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111th Congress                                            Rept. 111-130
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                     Part 1

======================================================================



 
                STEM EDUCATION COORDINATION ACT OF 2009

                                _______
                                

  June 2, 2009.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1709]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 1709) to establish a committee under 
the National Science and Technology Council with the 
responsibility to coordinate science, technology, engineering, 
and mathematics education activities and programs of all 
Federal agencies, and for other purposes, having considered the 
same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend 
that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Bill............................................................2
  II. Purpose.........................................................3
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................3
  IV. Hearing Summary.................................................4
   V. Committee Actions...............................................5
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................6
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis.....................................6
VIII. Committee Views.................................................7
  IX. Cost Estimate...................................................7
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate.......................7
  XI. Compliance with Public Law 104-4................................8
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations................8
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives...........8
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement..............................8
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement............................8
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act................................8
XVII. Earmark Identification..........................................8
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law..........8

 XIX. Committee Recommendations.......................................8
  XX. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup.........................10
 XXI. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................25

                                I. BILL

    The amendment is as follows:
    Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``STEM Education Coordination Act of 
2009''.

SEC. 2. DEFINITION.

  In this Act, the term ``STEM'' means science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics.

SEC. 3. COORDINATION OF FEDERAL STEM EDUCATION.

  (a) Establishment.--The Director of the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy shall establish a committee under the National 
Science and Technology Council with the responsibility to coordinate 
Federal programs and activities in support of STEM education, including 
at the National Science Foundation, the Department of Energy, the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Education, and all other 
Federal agencies that have programs and activities in support of STEM 
education.
  (b) Responsibilities.--The committee established under subsection (a) 
shall--
          (1) coordinate the STEM education activities and programs of 
        the Federal agencies;
          (2) develop, implement through the participating agencies, 
        and update once every 5 years a 5-year STEM education strategic 
        plan, which shall--
                  (A) specify and prioritize annual and long-term 
                objectives;
                  (B) specify the common metrics that will be used to 
                assess progress toward achieving the objectives;
                  (C) describe the approaches that will be taken by 
                each participating agency to assess the effectiveness 
                of its STEM education programs and activities; and
                  (D) with respect to subparagraph (A), describe the 
                role of each agency in supporting programs and 
                activities designed to achieve the objectives; and
          (3) establish, periodically update, and maintain an inventory 
        of federally sponsored STEM education programs and activities, 
        including documentation of assessments of the effectiveness of 
        such programs and activities and rates of participation by 
        underrepresented minorities in such programs and activities.
  (c) Responsibilities of OSTP.--The Director of the Office of Science 
and Technology Policy shall encourage and monitor the efforts of the 
participating agencies to ensure that the strategic plan under 
subsection (b)(2) is developed and executed effectively and that the 
objectives of the strategic plan are met.
  (d) Report.--The Director of the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy shall transmit a report annually to Congress at the time of the 
President's budget request describing the plan required under 
subsection (b)(2). The annual report shall include--
          (1) a description of the STEM education programs and 
        activities for the previous and current fiscal years, and the 
        proposed programs and activities under the President's budget 
        request, of each participating Federal agency;
          (2) the levels of funding for each participating Federal 
        agency for the programs and activities described under 
        paragraph (1) for the previous fiscal year and under the 
        President's budget request;
          (3) except for the initial annual report, a description of 
        the progress made in carrying out the implementation plan, 
        including a description of the outcome of any program 
        assessments completed in the previous year, and any changes 
        made to that plan since the previous annual report; and
          (4) a description of how the participating Federal agencies 
        will disseminate information about federally supported 
        resources for STEM education practitioners, including teacher 
        professional development programs, to States and to STEM 
        education practitioners, including to teachers and 
        administrators in schools that meet the criteria described in 
        subsection (c)(1)(A) and (B) of section 3175 of the Department 
        of Energy Science Education Enhancement Act (42 U.S.C. 
        7381j(c)(1)(A) and (B)).

                              II. PURPOSE

    The purpose of this bill is to establish a committee 
through the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) 
within the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), to 
coordinate Federal programs and activities in support of 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) 
education.

              III. BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION

    A consensus exists that improving STEM education across the 
United States is a necessary condition for preserving the 
Nation's capacity for innovation and discovery and for ensuring 
the Nation's economic strength and competitiveness. A variety 
of STEM education programs and activities exist for K-16 
students at the federal research and development (R&D;) 
agencies, which include: the National Science Foundation, the 
National Aeronautics & Space Administration, the National 
Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, the Environmental Protection Agency, 
the Department of Energy, and the National Institutes of 
Health.
    For the most part, agencies have developed their programs 
independently rather than sharing ``best practices'' and 
collaborating across agencies. Each program has also developed 
its own methods and criteria for evaluation, making a 
comparison of effectiveness across the programs impossible. 
This is often the case even within agencies, where there 
appears to be little communication between different offices 
and directorates, each of which may manage their own STEM 
education programs. Finally, the agencies have at times had 
trouble building widespread awareness of their programs among 
teachers and other practitioners.
    In 2006, the Department of Education, through the American 
Competitiveness Council (ACC), launched a year-long review of 
federal STEM education programs. The ACC process identified 105 
federal STEM education programs, across all levels, totaling 
$3.12 billion in federal funding. Agencies submitted a total of 
115 evaluations for those programs. Only 10 of the evaluations 
were determined to be scientifically rigorous and only four of 
them led the ACC to conclude that the educational activity 
evaluated had a meaningful positive impact. The ACC concluded, 
that, ``despite decades of significant federal investment in 
science and math education, there is a general dearth of 
evidence of effective practices and activities in STEM 
education.''
    In its May 2007 report, the ACC made six key 
recommendations:
          1. The government should maintain and update 
        regularly an inventory of federal STEM education 
        programs, including goals and metrics, to facilitate 
        stronger interagency coordination;
          2. Agencies and the federal government at large 
        should foster knowledge of effective practices through 
        improved evaluation and-or implementation of proven 
        effective, research-based instructional materials and 
        methods;
          3. Federal agencies should improve the coordination 
        of their K-12 STEM education programs with states and 
        local school systems;
          4. Federal agencies should adjust program designs and 
        operations so that programs can be assessed and 
        measurable results can be achieved, consistent with 
        STEM education program goals;
          5. Funding for federal STEM education programs 
        designed to improve STEM education outcomes should not 
        increase unless a plan for rigorous, independent 
        evaluation is in place, appropriate to the types of 
        activities funded; and
          6. Agencies with STEM education programs should 
        collaborate on implementation of ACC recommendations 
        under the auspices of the NSTC.
    In October 2007, the National Science Board (NSB) released 
its own report, ``A National Action Plan for Addressing the 
Critical Needs of the U.S. Science, Technology, Engineering, 
and Mathematics Education System.'' A key recommendation of the 
NSB action plan was the creation of a committee on STEM 
Education, under NSTC, responsible for coordinating STEM 
education programs across federal R&D; agencies and the 
Department of Education. Similarly, many of the witnesses at 
the Research and Science Education Subcommittee hearings held 
in the 110th Congress testified that there is a need for 
improved coordination among the agencies regarding their STEM 
education efforts in order to better communicate best practices 
and eliminate inefficiencies. Even though an NSTC subcommittee 
on education and workforce does currently exist, the ACC and 
NSB reviews and the Subcommittee hearings demonstrated that 
current efforts are far from sufficient to ensure a meaningful 
federal investment in STEM education.

                          IV. HEARING SUMMARY

    The Subcommittee on Research and Science Education heard 
testimony in the 110th Congress relevant to the activities 
authorized in H.R. 1709 at hearings held on May 15, June 6, and 
October 10, 2007.
    On Tuesday, May 15, 2007, the Honorable Brian Baird 
presiding, the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education 
held a hearing to examine K-16 STEM education programs 
supported by federal R&D; agencies from the perspective of 
education practitioners. The Subcommittee explored whether such 
issues as the lack of coordination between the agencies, 
difficulties for educators in finding information about the 
programs, and the absence of robust program evaluations hinder 
the potential of the federal programs to improve STEM 
education. Most importantly, the hearing highlighted how the 
federal R&D; mission agencies can best contribute to raising the 
level of scientific literacy of all Americans. Appearing as 
witnesses were (1) Ms. Linda Froschauer, President, National 
Science Teachers Association; (2) Mr. Michael Lach, Director of 
Mathematics and Science, Chicago Public Schools; (3) Dr. George 
D. Nelson, Director, Science, Technology, and Mathematics 
Education, Western Washington University; (4) Mr. Van Reiner, 
President, Maryland Science Center; and (5) Dr. Iris Weiss, 
President, Horizon Research, Inc.
    On June 6, 2007, the Honorable Brian Baird presiding, the 
Subcommittee on Research and Science Education heard from a 
panel of witnesses from federal agencies who provided testimony 
on the STEM education activities of their respective agencies 
and discussed efforts to improve interagency coordination and 
evaluation of programs. Witnesses for the hearing included (1) 
Dr. Cora Marrett, Assistant Director, Directorate for Education 
and Human Resources, National Science Foundation and Co-Chair, 
Education and Workforce Development Subcommittee, National 
Science and Technology Council; (2) Dr. Joyce Winterton, 
Assistant Administrator, Office of Education, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration; (3) Mr. William Valdez, 
Director, Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and 
Scientists, Office of Science, Department of Energy; and (4) 
Dr. Bruce Fuchs, Director, Office of Science Education, 
National Institutes of Health.
    On October 10, 2007, the Honorable Brian Baird presiding, 
the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education held a 
hearing to receive testimony on the National Science Board's 
recommendations for bringing greater coherence to the Nation's 
STEM education system, as laid out in their report, ``A 
National Action Plan for Addressing the Critical Needs of the 
U.S. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Education System.'' Witnesses for the hearing included: (1) Dr. 
Steven Beering, Chairman, National Science Board; (2) Ms. Judy 
A. Jeffrey, Director, Iowa Department of Education and 
Representing the Council of Chief State School Officers; (3) 
Dr. Francis (Skip) Fennell, President, National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics and Professor of Education at McDaniel 
College; (4) Ms. Chrisanne Gayl, Director of Federal Programs, 
National School Boards Association; (5) Dr. Robert Semper, 
Executive Associate Director, The Exploratorium and 
Representing the Association of Science-Technology Centers; and 
(6) Ms. Susan L. Traiman, Director, Education and Workforce 
Policy Business Roundtable.

                          V. COMMITTEE ACTIONS

    As summarized in Section IV of this report, the 
Subcommittee on Research and Science Education heard testimony 
relevant to H.R. 1709 on May 15, June 6 and October 10, 2007.
    On March 25, 2009, Representative Bart Gordon of Tennessee, 
Chairman of the Committee on Science and Technology, for 
himself and Representatives Hall, Lipinski, and Ehlers 
introduced H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 
2009, a bill to establish a committee under the National 
Science and Technology Council with the responsibility to 
coordinate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics 
education activities and programs of all Federal agencies, and 
for other purposes.
    The Subcommittee on Research and Science Education met to 
consider H.R. 1709 on Tuesday, March 31, 2009 and considered 
the following amendments to the bill:
    1. Ms. Fudge offered an amendment to direct the committee 
established under H.R. 1709 to develop a strategy to identify 
geographic areas in the United States that have the lowest STEM 
performance and increase interest and achievement in such 
areas. The amendment was withdrawn.
    Mr. Lipinski moved that the Subcommittee favorably report 
the bill, H.R. 1709, to the full Committee. The motion was 
agreed to by a voice vote.
    The full Committee on Science and Technology met to 
consider H.R. 1709 on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 and considered 
the following amendments to the bill:
    1. Ms. Johnson of Texas offered an amendment to specify 
that the committee established under H.R. 1709 create common 
metrics to assess progress toward achieving the objectives in 
the strategic plan; to add a responsibility to the Director of 
OSTP to encourage and monitor the agency efforts to ensure the 
strategic plan is executed effectively; and to require that the 
annual report to Congress include a description of the outcome 
of any program assessments completed in the previous year. The 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    2. Ms. Edwards offered an amendment to require that the 
inventory of federally sponsored STEM programs and activities, 
established and maintained by the committee, include 
documentation of the rates of participation by under-
represented minorities. The amendment was agreed to by voice 
vote.
    3. Ms. Fudge offered an amendment to require, that in the 
annual report to Congress, included will be a description of 
how the agencies will disseminate information about resources 
available to teachers, including to teachers and administrators 
in high-need schools (as defined in the COMPETES Act). The 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Gordon moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 1709, as amended, to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill, as amended do pass. The motion 
was agreed to by a voice vote.

              VI. SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE BILL

    H.R. 1709 requires the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy (OSTP), through the National Science and Technology 
Council (NSTC), to establish a committee to coordinate federal 
programs and activities in support of STEM education. In 
addition, the bill requires this committee to develop a STEM 
education strategic plan to inform program and budget planning 
for agencies and to establish and maintain an inventory of 
federally sponsored STEM education activities, including 
documentation on program assessments and participation by 
minorities. Finally, H.R. 1709 requires the Director of OSTP to 
submit an annual report to Congress including a description and 
level of funding of the STEM education programs and activities 
of each participating Federal agency for the previous and 
current fiscal years.

                    VII. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

    Sec. 1. Short title--STEM Education Coordination Act of 
2009.
    Sec. 2. Definition--Provides a definition for the term 
``STEM.''
    Sec. 3. Coordination of Federal STEM education--Requires 
the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), through the 
National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), to establish a 
committee to coordinate Federal programs and activities in 
support of STEM education. Requires the NSTC committee to 
develop a STEM education strategic plan that would: specify and 
prioritize objectives; specify metrics that will be used to 
determine progress toward those objectives; describe how 
agencies will evaluate their programs; describe the role of 
each agency in achieving objectives; and establish and maintain 
an inventory of federally sponsored STEM education activities, 
including documentation on program assessments and rates of 
participation by minorities. Requires the Director of OSTP to 
encourage and monitor the efforts of the NSTC committee. 
Finally, requires an annual report to Congress on the STEM 
education programs and activities of each participating federal 
agency, including program assessments, program funding for the 
previous and current fiscal years, and a description of how the 
agencies will disseminate information about their STEM programs 
to States and to practitioners.

                         VIII. COMMITTEE VIEWS

    The Committee recognizes that an NSTC subcommittee already 
exists to coordinate STEM education activities across the 
federal government, but believes that such effort needs to be 
greatly strengthened and elevated in priority within OSTP and 
the participating agencies.

                           IX. COST ESTIMATE

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section X of this report 
pursuant to House rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 1709 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. H.R. 
1709 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE COST ESTIMATE

                                                       May 5, 2009.
Hon. Bart Gordon,
Chairman, Committee on Science and Technology,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 1709, the STEM 
Education Coordination Act of 2009.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Matthew 
Pickford.
            Sincerely,
                                              Douglas W. Elmendorf.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 1709--STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009

    H.R. 1709 would require the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy (OSTP) to create a new committee under the 
executive branch's National Science and Technology Council. The 
committee would coordinate federal education programs related 
to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Agencies 
that have STEM programs include the National Science 
Foundation, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the 
Departments of Energy and Education. The new committee would be 
responsible for coordinating all programs and assessing their 
effectiveness.
    Based on information from the OSTP, CBO estimates that 
implementing H.R. 1709 would cost about $2 million annually, 
subject to the availability of appropriated funds. That amount 
includes the costs to prepare strategic plans, coordinate 
activities among the affected agencies, and hire new staff for 
the OSTP. The bill would have no effect on direct spending or 
revenues.
    H.R. 1709 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and 
would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Matthew 
Pickford. The estimate was approved by Theresa Gullo, Deputy 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. COMPLIANCE WITH PUBLIC LAW 104-4

    H.R. 1709 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. STATEMENT ON GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House rule XIII, the goal of 
H.R. 1709 is to establish a committee through the National 
Science and Technology Council (NSTC) within the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), to coordinate Federal 
programs and activities in support of science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.

                XIV. CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 1709.

                XV. FEDERAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    H.R. 1709 does not establish nor authorize the 
establishment of any advisory committee.

                 XVI. CONGRESSIONAL ACCOUNTABILITY ACT

    The Committee finds that H.R. 1709 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. EARMARK IDENTIFICATION

    H.R. 1709 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of rule XXI.

     XVIII. STATEMENT ON PREEMPTION OF STATE, LOCAL, OR TRIBAL LAW

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

                     XIX. COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS

    On April 29, 2009, the Committee on Science and Technology 
by voice vote favorably reported the bill, H.R. 1709, as 
amended, to the House with the recommendation that the bill, as 
amended, do pass.


   XX: PROCEEDINGS OF THE MARKUP BY THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON RESEARCH AND 
SCIENCE EDUCATION ON H.R. 1709, THE STEM EDUCATION COORDINATION ACT OF 
                                  2009

                              ----------                              


                        TUESDAY, MARCH 31, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
    Subcommittee on Research and Science Education,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 2:08 a.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Daniel 
Lipinski [Chair of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chair Lipinski. Good afternoon. The Subcommittee will come 
to order. Pursuant to notice, the Subcommittee on Research and 
Science Education meets to consider the following measures, 
H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009, and 
H.R. 1736, the International Science and Technology Cooperation 
Act of 2009.
    We will now proceed with the markup. This afternoon, the 
Subcommittee will consider H.R. 1709, the STEM Education 
Coordination Act of 2009, and H.R. 1736, the International 
Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 2009.
    The first bill we will consider, H.R. 1709, will improve 
the coordination of STEM education programs at the federal 
agencies, so that federal efforts in STEM education can be 
better focused and more effective. An area we explored in great 
detail in the last Congress was the role the Federal Government 
can play in improving STEM education. One conclusion that came 
up time and time again was that coordination and collaboration 
across the agencies must be improved in order to make the most 
of our tax dollars. H.R. 1709 establishes a mechanism to ensure 
that, through better planning, coordination, and evaluation, we 
are maximizing the impact of federally funded STEM education 
activities. I commend Chair Gordon and Mr. Hall for introducing 
this good bipartisan legislation.
    I also want to thank Dr. Baird for introducing H.R. 1736, 
the International Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 
2009 and for all of his work over the last two years that led 
up to this legislation. I would also like to thank Dr. Ehlers 
for his support, passion and work on international science 
cooperation and science diplomacy. We held a hearing 
specifically on a draft version of this bill last week, and the 
feedback from a panel of diverse experts, each with many 
decades of experience, was very positive.
    The shared conclusion was that a committee under OSTP 
devoted to interagency coordination of international science 
and technology partnerships would serve both our domestic 
science and technology agenda and our foreign policy goals. I 
believe that the new Administration gives us a tremendous 
opportunity and a fresh outlook for both science and foreign 
policy, and H.R. 1736 is right at the intersection of those two 
realms. I commend Chair Baird and Dr. Ehlers for this important 
and timely legislation. I thank the Members for their 
participation this morning, and I look forward to a productive 
markup.
    [The prepared statement of Chair Lipinski follows:]
              Prepared Statement of Chair Daniel Lipinski
    This morning the Subcommittee will consider H.R. 1709, the STEM 
Education Coordination Act of 2009, and H.R.1736, the International 
Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 2009.
    I thank the Members for their participation. The first bill we will 
consider this morning is H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act 
of 2009. This legislation will improve the coordination of STEM 
education programs at the federal agencies, so that federal efforts in 
STEM education can be better focused and more effective. An area we 
explored in great detail in the last Congress was the role the Federal 
Government can play in improving STEM education. One conclusion that 
came up time and time again, was that coordination and collaboration 
across the agencies must be improved in order to make the most of our 
tax dollars. H.R. 1709 establishes a mechanism to ensure that, through 
better planning, coordination, and evaluation, we are maximizing the 
impact of federally funded STEM education activities. I commend 
Chairman Gordon and Mr. Hall for introducing this good bipartisan 
legislation.
    The second bill we will consider this morning is this morning is 
H.R. 1736, the International Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 
2009. I want to thank Dr. Baird for introducing this bill and for all 
of his work over the last two years that led up to this legislation. I 
would also like to thank Dr. Ehlers for his support, passion and work 
on international science cooperation and science diplomacy. We held a 
hearing specifically on a draft version of this bill last week and the 
feedback from a panel of diverse experts, each with many decades of 
experience, was very positive. The shared conclusion was that a 
committee under OSTP devoted to interagency coordination of 
international science and technology partnerships would serve both our 
domestic S&T; agenda and our foreign policy goals. I believe that the 
new Administration gives us a tremendous opportunity and a fresh 
outlook for both science and foreign policy, and H.R. 1736 is right at 
the intersection of those two realms. I commend Chairman Baird and Dr. 
Ehlers for this important and timely legislation, and I look forward to 
a productive markup.

    Chair Lipinski. Now, I recognize Dr. Ehlers to present his 
opening remarks.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chair. I am pleased we have the 
opportunity to markup these two important pieces of legislation 
today in the Research and Science Education Subcommittee, and I 
thank you for scheduling these bills. It is good to see that we 
are following regular order and are giving these matters the 
appropriate amount of attention they deserve at all levels of 
the Committee process.
    I will reserve a majority of my comments on each individual 
bill until the appropriate time but will open by simply stating 
that I am pleased to be an original co-sponsor of both H.R. 
1709 and H.R. 1736, and I look forward to a productive 
discussion of both measures this afternoon.
    With that, I yield back the remainder of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Ehlers follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Vernon J. Ehlers
    Mr. Chairman, I am pleased that we have the opportunity to markup 
these two important pieces of legislation today in the Research and 
Science Education Subcommittee, and I thank you for scheduling it this 
afternoon. It is good to see that we are following regular order and 
are giving these matters the appropriate amount of attention they 
deserve at all levels of the Committee process.
    I will reserve a majority of my comments on each individual bill 
until the appropriate time, but will open by simply stating that I am 
pleased to be an original co-sponsor of both H.R. 1709 and H.R. 1736 
and look forward to a productive discussion of both measures.
    I yield back the remainder of my time.

    H.R. 1709
    Chair Lipinski. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers. Members may now 
place statements in the record at this point.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Carnahan follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Russ Carnahan
    Mr. Chairman, thank you for hosting today's markup of H.R. 1709, 
the STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009, and H.R. 1736, the 
International Science and Technology Cooperation Act of 2009.
    As a Member of both the Subcommittee on Research and Science 
Education and the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, I am extremely 
interested in the coordination of international science and technology 
diplomacy. The United States has a central role in science diplomacy, 
building more positive relationships with other countries through 
science. We also understand that the U.S. can better affect national 
security and economic interests by helping to build and partner with 
technological capacity in other countries.
    Today, I offer an amendment to H.R. 1736 which will add a 
requirement that the committee to coordinate international science and 
technology be co-chaired by senior level officials from the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy and the Department of State. Also, my 
amendment would add language to H.R. 1736 that would require the 
committee to address broad issues that influence the ability of the 
U.S. scientists and engineers to collaborate with foreign counterparts, 
including barriers to collaboration and access to scientific 
information.
    I urge my colleagues to support this amendment to H.R. 1736 and I 
would like to thank the Chairman for the ability to offer the 
amendment.

    Chair Lipinski. We will now consider H.R. 1709, the STEM 
Education Coordination Act of 2009. Mr. Gordon is unable to be 
here right now, although I know he wanted to be, so I am going 
to take a moment to describe the bill.
    The Science and Technology Committee, and this subcommittee 
in particular, is devoted to improving STEM education so that 
more students will be interested in and prepared to enter 
careers in the STEM fields. This bill draws on recommendations 
from the 2007 National Science Board Report, ``A National 
Action Plan for Addressing the Critical Needs of the U.S. 
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education 
System.''
    Multiple hearings were held in this subcommittee in the 
last Congress to explore the STEM education activities being 
funded at federal agencies. The Subcommittee held a hearing 
with local STEM educators to learn their perspectives on 
federally funded programs. In a later hearing, the Subcommittee 
heard from agency representatives about the work they are doing 
to improve their STEM education programs and activities. The 
Subcommittee also held a hearing to examine the findings of the 
National Science Board Report.
    The bill we are considering today is the product of the 
National Science Board's recommendations and those three 
hearings. H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 
2009, will establish a committee on STEM Education under the 
National Science and Technology Council. This committee would 
be charged with coordinating the STEM education programs and 
activities being funded through the federal R&D; mission 
agencies.
    The agencies are each investing in STEM education and doing 
some great work, but due to a lack of coordination, they have 
had trouble evaluating the programs and building awareness of 
their successes among teachers. Oftentimes, the agencies are 
even unaware of the useful work being done at other agencies.
    Specifically, H.R. 1709 would charge the committee with 
developing a STEM education strategic plan to specify and 
prioritize annual and long-term objectives. The strategic plan 
will also include metrics that will be used to assess progress 
and descriptions of the programs and activities conducted by 
each agency in support of the overall objective.
    In addition, the committee is charged with establishing and 
maintaining a comprehensive inventory of federally sponsored 
STEM education activities. This inventory will include 
assessments of the various programs. And finally, the bill 
would require an annual report to Congress, including a 
description and funding level of STEM education programs and 
activities at each of the participating federal agencies for 
both the previous and the current fiscal years.
    The issue of STEM education is one that is critically 
important to the future of our country. As someone who has a 
background as an engineer, I certainly know that to be the 
case, and this bill does a very good job in making sure that we 
are doing all we can to get the most out of our STEM education 
activities at the federal level.
    I want to thank Chair Gordon for introducing this good 
bipartisan bill, and I would also like to thank Ranking Member 
Hall and Dr. Ehlers who have joined me in co-sponsoring this 
bill.
    H.R. 1709 is an important piece of legislation that will 
bring about greatly needed interagency coordination of STEM 
activities funded across the Federal Government, and I urge my 
colleagues to support it.
    [The prepared statement of Chair Lipinski follows:]
              Prepared Statement of Chair Daniel Lipinski
    The Science and Technology Committee--and this subcommittee in 
particular--is devoted to improving STEM education so that more 
students will be interested in, and prepared to enter careers in STEM 
field.
    This bill draws on recommendations from a 2007 National Science 
Board report, ``A National Action Plan for Addressing the Critical 
Needs of the U.S. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Education System.''
    Multiple hearings were held before this subcommittee in the last 
Congress to explore the STEM education activities being funded at 
federal agencies.
    The Subcommittee held a hearing with local STEM educators to learn 
their perspectives on federally funded programs.
    In a later hearing, the Subcommittee heard from agency 
representatives about the work they are doing to improve their STEM 
education programs and activities. The Subcommittee also held a hearing 
to examine the findings of the National Science Board report. The bill 
we are considering today is the product of the National Science Board's 
recommendations and those three hearings.
    H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009, would 
establish a committee on STEM education under the National Science and 
Technology Council.
    This committee would be charged with coordinating the STEM 
education programs and activities being funded through the Federal R&D; 
mission agencies. The agencies are each investing in STEM education and 
doing some great work, but due to a lack of coordination, they have had 
trouble evaluating their programs and building awareness of their 
successes among teachers. Often times, the agencies are even unaware of 
the useful work being done at other agencies.
    Specifically, H.R. 1709 would charge the committee with developing 
a STEM education strategic plan to specify and prioritize annual and 
long-term objectives.
    The strategic plan will also include metrics that will be used to 
assess progress and descriptions of the programs and activities 
conducted by each agency in support of the overall objectives.
    In addition, the committee is charged with establishing and 
maintaining a comprehensive inventory of federally sponsored STEM 
education activities. This inventory will include assessments of the 
various programs. Finally, the bill would require an annual report to 
Congress including a description and funding level of the STEM 
Education programs and activities at each of the participating federal 
agencies for both the previous and current fiscal years.
    I want to thank Chairman Gordon for introducing this good 
bipartisan legislation. I would also like to thank Ranking Member Hall 
and Dr. Ehlers who have joined me in co-sponsoring the bill. H.R. 1709 
is an important piece of legislation that will bring about greatly 
needed interagency coordination of STEM activities funded across the 
Federal Government, and I urge my colleagues to support it.

    Chair Lipinski. I now recognize Dr. Ehlers to present any 
remarks on the bill.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chair. I join you in expressing 
joy that this bill is coming up at this time. The federal STEM 
Education Coordination bill before us today is the result of 
several hearings and two reports, both in the space of a couple 
years, one from the National Science Board and one from the 
Academic Competitiveness Council. As the Academic 
Competitiveness Council report revealed, there are many federal 
STEM education efforts, but overall our federal STEM programs 
suffer from a lack of both evaluation and coordination. 
Improving this coordination is challenging, but I believe we 
are taking appropriate steps to do that today, at least with 
regard to coordination among the federal agencies.
    We are taking the recommendation of the National Science 
Board and creating a committee on STEM Education within the 
National Science and Technology Council. While there is 
currently an Education and Workforce Subcommittee under the 
Committee on Science, this issue is important enough that it 
warrants its own committee and a higher profile within the 
Office of Science and Technology Policy.
    This is an issue that is near to my heart because I have 
taught STEM education for many years at the college and 
university level, and I am pleased to be an original cosponsor 
of H.R. 1709, along with Ranking Member Hall, Chair Gordon and 
you, Mr. Chair, and I look forward to advancing this bill to 
the Full Committee.
    I yield back the remainder of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Ehlers follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Vernon J. Ehlers
    The federal STEM education coordination bill before us today is the 
result of several hearings and two reports, one from the National 
Science Board (NSB) and one from the Academic Competitive Council. As 
the Academic Competitive Council report revealed, there are many 
federal STEM education efforts, but overall our federal STEM programs 
suffer from a lack of both evaluation and coordination. Improving this 
coordination is challenging, but I believe we are taking appropriate 
steps to do that today, at least with regard to coordination among the 
federal agencies.
    We are taking the recommendation of the National Science Board and 
creating a committee on STEM Education within the National Science and 
Technology Council (NSTC). While there is currently an Education and 
Workforce Subcommittee under the Committee on Science, this issue is 
important enough that it warrants its own committee and a higher 
profile within the Office of Science and Technology Policy.
    This is an issue that is near to my heart and that I have been 
working on for many years. I am pleased to be an original co-sponsor of 
H.R. 1709 along with Ranking Member Hall, Chairman Gordon and you, and 
look forward to advancing this bill to the Full Committee.
    I yield back the remainder of my time.

    Chair Lipinski. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers. We are now expecting 
votes at any minute on the Floor. We will move forward here and 
hopefully we will get through as much as we can before we are 
going to have to take a break.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized on this bill? I ask 
unanimous consent that the bill is considered as read and open 
to amendment at any point and that the Members proceed with the 
amendments in the order on the roster. Without objection, so 
ordered.
    First amendment on the roster is an amendment offered by 
the gentlelady from Ohio, Ms. Fudge. Are you ready to proceed 
with your amendment?
    Ms. Fudge. Yes, Mr. Chair.
    Chair Lipinski. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1709, amendment number 009, 
offered by Ms. Fudge of Ohio.
    Chair Lipinski. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered. I recognize the 
gentlelady for five minutes to explain the amendment.
    Ms. Fudge. Thank you, Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, I have an 
amendment to the STEM Coordination Act of 2009. My amendment 
will direct the proposed committee under the National Science 
and Technology Council to develop a strategy to identify 
geographic areas in the United States that have the lowest STEM 
performance and increase interest and achievement in such 
areas.
    The demand for a STEM literate workforce will only increase 
in the future. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 
science and technology jobs will increase by 26 percent 
compared to 15 percent for all other occupations from 2002 to 
2012. Additionally, computer science and mathematics are 
projected to increase by 39 percent. In 2007, according to the 
U.S. Department of Labor, the State of Ohio has lost over 
200,000 non-farm jobs since December of 2000. This represents a 
3.7 percent lost, and it is the worst seven-year period of job 
losses since the state started keeping records in 1939.
    Ten of Ohio's metropolitan areas including my district 
suffered plunging job losses in manufacturing that are more 
severe than for the State of Ohio. In an increasingly 
competitive global job market, it is imperative that every 
child in our country has the opportunity and resources 
necessary to succeed in STEM fields. Every child deserves the 
opportunity to excel in science, technology, engineering and 
math, and the purpose of my amendment is to achieve that goal.
    Working together I believe we can raise standards, prepare 
strong educators, and motivate more students to pursue STEM 
careers and make certain STEM education is a top priority for 
our country in all of its unique regions. I understand there 
are some concerns about the specific wording of this amendment, 
and I would like to work with the Chair and the Ranking Member 
to refine the language so it can be included in the bill. So at 
this time, I would like to withdraw this amendment, Mr. Chair.
    Chair Lipinski. Thank you, Ms. Fudge, and certainly I would 
be happy to continue to work with you. It is an important 
issue, and at this time I am going to recognize Dr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chair. It is certainly an issue 
that should be addressed, and I think we can address it at the 
appropriate time. But I appreciate the gentlewoman's 
willingness to withdraw it at this point as we continue to work 
on it.
    Chair Lipinski. If there is no objection, the amendment 
will be withdrawn. Without objection, so ordered.
    Are there any other amendments to this bill? If no, then 
the vote is on the bill, H.R. 1709. All in favor will say aye, 
all opposed will say no. In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes 
have it.
    I recognize myself to offer a motion. I move that the 
Subcommittee favorably report H.R. 1709 to the Full Committee. 
Furthermore, I move that the staff be instructed to prepare the 
Subcommittee report and make necessary technical and conforming 
changes to the bill in accordance with the recommendations of 
the Subcommittee.
    The question is on the motion to report the bill favorably. 
Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying aye, 
opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the bill is favorably 
reported. Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid 
upon the table. Members will have two subsequent calendar days 
in which to submit supplemental, Minority, or additional views 
on the measure.
    I want to thank Members for their attendance and very quick 
work that we made of these bills. Dr. Ehlers, you are 
recognized.
    Mr. Ehlers. Just one quick comment. After this performance, 
I think you are ready for NASCAR.
    Chair Lipinski. Thank you very much. I am all set. I want 
to thank everybody, and we have plenty of time to get down to 
vote. This concludes our Subcommittee markup.
    [Whereupon, at 2:34 p.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


        H.R. 1709, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendment Roster



                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
           H.R. 1709, STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009

Sec. 1. Short title

    STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009.

Sec. 2. Definition

    Provides a definition for the term `STEM.'

Sec. 3. Coordination of Federal STEM Education

    Requires the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), 
through the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), to 
establish a committee to coordinate federal programs and activities in 
support of STEM education. In addition, requires this committee to 
develop a STEM education strategic plan to inform program and budget 
planning for agencies and to establish and maintain an inventory of 
federally sponsored STEM education activities, including documentation 
on program assessments. Finally, requires the Director of OSTP to 
submit an annual report to Congress, including a description and level 
of funding of the STEM education programs and activities of each 
participating federal agency for the previous and current fiscal years.




 XXI: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 1709, THE STEM 
                   EDUCATION COOPERATION ACT OF 2009

                              ----------                              


                       WEDNESDAY, APRIL 29, 2009

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:03 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chair of the Committee] presiding.
    Chair Gordon. Good morning, everyone. The Committee will 
come to order pursuant to notice. The Committee on Science and 
Technology meets to consider the following measures: H.R. 2020, 
the Networking and Information Technology Research and 
Development Act of 2009, H.R. 1736, the International Science 
and Technology Cooperation Act of 2009, and H.R. 1709, the STEM 
Education Coordination Act of 2009.
    I would like to thank Chair Lipinski and Ranking Member 
Ehlers and other Members of the Research and Science Education 
Subcommittee for their work to improve these bills at the 
Subcommittee level, and I think we should also in abstentia 
thank Jim Wilson. I hope that you will pass it onto him for 
leaving a good legacy to us, which was certainly improved with 
our current staff and Members.
    While the subject matter varies greatly, there is a common 
theme in all three of the bills before us today. They all 
strengthen an interagency coordination process to achieve the 
set of goals that no one agency can achieve on its own. In 
fact, this theme cuts across many of the priorities of the 
Science and Technology Committee of this Congress, beginning 
with the National Nanotechnology Initiative Bill that passed 
the House in February, to the National Water Research and 
Development Initiative Act of 2009, that passed the House by a 
vote of 413 to 10 just last week.
    H.R. 2020, the Networking and Information Technology 
Research and Development Act of 2009, continues to improve and 
update a program that was originally created by the Committee 
in the High Performance Competing Act of 1991. The NITRD 
Program, as it is known, involves a collaboration of more than 
a dozen federal research and development agencies for current 
total federal investment of approximately $3.5 billion. This 
may sound like a lot, but the European Union is investing $7 
billion over the next five years in cyber physical systems 
alone. To ensure that we make the most effective use of our own 
resources to remain a leader in these fields, it is critical 
that these many agencies come together to develop common goals 
and well-defined strategies for networking and information 
technology R&D.;
    H.R. 2020 strengthens the interagency strategic planning 
process, formally authorizes the National Coordination Office 
that oversees and enforces this process, and requires that a 
wide range of industry and academic stakeholders have input 
into the process. Given how rapidly this field evolves, a 
regular and comprehensive look at the NITRD Program by Congress 
is timely.
    And I want to thank Mr. Hall for introducing this important 
piece of legislation with me, and I urge my colleagues to 
support it.
    H.R. 1736, the International Science and Technology 
Cooperation Act of 2009, would create a committee under the 
National Science and Technology Council to coordinate 
international S&T; activities at our federal agencies by 
bringing together the Department of State and the R&D; 
activities to focus on the international component of national 
R&D; priorities. A similar committee in the 1990s launched some 
important initiatives, most notably in the area of infectious 
diseases.
    It is critical that we don't miss opportunities to leverage 
our resources against those of other nations to tackle today's 
greatest global challenges, including energy and water, and to 
strengthen the contribution of U.S. science and technology to 
our national security. There is no existing entity whose 
primary purpose is to look across the Federal Government for 
such opportunities, and I commend Dr. Baird and Dr. Ehlers for 
introducing this legislation, and I urge my colleagues to 
support it.
    H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009, 
would strengthen and elevate an existing committee under NSTC 
to coordinate STEM education activities across the Federal 
Government. When half the world's workers earn less than $2 a 
day, we cannot compete on numbers. To stay competitive we must 
keep feeding the marketplace with new ideas that lead to new 
U.S. companies and new highly-paying jobs. The foundation for 
this innovative economy is the 21st century skilled workforce.
    The Federal Government can play an important role in STEM 
education at all levels because of the richness of S&T; 
resources at our science agencies. It may not surprise you to 
learn that our science agencies have little idea what other 
science agencies are funding in terms of STEM education and 
often don't even communicate between offices within a single 
agency. This is not an acceptable situation. Mr. Hall has 
joined me in introducing this bill because we agree that 
agencies need to be sharing best practices with each other, 
evaluating their programs for effectiveness and generally 
making more efficient and effective use of taxpayers' dollars.
    And I want to thank Mr. Hall and the Chair and Ranking 
Member of the Research and Science Education Subcommittee for 
introducing this bill with me, and I urge my colleagues to 
support it.
    These are three good bipartisan bills that strengthen 
interagency coordination and as President Obama has said in his 
inaugural, make our government smarter. I thank my colleagues 
and staff for their hard work on these bills, and I look 
forward to improving them even further with your amendments 
today.
    And I now recognize Mr. Hall, who will soon be recognizing 
his 49th what, birthday, several times over.
    Mr. Hall. My 39th.
    Chair Gordon. Thirty-ninth. Thirty-ninth.
    Mr. Hall. Thirty-ninth reunion of my 39th birthday.
    Chair Gordon. And I now recognize the spry Mr. Hall for 
his----
    [The prepared statement of Chair Gordon follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chair Bart Gordon
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee on Science and Technology meets 
to consider the following measures:

          H.R. 2020, the Networking and Information Technology 
        Research and Development Act of 2009;

          H.R. 1736, the International Science and Technology 
        Cooperation Act of 2009; and,

          H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 
        2009.

    As I mentioned, the Committee will consider three good bills today.
    I would like to thank Chairman Lipinski and Ranking Member Ehlers 
and other Members of the Research and Science Education Subcommittee 
for their work to improve these bills at the Subcommittee level.
    While the subject matter varies greatly, there is a common theme in 
all three of the bills before us today. They all strengthen an 
interagency coordination process to achieve a set of goals that no one 
agency can achieve on its own.
    In fact, this theme cuts across many of the priorities of the 
Science and Technology Committee this Congress, beginning with the 
National Nanotechnology Initiative bill that passed the House in 
February, to the National Water Research and Development Initiative Act 
of 2009 that passed the House by a vote of 413 to 10 just last week.
    H.R. 2020, the Networking and Information Technology Research and 
Development Act of 2009, continues to improve and update a program that 
was originally created by this committee in the High Performance 
Computing Act of 1991.
    The NITRD Program, as it is known, involves a collaboration of more 
than a dozen federal research and development agencies for a current 
total federal investment of approximately $3.5 billion.
    This may sound like a lot, but the European Union is investing $7 
billion over the next five years in cyberphysical systems alone.
    To ensure that we make the most effective use of our own resources 
to remain a leader in these fields, it is critical that these many 
agencies come together to develop common goals and well defined 
strategies for networking and information technology R&D.;
    H.R. 2020 strengthens the interagency strategic planning process, 
formally authorizes the National Coordination Office that oversees and 
enforces this process, and requires that a wide range of industry and 
academic stakeholders have input into the process. Given how rapidly 
this field evolves, a regular and comprehensive look at the NITRD 
program by Congress is timely.
    I thank Mr. Hall for introducing this important piece of 
legislation with me and I urge my colleagues to support it.
    H.R. 1736, the International Science and Technology Cooperation Act 
of 2009, would recreate a committee under the National Science and 
Technology Council (NSTC) to coordinate international S&T; activities at 
our federal agencies.
    By bringing together the Department of State and the R&D; agencies 
to focus on the international component of national R&D; priorities, a 
similar committee in the 1990's launched some important initiatives, 
most notably in the area of infectious diseases.
    It is critical that we don't miss opportunities to leverage our 
resources against those of other nations to tackle today's greatest 
global challenges, including energy and water, and to strengthen the 
contribution of U.S. science and technology to our national security.
    There is no existing entity whose primary purpose is to look across 
the Federal Government for such opportunities. I commend Dr. Baird and 
Dr. Ehlers for introducing this legislation and I urge my colleagues to 
support it.
    H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 2009, would 
strengthen and elevate an existing committee under NSTC to coordinate 
STEM education activities across the Federal Government.
    When half the world's workers earn less than $2 a day, we cannot 
compete on numbers. To stay competitive, we must keep feeding the 
marketplace with new ideas that lead to new U.S. companies and new 
highly paying jobs. The foundation for this innovation economy is the 
21st century skilled workforce.
    The Federal Government can play an important role in STEM education 
at all levels because of the richness of the S&T; resources at our 
science agencies. It may not surprise you to learn that our science 
agencies have little idea what other science agencies are funding in 
terms of STEM education and often don't even communicate between 
offices within a single agency.
    This is not an acceptable situation.
    Mr. Hall joined me in introducing this bill because we agree that 
agencies need to be sharing best practices with each other, evaluating 
their programs for effectiveness, and generally making more efficient 
and effective use of taxpayers' dollars. I thank Mr. Hall, and the 
Chair and Ranking Member of the Research and Science Education 
Subcommittee for introducing this bill with me and I urge my colleagues 
to support it.
    These are three good bipartisan bills that strengthen interagency 
coordination to, as President Obama said in his inaugural, make our 
government ``smarter.'' I thank my colleagues and staff for their hard 
work on these bills and I look forward to improving them even further 
with your amendments today.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his opening remarks.

    Mr. Hall. Good morning, Mr. Chair, and I thank you for 
several reasons. I don't know why I have to thank you because 
it is your duty to schedule this markup, but I still thank you 
for doing it, and whoever wrote this for me thanks you, and 
that means that all of us on this side thank you. So--and you 
thank me, and we are all thanked today.
    It would appear that we are doing a great deal of 
coordinating, and that is true. In addition to authorizing the 
Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, 
the NITRD Program, we are also marking up legislation to 
improve STEM education coordination among the federal agencies 
and a bill to coordinate science and technology initiatives 
that can help foster international cooperation.
    All of these bills do exactly what this committee should be 
doing; ensuring that our government is effectively and 
efficiently using federal science and technology dollars to 
guarantee we stay on top of cutting-edge research, both 
domestically and internationally, while continuing to develop 
the best and brightest STEM workforce for our future.
    I am pleased to join you as an original co-sponsor of H.R. 
2020 and the Federal STEM Education Coordination Act, 2020 and 
1709. I also want to thank you for maintaining regular order 
with both H.R. 1709 and H.R. 1736 and giving everyone the 
opportunity to work on these at Subcommittee level first. That 
is the way you work things out.
    When it comes to STEM education in particular, I think we 
are all better served to have Dr. Ehlers involved in the 
beginning as he brings so much to the table along this line.
    I know that all--both of our staffs have worked diligently 
to get these bills to where we are today, and I look forward to 
a discussion and proposed amendments, and I thank you.
    I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall

    Good morning, Mr. Chairman. I want to thank you for scheduling this 
markup and for the bipartisan spirit in which the bills before us today 
have been handled. It would appear that we are doing a great deal of 
coordinating today. In addition to authorizing the Networking and 
Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) program, we are 
also marking-up legislation to improve STEM education coordination 
among the federal agencies and a bill to help coordinate science and 
technology initiatives that can help foster international cooperation.
    All of these bills do exactly what this committee should be doing, 
ensuring that our government is effectively and efficiently using 
federal science and technology dollars to guarantee we stay on top of 
cutting edge research both domestically and internationally, while 
continuing to develop the best and brightest STEM workforce for our 
future.
    I am pleased to join you as an original co-sponsor of H.R. 2020, 
the NITRD Authorization Act, and H.R. 1709, the Federal STEM Education 
Coordination Act. I want to also thank you for maintaining regular 
order with both H.R. 1709 and H.R. 1736 and giving everyone the 
opportunity to work on these at the Subcommittee level first. When it 
comes to STEM education, in particular, I think we are all better 
served to have Dr. Ehlers involved from the beginning, as he brings so 
much to the table.
    I know both of our staffs have worked diligently to get these bills 
to where we are today, and I look forward to a discussion of proposed 
amendments.

    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Hall.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Mitchell follows:]

         Prepared Statement of Representative Harry E. Mitchell

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Today we will mark up the Networking and Information Technology 
Research and Development Act, H.R. 2020, the International Science and 
Technology Cooperation Act, H.R. 1736, and the STEM Education 
Coordination Act, H.R. 1709.
    Last Congress, we took a critical step in encouraging students and 
teachers to focus on STEM education in the America COMPETES Act, which 
is now law. Ensuring that our students receive a top level STEM 
education is vital to grow our economy and remain competitive in the 
global economy.
    However, I have heard from STEM teachers in Arizona that they are 
struggling to identify federal resources to help them develop effective 
STEM lesson plans.
    H.R. 1709 would help STEM teachers in Arizona and nationwide by 
establishing a committee to coordinate federal programs and activities 
in support of STEM education through the Office of Science and 
Technology and Policy (OSTP).
    I encourage my colleagues to support this important legislation.
    I yield back.

    Chair Gordon.We will now consider H.R. 1709, the STEM 
Education Coordination Act of 2009, and I recognize myself to 
describe the bill.
    Science, technology, engineering, and math, STEM education, 
is one of the most critical issues facing our nation today. 
Difficult economic times serve to remind us of the importance 
of education because we simply cannot compete in an 
increasingly-global economy without a highly-skilled, 21st 
century workforce. Real improvements in STEM education requires 
commitment by the local, State, and federal level. States, 
local school districts, and teachers all over the Nation are 
working in the trenches every day to improve the quality of 
STEM education for our students.
    And while our federal agencies all have worthwhile programs 
in place to share knowledge and passion for STEM with students, 
there is little communication or collaboration among the 
agencies with regard to their STEM education work. And it has 
become increasingly clear that rather than reinventing the 
wheel, agency by agency, there is a desperate need for a forum 
in which they can come together to discuss findings on the most 
effective research-based education programming, share tools for 
improved dissemination, create common metrics for evaluation, 
and avoid providing duplicate programs. The bill we are talking 
about today, H.R. 1709, the STEM Education Coordination Act of 
2009, does just that.
    H.R. 1709 would establish a committee on STEM education 
under the National Science and Technology Council, charged with 
coordinating the STEM education programs and activities being 
funded through the federal mission agencies.
    Specifically, H.R. 1709 would charge the committee with 
developing a STEM education strategic plan to specify and 
prioritize annual and long-term objectives and to develop 
common metrics to be used to assess progress of the programs 
and activities included by each agency.
    The bill also charges the committee with establishing and 
maintaining a comprehensive inventory of federally-sponsored 
STEM education activities. This valuable database will include 
assessment of the various programs and activities and will help 
the STEM education community learn what the Federal Government 
has to offer.
    Finally, the bill will require an annual report to Congress 
including a description and funding level of the STEM education 
programs and activities at each of the participating federal 
agencies for both the previous and the current fiscal years.
    I would like to thank Ranking Member Hall, Dr. Lipinski, 
and Dr. Ehlers, who have joined me in co-sponsoring this good 
bipartisan bill and urge my colleagues to support it.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present any remarks on the 
bill.

                Prepared Statement of Chair Bart Gordon

    Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) Education is one 
of the most critical issues facing our nation today. Difficult economic 
times serve to remind us of the importance of education, because we 
simply cannot compete in the increasingly global economy without a 
highly skilled 21st century workforce.
    Real improvement in STEM education requires commitment at the 
local, State, and federal level. States, local school districts, and 
teachers all over the Nation are working in the trenches everyday to 
improve the quality of STEM education for our students.
    Our federal science agencies, with their valuable S&T; resources, 
can play an important role in supporting and educating students, 
teachers, and the general public. Unfortunately, we are not making the 
most effective use of those resources.
    While the agencies all have worthwhile programs in place to share 
knowledge and passion for STEM with students, there is little 
communication or collaboration among the agencies with regard to their 
STEM education work.
    It has become increasingly clear that rather than reinventing the 
wheel, agency by agency, there is a desperate need for a forum in which 
they can come together to discuss findings on the most effective, 
research-based educational programming, share tools for improved 
dissemination, create common metrics for evaluation, and avoid 
providing duplicative programs.
    The bill we are taking up today, H.R. 1709, the STEM Education 
Coordination Act of 2009 does just that.
    H.R. 1709 would establish a committee on STEM education under the 
National Science and Technology Council charged with coordinating the 
STEM education programs and activities being funded through the federal 
mission agencies.
    Specifically, H.R. 1709 would charge the committee with developing 
a STEM education strategic plan to specify and prioritize annual and 
long-term objectives, and to develop common metrics to be used to 
assess progress of the programs and activities conducted by each 
agency.
    This bill also charges the committee with establishing and 
maintaining a comprehensive inventory of federally sponsored STEM 
education activities.
    This valuable database will include assessments of the various 
programs and activities, and will help the STEM community learn what 
the Federal Government has to offer.
    Finally, the bill would require an annual report to Congress 
including a description and funding level of the STEM Education 
programs and activities at each of the participating federal agencies 
for both the previous and current fiscal years.
    I would like to thank Ranking Member Hall, Dr. Lipinski, and Dr. 
Ehlers who have joined me in co-sponsoring this good bipartisan bill, 
and I urge my colleagues to support it.
    I now recognize Mr. Hall to present any remarks on the bill.

    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chair, thank you, and STEM education is an 
issue that this committee takes very seriously and will 
continue to do so. It is just as imperative that we be able to 
identify those STEM Programs in the Federal Government that are 
effective and could serve as models for other agencies as it 
is, I guess, for us to eliminate those programs that are 
duplicative and wasteful.
    This bill goes a long way in attaining both of these goals, 
and I am pleased to be an original co-sponsor. Again, I would 
like to yield the balance of my time to the distinguished 
Ranking Member of the Research and Science Education 
Subcommittee, Dr. Ehlers.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall

    STEM education is an issue that this committee takes very seriously 
and will continue to do so. It is just as imperative that we be able to 
identify those STEM programs in the Federal Government that are 
effective and could serve as models for other agencies--as it is for us 
to eliminate those programs that are duplicative and wasteful. This 
bill goes a long way in attaining both of those goals, and I am pleased 
to be an original co-sponsor. Again, I would like to yield the balance 
of my time to the distinguished Ranking Member of the Research and 
Science Education Subcommittee, Dr. Ehlers.

    Mr. Ehlers. I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I 
strongly support the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math 
Education Coordination Act of 2009.
    I have been involved in STEM education since roughly 1967, 
and taught for 20 years, and by choice taught courses aimed at 
non-scientists. My scientist colleagues thought I was crazy for 
being willing to do that, but they were delighted, because it 
meant they didn't have to do it. But I felt one of the 
principle things I could do is educate teachers well enough so 
that they could teach well in the classroom, and that is how I 
took this path.
    One of the simplest ways to improve STEM education at this 
point is to keep better track of what the Federal Government is 
doing already to strengthen our innovation capacity through 
programs spread across the Federal Government, and there are 
many such programs. The Academic Competitiveness Council report 
of 2007 revealed a snapshot of STEM programs across the Federal 
Government, but the information it provided was only the tip of 
the iceberg. A sustained, comprehensive inventory of federal 
STEM programs remained illusive.
    Later in 2007, the National Science Board recommended the 
creation of a standing committee of the National Science and 
Technology Council with the responsibility of coordination of 
STEM education activities across the Federal Government.
    I am pleased that this recommendation will be a reality 
when the legislation before us today is signed into law. I 
believe that increased transparency will be helpful to STEM 
practitioners in the Federal Government and to the public. It 
is very important that we recognize that there is strength and 
diversity of STEM education programs. Each one may have a 
unique goal for improving STEM education.
    Conversely, programs with similar goals may reach a unique 
population or age group. Each one can successfully contribute 
to the broad goal of strengthening our nation's capacity for 
creativity and innovation. By shedding light on the various 
goals, methods, and successes of federal STEM education 
programs we will be able to better support our economic and 
national security.
    The ultimate aim of all this coordination is, of course, to 
prepare superior materials and make them available to teachers 
across the Nation who can, through the means provided by this, 
be alert and aware of what is happening in the developments of 
science and math teaching. And I believe this bill will go a 
long way towards helping with that.
    With that I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Ehlers follows:]

         Prepared Statement of Representative Vernon J. Ehlers

    I support the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) 
Education Coordination Act of 2009. There are many steps that need to 
be taken to improve STEM Education in our country, but one of the 
simplest ones is keeping better track of what the Federal Government is 
already doing to strengthen our innovation capacity through programs 
spread across the Federal Government.
    The Academic Competitiveness Council (ACC) report of 2007 revealed 
a snapshot of STEM programs across the Federal Government, but the 
information it provided was only the tip of the iceberg. A sustained, 
comprehensive inventory of federal STEM programs remained elusive. 
Later in 2007 the National Science Board recommended the creation of a 
standing committee of the National Science and Technology Council with 
the responsibility of coordination of STEM Education activities across 
the Federal Government. I am pleased that this recommendation will be a 
reality when the legislation before us today is signed into law.
    I believe that increased transparency will be helpful to STEM 
practitioners in the Federal Government and to the public. It is very 
important that we recognize that there is strength in diversity of STEM 
education programs; each one may have a unique goal for improving STEM 
education. Conversely, programs with similar goals may reach a unique 
population or age group. Each one can successfully contribute to the 
broad goal of strengthening our nation's capacity for creativity and 
innovation. By shedding light on the various goals, methods, and 
successes of federal STEM Education programs we will be able to better 
support our economic and national security.

    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers, for your comments and 
more importantly your work, long work in this area.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Mr. Bartlett. Mr. Chair.
    Chair Gordon. Dr. Bartlett.
    Mr. Bartlett. I am a strong supporter of this bill. This 
year China will graduate seven times as many engineers as we 
graduate and about half of our engineering graduates will be 
Chinese students. So this clearly, clearly is an issue of 
national concern.
    As important as this bill is and as hard as we work on 
this, what we really need in our country is a cultural change. 
A society gets what it appreciates, and the reality is that as 
a society we just don't appreciate academic achievers in these 
areas. Bright young boys are called geeks and nerds and pretty 
girls won't date them, and bright girls have to play dumb to 
get a date. Is this dumb? This is really dumb. We need a 
cultural change, and let us hope that it starts here.
    Thank you very much, Mr. Chair.
    Mr. Ehlers. Will the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Bartlett. Yes, sir. I would be happy to yield.
    Mr. Ehlers. I just want to make it clear on the record that 
I am a nerd, and I am proud of it. And I also married a 
beautiful woman.
    Mr. Baird. Would the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Bartlett. I would be happy to.
    Mr. Baird. I better say the same thing on behalf of my 
spouse as well.
    Chair Gordon. Okay. With unanimous consent you are all 
nerds, so does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Mr. Rohrabacher. I am a surfer, Mr. Chair.
    Chair Gordon. And a near-Earth object.
    I ask unanimous consent that the bill is considered as read 
and open to the amendment at any point and that the Members 
proceed with the amendments in the order of the roster.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is the amendment offered 
by the gentlelady from Texas. Are you ready to proceed with 
your amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. Yes.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report----
    Ms. Johnson. I have an amendment at the desk.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1709, amendment number 041, 
offered by Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentlelady for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much, Mr. Gordon, and our 
Ranking Member and fellow Members of the Committee.
    My amendment to H.R. 1709 seeks to strengthen the 
coordinating committee that will be established within the 
National Science and Technology Council. As you know, this 
committee will be responsible for coordinating federal 
education programs in the area of science, technology, 
engineering, and math that is commonly called STEM courses. The 
committee also will be asked to develop a five-year strategic 
plan for STEM education.
    My amendment indicates that common metrics will be used to 
assess progress in achieving the objectives of the strategic 
plan. And in addition, the amendment states that the Director 
of Office of Science and Technology Policy should encourage and 
monitor the efforts of participating agencies to ensure that 
this strategic plan is developed and executed effectively. And 
further, the amendment asks the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy to monitor the agencies to ensure that the 
objectives of the strategic plan are met.
    In the report to Congress described in this bill my 
amendment also states that descriptions of progress shall 
include a description of the outcome of any program assessments 
completed in the previous year. It is clear that the Office of 
Science and Technology Policy will take a greater role in 
coordinating our federal STEM education programs.
    And while I support this goal, I also believe that it is 
critical, of critical importance to measure the success of 
every dollar that we spend on STEM education. We must see 
quantifiable results. The accountability must exist for every 
single program, and Members of this committee must answer to 
our constituents to ensure that federal investments are making 
a difference.
    It is my hope that the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy takes on this coordinating role that will also encourage 
agencies to do regular performance assessments of all programs 
that we support. It is the responsibility of this committee to 
ensure these programs are succeeding. For only when we measure 
for failure or success can we make informed judgments the 
programs for which we advocate.
    Thank you for considering this amendment, and I urge the 
support of it.
    I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Good morning, Chairman Gordon, Ranking Member Hall, and fellow 
Members.
    My amendment to H.R. 1709 seeks to strengthen the coordinating 
committee that will be established within the National Science and 
Technology Council.
    As you know, this committee will be responsible for coordinating 
federal education programs in the areas of science, technology, 
engineering, and math--also called STEM.
    The committee will also be asked to develop a five-year strategic 
plan on STEM education.
    My amendment indicates that common metrics will be used to assess 
progress in achieving the objectives of the strategic plan.
    In addition, the amendment states that the Director of the Office 
of Science and Technology Policy shall encourage and monitor the 
efforts of participating agencies to ensure that this strategic plan is 
developed and executed effectively.
    Furthermore, the amendment tasks OSTP to monitor the agencies to 
ensure that the objectives of the strategic plan are met.
    In the report to Congress described in the bill, my amendment also 
states that descriptions of progress shall include a description of the 
outcome of any program assessments completed in the previous year.
    Mr. Chairman, it is clear that OSTP will take on a greater role in 
coordinating our federal STEM education programs.
    While I support this goal, I also believe that it is of critical 
importance to measure the success of every dollar that we spend on STEM 
education.
    We must see quantifiable results. The accountability must exist for 
every single program.
    Members of this committee must answer to our constituents to ensure 
that federal investments are making a difference.
    It is my hope that as OSTP takes on this coordinating role that it 
will also encourage the agencies do regular performance assessments of 
all the programs that we support.
    It is the responsibility of this committee to ensure these programs 
are succeeding.
    For only when we measure for failure or success can we make 
informed judgments of the programs for which we advocate.
    Thank you for considering this amendment. I urge its support and 
yield back my time.

    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Johnson. We certainly want to 
get a dollar's worth, the benefit for a dollar spent, and this 
bill will help--your amendment will help with that.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the amendment is agreed 
to.
    The second amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentlelady from Maryland, Ms. Edwards. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Edwards. Yes, Mr. Chair. I have an amendment at the 
desk.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1709 offered by Ms. Edwards of 
Maryland, amendment number 014.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentlelady for five minutes to explain her 
amendment.
    Ms. Edwards. I thank the Chair for his recognition and 
leadership on this committee. This committee--call me a nerd 
because this committee handles about the most exciting and 
timely issues that really challenge each of us to be critical 
and strategic thinkers, and I think it is because of your 
oversight and leadership that we accomplish the work before us 
so effectively and efficiently and in bipartisan fashion and 
with a little bit of humor.
    Mr. Chair, almost a year ago the National Action Council 
for Minorities and Engineering, NACME, released a report 
revealing the number of minority students pursuing STEM degrees 
and careers has flattened out or even declined in recent years. 
The report noted that the percentage of Bachelor's degrees in 
engineering awarded to African-American students declined 
significantly from 1995, to 2005, from 3.3 percent down to 2.5 
percent.
    It also found that while three key under-represented 
minority groups; African-Americans, Latinos, and Native 
Americans, constitute some 30 percent of overall undergraduate 
student population in the United States, they receive only 
about 12 percent of the degrees awarded in engineering.
    My amendment would require the committee formed by the bill 
to establish, update, and maintain an inventory of the 
participation by under-represented minorities and federally-
sponsored STEM programs and activities. This amendment will 
ensure that this committee has solid and up-to-date information 
on minority participation. And once we receive the information 
we can better assess the role this committee needs to take to 
increase minority participation in these programs.
    President Obama has made a significant commitment to 
science and technology, which includes a commitment to STEM 
programs and we should take all steps necessary to make sure 
our minority students are not left behind in the field of 
science, math, and technology. This, in fact, I think will be 
our mark on the 21st century.
    And I read just this morning that according to the Nation's 
report card by the National Assessment of Educational Progress, 
compared to 2004, there was no significant change in the gap in 
mathematic scores between white students, age nine, and their 
black and Hispanic counterparts. We really to close this gap.
    Again, I thank the Chair and the staff for working with me 
on this amendment and for your commitment to the STEM programs, 
and I urge my colleagues to support the amendment.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Edwards follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Donna F. Edwards
    I thank the Chairman for his recognition and his leadership on this 
committee. This committee handles the most exciting and timely issues 
that challenge each of us to be critical and strategic thinkers. Mr. 
Chairman, I believe it is because of your oversight and leadership that 
we accomplish the work before us so effectively and efficiently and in 
a bipartisan fashion.
    Mr. Chairman, almost a year ago, the National Action Council for 
Minorities in Engineering (NACME) released a report revealing the 
number of minority students pursuing STEM degrees and careers has 
flattened out or even declined in recent years. The report noted that 
the percentage of Bachelor's degrees in engineering awarded to African 
American students declined significantly from 1995 to 2005, from 3.3 
percent to 2.5 percent. It also found that while three key under-
represented minority (URM) groups--African Americans, Latinos, and 
Native Americans--constitute some 30 percent of the overall 
undergraduate student population in the United States, they receive 
only about 12 percent of the degrees awarded in engineering.
    My amendment would require the committee formed by the bill to 
establish, update, and maintain an inventory of the participation by 
under-represented minorities in federally sponsored STEM programs and 
activities. This amendment will ensure that this committee has solid 
and up-to-date information on minority participation.
    Once we get this information, we can better assess the role this 
committee needs to take to increase minority participation in these 
programs. President Obama has made a commitment to Science and 
Technology, which includes a commitment to the STEM programs. We should 
take all steps necessary to make sure our minority students are not 
left behind in the fields of science, math, and technology this will be 
our mark on the 21st century. I read this morning that according to the 
Nation's Report Card by the National Assessment of Educational 
Progress, compared to 2004, there was no significant change in the gap 
in mathematic scores between white students age nine and their black 
and Hispanic counterparts. We need to close this gap.
    I, again, thank the Chairman and the staff for working with me on 
this amendment and for his commitment to the STEM programs. I urge my 
colleagues to support this important amendment.

    Chair Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Edwards. Clearly when we look 
at improving our STEM education, there is no place we can get a 
better bump than with minorities and women. Ms. Woolsey and Ms. 
Johnson have been leaders in that for some time. This 
committee, I mean, we can witness ourselves. As we tried to 
build a staff here, we have had difficulty in those areas, and 
so that is why, one of the reasons that we have worked to try 
to increase the representation within minorities and women, and 
again, it is good for our country, and it is the right thing to 
do.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs upon the amendment. All in favor, 
say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed 
to.
    The third amendment on the roster is the amendment offered 
by the gentlelady from Ohio, Ms. Fudge. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Fudge. Yes, Mr. Chair. I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chair Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1709, amendment number 012, 
offered by Ms. Fudge of Ohio.
    Chair Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentlelady for five minutes to explain the 
amendment.
    Ms. Fudge. Thank you, Mr. Chair.
    My amendment will direct the proposed committee under the 
National Science and Technology Council to describe in its 
annual report how we can better disseminate federally-supported 
STEM resources throughout the country. This will ultimately 
nurture teacher talent, increase professionalism, and provide 
teachers with the new ideas to increase STEM participation.
    The demand for a STEM-literate workforce will only increase 
in the future. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that 
science and technology jobs will increase by 26 percent 
compared to 15 percent for all other occupations from 2002, to 
2012.
    Additionally, computer science and mathematics are 
projected to increase by 39 percent. The more support a teacher 
receives, the more organized, well planned, and well prepared 
they will be. We must increase awareness of what is available 
to train teachers in science, technology, engineering, and math 
so we can provide our nation's future with better materials and 
ideas that improve lesson plans.
    In order to raise standards, prepare strong educators, and 
motivate more students to pursue STEM, it is imperative to 
effectively distribute the available federally-supported 
resources for our nation's teachers. Children who are taught by 
educators with proper certification and mentored by 
professionals are more likely to succeed and prosper in an 
increasingly technically-advanced society.
    Mr. Chair, I do ask for support of this amendment, and I 
yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Fudge follows:]

           Prepared Statement of Representative Marcia Fudge

    Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment to the STEM Education 
Coordination Act of 2009. My amendment will direct the proposed 
committee under the National Science and Technology Council to describe 
in its annual report how we can better disseminate federally supported 
STEM resources throughout the country. This will ultimately nurture 
teacher talent, increase professionalism, and provide teachers with new 
ideas to increase STEM participation.
    The demand for a STEM-literate workforce will only increase in the 
future. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that science and 
technology jobs will increase by 26 percent, compared to 15 percent for 
all occupations, from 2002 to 2012. Additionally, computer science and 
mathematics are projected to increase by 39 percent. The more support a 
teacher receives the more organized, well planned and well prepared 
they will be. We must increase awareness of what is available to train 
teachers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math so they can 
provide our nation's future with better materials and ideas that 
improve lesson plans.
    In order to raise standards, prepare strong educators, and motivate 
more students to pursue STEM, it is imperative to effectively 
distribute the available federally supported resources for our nation's 
teachers. Children who are taught by educators with proper 
certification and mentored by professionals are more likely to succeed 
and prosper in an increasingly technologically advanced society.

    Chair Gordon. Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the amendment is agreed 
to.
    Are there any other amendments?
    If no, then the vote is on the bill, H.R. 1709, as amended. 
All those in favor, say aye. All those opposed, no. In the 
opinion of the Chair the ayes have it.
    I now recognize myself to offer a motion.
    I move that the Committee favorably report H.R. 1709 as 
amended to the House with the recommendation that the bill do 
pass. Furthermore, I move that the staff be instructed to 
prepare the legislative report and make necessary technical and 
conforming changes, and that the Chair take all the necessary 
steps to bring the bill before the House for consideration.
    The question is on the motion to report the bill favorably. 
Those in favor of the motion will signify by saying, aye. The 
ayes have it. The bill is favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion is reconsidered. It is laid 
upon the table. The Members will have two subsequent calendar 
days in which to submit supplemental, Minority, or additional 
views on the measure.
    And let me point out to everyone, particularly our newer 
Members, we won't file this bill until next week, and so if any 
of you would like to become co-sponsors of any of these bills, 
we welcome that. I think you should all go home, take credit 
for these. These are good bills, and once again, I hope you are 
not disappointed that we are not arguing and fighting, and you 
know, and having a big rumpus here, but that doesn't mean that 
these aren't good, thoughtful bills. They went to the regular 
order, a law that was taken care of at the Subcommittee level, 
and so, again, we welcome all to be co-sponsors, and I want to 
thank the Members for their attendance.
    This concludes our markup.
    [Whereupon, at 10:51 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]


                               Appendix:

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                            Amendment Roster