems; and
           advanced control systems and blade sensors 
        to improve performance and reliability under a wide 
        variety of wind conditions.
    H.R. 3165 authorizes research targeted to fulfill these 
areas of needed research. Providing federal support to address 
areas of common need for the wind industry will help us to 
reach the goal of increasing the proportion of electrical 
generation from wind resources.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    The Energy and Environment Subcommittee held a hearing in 
the 111th Congress on July 14, 2009 to receive testimony on 
H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 
2009, as well as solar research activities supported by the 
Department of Energy. Witnesses included:
    Mr. Steve Lockard, CEO of TPI Composites and co-chair of 
the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Research & 
Development Committee.
    Mr. John Saintcross, Energy and Environmental Markets 
Program Manager, New York State Energy Research and Development 
Authority.
    Prof. Andrew Swift, Director of the Wind Science and 
Engineering Research Center at Texas Tech University.
    Mr. Ken Zweibel, Director of the George Washington 
University Solar Institute.
    Ms. Nancy Bacon, Senior Advisor for United Solar Ovonic and 
Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.
    The hearing examined research, development, and 
demonstration needs for wind energy technologies from the 
perspective of the wind industry, government, and academic 
institutions.
    Mr. Lockard stated that both AWEA and his company endorse 
H.R. 3165 and urge Members to support its passage. He noted 
that the bill was consistent with the findings of the Action 
Plan to 20% Wind Energy by 2030 produced in March 2009 by the 
AWEA Research & Development Committee he co-chairs.
    Mr. Saintcross explained that in his experience, wind 
energy systems still need to overcome several technical 
challenges as they attempt to meet a significant portion of New 
York State's renewable portfolio standard. He noted that the 
output from today's large wind turbines have consistently 
lagged announced expectations from their suppliers, and that 
improvements are needed in turbine gearbox efficiency, 
fabrication techniques, and diagnostic tools among other areas. 
Mr. Saintcross also stated that NYSERDA's research activities 
``could benefit greatly from co-funding from an increased 
federal wind technology budget as proposed in the legislation 
`Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 2009' being 
considered by the Committee.''
    Prof. Swift discussed ways that universities can work with 
national laboratories and the wind industry to advance wind 
energy system performance. He also described the wind 
industry's ongoing workforce development needs as well as 
technical issues including rotor design and control systems, 
advanced materials, and current gaps in the U.S.'s wind energy 
forecasting capabilities.

                          V. Committee Actions

    The Subcommittee on Energy and Environment met to consider 
H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 
2009, on July 21, 2009.
    Mr. Inglis offered an amendment to amend the list of areas 
to be focused on under the research and development program to 
include other research areas as determined by the Secretary. 
The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Lujan offered an amendment to add advanced 
computational modeling tools to improve siting of wind energy 
systems to maximize efficiency and minimize variable generation 
and to improve integration of wind energy systems into the 
existing electric grid to ensure reliability as areas to be 
focused on under the research and development program. The 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Baird moved that the Subcommittee favorably report H.R. 
3165, as amended, to the Full Committee. The motion was agreed 
to by voice vote.
    The Committee on Science and Technology met to consider 
H.R. 3165 on July 29, 2009.
    Mr. Neugebauer offered an amendment to ensure geographic 
diversity in wind energy demonstration projects and to add 
advanced computational modeling tools to improve understanding 
of the wake effect between upwind and downwind turbine 
operations as an area of research and development to be focused 
on under the research and development program. The amendment 
was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Smith of Nebraska offered an amendment to add 
scalability of transmission from remotely located renewable 
resource rich areas and optimization of advanced infrastructure 
design to the areas of research and development to be focused 
on under the research and development program. The amendment 
was agreed to by voice vote.
    Ms. Johnson of Texas offered an amendment to require the 
Secretary of Energy to coordinate with the Office of Minority 
Economic Impact and with the Office of Small and Disadvantaged 
Business Utilizations, and to provide special consideration to 
applications submitted by institutions, businesses, or entities 
containing majority representation by individuals identified in 
the Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act. The 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Bartlett offered an amendment to ensure that all awards 
are made on a competitive basis with an emphasis on technical 
merit. The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. McCaul offered an amendment instructing the Department 
of Energy to coordinate activities under this Act with other 
Federal research programs, to the maximum extent practicable. 
The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Gordon moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 3165, as amended, to the House. The motion was 
agreed to by a voice vote.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    H.R. 3165 requires the Secretary of Energy to carry out a 
program of research and development to: improve the energy 
efficiency, reliability, and capacity of wind turbines; 
optimize the design and adaptability of wind energy systems; 
and reduce the cost of construction, generation, and 
maintenance of wind energy systems.
    Specifically, the bill authorizes a program to focus on 
research and development of: (1) new materials and designs to 
make larger, lighter, less expensive, and more reliable motor 
blades; (2) technologies to improve gearbox performance and 
reliability; (3) automation, materials, and assembly of large-
scale components; (4) low-cost transportable towers greater 
than 100 meters in height; (5) advanced computational modeling 
tools; (6) advanced control systems and blade sensors; (7) 
advanced generators; (8) wind technology for offshore 
applications; (9) methods to assess and mitigate the effects of 
wind energy systems on radar and electromagnetic fields; (10) 
wind turbines with a maximum electric power production capacity 
of 100 kilowatts or less; (11) technical processes to enable 
scalability of transmission from remotely located renewable 
resource rich areas and optimization of advanced infrastructure 
design; and (12) other research areas as determined by the 
Secretary.
    H.R. 3165 also requires the Secretary of Energy to conduct 
a wind energy demonstration program. Under the bill, the 
Secretary is required to ensure that the program is of 
sufficient size and geographic diversity to measure wind energy 
performance under the full productive range of wind conditions 
in the United States and that data collected from demonstration 
projects is useful for carrying out the research and 
development program. The Secretary is also required to ensure 
that demonstration projects carried out under the program are 
conducted in collaboration with industry.
    The bill authorizes $200 million for each of fiscal years 
2010 through 2014 for these activities.

                    VII. Section-by-Section Analysis


Sec. 1. Short title

    Section 1 states that this Act may be cited as the ``Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act of 2009''.

Sec. 2. Wind energy research and development program

    Section 2(a) establishes the overall goals of the 
Department of Energy's wind energy research and development 
program.
    Section 2(b) identifies focus areas for this program, 
including: new materials and designs to make larger, lighter, 
less expensive, and more reliable rotor blades; advanced 
generators to improve the efficiency of converting blade 
rotation to electric power; advanced computational modeling 
tools; and innovative control systems and blade sensors to 
improve performance and reliability under a wide variety of 
wind conditions. It also authorizes the Secretary to pursue 
other promising wind energy research areas not explicitly 
identified in this section.

Sec. 3. Wind energy demonstration program

    Section 3 instructs the Secretary to carry out a 
significant wind energy demonstration program in collaboration 
with industry following enacted cost-sharing law.

Sec. 4. Equal opportunity

    Section 4 instructs the Secretary to provide special 
consideration to applications submitted by institutions, 
businesses, or entities containing majority representation by 
individuals identified in the Science and Engineering Equal 
Opportunities Act.

Sec. 5. Competitive awards

    Section 5 states that all awards shall be made on a 
competitive basis with an emphasis on technical merit.

Sec. 6. Coordination and nonduplication

    Section 6 instructs the Secretary to coordinate activities 
under this Act with other Federal research programs to the 
maximum extent practicable.

Sec. 7. Authorization of appropriations

    Section 7 authorizes to be appropriated to the Secretary of 
Energy to carry out this Act $200,000,000 for each of the 
fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

                         VIII. Committee Views

    The Committee notes that while wind power has emerged as 
the fastest growing renewable energy source in the country over 
the last several years, there are still many significant 
technical issues that need to be addressed before wind can 
serve as a large provider of baseload electricity in the United 
States. Several of these issues, such as the consistent 
underperformance of megawatt-scale turbines, have become more 
evident precisely because of the industry's recent growth. The 
Committee finds that the Department of Energy's current ongoing 
wind energy program, while providing strong on-site testing and 
evaluation services at the National Renewable Energy 
Laboratory, does not provide adequate resources or attention to 
address wind technologies' long-term, cross-cutting research 
needs. The Committee also finds that a larger, more 
geographically diverse demonstration program is required to 
advance these technologies and improve their cost-
competitiveness with fossil fuel-based energy sources as 
quickly as possible.
    The Committee believes that this bill represents a broad 
consensus of industry, academic, and government experts on 
today's wind energy research, development, and demonstration 
needs. H.R. 3165 is formally endorsed by the American Wind 
Energy Association and the House of Representatives Sustainable 
Energy and Environment Coalition. The Committee also believes 
that setting this robust, widely-vetted authorization level 
should be an important guide to future budget requests from the 
Administration, noting that no authorization level has been set 
in law for wind research and development since the Department 
of Energy's immediate predecessor, the Energy Research and 
Development Administration (ERDA), was established in 1975.
    In examining options to improve transmission from remotely 
located resource-rich areas, the Committee believes that the 
Department of Energy must fully explore and advance below-
ground technologies, including high temperature superconductors 
and high voltage direct current cables.
    The Committee notes that the Great Lakes, as well as other 
offshore locations throughout the United States, have 
significant wind energy potential. According to the U.S. 
Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory 
wind classifications, the Great Lakes have wind power 
classification ratings ranging from Excellent to Outstanding. 
Lake Erie presents unique opportunities for offshore wind 
technologies given it is the shallowest of the Great Lakes and 
is surrounded by major population centers and favorable 
electricity transmission interconnection points.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section X of this report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 3165 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. H.R. 
3165 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                                                   August 19, 2009.
Hon. Bart Gordon,
Chairman, Committee on Science and Technology,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act of 2009.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Jeff LaFave.
            Sincerely,
                                              Douglas W. Elmendorf.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 3165--Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 2009

    Summary: H.R. 3165 would authorize the appropriation of $1 
billion over the 2010-2014 period for a Department of Energy 
(DOE) research and development program to improve wind energy 
technologies. Assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts, 
CBO estimates that implementing the legislation would cost $880 
million over the 2010-2014 period and $120 million after 2014. 
Enacting the legislation would not affect direct spending or 
revenues.
    H.R. 3165 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 3165 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 250 
(general science, space, and technology).


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                         -------------------------------------------------------
                                                            2010     2011     2012     2013     2014   2010-2014
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level.....................................      200      200      200      200      200     1,000
Estimated Outlays.......................................      110      170      200      200      200       880
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes the bill 
will be enacted near the end of fiscal year 2009 and that the 
authorized amounts will be appropriated each year. Estimated 
outlays are based on historical spending patterns for DOE 
research programs.
    H.R. 3165 would authorize the appropriation of $200 million 
a year over the 2010-2014 period for research, development, and 
demonstration activities related to wind energy systems. 
Specifically, the bill would direct DOE to establish a research 
and development program to improve the efficiency of wind 
turbines, reduce the cost of wind energy systems, and conduct a 
demonstration program to measure the performance of wind energy 
systems at locations across the United States.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 3165 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Jeff LaFave; Impact on 
State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Ryan Miller; Impact on 
the Private Sector: Amy Petz.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 3165 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c) of House Rule XIII, the goal of 
H.R. 3165 is to authorize a comprehensive research, 
development, and demonstration program to advance wind energy 
technologies.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 3165.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 3165 does not establish nor authorize the 
establishment of any advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 3165 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. Earmark Identification

    H.R. 3165 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of rule XXI.

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

                     XIX. Committee Recommendations

    On July 29, 2009, the Committee on Science and Technology 
by voice vote favorably reported the bill, H.R. 3165, as 
amended, to the House with the recommendation that the bill, as 
amended, do pass.



    XX: PROCEEDINGS OF THE MARKUP BY THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND 
ENVIRONMENT ON H.R. 3165, THE WIND ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT 
                                OF 2009

                              ----------                              


                         TUESDAY, JULY 21, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
            Subcommittee on Energy and Environment,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 2:03 p.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Brian 
Baird [Chair of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chair Baird. The Subcommittee will now come to order. 
Pursuant to notice the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment 
meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 3246, the 
Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009, H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act of 2009, H.R. 3029, To 
establish a research, development, and technology demonstration 
program to improve the efficiency of gas turbines used in 
combined cycle power generation systems, and H.R. 3247, To 
establish a social and behavioral sciences research program at 
the Department of Energy, and for other purposes.
    As I just mentioned, this afternoon our committee is 
considering those four bills. I will go into a bit more detail 
now.
    H.R. 3246 is authored by Representative Peters and co-
sponsored by Representative Biggert of our subcommittee. This 
legislation authorizes research and development on different 
classes of vehicles with the goal of reducing or eliminating 
petroleum fuel use and their associated emissions.
    H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 
2009, is offered by our colleague, Mr. Tonko. This legislation 
authorizes several areas of research identified in a recent 
report outlining the needs for expanding the use of wind-
powered electricity generation.
    H.R. 3029 is also offered by the now prolific Mr. Tonko. 
This bill establishes an R&D; program to improve the efficiency 
of gas turbines used in combined cycle power generation 
systems. Today 15 percent of electric power is produced from 
natural gas. This percentage is predicted to double over the 
next decade. The investment cost for new power plants are very 
high, and once built they operate for many decades. It is vital 
we build them to be as efficient as possible from the outset, 
and this legislation will help achieve that goal.
    Finally, we will mark up H.R. 3247, a bill I introduced to 
authorize a social and behavioral research program at the 
Department of Energy. Technology development and investment are 
only part of the solution to our energy problem. The decisions 
each of us make every day have a significant impact on energy 
production and consumption. It is important that we understand 
why some technologies are more readily embraced than others, 
and it is important that we know how to communicate effectively 
about the nature of our energy challenge and know how to 
empower individual citizens to participate in overcoming those 
challenges.
    The four bills we will consider today address important 
energy technology needs and the need for more research on the 
human factors that determine their acceptance and success. I 
look forward to a productive markup. Thank you all for your 
attendance and participation this afternoon.
    I now recognize Mr. Inglis to present opening remarks.
    [The prepared statement of Chair Baird follows:]

                Prepared Statement of Chair Brian Baird

    This afternoon the Subcommittee will consider four bills.
    H.R. 3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009 is authored 
by Rep. Peters and co-sponsored by Rep. Biggert of our subcommittee. 
This legislation authorizes research and development on different 
classes of vehicles with a goal of reducing or eliminating petroleum 
fuel use and their associated emissions.
    H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 2009 is 
authored by our colleague, Mr. Tonko. This legislation authorizes 
several areas of research identified in a recent report outlining the 
needs for expanding the use of wind powered electricity generation.
    H.R. 3029, is also authored by Rep. Tonko. This bill establishes an 
R&D; program to improve the efficiency of gas turbines used in combined 
cycle power generation systems. Today, 15 percent of our electric power 
is produced from natural gas. This percentage is predicted to double 
over the next decade. The investment costs for new power plants are 
very high and, once built they operate for many decades. It is vital 
that we build them to be as efficient as possible from the outset.
    Finally, we will be marking up H.R. 3247. I introduced H.R. 3247 
last week to authorize a social and behavioral research program at the 
Department of Energy. Technology development and investment are only 
part of the solution to our energy problem. The decisions each of us 
make every day have a significant impact on energy production and 
consumption. It is important that we understand why some technologies 
are more readily embraced than others. And it is important that we know 
how to communicate effectively about the nature of our energy 
challenges and know how to empower individual citizens to participate 
in overcoming them.
    The four bills we will consider today address important energy 
technology needs and the need for more research on the human factors 
that determine their acceptance and success.
    I look forward to a productive markup. Thank you all for your 
attendance and participation this afternoon.

    Mr. Inglis. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I am looking 
forward to discussing and improving the four pieces of 
legislation before us today.
    The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009 will authorize 
a vehicle technologies program at DOE. The bill realigns the 
program to approach a wide variety of critical transportation 
and technology research areas, with the goal of reducing 
petroleum use and the related emissions.
    A balanced and robust research program is necessary to 
expand our mobility options, increase our national security, 
and establish the United States as a world leader in auto and 
truck design, manufacture, and transportation fuel development.
    The second bill we will discuss today is the Wind Energy 
Research and Development Act. As the Department of Energy and 
the American Wind Energy Association have made clear, expanding 
our wind-power generating capacity will require a significant 
improvement in turbine technologies, forecasting capabilities, 
energy storage, and the transmission grid.
    Strengthening the research effort in wind energy will help 
us move away from polluting fossil fuel energy, while creating 
jobs in wind energy design, manufacturing, and operation.
    H.R. 3029 will implement a short-term research, 
development, and demonstration project at DOE to push gas 
turbine combine cycle generation systems to 65 percent 
efficiency. Natural gas is a clean-burning fuel produced right 
here in the United States and is the fastest growing source of 
new electricity capacity. Increasing turbine efficiency will 
reduce fuel usage and corresponding emissions, optimize our use 
of this limited resource, and lower electricity costs.
    Finally, H.R. 3247 establishes a social and behavioral 
sciences research program at the Department of Energy. This 
research is intended to help us better understand the way 
individual decisions impact energy markets and energy 
technology development.
    I am aware of the National Science Foundation's work in 
this area. I understand the Chairman's desire to see this work 
become an emphasis of DOE. I look forward to hearing how that 
cross-pollenization may work, and I will have some questions 
about how it would work.
    Thank you again for the opportunity to work with you on 
this legislation, Mr. Chairman.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Inglis follows:]

            Prepared Statement of Representative Bob Inglis

    Good morning and thank you for holding this markup, Mr. Chairman. 
I'm looking forward to discussing and improving the four pieces of 
legislation before us today.
    The Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009 will reauthorize the 
Vehicle Technologies Program at DOE. The bill realigns the program to 
approach a wide variety of critical transportation technology research 
areas with the goal of reducing petroleum use and the related 
emissions. A balanced and robust research program is necessary to 
expand our mobility options, increase our national security, and 
establish the United States as a world leader in auto and truck design 
and manufacturing and transportation fuel development.
    The second bill we'll address today, is the Wind Energy Research 
and Development Act. As the Department of Energy and the American Wind 
Energy Association have made clear, expanding our wind power generating 
capacity will require significant improvement in turbine technologies, 
forecasting capabilities, energy storage, and the transmission grid. 
Strengthening the research effort in wind energy will help us move away 
from polluting fossil fuel energy while creating jobs in wind energy 
design, manufacturing, and operation.
    H.R. 3029 will implement a short-term research, development, and 
demonstration program at DOE to push gas turbine combined cycle 
generating systems to 65 percent efficiency. Natural gas is a clean 
burning fuel produced right here in the United States and is the 
fastest growing source of new electricity capacity. Increasing turbine 
efficiency will reduce fuel usage and corresponding emissions, optimize 
our use of this limited resource, and lower electricity costs.
    Finally, H.R. 3247 establishes a social and behavioral sciences 
research program at the Department of Energy. This research is intended 
to help us better understand the way individual decisions impact energy 
markets and energy technology development. I'm aware of the National 
Science Foundation's work in this area, and I understand the Chairman's 
desire to see this work become an emphasis at the DOE. I look forward 
to hearing how that cross-pollination might work.
    Thank you again for the opportunity to work with you on this 
legislation, Mr. Chairman.

    Chair Baird. Thank you, Mr. Inglis. Members may place 
statements in the record at this point.
    We will now consider H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research 
and Development Act of 2009. I understand Mr. Tonko is involved 
in another mark of the legislation. I have described it 
earlier. We have had hearings on this topic, and I would urge 
its passage, and I am certain Mr. Tonko will speak to this when 
it comes to the Full Committee.
    I would now recognize Mr. Inglis if he has additional 
remarks on the bill.
    Mr. Inglis. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    In the upstate of South Carolina, General Electric employs 
about 1,500 engineers and 1,500 production employees dedicated 
to designing and manufacturing advanced wind and gas turbines. 
These are great-paying jobs, stable jobs that benefit our local 
economy. An expansion of wind energy capacity will not only 
create more great jobs like these at General Electric in 
Greenville but will make the U.S. a world leader in the wind 
energy sector.
    DOE and the American Wind Energy Association agree that 
there are no prohibitive obstacles to rapidly expanding our 
wind energy capacity to 20 percent by 2030. In that we have a 
lot to gain economically and environmentally from increasing 
our dependence on this energy source.
    This bill addresses specific research challenges to 
building a domestic fleet of efficient and reliable wind 
turbines and meeting the 20 percent by 2030 goal.
    So I am happy to support the bill, Mr. Chairman, and I 
yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Inglis follows:]

            Prepared Statement of Representative Bob Inglis

    In the Upstate, General Electric employs about 1,500 engineers and 
1,500 production employees dedicated to designing and manufacturing 
advanced wind and gas turbines. These are high paying, stable jobs 
benefiting the local economy. An expansion of wind energy capacity will 
not only create more great jobs like those at GE in Greenville, but 
will make the U.S. a world leader in the wind energy sector. DOE and 
the American Wind Energy Association agree that there are no 
prohibitive obstacles to rapidly expanding our wind energy capacity to 
20 percent by 2030, and that we have a lot to gain economically and 
environmentally from increasing our dependence on this energy source. 
This bill addresses specific research challenges to building a domestic 
fleet of efficient and reliable wind turbines and meeting the 20 
percent by 2030 goal.

    [The prepared statement of Mr. Tonko follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Paul D. Tonko

    Thank you Mr. Chairman.
    Mr. Chairman, my bill is H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and 
Development Act of 2009. The Department of Energy (DOE) published a 
report that examines the technical feasibility of using wind energy to 
generate 20 percent of the Nation's electricity demand by 2030. The 
report, ``20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's 
Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply,'' includes contributions from 
DOE and its national laboratories, the wind industry, electric 
utilities, and other groups. The report examines the costs, major 
impacts, and challenges associated with producing 20 percent wind 
energy or 300 GW of wind generating capacity by 2030.
    In response to the DOE report, the American Wind Energy Association 
published a report indicating that in order to reach the 20 percent 
goal by 2030 our nation must provide more funding for wind energy 
research and development and other wind-related programs. The DOE Wind 
Program currently receives about $50 million annually, a level that is 
well below the record $63 million appropriated in FY 1980. In 
comparison, the research and development budget for nuclear energy is 
over $960 million, coal receives at least $500 million, solar receives 
$168 million, and biomass receives roughly $200 million.
    A team of over 80 American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) members 
and advisors from industry, government, and academic institutions have 
identified $217 million in federal funding, combined with a $224 
million industry/State cost share, that will be necessary to support 
the research and development and related programs needed to meet the 
goal of providing 20 percent of America's electricity from wind by 
2030.
    Therefore, my bill, the Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 
2009, which is endorsed by AWEA, will give the Secretary of Energy the 
authority to implement a program of research and development to improve 
the efficiency, reliability and capacity of wind turbines as well as 
optimize the design and adaptability of wind systems. Ultimately, this 
will reduce the cost of construction, generation and maintenance of 
systems.
    The program will focus on research and development of making 
materials larger, lighter, more reliable and more affordable. It will 
also work towards improving gearbox reliability and performance, 
reducing manufacturing costs, and advance computational modeling tools, 
among other things.
    The bill provides $200 million a year for fiscal years 2010 through 
2014, an amount that is directly in line with the DOE and AWEA reports, 
and will help ensure a diversity of players in the wind R&D; market.
    I know that my colleagues Mr. Inglis and Mr. Lujan have amendments 
on this bill of which I am supportive. Thank you for your input on the 
bill.
    Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Baird. Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    I would ask unanimous consent that the bill is considered 
as read and open to amendment at any point, that the Members 
proceed with the amendments in the order of the roster. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the Ranking Member, Mr. Inglis. Are you ready to proceed 
with your amendment, Mr. Inglis?
    Mr. Inglis. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I have an amendment at the 
desk.
    Chair Baird. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 3165, amendment number 001, 
offered by Mr. Inglis of South Carolina.
    Chair Baird. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain his 
amendment.
    Mr. Inglis. Mr. Chairman, my amendment is fairly simple and 
self-explanatory. It follows the--it allows the Secretary of 
Energy to include other research and development focus areas in 
the Wind Energy Research and Development Program listed on 
pages 2 and 3 of the bill.
    The American Wind Energy Association's action plan to 
achieve 20 percent wind energy by 2030, listed 59 action items, 
``deemed necessary to meet the 20 percent wind vision by 
2030.''
    My amendment allows for the Secretary to determine which 
additional areas, if any, to focus R&D; in order to achieve the 
20 percent by 2030, goal.
    And I would urge adoption of the amendment, Mr. Chairman.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Inglis follows:]

            Prepared Statement of Representative Bob Inglis

    Mr. Chairman, my amendment is pretty simple and self-explanatory. 
It allows the Secretary of Energy to include other research and 
development focus areas in the wind energy research and development 
program listed on pages 2 and 3 of the bill. The American Wind Energy 
Association's Action Plan to Achieve 20 percent Wind Energy by 2030 
listed 59 action items ``deemed necessary to meet the 20 percent wind 
vision by 2030.'' My amendment allows for the Secretary to determine 
which additional areas, if any, to focus R&D; on in order to achieve the 
20 percent by 2030 goal.

    Chair Baird. This strikes me as a constructive and useful 
amendment. I applaud the gentleman for offering it and would 
urge support.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor will 
say aye. Those opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is 
agreed to.
    The second amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from New Mexico, Mr. Lujan. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Lujan. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I have an amendment at the 
desk.
    Chair Baird. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 3165, amendment number 026, 
offered by Mr. Lujan of New Mexico.
    Chair Baird. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman from New Mexico for five minutes 
to explain his amendment.
    Mr. Lujan. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.
    New Mexico is well-positioned to be a leader in renewable 
energy development, and wind and solar have the potential to 
solve our energy problems. New Mexico has vast energy resources 
in wind and solar. Already scientists and entrepreneurs are 
hard at work harnessing the power of the wind in Eastern New 
Mexico, and the eastern side of my state has become an immense 
generating source of wind energy.
    In my District the North American Wind Research and 
Training Center and Mesalands Community College has established 
curricula and provided training opportunities to create a 
strong labor force to support a robust renewable energy 
economy.
    Still we have a lot of work to do, and I commend 
Congressman Tonko for introducing this important legislation 
that invests in wind energy research, development, and 
demonstration. H.R. 3165 establishes a program that focuses on 
the research and development of advanced computational modeling 
tools to improve the study of wind energy systems.
    My amendment today adds two new subparagraphs under the 
computational modeling research and development section. The 
first subparagraph focuses on using computational modeling 
tools to assist in locating ideal sites on which to build wind 
energy systems. Advanced computational resources can help 
developers make better informed decisions to maximize wind 
energy production and efficiency while minimizing variable 
generation.
    The intermittent nature of wind power needs to be 
addressed. My amendment addresses this by adding an additional 
subparagraph that focuses on using computational modeling tools 
to improve the integration of wind energy systems into the 
electric grid. Investing in technology that focuses on 
integration of renewable energy into the grid ensures power 
reliability and brings us closer to achieving a clean energy 
economy.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Lujan follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Ben R. Lujan

    Thank you Mr. Chairman.
    New Mexico is well-positioned to be a leader in renewable energy 
development and wind and solar have the potential to power our entire 
country. New Mexico has vast energy resources in wind and solar. 
Already, scientists and entrepreneurs are hard at work harnessing the 
power of the wind in Eastern New Mexico and the eastern side of our 
state has become a generating source of renewable wind energy. In my 
District, the North American Wind Research and Training Center at 
Mesalands Community College has established curriculum and provided 
training opportunities to create a strong labor force to support a 
robust renewable energy economy. Still, we have a lot of work to do, 
and I commend Congressman Tonko for introducing this important 
legislation that invests in wind energy research, development and 
demonstration.
    H.R. 3165 establishes a program that focuses on the research and 
development of advanced computational modeling tools to improve the 
study of wind energy systems. My amendment today adds two new 
subparagraphs under the computational modeling research and development 
section.
    The first subparagraph focuses on using computational modeling 
tools to assist in locating ideal sites on which to build wind energy 
systems. Advanced computational resources can help developers make 
better informed decisions to maximize wind energy production and 
efficiency while minimizing variable generation.
    The intermittent nature of wind power can be problematic for 
integrating wind power into the electric grid. My amendment addresses 
this by adding an additional subparagraph that focuses on using 
computational modeling tools to improve the integration of wind energy 
systems into the existing electric grid. Investing in technology that 
focuses on integration of renewable energy into the grid ensures power 
reliability and brings us closer to achieving a clean energy economy.
    Thank you Mr. Chairman, I yield back my time.

    Chair Baird. I thank the gentleman for his amendment. I 
also believe this is a constructive and well-crafted amendment, 
and would be happy to support it myself.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor will 
say aye. Those opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is 
agreed to.
    Any further amendments that other Members wish to offer?
    Hearing none, the vote is on the bill H.R. 3165 as amended. 
All those in favor will say aye. All those opposed, no. In the 
opinion of the Chair the ayes have it.
    I recognize myself to offer a motion. I move the 
Subcommittee favorably report H.R. 3165 as amended to the Full 
Committee. Furthermore, I move that the staff be instructed to 
prepare the Subcommittee report and make necessary technical 
and conforming changes to the bill in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Subcommittee.
    The question is on the motion to report the bill favorably. 
Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye. 
Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the bill is favorably 
reported.
    Without objection the motion to reconsider is laid upon the 
table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days in which 
to submit supplemental Minority or additional views on the 
measure.
    I want to thank Members for their attendance, staff for all 
their good work. This concludes our Subcommittee markup.
    [Whereupon, at 2:41 p.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]


                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


        H.R. 3165, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendment Roster





                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
                  H.R. 3165, Wind Energy Research and
                        Development Act of 2009

Sec. 1. Short title.

    Section 1 states that this Act may be cited as the ``Wind Energy 
Research and Development Act of 2009.''

Sec. 2. Wind Energy Research and Development Program.

    Section 2(a) establishes the overall goals of the Department of 
Energy's wind energy research and development program.
    Section 2(b) identifies focus areas for this program, including: 
new materials and designs to make larger, lighter, less expensive, and 
more reliable rotor blades; advanced generators to improve the 
efficiency of converting blade rotation to electric power; and 
innovative control systems and blade sensors to improve performance and 
reliability under a wide variety of wind conditions.

Sec. 3. Wind Energy Demonstration Program.

    Section 3 instructs the Secretary to carry out a significant wind 
energy demonstration program in collaboration with industry following 
enacted cost-sharing law.

Sec. 4. Authorization of Appropriations.

    Section 4 authorizes to be appropriated to the Secretary of Energy 
to carry out this Act $200,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2010 
through 2014.





 XXI: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 3165, THE WIND 
              ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACT OF 2009

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:00 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chair of the Committee] presiding.
    Chair Gordon. Good morning. The Committee will come to 
order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science and Technology 
meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 3246, the 
Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009; H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act of 2009; H.R. 3029, To 
establish a research, development and technology demonstration 
program to improve the efficiency of gas turbines used in 
combined cycle power generation systems, and H.R. 3247, To 
establish a social and behavioral science research program at 
the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. We will now 
proceed with the markup.
    This morning the Committee will consider four bills. H.R. 
3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009, is authored 
by our colleague, Mr. Peters, and co-sponsored by 
Representative Biggert. I think we have a Michigan theme going 
here. H.R. 3246 authorizes research and development on vehicles 
with a goal of reducing or eliminating petroleum fuel base and 
its associated emissions.
    We will also consider H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research 
and Development Act of 2009, and H.R. 3029, a bill to authorize 
R&D; and to improve the efficiency of gas turbines, both of 
these bills authored by Mr. Tonko. H.R. 3165 authorizes R&D; on 
wind power. The specific areas of R&D; were identified in a 
recent report by the Department of Energy and the American Wind 
Energy Association describing the areas of improvements needed 
if we are to expand wind power electricity generation.
    Currently, 15 percent of our electric power is produced 
from natural gas. Over the next decade, this percentage is 
predicted to double. The research and development authorized in 
H.R. 3029 is intended to improve the efficiency of turbines 
used in these combined cycle power generation systems.
    Finally, we will be marking up H.R. 3247, a bill to 
establish a social and behavioral research program at the 
Department of Energy. H.R. 3247 was introduced by Dr. Baird, 
who has been a champion of these areas of research throughout 
his service on the Committee. It is important to understand why 
some technologies are more readily adopted than others, and it 
is important that we communicate to the public clearly about 
the challenges and opportunities of becoming a more energy-
efficient society. H.R. 3247 will help us to accomplish these 
important goals.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his remarks.
    [The prepared statement of Chair Gordon follows:]

                Prepared Statement of Chair Bart Gordon

    This morning the Committee will consider four bills. H.R. 3246, the 
Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009, is authored by our colleague, 
Mr. Peters, and co-sponsored by Representative Biggert. I think we have 
a Michigan theme going here. H.R. 3246 authorizes research and 
development on vehicles with a goal of reducing or eliminating 
petroleum fuel base and its associated emissions.
    We will also consider H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and 
Development Act of 2009, and H.R. 3029, a bill to authorize R&D; and to 
improve the efficiency of gas turbines, both of these bills authored by 
Mr. Tonko.
    H.R. 3165 authorizes R&D; on wind power. The specific areas of R&D; 
were identified in a recent report by the Department of Energy and the 
American Wind Energy Association describing the areas of improvements 
needed if we are to expand wind power electricity generation.
    Currently, 15 percent of our electric power is produced from 
natural gas. Over the next decade, this percentage is predicted to 
double. The research and development authorized in H.R. 3029 is 
intended to improve the efficiency of turbines used in these combined 
cycle power generation systems. It is vital that utilities build new 
plants to be as efficient as possible since the investment costs are 
high and plants operate for many decades once they are brought online.
    Finally, we will be marking up H.R. 3247, a bill to establish a 
social and behavioral research program at the Department of Energy. 
H.R. 3247 was introduced by Dr. Baird, who has been a champion of these 
areas of research throughout his service on the Committee. People 
determine the success or failure of new technologies. It is important 
to understand why some technologies are more readily adopted than 
others. And it is important that we communicate to the public clearly 
about the challenges and opportunities of becoming a more energy 
efficient society. H.R. 3247 will help us to accomplish these important 
goals.
    The four bills we have before us today target several important 
energy research needs. I congratulate the Members for their work on 
these bills, and I look forward to a productive markup. Thank you all 
for your attendance and participation this morning.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.

    Mr. Hall. I thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we do meet to mark up these bills that you set out 
there, and H.R. 3029 is to establish a research, development 
and technology demonstration program to improve the efficiency 
of gas turbines used in combined cycle power generation 
systems, and H.R. 3247, to establish a social and behavioral 
sciences research program at the Department of Energy. I will 
have some things to say about that one a little bit later, 
especially about the author who is a very good friend of mine 
and may need this bill. I don't know. These two boys from 
California every now and then I think they need it, even 
Sensenbrenner sometimes. We are going to have to really look at 
this. Josh himself does now and then--I mean Roscoe, but he is 
too old to be up here anyway. I better yield my time back right 
now.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall

    Thank you Mr. Chairman. Today we meet to markup four bills. H.R. 
3246, the Advanced Vehicle Technology Act of 2009; H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act of 2009; H.R. 3029, To establish a 
research, development, and technology demonstration program to improve 
the efficiency of gas turbines used in combined cycle power generation 
systems; and H.R. 3247, To establish a social and behavioral sciences 
research program at the Department of Energy, and for other purposes.
    I will not take up a lot of time talking about these bills in my 
opening statement but will instead make any necessary comments when 
each bill is brought up.
    I would like to thank the staff on both sides for their hard work 
in getting these bills and their amendments together and ready in such 
a short period of time.
    With that I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Gordon. Are you sure you don't want to say something 
about Mr. Neugebauer here before we proceed?
    Mr. Hall. He and Boone Pickens got the wind in their 
problem out in West Texas. Women complain about it blowing 
their hair.
    Chair Gordon. Yes, sir, so here we go. Members can place 
statements in the record at any point.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Mitchell follows:]

         Prepared Statement of Representative Harry E. Mitchell

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we will mark up four pieces of legislation: H.R. 3246, the 
Advanced Vehicle Technology Act, H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research 
and Development Act, H.R. 3029, legislation to establish a research, 
development, and technology demonstration program to improve the 
efficiency of gas turbines used in combined cycle power generation 
systems, and H.R. 3247, legislation to establish a social and 
behavioral sciences research program at the Department of Energy.
    I am especially pleased that we are considering H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act.
    Wind energy, like solar energy, is a clean alternative energy 
source that could not only help meet our energy needs, but it could 
also be a boon to our economy.
    According to a May 2008 report from the Department of Energy, 
current U.S. land-based and offshore wind resources are sufficient to 
supply the electrical energy needs of the U.S. several times over.
    H.R. 3165 would take important steps in advancing wind energy 
research efforts. Specifically, this bill would require the DOE to 
focus research and development on improving the energy efficiency, 
reliability, and capacity of wind turbines, optimizing the design and 
adaptability of wind energy systems, and reducing the cost of wind 
energy systems. This legislation would also establish a wind 
demonstration program.
    I urge my colleagues to support this important measure, and I yield 
back.

    Chair Gordon. We will now consider H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act of 2009.
    I recognize the gentleman from New York, Mr. Tonko, to 
describe his bill.
    Mr. Tonko. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    The bill, H.R. 3165, creates the Wind Energy Research and 
Development Act of 2009. The Department of Energy published a 
report that examines the technical feasibility of using wind 
energy to generate 20 percent of the Nation's electricity 
demand by 2030. In response to the DOE report, the American 
Wind Energy Association published a report indicating that in 
order to reach that 20 percent goal by 2030, our nation must 
provide more funding for wind energy research and development 
and other wind-related programs.
    Therefore, this bill, the Wind Energy Research and 
Development Act of 2009, which is endorsed by the American Wind 
Energy Association, will give the Secretary of Energy to the 
authority a program of research and development to improve the 
efficiency, the reliability and the capacity of wind turbines 
as well as optimize the design and adaptability of wind 
systems. Ultimately, this will reduce the cost of construction, 
of generation and of maintenance of systems. The program will 
focus on research and development of making materials larger, 
lighter, more reliable and more affordable. It will also work 
towards improving gearbox reliability and performance, reducing 
manufacturing costs and advancing computational modeling tools, 
among other things. This bill provides $200 million a year for 
fiscal years 2010 through 2014, an amount that is directly in 
line with the DOE and AWEA reports. It will help ensure 
diversity of players in the wind R&D; market.
    Mr. Chairman, I know that my colleagues, Mr. Smith, Mr. 
McCaul, Mr. Neugebauer and Mr. Bartlett have amendments to this 
bill. I thank them for their input and am supportive of those 
given amendments. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Tonko follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Paul D. Tonko

    Thank you Mr. Chairman.
    Mr. Chairman, my bill is H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and 
Development Act of 2009. The Department of Energy (DOE) published a 
report that examines the technical feasibility of using wind energy to 
generate 20 percent of the Nation's electricity demand by 2030.
    In response to the DOE report, the American Wind Energy Association 
published a report indicating that in order to reach the 20 percent 
goal by 2030 our nation must provide more funding for wind energy 
research and development and other wind-related programs.
    Therefore, my bill, the Wind Energy Research and Development Act of 
2009, which is endorsed by AWEA, will give the Secretary of Energy the 
authority to implement a program of research and development to improve 
the efficiency, reliability and capacity of wind turbines as well as 
optimize the design and adaptability of wind systems. Ultimately, this 
will reduce the cost of construction, generation and maintenance of 
systems.
    The program will focus on research and development of making 
materials larger, lighter, more reliable and more affordable. It will 
also work towards improving gearbox reliability and performance, 
reducing manufacturing costs, and advance computational modeling tools, 
among other things.
    The bill provides $200 million a year for fiscal years 2010 through 
2014, an amount that is directly in line with the DOE and AWEA reports, 
and will help ensure a diversity of players in the wind R&D; market.
    I know that my colleagues Mr. Smith, Mr. McCaul, Mr. Neugebauer and 
Mr. Bartlett have amendments on this bill. I thank them for their input 
and am supportive of those amendments.
    Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Gordon. I now recognize Mr. Hall to present any 
remarks on the bill.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I support H.R. 3165, the Wind 
Energy Research and Development Act. Wind energy continues to 
be a very important part of the electricity-generating 
portfolio in this country and particularly in my home State of 
Texas, which is, by the way, the largest producer of wind 
energy in the country. The technology can be improved upon to 
make the wind turbines, systems and farms more efficient and 
more effective at producing energy. We really need to be 
looking closely at it, just like we need to look at solar for 
the future. You know, a million bucks for each one of these 
fans is what I have heard they cost. It takes a long time to 
get their money back and there is some question about 
productivity. Even one of the major supporters of wind energy, 
Mr. Pickens, is easing off it.
    This bill addresses the key research areas needed to expand 
the country's production of wind energy. I thank Mr. Tonko for 
his work on this important renewable energy source. It is very 
important, and we need to keep working and trying to get it 
hooked up to where it is beneficial to the greatest good for 
the greatest number. I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall

    Mr. Chairman, I support H.R. 3165, the Wind Energy Research and 
Development Act. Wind energy has been and continues to be an important 
part of the electricity generating portfolio in this country and in 
particular, Texas which is the largest producer of wind energy in the 
country. However, the technology can be improved upon to make the wind 
turbines, systems and farms more efficient and more effective at 
producing energy. This bill addresses the key research areas needed to 
expand our country's production of wind energy and I thank Mr. Tonko 
for his work on this important renewable energy source.
    With that I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Gordon. Does anyone else wish to be recognized? If 
not, I ask unanimous consent the bill is considered as read and 
open to amendment at any point and that the Members proceed 
with the amendments in the order of the roster. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Texas, Mr. Neugebauer. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Neugebauer. I am, Mr. Chairman. I have an amendment at 
the desk.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 3165, amendment number 041, 
offered by Mr. Neugebauer of Texas.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Mr. Neugebauer. Well, thank you, Mr. Chairman. As the 
Congressman that has more wind energy in his district than any 
other one in the country and the home of the largest wind farm 
in the world, obviously we are very interested in wind energy 
in Texas and in the 19th Congressional District. My amendment 
would make some slight changes and I believe improvements in 
what I think is a pretty big bill--I mean pretty good bill, I 
think, and pretty big. That was not a Freudian slip, that was 
actually--but I am concerned as I mentioned in other 
legislation that we are authorizing here, and I think it is 
important that as we authorize this, we authorize in a way that 
we give the departments that are going to administer this 
flexibility, as well as our appropriators, in making the right 
decisions.
    When the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment held a 
hearing on this subject, we heard from various experts on this 
issue and one of those was a wind engineering professor from my 
District, and my amendment would address the growing need to 
assess the issues of up wind and down wind characterizations 
that happen in these wind farms. In other words, some of the 
wind turbines in the front of the area where the wind is 
blowing, there are different wind patterns developed. As those 
wind turbines are put in grids, we need to understand what is 
the most efficient way to do that and so I think I would expand 
the research into that as well.
    The other is that we need to make sure that we bring all of 
the partners together and this basically includes, it would 
allow universities to be partners in this process and I think 
that is an important part of that. Also, there are 
demonstration projects called for in this particular 
legislation, and while people think all wind is the same, all 
wind is not the same, and the wind characteristics in certain 
parts of the country are different than other areas of the 
country. So I think it would be important in these 
demonstration projects to make sure that we have a diversity in 
the geographical location of these programs to assess what are 
the wind patterns and what are some of the--really, quiet 
honestly, what are some of the optimum places where the wind 
technology will be better suited than other kinds of 
technologies. For example, the wind off the Great Lakes is 
different than the wind in West Texas so my amendment would 
also encourage that.
    Also, obviously, Mr. Chairman, I fully support an all-of-
the-above energy policy, and certainly wind is a piece of that. 
Solar has been mentioned but there are new technologies or 
existing technologies that we continue to see in this country. 
I think we should continue to move in that direction, and so, 
Mr. Chairman, I think these are provisions that make sure that 
this is a good bill, and with that, I yield back the balance of 
my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Neugebauer follows:]

         Prepared Statement of Representative Randy Neugebauer

    My amendment would make slight changes, and improvements in what I 
believe is a pretty good bill. Although I remain concerned over its 
costs, it is my hope that DOE does not overlap existing research 
currently being conducted by the Department of Energy [authorizes $200 
million for 2010-2014 each year]
    When the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment held a hearing on 
this subject, we heard from various subject matter experts on this 
issue. One of them was a wind engineering professor from my district.
    My amendment would address the growing need to assess the issue of 
upwind and downwind characterizations. Presently, as we know, wind 
turbines are literally located on used, as well as unused farmland, and 
although they are positioned in such a way that they in no way 
interfere with the turbines near them; there are still unknown impacts 
that occur as a result of these various arrays.
    As the witnesses testified, there currently are unexplained 
decreases in performance and reliability on many wind farms. My 
amendment would encourage further study in the area of upwind and 
downwind turbine operations to increase performance in wind energy.
    Second, my amendment would address the demonstration programs 
called for in Section 3 of this legislation. While to the typical 
layman, all wind is the same, it is in fact not all the same.
    The winds that blow in the region that I represent in the Great 
Plains are not representative of winds that regularly blow off of a 
Great Lake, or in a particularly mountainous region. My amendment would 
encourage geographic diversity, which ensures a quality representation 
of different wind class regimes across the country.
    Lastly Mr. Chairman, while I fully support an all-of-the-above 
energy policy, I also support an all-of-the-above research policy. My 
amendment would encourage such demonstrations projects to be carried 
out not only by industry leaders, but also their partners in the 
academic community.
    Thank you Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the Committee's attention to 
these matters, and I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Neugebauer, and I also thank 
you for that tutorial on wind. I am ready for Jeopardy now.
    Is there anyone else that would like to discuss the 
amendment?
    Mr. Bilbray. Mr. Chairman.
    Chair Gordon. Mr. Bilbray.
    Mr. Bilbray. Mr. Chairman, just quickly, I think that 
anyone who has been looking at this technology understands that 
when it first developed there was sort of a breakthrough there 
in the use of composite technologies, and separate from this, 
it doesn't specifically address it there but I think there is a 
reference there in the development. I will just ask the whole 
Committee to understand that separate from the particulars, I 
hope to see us move forward with some general research in 
advanced composites, and here is a technology where composite 
technology could make huge leaps in not only the efficiency but 
also the size, the application and everything else. So I bring 
this up so in the future when we start talking about why even 
look at research into advanced composites this is one component 
that I don't think we talk enough about, and I just want to 
tell both my gentlemen from Texas, the greatest challenge right 
now for Mr. Pickens is not generating electricity but getting 
the easements to get into the cities, and this committee needs 
to work with the other committees of jurisdiction. I am talking 
about we need to be as forceful with the siting and the 
alignment for clean energy getting to the cities as we are the 
freeways that the gentlelady from Texas always talks about, and 
I yield back.
    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Bilbray. I will point out that 
with the National Nanotechnology Initiative, we took a major 
step in terms of composites. I think that is where we are going 
to see the breakthroughs, and that was a very good bill and we 
thank you all for helping.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment? Dr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I just want to commend 
Mr. Neugebauer on the amendments. Clearly, understanding the 
wake effect is a major factor, and I am surprised it hasn't 
been addressed thoroughly before and it clearly has to be done. 
With the geographic diversity, that is genuinely a surprise to 
people, that the winds in North Dakota are far different from 
those in Texas. The Texans manage to generate much more wind, 
of course, but aside from that, it is very important to 
understand these, and there are other factors that I am sure 
will emerge that are equally important, and I appreciate Mr. 
Neugebauer's amendment.
    Mr. Neugebauer. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Ehlers. Yes, I would be happy to yield.
    Mr. Neugebauer. I wanted to clarify. Did you say Texans 
create more wind or Texas creates more wind? I think there is--
--
    Mr. Hall. I think it is immaterial. They are both true.
    Chair Gordon. Okay. Any rebuttal?
    Mr. Ehlers. I yield back.
    Chair Gordon. Is there further discussion? If there is no 
further discussion, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in 
favor, say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the amendment 
is agreed to.
    The second amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Nebraska, also where there is a lot of 
wind. Are you ready to proceed with your amendment, Mr. Smith?
    Mr. Smith of Nebraska. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. This 
amendment would allow for research and development into the 
processes for planning and----
    Chair Gordon. Do you want to inquire of the Clerk if your 
amendment is there?
    Mr. Smith of Nebraska. I would, please.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 3165, amendment number 010, 
offered by Mr. Smith of Nebraska.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Mr. Smith of Nebraska. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    This amendment would allow for R&D; into the process for 
planning and methods to size and scale transmission for 
remotely located renewable resource-rich areas. The amendment 
also enables R&D; for ways to efficiently and cost-effectively 
create high-voltage transmission for renewable energy. Nebraska 
is sixth in the Nation in wind energy potential yet lacks the 
transmission capacity and development for additional 
generation. Transmission capacity concerns reside not only in 
rural Nebraska but across the country as well. In order to 
become truly energy independent, we must continue to explore 
all forms of renewable energy including wind.
    Mr. Chairman, I appreciate Representative Tonko and the 
Committee's work on wind energy R&D; and would urge adoption of 
this amendment. I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Smith follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Adrian Smith

    Thank you Mr. Chairman. This amendment would allow for research and 
development into the processes for planning, and methods to size and 
scale transmission for remotely located renewable resource-rich areas. 
The amendment also enables research and development for ways to 
efficiently and cost-effectively create high-voltage transmission for 
renewable energy.
    My home State of Nebraska is sixth in the Nation in wind energy 
potential, yet lacks in transmission capacity and development for 
additional generation. Transmission capacity concerns reside not only 
in rural areas of the Third District of Nebraska, but across the 
country. In order to become truly energy independent, we must continue 
to explore all forms of renewable energy, including wind. Mr. Chairman, 
I appreciate Representative Tonko and the Committee's work on wind 
energy R&D;, and would urge adoption of this amendment.
    I yield back my time.

    Chair Gordon. Is there further discussion on the amendment? 
If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say aye. 
Opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed to.
    The third amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentlelady from Texas, Ms. Johnson. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentlelady for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much, Chairman Gordon and 
Ranking Member Hall.
    My amendment adds a new section to the wind energy bill 
that deals with equal opportunity. The amendment states that 
the Secretary of Energy shall coordinate with the Office of 
Minority Economic Impact and with the Office of Small and 
Disadvantaged Business Utilization. The amendment also directs 
the Secretary to provide special consideration to applications 
submitted by minority-serving institutions and businesses. I 
understand that the Department of Energy has regulations 
specifying the inclusion of minority groups in its research, 
development and education programs. However, I would like to 
see research program officials work more closely with the 
Office of Economic Impact and Diversity. Many of the 
professionals who will be applying for these grants are 
engineers. Only 3.2 percent of the Ph.D. engineers in this 
country are African-American. I could not even find statistics 
on the ethnicity and education of employees at DOE's supported 
national labs. It would be good to know what percentage of 
scientists working in the national labs are minorities. I say 
this only because it means a great deal of impact on this 
nation in the future. DOE shall incorporate greater 
transparency with regard to its own workforce that is funded, 
by the way, with taxpayers' money.
    I would like also to see greater effort by the Department 
of Energy program directors to reach out to small minority-
owned businesses to inform them of these funding opportunities. 
In order to do that, there shall be smoother coordination with 
the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity. My amendment 
simply facilitates that coordination. I ask my colleagues on 
this committee to support this amendment and increase the 
diversity of our research grant recipient pool.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I yield back.
    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Chair, for a good amendment.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment? If no, the 
vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor say aye. All 
opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed to.
    The fourth amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Maryland, Mr. Bartlett--Dr. Bartlett. Are 
you ready to proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Bartlett. I am. I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 3165, amendment number 002, 
offered by Mr. Bartlett of Maryland.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Mr. Bartlett. Wind power is growing rapidly. The United 
States alone can already power seven million homes through the 
power of wind. I support this bill because more is needed to 
accelerate our harvest of wind energy into electricity. The 
bill calls for a program on wind energy research and 
development and a demonstration program in wind energy to 
provide important opportunities for researchers to contribute 
to this challenging yet essential process.
    This amendment would assure that any monies distributed 
under this Act are awarded on a competitive basis in order to 
ensure quality and efficiency as well as promote job growth and 
economic development. Competition will ensure the greatest 
benefit to taxpayers at the least expense, and I yield back, 
Mr. Chairman.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Bartlett follows:]

          Prepared Statement of Representative Roscoe Bartlett

    Wind power is growing rapidly. The U.S. alone can already power 
seven million homes through the power of wind. I support this bill 
because more is needed to accelerate our harvest of wind energy into 
electricity. The bill calls for a program on wind energy research and 
development and a demonstration program on wind energy to provide 
important opportunities for researchers to contribute to this 
challenging yet essential process.
    This amendment would ensure that any monies distributed under this 
Act are awarded on a competitive basis, in order to ensure quality and 
efficiency as well as promote job growth and economic improvements. 
Competition will ensure the greatest benefit to taxpayers at the lowest 
expense.

    Chair Gordon. Is there further discussion on the amendment? 
If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor say aye. 
Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the amendment is agreed to.
    The fifth amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Texas, Mr. McCaul. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. McCaul. I am, Mr. Chairman. I have an amendment at the 
desk.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 3165, amendment number 003, 
offered by Mr. McCaul of Texas.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Mr. McCaul. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    My amendment is simple. It attempts to make sure that this 
new program created by this bill coordinates with already 
existing wind energy programs at the Department of Energy. I 
believe the United States needs to explore all possible energy 
sources to increase our energy independence and end our 
reliance on foreign sources. However, we should make sure that 
when creating new federal programs, we are not duplicating past 
efforts or the ongoing efforts of existing programs. That way, 
each program advances our understanding and brings the 
technology closer to the point where it becomes economically 
viable and able to reliably deliver power.
    So my amendment seeks to make sure that this program 
advances our understanding of wind power rather than simply 
repeating the efforts of the past and current programs, and 
with that, I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. McCaul follows:]

         Prepared Statement of Representative Michael T. McCaul

    My amendment is simple. It attempts to make sure that the new 
program created by this bill coordinates with already existing wind 
energy programs at the Department of Energy. I believe that the United 
States needs to explore all possible energy sources to increase our 
energy independence and end our reliance on foreign sources; however we 
should make sure that, when creating new federal programs, we are not 
duplicating past efforts or the ongoing efforts of existing programs. 
That way each program advances our understanding and brings the 
technology closer to the point where it becomes economically viable and 
able to reliably deliver power. So my amendment seeks to make sure that 
this program advances our understanding of wind power rather than 
simply repeating the efforts of past and current programs.
    I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Mr. McCaul. That really has been a 
theme of this committee, is to try to get best use out of 
limited dollars, and you are right on point.
    Mr. McCaul. Thank you.
    Chair Gordon. Is there further discussion? If no, the vote 
occurs on the amendment. All in favor say aye. Those opposed, 
no. The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed to.
    Mr. Tonko is recognized.
    Mr. Tonko. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I again thank the 
Members of the Committee for their amendments, and as I 
indicated earlier, am in support of those amendments. I also 
would ask that a letter from the Sustainable Energy and 
Environment Coalition in the House be put into the record of 
these proceedings, and it is a letter of support for the given 
legislation.
    Chair Gordon. If no objection, the letter will be made a 
part of the record.
    [The information follows:]

    
    

    Chair Gordon. Are there other amendments? If no, the vote 
is on the bill, H.R. 3165 as amended. All those in favor, say 
aye. All those opposed, say no. In the opinion of the Chair, 
the ayes have it.
    Now I now recognize Mr. Tonko for a motion.
    Mr. Tonko. Thank you, Chairman Gordon. I move that the 
Committee favorably report H.R. 3165 as amended to the House 
with the recommendation that the bill do pass. Furthermore, I 
move that the staff be instructed to prepare the legislative 
report and make necessary technical and conforming changes and 
that the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring the bill 
before the House for consideration.
    Chair Gordon. The question is on the motion to report the 
bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify by 
saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it and the bill is 
favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days in 
which to submit supplemental Minority or additional views on 
the measure.
    Chair Gordon. This concludes our Committee markup.
    [Whereupon, at 12:53 p.m., the Committee was adjourned.]


                                Appendix

                              ----------                              


                 H.R. 3165 as amended, Amendment Roster