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110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                     110-85

======================================================================



 
   10,000 TEACHERS, 10 MILLION MINDS SCIENCE AND MATH SCHOLARSHIP ACT

                                _______
                                

 April 16, 2007.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 362]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 362) to authorize science scholarships 
for educating mathematics and science teachers, and for other 
purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon 
with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do 
pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose........................................................11
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation........................11
  IV. Hearing Summary................................................12
   V. Committee Actions..............................................13
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill........................15
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis....................................15
VIII. Committee Views................................................18
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................22
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................23
  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4...............................26
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............26
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........26
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................26
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................26
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................26
XVII. Earmark Identification.........................................26
XVIII.Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........26

 XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported..........27
  XX. Committee Recommendations......................................40
 XXI. Correspondence.................................................41
XXII. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................43

                              I. Amendment

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

  The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Table of contents.
Sec. 2. Findings.
Sec. 3. Definitions.

                     TITLE I--SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIPS

Sec. 101. Short title.
Sec. 102. Findings.
Sec. 103. Policy objective.
Sec. 104. Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program.

        TITLE II--MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT

Sec. 201. Mathematics and science education partnerships amendments.
Sec. 202. Teacher institutes.
Sec. 203. Graduate degree program.
Sec. 204. Curricular materials.
Sec. 205. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Talent 
Expansion Program.
Sec. 206. High-need local educational agency definition.
Sec. 207. Teacher leaders.
Sec. 208. Laboratory science pilot program.
Sec. 209. Study on laboratory equipment donations for schools.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) The National Science Foundation has made significant and 
        valuable contributions to the improvement of K-12 and 
        undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics 
        education throughout its 56 year history.
          (2) Under section 3 of the National Science Foundation Act of 
        1950 (42 U.S.C. 1862), the National Science Foundation is 
        explicitly required to strengthen science, mathematics, and 
        engineering research potential and education programs at all 
        levels.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act:
          (1) The term ``cost of attendance'' has the meaning given 
        that term in section 472 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
        (20 U.S.C. 1087ll).
          (2) The term ``Director'' means the Director of the National 
        Science Foundation.
          (3) The term ``institution of higher education'' has the 
        meaning given that term in section 101(a) of the Higher 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).
          (4) The term ``mathematics and science teacher'' means a 
        mathematics, science, or technology teacher at the elementary 
        school or secondary school level.

                     TITLE I--SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIPS

SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

  This title may be cited as the ``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds 
Science and Math Scholarship Act''.

SEC. 102. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) The prosperity the United States enjoys today is due in 
        no small part to investments the Nation has made in research 
        and development over the past 50 years.
          (2) Corporate, government, and national scientific and 
        technical leaders have raised concerns that current trends 
        affecting the science and technology enterprise of the Nation 
        could result in erosion of this past success and jeopardize 
        future prosperity.
          (3) The National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of 
        Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine were tasked in a 
        congressional request to recommend actions that the Federal 
        Government could take to enhance the science and technology 
        enterprise so that the United States can successfully compete, 
        prosper, and be secure in the global community of the 21st 
        century.
          (4) The Academies' highest priority recommendation in its 
        report, ``Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and 
        Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future'', is to 
        improve K-12 mathematics and science education, and the 
        Academies' first recommended action item is to institute a 
        major scholarship program to recruit and educate annually 
        10,000 mathematics and science teachers.

SEC. 103. POLICY OBJECTIVE.

  In carrying out the program under section 104, the National Science 
Foundation shall seek to increase by up to 10,000 per year the number 
of elementary and secondary mathematics and science teachers in the 
Nation's schools having both exemplary subject knowledge and 
pedagogical skills.

SEC. 104. ROBERT NOYCE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

  (a) Program Amendments.--Section 10 of the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n-1) is amended--
          (1) by inserting ``teacher'' after 
        ``noyce'' in the section heading;
          (2) in subsection (a)(1)--
                  (A) by striking ``to provide scholarships, stipends, 
                and programming designed'';
                  (B) by inserting ``and to provide scholarships and 
                stipends to students participating in the program'' 
                after ``science teachers''; and
                  (C) by inserting ``Teacher'' after ``Noyce'';
          (3) in subsection (a)(3)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``encourage top college juniors and 
                seniors'' and inserting ``recruit and prepare 
                undergraduate students''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``qualified as'' after ``to 
                become'';
          (4) in subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii)--
                  (A) by striking ``programs to help scholarship 
                recipients'' and inserting ``academic courses and early 
                field teaching experiences designed to prepare students 
                participating in the program'';
                  (B) by striking ``programs that will result in'' and 
                inserting ``such preparation as is necessary to meet 
                requirements for''; and
                  (C) by striking ``licensing; and'' and inserting 
                ``licensing;'';
          (5) in subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii)--
                  (A) by striking ``scholarship recipients'' and 
                inserting ``students participating in the program'';
                  (B) by striking ``enable the recipients'' and 
                inserting ``enable the students''; and
                  (C) by striking ``; or'' and inserting ``; and'';
          (6) in subsection (a)(3)(A) by inserting at the end the 
        following new clause:
                          ``(iv) providing summer internships for 
                        freshman students participating in the program; 
                        or'';
          (7) in subsection (a)(3)(B)--
                  (A) by striking ``encourage'' and inserting ``recruit 
                and prepare''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``qualified as'' after ``to 
                become'';
          (8) by amending clause (ii) of subsection (a)(3)(B) to read 
        as follows:
                          ``(ii) offering academic courses and field 
                        teaching experiences designed to prepare 
                        stipend recipients to teach in elementary 
                        schools and secondary schools, including such 
                        preparation as is necessary to meet 
                        requirements for teacher certification or 
                        licensing; and'';
          (9) in subsection (a) by inserting at the end the following 
        new paragraph:
          ``(4) Eligibility requirement.--To be eligible for an award 
        under this section, an institution of higher education (or 
        consortia of such institutions) shall ensure that specific 
        faculty members and staff from the institution's mathematics, 
        science, or engineering departments and specific education 
        faculty are designated to carry out the development and 
        implementation of the program. An institution of higher 
        education may also include teacher leaders to participate in 
        developing the pedagogical content of the program and to 
        supervise students participating in the program in their field 
        teaching experiences. No institution of higher education shall 
        be eligible for an award unless faculty from the institution's 
        mathematics, science, or engineering departments are active 
        participants in the program.'';
          (10) in subsection (b)(1)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``scholarship or stipend'';
                  (B) by inserting ``and summer internships'' after 
                ``number of scholarships''; and
                  (C) by inserting ``the type of activities proposed 
                for the recruitment of students to the program,'' after 
                ``intends to award,'';
          (11) in subsection (b)(1)(B)--
                  (A) by striking ``scholarship or stipend''; and
                  (B) by striking ``; and'' and inserting ``, which may 
                include a description of any existing programs at the 
                applicant's institution that are targeted to the 
                education of mathematics and science teachers and the 
                number of teachers graduated annually from such 
                programs;'';
          (12) in subsection (b)(1), by striking subparagraph (C) and 
        inserting the following:
                  ``(C) a description of the academic courses and field 
                teaching experiences required under subsection 
                (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (B)(ii), including--
                          ``(i) a description of the undergraduate 
                        program that will enable a student to graduate 
                        within 5 years with a major in mathematics, 
                        science, or engineering and to obtain teacher 
                        certification or licensing;
                          ``(ii) a description of the field teaching 
                        experiences proposed; and
                          ``(iii) evidence of agreements between the 
                        applicant and the schools or school districts 
                        that are identified as the locations at which 
                        field teaching experiences will occur;
                  ``(D) a description of the programs required under 
                subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii) and (B)(iii), including 
                activities to assist new teachers in fulfilling their 
                service requirements under this section; and
                  ``(E) an identification of the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty and its 
                education faculty who will carry out the development 
                and implementation of the program as required under 
                subsection (a)(4).'';
          (13) in subsection (b)(2)--
                  (A) by redesignating subparagraphs (B), (C), (D), and 
                (E) as subparagraphs (C), (D), (E) and (F), 
                respectively;
                  (B) by inserting after subparagraph (A) a new 
                subparagraph as follows:
                  ``(B) the extent to which the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty and its 
                education faculty have worked or will work 
                collaboratively to design new or revised curricula that 
                recognizes the specialized pedagogy required to teach 
                mathematics, science, and technology effectively in 
                elementary and secondary schools;''; and
                  (C) by amending subparagraph (F), as so redesignated 
                by subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, to read as 
                follows:
                  ``(F) the ability of the applicant to recruit 
                students who are individuals identified in section 33 
                or 34 of the Science and Engineering Equal 
                Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b).'';
          (14) in subsection (c)(1)(B), by striking ``2 years'' and 
        inserting ``3 years'';
          (15) in subsection (c)(3)--
                  (A) by striking ``$7,500'' and inserting ``$10,000''; 
                and
                  (B) by striking ``2 years of scholarship support'' 
                and inserting ``3 years of scholarship support, unless 
                the Director establishes a policy by which part-time 
                students may receive additional years of support'';
          (16) in subsection (c)(4)--
                  (A) by striking ``6 years'' and inserting ``8 
                years'';
                  (B) by inserting ``, with a maximum service 
                requirement of 6 years'' after ``was received''; and
                  (C) by striking ``Service required under this 
                paragraph shall be performed in a high-need local 
                educational agency.'';
          (17) in subsection (c), by adding at the end a new paragraph 
        as follows:
          ``(5) Exception.--The period of service obligation under 
        paragraph (4) is reduced by 1 year for scholarship recipients 
        whose service is performed in a high-need local educational 
        agency.'';
          (18) in subsection (d)(1), by striking ``to receive 
        certification or licensing to teach'' and inserting 
        ``established under subsection (a)(3)(B)'';
          (19) in subsection (d)(2), by inserting ``and professional 
        achievement'' after ``academic merit'';
          (20) in subsection (d)(3), by striking ``1 year'' and 
        inserting ``16 months'';
          (21) in subsection (d)(4)--
                  (A) by striking ``6 years'' and inserting ``4 
                years''; and
                  (B) by striking ``for each year a stipend was 
                received'';
          (22) in subsection (g)(2)(A)--
                  (A) by striking ``Treasurer of the United States,'' 
                and inserting ``Treasurer of the United States.''; and
                  (B) by striking ``multiplied by 2.'';
          (23) in subsection (i)(3), by inserting ``or had a career 
        in'' after ``is working in'';
          (24) in subsection (i)--
                  (A) by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (4);
                  (B) by striking the period at the end of paragraph 
                (5) and inserting ``; and''; and
                  (C) by adding at the end the following:
          ``(6) the term `teacher leader' means a mathematics or 
        science teacher who works to improve the instruction of 
        mathematics or science in kindergarten through grade 12 
        through--
                  ``(A) participating in the development or revision of 
                science, mathematics, engineering, or technology 
                curricula;
                  ``(B) serving as a mentor to mathematics or science 
                teachers;
                  ``(C) coordinating and assisting teachers in the use 
                of hands-on inquiry materials, equipment, and supplies, 
                and when appropriate, supervising acquisition and 
                repair of such materials;
                  ``(D) providing in-classroom teaching assistance to 
                mathematics or science teachers; and
                  ``(E) providing professional development, for the 
                purposes of training other teacher leaders, to 
                mathematics and science teachers.''; and
          (25) by adding at the end the following:
  ``(j) Mathematics and Science Scholarship Gift Fund.--In accordance 
with section 11(f) of the National Science Foundation Act of 1950, the 
Director is authorized to accept donations from the private sector to 
support scholarships, stipends, or internships associated with programs 
under this section.
  ``(k) Assessment of Teacher Service and Retention.--Not later than 4 
years after the date of enactment of this subsection, the Director 
shall transmit to Congress a report on the effectiveness of the program 
carried out under this section. The report shall include the proportion 
of individuals receiving scholarships or stipends under the program who 
--
          ``(1) fulfill their service obligation required under this 
        section in a high-need local educational agency;
          ``(2) elect to fulfill their service obligation in a high-
        need local educational agency but fail to complete it, as 
        defined in subsection (g);
          ``(3) remain in the teaching profession beyond their service 
        obligation; and
          ``(4) remain in the teaching profession in a high-need local 
        educational agency beyond their service obligation.
  ``(l) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship 
Program--
          ``(1) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;
          ``(2) $101,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;
          ``(3) $133,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          ``(4) $164,000,000 for fiscal year 2011; and
          ``(5) $196,000,000 for fiscal year 2012.''.
  (b) Conforming Amendment.--Section 8(6) of the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002 is amended--
          (1) in the paragraph heading by inserting ``Teacher'' after 
        ``Noyce''; and
          (2) by inserting ``Teacher'' after ``Noyce''.

        TITLE II--MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT

SEC. 201. MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS AMENDMENTS.

  Section 9 of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 
2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n) is amended--
          (1) in subsection (a)(2)--
                  (A) by striking ``(A)'';
                  (B) by striking subparagraph (B);
                  (C) by inserting ``, through 1 or more of its 
                departments in science, mathematics, or engineering,'' 
                after ``institution of higher education''; and
                  (D) by striking ``a State educational agency'' and 
                inserting ``education faculty from the participating 
                institution or institutions of higher education, a 
                State educational agency,'';
          (2) in subsection (a)(3)(B)--
                  (A) by inserting ``content-specific'' before 
                ``professional development programs'';
                  (B) by inserting ``which are'' before ``designed''; 
                and
                  (C) by inserting ``and which may include teacher 
                training activities to prepare mathematics and science 
                teachers to teach challenging mathematics, science, and 
                technology college-preparatory courses, including 
                Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate 
                courses'' after ``and science teachers'';
          (3) in subsection (a)(3)(C)--
                  (A) by inserting ``and laboratory experiences'' after 
                ``technology''; and
                  (B) by inserting ``and laboratory'' after ``provide 
                technical'';
          (4) in subsection (a)(3)(I) by inserting ``including model 
        induction programs for teachers in their first 2 years of 
        teaching,'' after ``and science,'';
          (5) in subsection (a)(3)(K) by striking ``developing and 
        offering mathematics or science enrichment programs for 
        students, including after-school and summer programs;'' and 
        inserting ``developing educational programs and materials and 
        conducting mathematics, science, and technology enrichment 
        programs for students, including after-school programs and 
        summer camps for students described in subsection (b)(2)(G);'';
          (6) in subsection (a) by inserting at the end the following:
          ``(8) Master's degree programs.--Activities carried out in 
        accordance with paragraph (3)(B) shall include the development 
        and offering of master's degree programs for in-service 
        mathematics and science teachers that will strengthen their 
        subject area knowledge and pedagogical skills, as described in 
        section 203 of the Act enacting this paragraph. Grants provided 
        under this section may be used to develop and implement courses 
        of instruction for the master's degree programs, which may 
        involve online learning, and develop related educational 
        materials.
          ``(9) Mentors for teachers and students of challenging 
        courses.--Partnerships carrying out activities to prepare 
        mathematics and science teachers to teach challenging 
        mathematics, science, and technology college-preparatory 
        courses, including Advanced Placement and International 
        Baccalaureate courses, in accordance with paragraph (3)(B) 
        shall encourage companies employing scientists, mathematicians, 
        or engineers to provide mentors to teachers and students and 
        provide for the coordination of such mentoring activities.
          ``(10) Inventiveness.--Activities carried out in accordance 
        with paragraph (3)(H) may include the development and 
        dissemination of curriculum tools that will help foster 
        inventiveness and innovation.'';
          (7) in subsection (b)(2) by redesignating subparagraphs (E) 
        and (F) as subparagraphs (F) and (G), respectively, and 
        inserting after subparagraph (D) the following new 
        subparagraph:
                  ``(E) the extent to which the evaluation described in 
                paragraph (1)(E) will be independent and based on 
                objective measures;'';
          (8) in subsection (b) by inserting at the end the following:
          ``(4) Minimum and maximum grant size.--A grant awarded under 
        this section shall be not less than $75,000 or greater than 
        $2,000,000 for any fiscal year.'';
          (9) in subsection (c)--
                  (A) by striking paragraph (2);
                  (B) by redesignating paragraphs (3), (4), and (5) as 
                paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively; and
                  (C) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following 
                new paragraphs:
          ``(2) Report on model projects.--The Director shall determine 
        which completed projects funded through the program under this 
        section should be seen as models to be replicated on a more 
        expansive basis at the State or national levels. Not later than 
        1 year after the date of enactment of this paragraph, the 
        Director shall transmit a report describing the results of this 
        study to the Committee on Science and Technology and the 
        Committee on Education and Labor of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
        Transportation and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, 
        and Pensions of the Senate.
          ``(3) Report on evaluations.--Not later than 4 years after 
        the date of enactment of this paragraph, the Director shall 
        transmit a report summarizing the evaluations required under 
        subsection (b)(1)(E) of grants received under this program and 
        describing any changes to the program recommended as a result 
        of these evaluations to the Committee on Science and Technology 
        and the Committee on Education and Labor of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
        Transportation and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, 
        and Pensions of the Senate. Such report shall be made widely 
        available to the public.''; and
          (10) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
  ``(d) Definitions.--In this section--
          ``(1) the term `mathematics and science teacher' means a 
        mathematics, science, or technology teacher at the elementary 
        school or secondary school level; and
          ``(2) the term `science', in the context of elementary and 
        secondary education, includes technology and pre-
        engineering.''.

SEC. 202. TEACHER INSTITUTES.

  (a) National Science Foundation Institutes.--
          (1) In general.--The Director shall establish a grant program 
        to provide for summer or academic year teacher institutes or 
        workshops authorized by section 9(a)(3)(B) of the National 
        Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 
        1862n(a)(3)(B)) and shall allow grantees under the Teacher 
        Institutes for the 21st Century program to operate 1 to 2 week 
        summer teacher institutes with the goal of reaching the maximum 
        number of in-service mathematics and science teachers, 
        particularly elementary and middle school teachers, to improve 
        their content knowledge and pedagogical skills.
          (2) Preparation to teach challenging courses.--The Director 
        shall ensure that activities supported for awards under 
        paragraph (1) include the development and implementation of 
        teacher training activities to prepare mathematics and science 
        teachers to teach challenging mathematics, science, and 
        technology college-preparatory courses, including Advanced 
        Placement and International Baccalaureate courses.
          (3) Awards.--In awarding grants under this section, the 
        Director shall give priority to applications that propose 
        programs that will attract mathematics and science teachers 
        from local educational agencies that--
                  (A) are receiving grants under title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
                U.S.C. 6301 et seq) as a result of having within their 
                jurisdictions concentrations of children from low 
                income families; and
                  (B) are experiencing a shortage of highly qualified 
                teachers, as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary 
                and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801), 
                in the fields of science, mathematics, or technology.
          (4) Authorization of appropriations.--There are authorized to 
        be appropriated to the National Science Foundation for the 
        purposes of this section, $32,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, 
        $35,200,000 for fiscal year 2009, $38,700,000 for fiscal year 
        2010, $42,600,000 for fiscal year 2011, and $46,800,000 for 
        fiscal year 2012.
  (b) Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development.--There are 
authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Energy for the 
Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development program, $3,000,000 
for fiscal year 2008, $8,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, $10,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2010, $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, and $10,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2012.

SEC. 203. GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--The Director shall ensure that master's degree 
programs for in-service mathematics and science teachers that will 
strengthen their subject area knowledge and pedagogical skills are 
instituted in accordance with section 9(a)(8) of the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n(a)(8)). The 
degree programs shall be designed for current teachers, who will enroll 
as part-time students, and to allow participants to obtain master's 
degrees within a period of 3 years.
  (b) Distribution of Awards.--The Director shall, in awarding grants 
to carry out subsection (a), consider the distribution of awards among 
institutions of higher education of different sizes and geographic 
locations.
  (c) Program Activities.--Activities supported through master's degree 
programs established under subsection (a) may include--
          (1) development of courses of instruction and related 
        educational materials;
          (2) stipends to defray the cost of attendance for students in 
        the degree program; and
          (3) acquisition of computer and networking equipment needed 
        for online instruction under the degree program.
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for the purposes of 
this section $46,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, $50,600,000 for fiscal 
year 2009, $55,700,000 for fiscal year 2010, $61,200,000 for fiscal 
year 2011, and $67,300,000 for fiscal year 2012.

SEC. 204. CURRICULAR MATERIALS.

  The Director, in consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall 
convene a national panel of experts on mathematics and science 
education to identify and collect K-12 mathematics, science, and 
technology teaching materials that have been demonstrated to be 
effective and to recommend the development of new materials in areas 
where effective materials do not exist. The Director and Secretary 
shall develop ways to disseminate effective materials and support 
efforts to develop new materials, in accordance with the 
recommendations of the national panel. Recommendations made under this 
section shall not be considered a mandate of specific K-12 curricula.

SEC. 205. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, AND MATHEMATICS TALENT 
                    EXPANSION PROGRAM.

  (a) Amendments.--Section 8(7) of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (A) by striking ``competitive, merit-
        based'' and all that follows through ``in recent years.'' and 
        inserting ``competitive, merit-reviewed multiyear grants for 
        eligible applicants to improve undergraduate education in 
        science, mathematics, engineering, and technology through--
                  ``(i) the creation of programs to increase the number 
                of students studying toward and completing associate's 
                or bachelor's degrees in science, technology, 
                engineering, and mathematics, particularly in fields 
                that have faced declining enrollment in recent years; 
                and
                  ``(ii) the creation of centers (in this paragraph 
                referred to as `Centers') to develop undergraduate 
                curriculum, teaching methods for undergraduate courses, 
                and methods to better train professors and teaching 
                assistants who teach undergraduate courses to increase 
                the number of students completing undergraduate courses 
                in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, 
                including the number of nonmajors, and to improve 
                student academic achievement in those courses.
        Grants made under clause (ii) shall be awarded jointly through 
        the Education and Human Resources Directorate and at least 1 
        research directorate of the Foundation.'';
          (2) by amending subparagraph (B) to read as follows:
          ``(B) In selecting projects under subparagraph (A)(i), the 
        Director shall strive to increase the number of students 
        studying toward and completing baccalaureate degrees, 
        concentrations, or certificates in science, mathematics, 
        engineering, or technology who are--
                  ``(i) individuals identified in section 33 or 34 of 
                the Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 
                U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b); or
                  ``(ii) graduates of a secondary school that is 
                administered by a local educational agency that is 
                receiving grants under title I of the Elementary and 
                Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq) 
                as a result of having within its jurisdiction 
                concentrations of children from low income families.'';
          (3) in subparagraph (C)--
                  (A) by inserting ``(i)'' before ``The types of'';
                  (B) by redesignating clauses (i) through (vi) as 
                subclauses (I) through (VI), respectively;
                  (C) by striking ``under this paragraph'' and 
                inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)''; and
                  (D) by adding at the end the following new clause:
          ``(ii) The types of activities the Foundation may support 
        under subparagraph (A)(ii) include--
                  ``(I) creating model curricula and laboratory 
                programs;
                  ``(II) developing and demonstrating research-based 
                instructional methods and technologies;
                  ``(III) developing methods to train graduate students 
                and faculty to be more effective teachers of 
                undergraduates;
                  ``(IV) conducting programs to disseminate curricula, 
                instructional methods, or training methods to faculty 
                at the grantee institutions and at other institutions;
                  ``(V) conducting assessments of the effectiveness of 
                the Center at accomplishing the goals described in 
                subparagraph (A)(ii); and
                  ``(VI) conducting any other activities the Director 
                determines will accomplish the goals described in 
                subparagraph (A)(ii).'';
          (4) in subparagraph (D)(i), by striking ``under this 
        paragraph'' and inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)'';
          (5) in subparagraph (D)(ii), by striking ``under this 
        paragraph'' and inserting ``under subparagraph (A)(i)'';
          (6) after subparagraph (D)(iii), by adding at the end the 
        following new clause:
          ``(iv) A grant under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be awarded 
        for 5 years, and the Director may extend such a grant for up to 
        2 additional 3 year periods.'';
          (7) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``under this paragraph'' 
        both places it appears and inserting ``under subparagraph 
        (A)(i)'';
          (8) by redesignating subparagraph (F) as subparagraph (J); 
        and
          (9) by inserting after subparagraph (E) the following new 
        subparagraphs:
          ``(F) Grants awarded under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be 
        carried out by a department or departments of science, 
        mathematics, or engineering at institutions of higher education 
        (or a consortia thereof), which may partner with education 
        faculty. Applications for awards under subparagraph (A)(ii) 
        shall be submitted to the Director at such time, in such 
        manner, and containing such information as the Director may 
        require. At a minimum, the application shall include--
                  ``(i) a description of the activities to be carried 
                out by the Center;
                  ``(ii) a plan for disseminating programs related to 
                the activities carried out by the Center to faculty at 
                the grantee institution and at other institutions;
                  ``(iii) an estimate of the number of faculty, 
                graduate students (if any), and undergraduate students 
                who will be affected by the activities carried out by 
                the Center; and
                  ``(iv) a plan for assessing the effectiveness of the 
                Center at accomplishing the goals described in 
                subparagraph (A)(ii).
          ``(G) In evaluating the applications submitted under 
        subparagraph (F), the Director shall consider, at a minimum--
                  ``(i) the ability of the applicant to effectively 
                carry out the proposed activities, including the 
                dissemination activities described in subparagraph 
                (C)(ii)(IV); and
                  ``(ii) the extent to which the faculty, staff, and 
                administrators of the applicant institution are 
                committed to improving undergraduate science, 
                mathematics, and engineering education.
          ``(H) In awarding grants under subparagraph (A)(ii), the 
        Director shall endeavor to ensure that a wide variety of 
        science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields and 
        types of institutions of higher education, including 2-year 
        colleges and minority-serving institutions, are covered, and 
        that--
                  ``(i) at least 1 Center is housed at a Doctoral/
                Research University as defined by the Carnegie 
                Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching; and
                  ``(ii) at least 1 Center is focused on improving 
                undergraduate education in an interdisciplinary area.
          ``(I) The Director shall convene an annual meeting of the 
        awardees under this paragraph to foster collaboration and to 
        disseminate the results of the Centers and the other activities 
        funded under this paragraph.''.
  (b) Report on Data Collection.--Not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, the Director shall transmit to Congress 
a report on how the Director is determining whether current grant 
recipients in the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
Talent Expansion Program are making satisfactory progress as required 
by section 8(7)(D)(ii) of the National Science Foundation Authorization 
Act of 2002 and what funding actions have been taken as a result of the 
Director's determinations.
  (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for the program 
described in paragraph (7) of section 8 of the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 2002--
          (1) $44,000,000 for fiscal year 2008, of which $4,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii) of 
        that paragraph;
          (2) $55,000,000 for fiscal year 2009, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii) of 
        that paragraph;
          (3) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2010, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii) of 
        that paragraph;
          (4) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2011, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii) of 
        that paragraph; and
          (5) $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2012, of which $10,000,000 
        shall be for the grants described in subparagraph (A)(ii) of 
        that paragraph.

SEC. 206. HIGH-NEED LOCAL EDUCATIONAL AGENCY DEFINITION.

  Section 4(8) of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 
2002 (42 U.S.C. 1862n note) is amended to read as follows:
          ``(8) High-need local educational agency.--The term `high-
        need local educational agency' means a local educational agency 
        that--
                  ``(A) is receiving grants under title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
                U.S.C. 6301 et seq) as a result of having within its 
                jurisdiction concentrations of children from low income 
                families; and
                  ``(B) is experiencing a shortage of highly qualified 
                teachers, as defined in section 9101 of the Elementary 
                and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801), 
                in the fields of science, mathematics, or 
                engineering.''.

SEC. 207. TEACHER LEADERS.

  The National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2002 is 
amended--
          (1) in section 4(11)--
                  (A) by striking ``master teacher'' and inserting 
                ``teacher leader'';
                  (B) by striking ``master teacher'' and inserting 
                ``teacher leader''; and
                  (C) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``master 
                teachers'' and inserting ``teacher leaders''; and
          (2) in section 9--
                  (A) in subsection (a)(3)(E), by striking ``master 
                teachers'' and inserting ``teacher leaders''; and
                  (B) in subsection (a)(4)--
                          (i) by striking ``master teachers'' and 
                        inserting ``teacher leaders''; and
                          (ii) by striking ``master teachers'' each 
                        place it appears and inserting ``teacher 
                        leaders''.

SEC. 208. LABORATORY SCIENCE PILOT PROGRAM.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress finds the following:
          (1) To remain competitive in science and technology in the 
        global economy, the United States must increase the number of 
        students graduating from high school prepared to pursue 
        postsecondary education in science, technology, engineering, 
        and mathematics.
          (2) There is broad agreement in the scientific community that 
        learning science requires direct involvement by students in 
        scientific inquiry and that laboratory experience is so 
        integral to the nature of science that it must be included in 
        every science program for every science student.
          (3) In America's Lab Report, the National Research Council 
        concluded that the current quality of laboratory experiences is 
        poor for most students and that educators and researchers do 
        not agree on how to define high school science laboratories or 
        on their purpose, hampering the accumulation of research on how 
        to improve labs.
          (4) The National Research Council found that schools with 
        higher concentrations of non-Asian minorities and schools with 
        higher concentrations of poor students are less likely to have 
        adequate laboratory facilities than other schools.
          (5) The Government Accountability Office reported that 49.1 
        percent of schools where the minority student population is 
        greater than 50.5 percent reported not meeting functional 
        requirements for laboratory science well or at all.
          (6) 40 percent of those college students who left the science 
        fields reported some problems related to high school science 
        preparation, including lack of laboratory experience and no 
        introduction to theoretical or to analytical modes of thought.
          (7) It is in the national interest for the Federal Government 
        to invest in research and demonstration projects to improve the 
        teaching of laboratory science in the Nation's high schools.
  (b) Grant Program.--Section 8(8) of the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 is amended--
          (1) by redesignating subparagraphs (A) through (F) as clauses 
        (i) through (vi), respectively;
          (2) by inserting ``(A)'' before ``A program of competitive''; 
        and
          (3) by inserting at the end the following new subparagraphs:
          ``(B) In accordance with subparagraph (A)(v), the Director 
        shall establish a research pilot program designated as 
        `Partnerships for Access to Laboratory Science' to award grants 
        to partnerships to improve laboratories and provide 
        instrumentation as part of a comprehensive program to enhance 
        the quality of mathematics, science, engineering, and 
        technology instruction at the secondary school level. Grants 
        under this subparagraph may be used for--
                  ``(i) purchase, rental, or leasing of equipment, 
                instrumentation, and other scientific educational 
                materials;
                  ``(ii) maintenance, renovation, and improvement of 
                laboratory facilities;
                  ``(iii) development of instructional programs 
                designed to integrate the laboratory experience with 
                classroom instruction and to be consistent with State 
                mathematics and science academic achievement standards;
                  ``(iv) training in laboratory safety for school 
                personnel;
                  ``(v) design and implementation of hands-on 
                laboratory experiences to encourage the interest of 
                individuals identified in section 33 or 34 of the 
                Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 
                U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b) in mathematics, science, 
                engineering, and technology and help prepare such 
                individuals to pursue postsecondary studies in these 
                fields; and
                  ``(vi) assessment of the activities funded under this 
                subparagraph.
          ``(C) Grants may be made under subparagraph (B) only to a 
        partnership--
                  ``(i) for a project that includes significant teacher 
                training and professional development components; or
                  ``(ii) that establishes that appropriate teacher 
                training and professional development is being 
                addressed, or has been addressed, through other means.
          ``(D) Grants awarded under subparagraph (B) shall be to a 
        partnership that--
                  ``(i) includes an institution of higher education or 
                a community college;
                  ``(ii) includes a high-need local educational agency;
                  ``(iii) includes a business or eligible nonprofit 
                organization; and
                  ``(iv) may include a State educational agency, other 
                public agency, National Laboratory, or community-based 
                organization.
          ``(E) The Federal share of the cost of activities carried out 
        using amounts from a grant under subparagraph (B) shall not 
        exceed 50 percent.
          ``(F) The Director shall require grant recipients to submit a 
        report to the Director on the results of the project supported 
        by the grant.''.
  (c) Report.--The Director shall evaluate the effectiveness of 
activities carried out under the research pilot projects funded by the 
grant program established pursuant to the amendment made by subsection 
(b) in improving student performance in mathematics, science, 
engineering, and technology. A report documenting the results of that 
evaluation shall be submitted to the Committee on Science and 
Technology of the House of Representatives and the Committees on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation and on Health, Education, Labor, 
and Pensions of the Senate not later than 5 years after the date of 
enactment of this Act. The report shall identify best practices and 
materials developed and demonstrated by grant awardees.
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation to carry out this 
section and the amendments made by this section $5,000,000 for fiscal 
year 2008, and such sums as may be necessary for each of the 3 
succeeding fiscal years.

SEC. 209. STUDY ON LABORATORY EQUIPMENT DONATIONS FOR SCHOOLS.

  Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
Director shall transmit a report to the Congress examining the extent 
to which institutions of higher education are donating used laboratory 
equipment to elementary and secondary schools. The Director, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall survey institutions 
of higher education to determine--
          (1) how often, how much, and what type of equipment is 
        donated;
          (2) what criteria or guidelines the institutions are using to 
        determine what types of equipment can be donated, what 
        condition the equipment should be in, and which schools receive 
        the equipment;
          (3) whether the institutions provide any support to, or 
        follow-up with the schools; and
          (4) how appropriate donations can be encouraged.

                              II. Purpose

    The purpose of the bill is to improve K-12 mathematics, 
science, and technology education through recruitment, 
training, mentoring, and professional development of teachers, 
to improve laboratory experiences in secondary schools, and to 
increase the number of undergraduates entering science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.

              III. Background and Need for the Legislation

    In 1995, the first Trends in International Math and Science 
Study (TIMSS) reported alarming data regarding American student 
achievement in mathematics and science.
    American twelfth-graders ranked behind comparable students 
from 17 other countries out of 21 countries in the study. Of 
the 16 of those countries that participated in an analysis of 
achievement in physics, the United States ranked last. Follow-
up TIMSS studies and Programme for International Student 
Assessment (PISA) studies have confirmed that American students 
are behind their peers from many other industrialized nations. 
For example, in the comprehensive 2003 PISA study, the United 
States ranked 28th out of 40 countries in mathematics 
achievement of 15-year-old students. Several recent reports 
have concluded that improving the math and science achievement 
of American students is critical to the vision of a competitive 
America continuing to lead the world in technology and 
innovation. In particular, the National Academies 2007 report 
Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing 
America for a Brighter Economic Future (Gathering Storm) 
identifies the following as its highest priority policy 
recommendation:
      Increase America's talent pool by vastly improving K-12 
science and mathematics education.
    Other reports echoing this same sentiment have come from 
the National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching for 
the 21st Century (the Glenn Commission), the Council on 
Competitiveness, the Association of American Universities 
(AAU), the President's Council of Advisors on Science and 
Technology, AeA (formerly the American Electronics 
Association), the Business Roundtable, the Electronic 
Industries Alliance, the National Association of Manufacturers, 
and TechNet.
    Having a leading science and technology enterprise is not 
just a matter of national prestige. Science and technology is 
largely responsible for the innovation that drove the American 
economic dominance of the last half of the twentieth century 
and that led to high-paying jobs and a high standard of living. 
But the last decade or two has seen a narrowing of the U.S. 
lead in these areas, and the ``gathering storm'' in the title 
of the National Academies report is a reference to the decline 
of American technological leadership. High-tech jobs are moving 
off-shore, historic giants of American industry are in decline, 
and the U.S. has become a net importer of high-tech products.
    To rise above this gathering storm, the Academies report 
advocates for a major investment in the nation's 
competitiveness. In addition to improving K-12 science and 
mathematics education, the report recommends investing in 
scientific and engineering research, recruiting and retaining 
the best scientists and engineers in the world, and improving 
the innovation climate for industry.
    The Gathering Storm report identifies specific action items 
to accomplish the general recommendations. Among them are to 
annually recruit 10,000 science and mathematics teachers by 
awarding scholarships, to strengthen the skills of 250,000 
teachers through summer institutes and master's degree 
programs, and to increase the number of U.S. citizens who earn 
bachelor's degrees in STEM fields by providing 25,000 
scholarships every year. The principal provisions of this Act 
work towards the implementation of these three action items.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    On Tuesday, March 13, 2007, the Committee on Science and 
Technology held a hearing on Science and Technology Leadership 
in a 21st Century Global Economy. The witnesses were Mr. Norman 
R. Augustine, retired Chairman and CEO of the Lockheed Martin 
Corporation and chair of the National Academies committee that 
wrote the Gathering Storm report; Mr. Harold McGraw III, 
Chairman and CEO of the McGraw-Hill Companies and Chair of the 
Business Roundtable; Dr. Robert Dynes, President of the 
University of California; Dr. Craig Barrett, Chairman of the 
Board of the Intel Corporation; Dr. Neal Lane, Professor of 
Physics at Rice University and former Director of the National 
Science Foundation; and Ms. Deborah Wince-Smith, President of 
the Council on Competitiveness. The witnesses were asked to 
explain why the promotion of science and technology is so 
critical to America's prosperity. In particular, they were 
asked to address H.R. 362, H.R. 363, and the connection between 
these bills and the recommendations of the Gathering Storm 
report.
    These witnesses represent a broad cross-section of 
academic, government, and business leadership. Their testimony 
emphasized how support of K-12 education in math and science is 
critical to developing the technical workforce that a 
competitive nation demands. They also emphasized how the entire 
science and technology enterprise supports innovation that is 
needed to produce high-paying jobs and a high standard of 
living. Members of the committee asked the panelists to comment 
on
         why the emphasis within the education programs 
        is on teachers;
         how our economy can produce high-paying jobs;
         the role of NSF in federal STEM education 
        programs;
         whether our culture needs changing to improve 
        attitudes about education;
         whether funds for physical science research 
        should come from other disciplines;
         what we need to do to make teaching a more 
        attractive profession; and
         how to entice industry into funding education 
        programs.
    All the witnesses expressed their support for H.R. 362.

                          V. Committee Actions

    On January 10, 2007, Rep. Bart Gordon and Rep. Ralph Hall, 
Chairman and Ranking Minority Member of the Committee on 
Science and Technology, introduced H.R. 362, which includes the 
``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds Science and Math 
Scholarship Act''. The purpose of the bill is to improve K-12 
STEM education through recruitment, training, mentoring, and 
professional development of teachers. Many of the provisions in 
the bill are closely related to provisions in H.R. 5358, which 
was ordered reported by the Committee during the 109th 
Congress.
    The full Committee on Science and Technology met on 
Wednesday, March 28, 2007, to consider the bill. Mr. Gordon and 
Mr. Hall offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute 
that clarifies language in several places and that
         inserts ``technology'' in all references to K-
        12 science and mathematics education;
         allows Noyce Program scholarship recipients to 
        complete their program within 5 years, rather than in 4 
        years;
         for review of applications under the Noyce 
        program, adds the requirement for NSF to consider the 
        ability of the applicant to attract women and minority 
        students;
         revises Noyce program reporting requirements 
        to track involvement of participants in high-need 
        schools;
         provides a single authorization of 
        appropriations for each year of the Noyce program 
        (removes floors and ceilings for ``capacity building 
        activities'');
         replaces references to Advanced Placement (AP) 
        and International Baccalaureate (IB) courses with 
        ``challenging math, science, and technology college-
        preparatory courses, including AP and IB courses'';
         allows part-time master's degree programs to 
        cover 3 years, rather than being limited to 2 years;
         redefines ``high-need local education agency'' 
        to be one in which there is a concentration of children 
        from low-income families and a shortage of highly 
        qualified teachers; and
         replaces the term ``master teacher'' with the 
        term ``teacher leader''.
    By unanimous consent, the Committee agreed to treat this 
amendment in the nature of a substitute as original text for 
purposes of amendment.
    Ms. Johnson and Mr. Ehlers offered an amendment to 
establish a pilot research program at NSF to fund partnerships 
between universities, businesses, and high-need schools for the 
purpose of determining how to improve laboratory science in 
secondary schools. Grants funded under this program:
         must have a one-to-one cost sharing from non-
        federal sources;
         must provide for teacher training and 
        professional development in the effective use of 
        laboratories; and
         may be used for acquisition or maintenance of 
        instrumentation and equipment and the development of 
        instructional programs.
    The amendment was adopted by a voice vote.
    Ms. Johnson offered an amendment to specify that NSF, in 
attempting to provide STEM Talent Expansion Program (STEP) 
grants at a wide variety of types of institutions of higher 
education, include minority-serving institutions in these 
attempts. The amendment was adopted by a voice vote.
    Ms. Giffords offered an amendment to require that NSF 
attempt to increase the number of STEP grants that involve 
projects that are designed to attract students who have 
graduated from secondary schools having a concentration of 
students from low-income families. The amendment was adopted by 
a voice vote.
    Ms. Giffords offered an amendment to require NSF to give 
priority in awarding grants for teacher summer institutes under 
the Mathematics and Science Education Partnership program to 
projects that involve teachers from high-need school systems. 
The amendment was adopted by a voice vote.
    Mr. Akin offered an amendment to ensure that Section 204 
not be considered as a mandate for use of specific STEM 
curricula. The amendment was adopted by a voice vote.
    There being no further amendments, the amendment in the 
nature of a substitute was adopted by a voice vote.
    With a quorum present, the bill was then unanimously 
approved by a voice vote.
    Rep. Ralph Hall, Ranking Minority Member of the Committee, 
moved that the Committee favorably report the bill, H.R. 362, 
as amended, to the House with the recommendation that the bill 
do pass, and that the staff be instructed to make technical and 
conforming changes to the bill and prepare the legislative 
report and that the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring 
the bill before the House for consideration. With a quorum 
present, the motion was agreed to by a voice vote.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    This bill amends the National Science Foundation 
Authorization Act of 2002 by:
           amending the Robert Noyce Scholarship 
        program to improve STEM teacher education and provide 
        scholarships for college students in STEM fields who 
        commit to teaching after graduation. Scholarship 
        students major in a STEM field, learn content-specific 
        pedagogy, get early field experience, and receive 
        mentoring and induction support;
           amending the Mathematics and Science 
        Education Partnership (MSP) program to provide for 
        summer institutes and graduate programs that provide 
        sustained, content-oriented professional development to 
        teachers of math, science and technology;
           amending the STEP program by establishing 
        centers for improvement of undergraduate education in 
        STEM fields; and
           establishing a pilot program at NSF to build 
        partnerships to improve laboratory science in secondary 
        schools.
    The bill also:
           establishes a national panel to collect 
        model K-12 mathematics, science, and technology 
        teaching materials; and
           authorizes appropriations for an existing 
        program of summer institutes for teachers at the 
        Department of Energy.

                    VII. Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Table of contents

Section 2. Findings on the role of NSF in K-12 and undergraduate STEM 
        education

    Expresses the finding of Congress that NSF has made a 
valuable contribution to the improvement of K-12 education and 
that this role is explicitly required by NSF's founding 
authorization statute.

Section 3. Definitions used in the bill

                     TITLE I--SCIENCE SCHOLARSHIPS

    Section 101. Short Title. 10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds 
Science and Math Scholarship Act.
    Section 102. Findings relating the bill to the NAS report 
recommendations. Notes that the Gathering Storm report 
identifies recommendations the nation must take to address 
prosperity and that the report's highest priority 
recommendation is to improve K-12 STEM education.
    Section 103. Policy objective. To increase by 10,000 
annually the number of exemplary K-12 STEM teachers.
    Section 104. Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. 
Amends the NSF Noyce Scholarship program, established by the 
NSF Authorization Act of 2002, to create incentives for 
colleges and universities to improve the training of STEM 
teachers and to increase the size and duration of the 
scholarships provided for science, math, and engineering majors 
who pursue teaching credentials:
           Provides competitive awards to institutions 
        of higher education (or consortia of such institutions) 
        that (1) establish cross-department faculty teams 
        (science, math and engineering faculty along with 
        education faculty) to develop courses of instruction 
        leading to baccalaureate degrees in fields of science, 
        mathematics, and/or engineering and also preparing 
        graduates to become certified or licensed to teach in a 
        K-12 classroom; and (2) administer scholarships for 
        students during their sophomore through senior years 
        and summer internships following their freshman years.
           Requires early field teaching experiences 
        for student teachers in the program under the 
        supervision of highly experienced and effective 
        teachers.
           Requires awardees to provide professional 
        development and mentoring support to scholarship 
        recipients after matriculation.
           Sets scholarship amounts at the cost of 
        attendance at particular institutions, not to exceed 
        $10,000 per year, and provides up to 3 years of 
        scholarship support for any individual.
           Requires scholarship recipients to commit to 
        teaching for up to 6 years following graduation (the 
        period of teaching commitment is based on the number of 
        years of scholarship support), reduces the commitment 
        by one year for individuals who teach at high-need 
        schools, and converts the scholarships to loans if the 
        teaching commitment is not met.
           Requires NSF to track the proportion of 
        individuals under the program who carry out their 
        teaching obligation in high-need schools, fail to 
        complete their teaching obligation, and remain in the 
        teaching profession beyond their service commitment, 
        including those who remain in high-need schools.
           Authorizes NSF to accept donations from the 
        private sector to help support scholarships and 
        internships.
           Authorizes $70 million for NSF for FY 2008, 
        $101 million for FY 2009, $133 million for FY 2010, 
        $164 million for FY 2011, and $196 million for FY 2012.

        TITLE II--MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION IMPROVEMENT

    Section 201. Mathematics and Science Education Partnerships 
Amendments. Amends the Mathematics and Science Education 
Partnership program established by the NSF Authorization Act of 
2002 in the following ways:
           Authorizes teacher training activities to 
        prepare teachers to teach challenging STEM education 
        courses, including Advanced Placement and International 
        Baccalaureate courses, and provides for mentoring by 
        professional scientists, mathematicians, and engineers.
           Authorizes the development of master's 
        degree programs for in-service STEM teachers.
           Authorizes model induction programs for STEM 
        teachers in their first 2 years of teaching.
    Section 202. Teacher institutes. Provides for teacher 
institute programs at NSF and the Department of Energy (DOE).
    NSF is directed to establish a grant program to support 
summer or academic year teacher institutes and authorizes 
summer teacher institutes as a component of the NSF 21st 
Century program. Some of these summer institutes must include 
teacher training activities to prepare teachers to teach 
challenging STEM education courses, including Advanced 
Placement and International Baccalaureate courses. NSF is 
directed to give priority in awarding grants to applications 
that will attract STEM teachers from high-need schools.
    Authorizes $32 million for NSF for FY 2008, $35.2 million 
for FY 2009, $38.7 million for FY 2010, $42.6 million for FY 
2011, and $46.8 million for FY 2012.
    The following amounts are authorized for the existing 
Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development program at 
DOE: $3 million for FY 2008, $8 million for FY 2009, and $10 
million for each year FY 2010 through FY 2012.
    Section 203. Graduate degree program. Requires NSF, under 
the Mathematics and Science Education Partnership program, to 
develop and implement master's degree programs for in-service 
STEM teachers, who attend on a part-time basis and who will be 
able to complete the degree requirements within three years. 
The programs have the following features:
           Provide stipends to defray the cost of 
        attendance for teachers in the program.
           Allow for support for the development of the 
        courses of instruction and related educational 
        materials and equipment (offering of online learning is 
        an option).
           Require the distribution of awards among 
        institutions of different sizes and geographic 
        locations.
    Authorizes $46 million for NSF for FY 2008, $50.6 million 
for FY 2009, $55.7 million for FY 2010, $61.2 million for FY 
2011, and $67.3 million for FY 2012.
    Section 204. Curricular Materials. Establishes a national 
panel of experts to identify and collect K-12 mathematics, 
science, and technology teaching materials that have been 
demonstrated to be effective and to recommend the development 
of new materials in areas where effective materials do not 
exist; and directs NSF and the Department of Education to 
develop ways to disseminate effective materials and support 
efforts to develop new materials, in accordance with the 
recommendations of the national panel. Emphasizes that the 
recommendations of the panel are not a mandate for specific K-
12 curricula.
    Section 205. Science, Technology, Engineering, and 
Mathematics Talent Expansion Program. Amends the STEM Talent 
Expansion (STEP) program established under the NSF 
Authorization Act of 2002 to create centers for improvement of 
undergraduate education in STEM fields, including centers to 
develop and enhance undergraduate curriculum and teaching 
methods and to train faculty and teaching assistants in 
effective pedagogical practices. Specifies that NSF is expected 
to provide STEP grants to a wide range of types of 
institutions, including minority-serving institutions, and that 
one goal of the STEP program is to attract individuals 
graduating from secondary schools with a concentration of 
students from low-income families.
    Directs NSF to assess the effectiveness of the centers and 
to disseminate information about materials and methods 
developed.
    Authorizes $44 million for NSF for the STEP program for FY 
2008, of which $4 million is for centers; $55 million for FY 
2009, of which $10 million is for centers; and $60 million for 
each year of FY 2010 through FY 2012, of which $10 million in 
each year is for centers.
    Section 206. High-Need Local Educational Agency Definition. 
Amends the NSF Authorization Act of 2002 to redefine a high-
need local educational agency as one that has a concentration 
of students from low-income families and a shortage of highly 
qualified teachers.
    Section 207. Teacher Leaders. Amends the NSF Authorization 
Act of 2002 to replace the term ``master teacher'' each place 
it appears with the term ``teacher leader''.
    Section 208. Laboratory Science Pilot Program. Amends the 
NSF Authorization Act of 2002 to establish a new research pilot 
program designated as ``Partnerships for Access to Laboratory 
Science''. The program will fund partnerships between 
universities, businesses, and high-need schools for the purpose 
of improving laboratory science in secondary schools. Grants 
funded under this program
           must have a one-to-one cost sharing from 
        non-federal sources;
           must provide for teacher training and 
        professional development in the effective use of 
        laboratories; and
           may be used for acquisition or maintenance 
        of instrumentation and equipment and the development of 
        instructional programs.
    Requires NSF to carry out an assessment of the 
effectiveness of the activities carried out under the pilot 
projects supported for improving student performance and to 
submit a report documenting its findings to Congress within 
five years of the date of enactment.
    Authorizes $5 million for NSF for FY 2008, and ``such 
sums'' for FY 2009 through FY 2011.
    Section 209. Study on Laboratory Equipment Donations for 
Schools. Requires NSF, in consultation with the Department of 
Education, to conduct a study and submit a report to Congress 
within two years of the date of enactment that documents the 
extent to which institutions of higher education donate used 
laboratory equipment to K-12 schools.

                         VIII. Committee Views


National Science Foundation Role in Science, Technology, Engineering, 
        and Mathematics (STEM) Education

    STEM education is a cornerstone of the historic mission of 
NSF. The NSF Act of 1950, which established NSF, directed the 
agency to support and strengthen STEM education programs at all 
levels. NSF has accumulated a 50-year record of accomplishment 
in developing highly successful STEM education programs, which 
are strongly supported by the education community. The 
Committee believes that it is vitally important that NSF 
continue to carry out its mission to improve K-12 and 
undergraduate STEM education. NSF's peer review system, its 
connections with higher education, and its prestige give it a 
unique role in improving STEM education that cannot be 
duplicated at any other federal agency.

Rising Above the Gathering Storm

    The Act strengthens and expands existing programs at NSF to 
enhance federal STEM education efforts. The National Academies 
report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, stresses the 
importance of improving K-12 education in the United States and 
also emphasizes the need for increasing the number of 
undergraduate and graduate students studying and choosing 
careers in STEM fields. The Committee endorses the Academies' 
focus on the link between a technologically-educated population 
and the U.S. ability to innovate and remain competitive, and 
this Act implements key recommendations of the Gathering Storm 
report that relate to education.

K-12 STEM education

            Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program
    The Committee recognizes that the preparation and retention 
of excellent K-12 teachers is essential to improving STEM 
education in the United States. The Act includes provisions for 
recruiting, training, and retaining teachers to ensure that 
schools have access to a pool of talented, qualified, and 
committed STEM teachers.
    The Committee strongly believes that both strong STEM 
content knowledge and excellent pedagogical skills related to 
that content are necessary for success as a K-12 STEM teacher. 
This Act expands the Noyce program to support and encourage the 
transformation of how K-12 STEM teachers are educated in this 
country. In addition to providing scholarships to sophomores, 
juniors, and seniors, colleges and universities receiving Noyce 
grants will be required to offer a program that provides 
instruction (which may begin as early as freshman year) and 
early field teaching experiences, including interactions with 
teacher leaders and coursework developed by STEM and education 
faculty, to allow participants in the program both to graduate 
with STEM degrees and to meet requirements for teacher 
certification or licensing. The Committee also believes that 
the colleges and universities should develop and implement 
induction programs to support graduates of the program in their 
first few years of teaching in order to improve the retention 
of Noyce program graduates in the teaching profession.
    The Committee believes that collaboration between STEM and 
education faculty is critical for the success of these 
programs. The Committee applauds the work of the University of 
Texas at Austin on its UTeach program and the University of 
California on its Cal Teach program, which are successful 
models of the type of teacher education and support program the 
Committee wishes to encourage.
    The UTeach program prepares students to receive degrees in 
a STEM field and a certificate to teach in 4 years. This is a 
desirable model, but that model may not work in all settings. 
Students who enter programs late, or who major in certain 
engineering fields, or who are working for licensure in certain 
states may not be able to become fully certified teachers after 
just 4 years. The programs funded by the Noyce grants should 
streamline the certification process, although that may mean 
reducing a 6-year program to 5, or a 5-year program to 4-and-a-
half.
    The Committee believes that to maximize the impact of the 
teacher training programs supported through the Noyce Program, 
institutions receiving grants should make strong efforts to 
inform potential program participants about the program and the 
scholarships. NSF should support such recruitment efforts and 
use annual conferences of participants as opportunities to 
share best practices in recruitment as well as in other program 
components, such as coursework, mentoring, and field teaching 
experiences.
    The Gathering Storm report calls for federal programs to 
support recruiting 10,000 new mathematics and science teachers 
every year, and the appropriations authorized in this Act put 
the Noyce program on track to reach that level of effort in 
2017.
    The Committee expects NSF to do far more to publicize and 
promote participation by institutions of higher education in 
the Noyce Program, especially among schools that are more known 
for their rigorous STEM programs than they are for teacher 
preparation. Community or junior colleges can participate in 
Noyce as part of a consortium, although they cannot be sole 
recipients of Noyce grants.
    The Committee expects that the preponderance of the funds 
for this program will go directly to participants in the form 
of scholarships and stipends. But the Committee also expects 
that sufficient funds will be allocated for capacity-building 
activities described in sections 10(a)(3)(A)(ii) and (iii) and 
(B)(ii) and (iii) of the NSF Act of 2002, as amended by this 
Act. The Committee also understands that the resources needed 
to initiate a teacher education program may exceed the level 
needed for steady state operation of the program. The Committee 
expects that NSF will ensure that resources are allocated under 
the program to ensure a sufficient investment in capacity-
building activities, so that the program does not merely hand 
out scholarships and stipends but rather reforms the way 
teachers are educated.
            Mathematics and Science Education Partnerships
    The changes made by the Act to the existing Mathematics and 
Science Education Partnership program at NSF reflect a stronger 
focus on teacher training, especially in STEM content. The 
changes also address recommendations in this area by the 
Gathering Storm report, particularly on providing master's 
degree programs for in-service teachers and summer institutes 
and other training programs to prepare teachers to teach 
challenging mathematics, science, and technology courses. The 
Committee strongly believes that grant applications that focus 
on teacher training should be given strong priority by NSF and 
that particular attention should be given to improving the 
capabilities of STEM teachers serving in high-need school 
systems. Additionally, the Committee is concerned about the 
high attrition rates for new K-12 STEM teachers and recommends 
teacher induction programs, which provide content instruction, 
mentoring, professional development, and other support to 
teachers in the first few years of their career, to address 
this concern.
    Also, because of the importance of improving the subject 
matter knowledge of teachers, the Act requires that the 
principal investigator for a partnership grant be a science, 
mathematics, or engineering faculty member at the grantee 
institution. To improve the focus of the partnership program, 
the Act requires that grants fall within the limits of $75,000 
to $2,000,000 a year. By limiting grant size, the Committee 
hopes that proposed projects will focus on targeted approaches 
to improving STEM education and thus allow clear evaluation of 
the effectiveness of each project.
    In adding language allowing the development and 
dissemination of curriculum tools that will help foster 
inventiveness and innovation, the Committee recognizes the 
value of innovation in U.S. competitiveness and the economic 
benefits that the U.S. gains by being a culture that encourages 
and rewards innovation. To support and cultivate the next 
generation of inventive scientists and engineers, teachers 
should have access to curriculum tools that include activities 
such as open-ended problem solving; hands-on and ``how things 
work'' exercises; projects that emphasize creativity, design, 
and teamwork; and lessons to raise the stature of inventors and 
invention in the eyes of young people.

STEM education at the undergraduate level

    Undergraduate education is the first step toward a career 
in teaching and in other science, engineering, or mathematics 
fields; it is the primary source of education and training for 
technical workers; and, it is often the last time non-majors 
will take a class in mathematics and science. The Committee 
believes that NSF, due to its close relationship with 
institutions of higher education and its expertise and 
experience in education at all levels, has a critical role to 
play in improving undergraduate STEM education for majors and 
non-majors, especially future teachers. No other Federal agency 
has a clear responsibility for undergraduate STEM education.
    The Act expands NSF's STEP to fund the creation of centers 
at colleges and universities that will develop new approaches 
to undergraduate STEM education programs. The Committee intends 
that these centers focus not only on improving undergraduate 
teaching and courses at their own institutions, but also on 
developing and disseminating innovative curricula, laboratory 
experiences, and teaching and training methods that can be used 
throughout the country. The Committee expects STEP grants to 
support undergraduate education improvements in a wide variety 
of STEM fields and of types of institutions of higher 
education, including 2-year colleges and minority-serving 
institutions.
    The Committee also emphasizes the important goal of the 
STEP grants in increasing participation by individuals 
currently underrepresented in STEM careers, including women, 
minorities, and graduates of high schools with a concentration 
of students from low-income families.
    The Committee is also concerned that in running STEP, NSF 
has not seriously enforced the statutory requirement that an 
applicant set a numerical goal for increasing the number of 
STEM majors and that grantees be evaluated, in part, on the 
basis of whether they are meeting the numerical goals contained 
in their applications. The Committee expects STEP to be carried 
out pursuant to statute. This Act requires a report to Congress 
to ensure that NSF gathers data on majors at STEP institutions.
    In addition to STEP, NSF currently carries out a range of 
other programs designed to improve undergraduate STEM 
education, and the Committee strongly supports the continuation 
of these activities, especially the Course, Curriculum, and 
Laboratory Improvement program.

Curricular materials

    The committee feels that there should be better 
coordination among agencies and foundations dedicated to 
creating innovative curricular materials for K-12 STEM 
instruction. This Act requires the Director of NSF to convene a 
national panel to identify, collect, and disseminate the best 
available materials. The Committee does not intend that the 
recommendations of the panel constitute a mandate of specific 
K-12 curricula.

Technology

    Engineering and technology education includes instruction 
in engineering design processes, human innovation, and design 
skills. The Committee expects the participation of technology 
instructors in the teacher recruitment, preparation, and 
professional development programs authorized in this bill. No 
reference to elementary or secondary mathematics and science 
education should be understood to exclude technology or pre-
engineering education.

Partnerships for Access to Laboratory Science

    The Committee believes that hands-on laboratory instruction 
should be an integral part of science and technology education 
in secondary schools and has established an NSF research 
program, Partnerships for Access to Laboratory Science, to 
determine best practices for integrating classroom instruction 
and laboratory exercises. The Committee expects the results of 
projects supported under this program to be carefully assessed 
and the findings widely disseminated.
    In awarding demonstration grants for Partnerships for 
Access to Laboratory Science, it is the Committee's intention 
that the non-federal partners of the partnership provide 
funding for activities described in section 8(8)(B)(i) and (ii) 
of the NSF Authorization Act of 2002, as amended by this Act, 
and that federal funds be primarily used to support 
professional development and incorporation of relevant research 
practices.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section X of this report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 362 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
362 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate


H.R. 362--A bill to authorize science scholarships for educating 
        mathematics and science teachers, and for other purposes

    Summary: H.R. 362 would authorize the appropriation of 
about $1.5 billion for several new and existing programs within 
the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of 
Energy (DOE) that support the training and professional 
development of elementary and secondary schools teachers in the 
fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics 
(STEM). CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 362 would cost 
$898 million over the 2008-2012 period, assuming appropriation 
of the amounts authorized or estimated to be necessary. 
Enacting H.R. 362 would have no significant effect on direct 
spending or revenues.
    H.R. 362 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA); 
the bill would benefit public institutions of higher education.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 362 is shown in the following table. 
The cost of this legislation falls within budget function 250 
(general science, space, and technology).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
                                                                   2007    2008    2009    2010    2011    2012
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending Under Current Law for Certain Programs Authorized by
 H.R. 362
    Scholarship, Teacher Development, and Talent Expansion
     Programs
        Estimated Budget Authority \1\..........................      40       0       0       0       0       0
        Estimated Outlays.......................................      35      33      18       8       2       0
Proposed Changes
    Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      70     101     133     164     196
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       8      40      75     109     141
    Teacher Institutes and Development Programs
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      35      43      49      53      57
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       4      19      32      42      48
    STEM Talent Expansion Program
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      44      55      60      60      60
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       5      24      41      52      57
    Graduate Degree Grant Program
        Authorization Level.....................................       0      46      51      56      61      67
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       6      24      39      49      56
    Laboratory Science Expansion Program
        Estimated Authorization Level...........................       0       5       5       5       5       0
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       1       3       4       5       4
    Other Provisions
        Estimated Authorization Level...........................       0       2       2       2       2       2
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0       2       2       2       2       2
    Total Changes
        Estimated Authorization Level...........................       0     202     257     305     345     382
        Estimated Outlays.......................................       0      26     112     193     259     308
Spending Under H.R. 362
    Estimated Authorization Level...............................      40     202     257     305     345     382
    Estimated Outlays...........................................      35      59     130     201     261    308
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 2007 level reflects estimated appropriations for the Robert Noyce Scholarship Program; teacher
  institutes and development programs at NSF and DOE; and the STEM Talent Expansion Program.

    Basis of estimate: H.R. 362 would authorize about $1.5 
billion for new and existing programs to provide support for 
undergraduate students and elementary and secondary school 
teachers in STEM fields. CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 
362 would cost $898 million over the 2008-2012 period, assuming 
appropriation of the necessary amounts. For this estimate, CBO 
assumes that the legislation will be enacted before the 
beginning of fiscal year 2008 and that the necessary amounts 
will be appropriated each year. Estimated outlays are based on 
historical spending patterns for existing or similar programs.
            Authorizations for existing programs
    H.R. 362 would authorize appropriations for several 
existing programs at NSF and DOE, including the Robert Noyce 
Scholarship Program, the Teacher Institutes for the 21st 
Century program, the Laboratory Science Teacher Professional 
Development program, and the Science, Technology, Engineering, 
and Mathematics Talent Expansion program. The bill would 
authorize $149 million for 2008 for those programs and a total 
of about $1.2 billion over the 2008-2012 period. (By 
comparison, about $40 million was appropriated for 2007.) CBO 
estimates that implementing these provisions would cost $697 
million over the 2008-2012 period, assuming appropriation of 
the specified amounts.
    Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program. This program 
provides grants to institutions of higher education for 
scholarships and stipends for undergraduate students in the 
fields of mathematics, science and engineering planning to 
become elementary and secondary school teachers. According to 
NSF, about $10 million was provided for the Robert Noyce 
Teacher Scholarship program for 2007.
    Section 104 would authorize the appropriation of $70 
million in 2008 and a total of $664 million over the 2008-2012 
period for this scholarship program. The bill would increase 
the minimum annual scholarship under the program from $7,500 to 
$10,000 and would extend the maximum award from two years to 
three years. Assuming appropriation of the specified amounts, 
CBO estimates that this program would cost $373 million over 
the 2008-2012 period.
    Teacher Institutes and Development. H.R. 362 would 
authorize appropriations for two programs that foster 
partnerships between researchers and those who teach math and 
science in elementary and secondary schools. Section 202 would 
authorize the appropriation of $32 million for 2008 and $195 
million over the 2008-2012 period for NSF's Funding for Teacher 
Institutes for the 21st Century program, which received about 
$2 million in 2007. Assuming appropriation of the specified 
amounts, this program would cost $121 million over the 2008-
2012 period, CBO estimates.
    Similarly, DOE's Office of Science will spend about $2 
million in 2007 for the Laboratory Science Teacher Professional 
Development program, which provides professional development 
for about 300 elementary and secondary school teachers through 
partnerships with several DOE national laboratories. Section 
202 would authorize the appropriation of $3 million for 2008 
and a total of $41 million over the 2008-2012 period for this 
program. CBO estimates that outlays for this program would 
total $24 million over the 2008-2012 period, assuming 
appropriation of the specified amounts.
    STEM Talent Expansion Program. NSF's STEM Talent Expansion 
Program (STEP) currently spends about $26 million a year for 
grants to institutions of higher education to increase the 
number of undergraduate students that complete programs in STEM 
fields. Grant funding may be used to promote research, 
interdisciplinary teaching, and other activities such as 
internships, student advising, and community college bridge 
programs.
    Section 205 would authorize the appropriation of $40 
million for the STEP program for 2008 and a total of $255 
million over the 2008-2012 period. In addition, the bill would 
direct NSF to establish centers to support the STEP program, 
with funding authorized at $4 million in 2008 and $24 million 
over the 2008-2012 period. The centers would be responsible for 
developing undergraduate curriculum, teaching methods, and 
better training for professors and teaching assistants to 
increase the number of STEM graduates. CBO estimates that 
implementing those two initiatives would cost $179 million over 
the 2008-2012 period if the authorized funds are appropriated.
            Authorization of new initiatives
    H.R. 362 would authorize several new initiatives at NSF, 
including a graduate degree grant program, a Laboratory Science 
Pilot Program, and various other activities. CBO estimates that 
implementing those programs would cost $201 million over the 
2008-2012 period, assuming appropriation of the necessary 
funds.
    Graduate Degree Grant Program. Section 204 would authorize 
the appropriation of $281 million over the 2008-2012 period for 
grants to institutions of higher education to establish 
master's degree programs for math and science teachers 
currently in the workforce. That funding, which would be 
administered by NSF's Math and Science Partnership program, 
would be used to develop instructional materials, provide 
stipend support, and acquire equipment necessary to offer 
online instruction. CBO estimates that implementing this 
program would cost $174 million over the 2008-2012 period.
    Laboratory Science Pilot Program. Section 208 would 
establish a new program at NSF that would provide grants to 
educational partnerships for purchasing laboratory equipment, 
maintaining and renovating facilities, providing safety 
training, and developing programs that integrate laboratory 
experience with classroom instruction. The federal cost-share 
for these grants would be capped at 50 percent. The bill would 
authorize the appropriation of $5 million for this program for 
2008, and such sums as may be necessary through fiscal year 
2011. CBO estimates that implementing this provision would cost 
$17 million over the 2008-2012 period.
    Other provisions. In addition, H.R. 362 would:
          Establish a program for teachers participating in the 
        Math and Science Partnership to develop mentor 
        relationships with industry scientists, mathematicians 
        and engineers;
          Establish a national panel on curricular materials; 
        and
          Direct NSF to report to the Congress on the 
        effectiveness of several programs authorized by the 
        bill.
    Based on the cost of similar activities, CBO estimates that 
NSF would spend about $10 million over the 2008-2012 period to 
implement those projects, assuming appropriation of the 
necessary amounts.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 362 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in the UMRA. The bill would authorize activities and 
grant funds that would benefit institutions of higher 
education. Any costs they might incur would result from 
complying with conditions of Federal assistance.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Daniel Hoople; Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Lisa Ramirez-Branum; 
Impact on the Private Sector: Craig Cammarata.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 362 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House rule XIII, the goals of 
H.R. 362 are to strengthen and expand programs at NSF
          to improve K-12 mathematics and science education 
        through recruitment, training, mentoring, and 
        professional development of teachers and
          to increase the number of undergraduates entering 
        STEM fields.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 362.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 362 does not establish nor authorize the establishment 
of any advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 362 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. Earmark Identification

    H.R. 362 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of Rule XXI.

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

       XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

         NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2002


SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act:
          (1)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          [(8) High-need local educational agency.--The term 
        ``high-need local educational agency'' means a local 
        educational agency that meets one or more of the 
        following criteria:
                  [(A) It has at least one school in which 50 
                percent or more of the enrolled students are 
                eligible for participation in the free and 
                reduced price lunch program established by the 
                Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act 
                (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.).
                  [(B) It has at least one school in which--
                          [(i) more than 34 percent of the 
                        academic classroom teachers at the 
                        secondary level (across all academic 
                        subjects) do not have an undergraduate 
                        degree with a major or minor in, or a 
                        graduate degree in, the academic field 
                        in which they teach the largest 
                        percentage of their classes; or
                          [(ii) more than 34 percent of the 
                        teachers in two of the academic 
                        departments do not have an 
                        undergraduate degree with a major or 
                        minor in, or a graduate degree in, the 
                        academic field in which they teach the 
                        largest percentage of their classes.
                  [(C) It has at least one school whose teacher 
                attrition rate has been 15 percent or more over 
                the last three school years.]
          (8) High-need local educational agency.--The term 
        ``high-need local educational agency'' means a local 
        educational agency that--
                  (A) is receiving grants under title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
                (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq) as a result of having 
                within its jurisdiction concentrations of 
                children from low income families; and
                  (B) is experiencing a shortage of highly 
                qualified teachers, as defined in section 9101 
                of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act 
                of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801), in the fields of 
                science, mathematics, or engineering.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (11) [Master teacher] Teacher leader.--The term 
        ``[master teacher] teacher leader'' means a mathematics 
        or science teacher who works to improve the instruction 
        of mathematics or science in kindergarten through grade 
        12 through--
                  (A)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (E) providing professional development, 
                including for the purposes of training other 
                [master teachers] teacher leaders, to 
                mathematics and science teachers.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 8. SPECIFIC PROGRAM AUTHORIZATIONS.

  From amounts authorized to be appropriated under section 5, 
the Director shall carry out the Foundation's research and 
education programs, including the following initiatives in 
accordance with this section:
          (1)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (6) Robert noyce teacher scholarship program.--The 
        Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program described in 
        section 10.
          (7) Science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
        talent expansion program.--(A) A program of 
        [competitive, merit-based, multi-year grants for 
        eligible applicants to increase the number of students 
        studying toward and completing associate's or 
        bachelor's degrees in science, mathematics, 
        engineering, and technology, particularly in fields 
        that have faced declining enrollment in recent years.] 
        competitive, merit-reviewed multiyear grants for 
        eligible applicants to improve undergraduate education 
        in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
        through--
                  (i) the creation of programs to increase the 
                number of students studying toward and 
                completing associate's or bachelor's degrees in 
                science, technology, engineering, and 
                mathematics, particularly in fields that have 
                faced declining enrollment in recent years; and
                  (ii) the creation of centers (in this 
                paragraph referred to as ``Centers'') to 
                develop undergraduate curriculum, teaching 
                methods for undergraduate courses, and methods 
                to better train professors and teaching 
                assistants who teach undergraduate courses to 
                increase the number of students completing 
                undergraduate courses in science, technology, 
                engineering, and mathematics, including the 
                number of nonmajors, and to improve student 
                academic achievement in those courses.
        Grants made under clause (ii) shall be awarded jointly 
        through the Education and Human Resources Directorate 
        and at least 1 research directorate of the Foundation.
          [(B) In selecting projects under this paragraph, the 
        Director shall strive to increase the number of 
        students studying toward and completing baccalaureate 
        degrees, concentrations, or certificates in science, 
        mathematics, engineering, or technology who are 
        individuals identified in section 33 or 34 of the 
        Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 
        U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b).]
          (B) In selecting projects under subparagraph (A)(i), 
        the Director shall strive to increase the number of 
        students studying toward and completing baccalaureate 
        degrees, concentrations, or certificates in science, 
        mathematics, engineering, or technology who are--
                  (i) individuals identified in section 33 or 
                34 of the Science and Engineering Equal 
                Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b); 
                or
                  (ii) graduates of a secondary school that is 
                administered by a local educational agency that 
                is receiving grants under title I of the 
                Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 
                (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq) as a result of having 
                within its jurisdiction concentrations of 
                children from low income families.
          (C)(i) The types of projects the Foundation may 
        support [under this paragraph] under subparagraph 
        (A)(i) include those that promote high quality--
                  [(i)] (I) interdisciplinary teaching;
                  [(ii)] (II) undergraduate-conducted research;
                  [(iii)] (III) mentor relationships for 
                students;
                  [(iv)] (IV) bridge programs that enable 
                students at community colleges to matriculate 
                directly into baccalaureate science, 
                mathematics, engineering, or technology 
                programs;
                  [(v)] (V) internships carried out in 
                partnership with industry; and
                  [(vi)] (VI) innovative uses of digital 
                technologies, particularly at institutions of 
                higher education that serve high numbers or 
                percentages of economically disadvantaged 
                students.
          (ii) The types of activities the Foundation may 
        support under subparagraph (A)(ii) include--
                  (I) creating model curricula and laboratory 
                programs;
                  (II) developing and demonstrating research-
                based instructional methods and technologies;
                  (III) developing methods to train graduate 
                students and faculty to be more effective 
                teachers of undergraduates;
                  (IV) conducting programs to disseminate 
                curricula, instructional methods, or training 
                methods to faculty at the grantee institutions 
                and at other institutions;
                  (V) conducting assessments of the 
                effectiveness of the Center at accomplishing 
                the goals described in subparagraph (A)(ii); 
                and
                  (VI) conducting any other activities the 
                Director determines will accomplish the goals 
                described in subparagraph (A)(ii).
          (D)(i) In order to receive a grant [under this 
        paragraph] under subparagraph (A)(i), an eligible 
        applicant shall establish targets to increase the 
        number of students studying toward and completing 
        associate's or bachelor's degrees in science, 
        mathematics, engineering, or technology.
          (ii) A grant [under this paragraph] under 
        subparagraph (A)(i) shall be awarded for a period of 5 
        years, with the final 2 years of funding contingent on 
        the Director's determination that satisfactory progress 
        has been made by the grantee toward meeting the targets 
        established under clause (i).
          (iii) In the case of community colleges, a student 
        who transfers to a baccalaureate program, or receives a 
        certificate under an established certificate program, 
        in science, mathematics, engineering, or technology 
        shall be counted toward meeting a target established 
        under clause (i).
          (iv) A grant under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be 
        awarded for 5 years, and the Director may extend such a 
        grant for up to 2 additional 3 year periods.
          (E) For each grant awarded [under this paragraph] 
        under subparagraph (A)(i) to an institution of higher 
        education, at least 1 principal investigator shall be 
        in a position of administrative leadership at the 
        institution of higher education, and at least 1 
        principal investigator shall be a faculty member from 
        an academic department included in the work of the 
        project. For each grant awarded to a consortium or 
        partnership, at each institution of higher education 
        participating in the consortium or partnership, at 
        least 1 of the individuals responsible for carrying out 
        activities authorized [under this paragraph] under 
        subparagraph (A)(i) at that institution shall be in a 
        position of administrative leadership at the 
        institution, and at least 1 shall be a faculty member 
        from an academic department included in the work of the 
        project at that institution.
          (F) Grants awarded under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall 
        be carried out by a department or departments of 
        science, mathematics, or engineering at institutions of 
        higher education (or a consortia thereof), which may 
        partner with education faculty. Applications for awards 
        under subparagraph (A)(ii) shall be submitted to the 
        Director at such time, in such manner, and containing 
        such information as the Director may require. At a 
        minimum, the application shall include--
                  (i) a description of the activities to be 
                carried out by the Center;
                  (ii) a plan for disseminating programs 
                related to the activities carried out by the 
                Center to faculty at the grantee institution 
                and at other institutions;
                  (iii) an estimate of the number of faculty, 
                graduate students (if any), and undergraduate 
                students who will be affected by the activities 
                carried out by the Center; and
                  (iv) a plan for assessing the effectiveness 
                of the Center at accomplishing the goals 
                described in subparagraph (A)(ii).
          (G) In evaluating the applications submitted under 
        subparagraph (F), the Director shall consider, at a 
        minimum--
                  (i) the ability of the applicant to 
                effectively carry out the proposed activities, 
                including the dissemination activities 
                described in subparagraph (C)(ii)(IV); and
                  (ii) the extent to which the faculty, staff, 
                and administrators of the applicant institution 
                are committed to improving undergraduate 
                science, mathematics, and engineering 
                education.
          (H) In awarding grants under subparagraph (A)(ii), 
        the Director shall endeavor to ensure that a wide 
        variety of science, technology, engineering, and 
        mathematics fields and types of institutions of higher 
        education, including 2-year colleges and minority-
        serving institutions, are covered, and that--
                  (i) at least 1 Center is housed at a 
                Doctoral/Research University as defined by the 
                Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of 
                Teaching; and
                  (ii) at least 1 Center is focused on 
                improving undergraduate education in an 
                interdisciplinary area.
          (I) The Director shall convene an annual meeting of 
        the awardees under this paragraph to foster 
        collaboration and to disseminate the results of the 
        Centers and the other activities funded under this 
        paragraph.
          [(F)] (J) In this paragraph, the term ``eligible 
        applicant'' means--
                  (i)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (8) Secondary School Systemic Initiative.--(A) A 
        program of competitive, merit-based grants for State 
        educational agencies or local educational agencies that 
        supports the planning and implementation of agency-wide 
        secondary school reform initiatives designed to promote 
        scientific and technological literacy, meet the 
        mathematics and science education needs of students at 
        risk of not achieving State student academic 
        achievement standards, reduce the need for basic skill 
        training by employers, and heighten college completion 
        rates through activities, such as--
                  [(A)] (i) systemic alignment of secondary 
                school curricula and higher education freshman 
                placement requirements;
                  [(B)] (ii) development of materials and 
                curricula that support small, theme-oriented 
                schools and learning communities;
                  [(C)] (iii) implementation of enriched 
                mathematics and science curricula for all 
                secondary school students;
                  [(D)] (iv) strengthened teacher training in 
                mathematics, science, and reading as it relates 
                to technical and specialized texts;
                  [(E)] (v) laboratory improvement and 
                provision of instrumentation as part of a 
                comprehensive program to enhance the quality of 
                mathematics, science, engineering, and 
                technology instruction; or
                  [(F)] (vi) other secondary school systemic 
                initiatives that enable grantees to leverage 
                private sector funding for mathematics, 
                science, engineering, and technology 
                scholarships.
          (B) In accordance with subparagraph (A)(v), the 
        Director shall establish a research pilot program 
        designated as ``Partnerships for Access to Laboratory 
        Science'' to award grants to partnerships to improve 
        laboratories and provide instrumentation as part of a 
        comprehensive program to enhance the quality of 
        mathematics, science, engineering, and technology 
        instruction at the secondary school level. Grants under 
        this subparagraph may be used for--
                  (i) purchase, rental, or leasing of 
                equipment, instrumentation, and other 
                scientific educational materials;
                  (ii) maintenance, renovation, and improvement 
                of laboratory facilities;
                  (iii) development of instructional programs 
                designed to integrate the laboratory experience 
                with classroom instruction and to be consistent 
                with State mathematics and science academic 
                achievement standards;
                  (iv) training in laboratory safety for school 
                personnel;
                  (v) design and implementation of hands-on 
                laboratory experiences to encourage the 
                interest of individuals identified in section 
                33 or 34 of the Science and Engineering Equal 
                Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b) in 
                mathematics, science, engineering, and 
                technology and help prepare such individuals to 
                pursue postsecondary studies in these fields; 
                and
                  (vi) assessment of the activities funded 
                under this subparagraph.
          (C) Grants may be made under subparagraph (B) only to 
        a partnership--
                  (i) for a project that includes significant 
                teacher training and professional development 
                components; or
                  (ii) that establishes that appropriate 
                teacher training and professional development 
                is being addressed, or has been addressed, 
                through other means.
          (D) Grants awarded under subparagraph (B) shall be to 
        a partnership that--
                  (i) includes an institution of higher 
                education or a community college;
                  (ii) includes a high-need local educational 
                agency;
                  (iii) includes a business or eligible 
                nonprofit organization; and
                  (iv) may include a State educational agency, 
                other public agency, National Laboratory, or 
                community-based organization.
          (E) The Federal share of the cost of activities 
        carried out using amounts from a grant under 
        subparagraph (B) shall not exceed 50 percent.
          (F) The Director shall require grant recipients to 
        submit a report to the Director on the results of the 
        project supported by the grant.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 9. MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION PARTNERSHIPS.

  (a) Program Authorized.--
          (1) In general.--(A) The Director shall carry out a 
        program to award grants to institutions of higher 
        education or eligible nonprofit organizations (or 
        consortia of such institutions or organizations) to 
        establish mathematics and science education partnership 
        programs to improve elementary and secondary 
        mathematics and science instruction.
          (B) Grants shall be awarded under this subsection on 
        a competitive, merit-reviewed basis.
          (2) Partnerships.--[(A)] In order to be eligible to 
        receive a grant under this subsection, an institution 
        of higher education, through 1 or more of its 
        departments in science, mathematics, or engineering, or 
        eligible nonprofit organization (or consortium of such 
        institutions or organizations) shall enter into a 
        partnership with one or more local educational agencies 
        that may also include [a State educational agency] 
        education faculty from the participating institution or 
        institutions of higher education, a State educational 
        agency, or one or more businesses.
          [(B) A participating institution of higher education 
        shall include mathematics, science, or engineering 
        departments in the programs carried out through a 
        partnership under this paragraph.]
          (3) Uses of funds.--Grants awarded under this 
        subsection shall be used for activities that draw upon 
        the expertise of the partners to improve elementary or 
        secondary education in mathematics or science and that 
        are consistent with State mathematics and science 
        student academic achievement standards, including--
                  (A)  * * *
                  (B) offering content-specific professional 
                development programs, including summer or 
                academic year institutes or workshops, which 
                are designed to strengthen the capabilities of 
                mathematics and science teachers and which may 
                include teacher training activities to prepare 
                mathematics and science teachers to teach 
                challenging mathematics, science, and 
                technology college-preparatory courses, 
                including Advanced Placement and International 
                Baccalaureate courses;
                  (C) offering innovative preservice and 
                inservice programs that instruct teachers on 
                using technology and laboratory experiences 
                more effectively in teaching mathematics and 
                science, including programs that recruit and 
                train undergraduate and graduate students to 
                provide technical and laboratory support to 
                teachers;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (E) developing a cadre of [master teachers] 
                teacher leaders who will promote reform and 
                improvement in schools;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (I) developing initiatives to increase and 
                sustain the number, quality, and diversity of 
                prekindergarten through grade 12 teachers of 
                mathematics and science, including model 
                induction programs for teachers in their first 
                2 years of teaching, especially in underserved 
                areas;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (K) [developing and offering mathematics or 
                science enrichment programs for students, 
                including after-school and summer programs;] 
                developing educational programs and materials 
                and conducting mathematics, science, and 
                technology enrichment programs for students, 
                including after-school programs and summer 
                camps for students described in subsection 
                (b)(2)(G);

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) [Master teachers] Teacher leaders.--Activities 
        carried out in accordance with paragraph (3)(E) shall--
                  (A) emphasize the training of [master 
                teachers] teacher leaders who will improve the 
                instruction of mathematics or science in 
                kindergarten through grade 12;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (C) provide training only to teachers who 
                will be granted sufficient nonclassroom time to 
                serve as [master teachers] teacher leaders, as 
                demonstrated by assurances their employing 
                school has provided to the Director, in such 
                time and such manner as the Director may 
                require.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (8) Master's degree programs.--Activities carried out 
        in accordance with paragraph (3)(B) shall include the 
        development and offering of master's degree programs 
        for in-service mathematics and science teachers that 
        will strengthen their subject area knowledge and 
        pedagogical skills, as described in section 203 of the 
        Act enacting this paragraph. Grants provided under this 
        section may be used to develop and implement courses of 
        instruction for the master's degree programs, which may 
        involve online learning, and develop related 
        educational materials.
          (9) Mentors for teachers and students of challenging 
        courses.--Partnerships carrying out activities to 
        prepare mathematics and science teachers to teach 
        challenging mathematics, science, and technology 
        college-preparatory courses, including Advanced 
        Placement and International Baccalaureate courses, in 
        accordance with paragraph (3)(B) shall encourage 
        companies employing scientists, mathematicians, or 
        engineers to provide mentors to teachers and students 
        and provide for the coordination of such mentoring 
        activities.
          (10) Inventiveness.--Activities carried out in 
        accordance with paragraph (3)(H) may include the 
        development and dissemination of curriculum tools that 
        will help foster inventiveness and innovation.
  (b) Selection Process.--
          (1)  * * *
          (2) Review of applications.--In evaluating the 
        applications submitted under paragraph (1), the 
        Director shall consider, at a minimum--
                  (A)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (E) the extent to which the evaluation 
                described in paragraph (1)(E) will be 
                independent and based on objective measures;
                  [(E)] (F) the likelihood that the partnership 
                will demonstrate activities that can be widely 
                implemented as part of larger scale reform 
                efforts; and
                  [(F)] (G) the extent to which the activities 
                will encourage the interest of individuals 
                identified in section 33 or 34 of the Science 
                and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 
                U.S.C. 1885a or 1885b) in mathematics, science, 
                engineering, and technology and will help 
                prepare such individuals to pursue 
                postsecondary studies in these fields.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) Minimum and maximum grant size.--A grant awarded 
        under this section shall be not less than $75,000 or 
        greater than $2,000,000 for any fiscal year.
  (c) Accountability and Dissemination.--
          (1)  * * *
          [(2) Dissemination of results.--(A) The results of 
        the evaluation required under paragraph (1) shall be 
        made available to the public and shall be provided to 
        the Committee on Science of the House of 
        Representatives, the Committee on Commerce, Science, 
        and Transportation of the Senate, and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.
          [(B) Materials developed under the program 
        established under subsection (a) that are demonstrated 
        to be effective shall be made widely available to the 
        public.]
          (2) Report on model projects.--The Director shall 
        determine which completed projects funded through the 
        program under this section should be seen as models to 
        be replicated on a more expansive basis at the State or 
        national levels. Not later than 1 year after the date 
        of enactment of this paragraph, the Director shall 
        transmit a report describing the results of this study 
        to the Committee on Science and Technology and the 
        Committee on Education and Labor of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, 
        Science, and Transportation and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate.
          (3) Report on evaluations.--Not later than 4 years 
        after the date of enactment of this paragraph, the 
        Director shall transmit a report summarizing the 
        evaluations required under subsection (b)(1)(E) of 
        grants received under this program and describing any 
        changes to the program recommended as a result of these 
        evaluations to the Committee on Science and Technology 
        and the Committee on Education and Labor of the House 
        of Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, 
        Science, and Transportation and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate. 
        Such report shall be made widely available to the 
        public.
          [(3)] (4) Annual meeting.--The Director, in 
        consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall 
        convene an annual meeting of the partnerships 
        participating under this section to foster greater 
        national collaboration.
          [(4)] (5) Report on coordination.--The Director, in 
        consultation with the Secretary of Education, shall 
        provide an annual report to the Committee on Science of 
        the House of Representatives, the Committee on 
        Education and the Workforce of the House of 
        Representatives, the Committee on Commerce, Science, 
        and Transportation of the Senate, and the Committee on 
        Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate 
        describing how the program authorized under this 
        section has been and will be coordinated with the 
        program authorized under part B of title II of the 
        Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 
        U.S.C. 6601 et seq.). The report under this paragraph 
        shall be submitted along with the President's annual 
        budget request.
          [(5)] (6) Technical assistance.--At the request of an 
        eligible partnership or a State educational agency, the 
        Director shall provide the partnership or agency with 
        technical assistance in meeting any requirements of 
        this section, including providing advice from experts 
        on how to develop--
                  (A)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (d) Definitions.--In this section--
          (1) the term ``mathematics and science teacher'' 
        means a mathematics, science, or technology teacher at 
        the elementary school or secondary school level; and
          (2) the term ``science'', in the context of 
        elementary and secondary education, includes technology 
        and pre-engineering.

SEC. 10. ROBERT NOYCE TEACHER SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM.

  (a) Scholarship Program.--
          (1) In general.--The Director shall carry out a 
        program to award grants to institutions of higher 
        education (or consortia of such institutions) [to 
        provide scholarships, stipends, and programming 
        designed] to recruit and train mathematics and science 
        teachers and to provide scholarships and stipends to 
        students participating in the program. Such program 
        shall be known as the ``Robert Noyce Teacher 
        Scholarship Program''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Use of grants.--Grants provided under this 
        section shall be used by institutions of higher 
        education or consortia--
                  (A) to develop and implement a program to 
                [encourage top college juniors and seniors] 
                recruit and prepare undergraduate students 
                majoring in mathematics, science, and 
                engineering at the grantee's institution to 
                become qualified as mathematics and science 
                teachers, through--
                          (i)  * * *
                          (ii) offering [programs to help 
                        scholarship recipients] academic 
                        courses and early field teaching 
                        experiences designed to prepare 
                        students participating in the program 
                        to teach in elementary schools and 
                        secondary schools, including [programs 
                        that will result in] such preparation 
                        as is necessary to meet requirements 
                        for teacher certification or licensing; 
                        [and]
                          (iii) offering programs to 
                        [scholarship recipients] students 
                        participating in the program, both 
                        before and after they receive their 
                        baccalaureate degree, to [enable the 
                        recipients] enable the students to 
                        become better mathematics and science 
                        teachers, to fulfill the service 
                        requirements of this section, and to 
                        exchange ideas with others in their 
                        fields; [or] and
                          (iv) providing summer internships for 
                        freshman students participating in the 
                        program; or
                  (B) to develop and implement a program to 
                [encourage] recruit and prepare science, 
                mathematics, or engineering professionals to 
                become qualified as mathematics and science 
                teachers, through--
                          (i)  * * *
                          [(ii) offering programs to help 
                        stipend recipients obtain teacher 
                        certification or licensing; and]
                          (ii) offering academic courses and 
                        field teaching experiences designed to 
                        prepare stipend recipients to teach in 
                        elementary schools and secondary 
                        schools, including such preparation as 
                        is necessary to meet requirements for 
                        teacher certification or licensing; and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) Eligibility requirement.--To be eligible for an 
        award under this section, an institution of higher 
        education (or consortia of such institutions) shall 
        ensure that specific faculty members and staff from the 
        institution's mathematics, science, or engineering 
        departments and specific education faculty are 
        designated to carry out the development and 
        implementation of the program. An institution of higher 
        education may also include teacher leaders to 
        participate in developing the pedagogical content of 
        the program and to supervise students participating in 
        the program in their field teaching experiences. No 
        institution of higher education shall be eligible for 
        an award unless faculty from the institution's 
        mathematics, science, or engineering departments are 
        active participants in the program.
  (b) Selection Process.--
          (1) Application.--An institution of higher education 
        or consortium seeking funding under this section shall 
        submit an application to the Director at such time, in 
        such manner, and containing such information as the 
        Director may require. The application shall include, at 
        a minimum--
                  (A) a description of the [scholarship or 
                stipend] program that the applicant intends to 
                operate, including the number of scholarships 
                and summer internships or the size and number 
                of stipends the applicant intends to award, the 
                type of activities proposed for the recruitment 
                of students to the program, and the selection 
                process that will be used in awarding the 
                scholarships or stipends;
                  (B) evidence that the applicant has the 
                capability to administer the [scholarship or 
                stipend] program in accordance with the 
                provisions of this section[; and], which may 
                include a description of any existing programs 
                at the applicant's institution that are 
                targeted to the education of mathematics and 
                science teachers and the number of teachers 
                graduated annually from such programs;
                  [(C) a description of the programming that 
                will be offered to scholarship or stipend 
                recipients during and after their matriculation 
                in the program for which the scholarship or 
                stipend is received.]
                  (C) a description of the academic courses and 
                field teaching experiences required under 
                subsection (a)(3)(A)(ii) and (B)(ii), 
                including--
                          (i) a description of the 
                        undergraduate program that will enable 
                        a student to graduate within 5 years 
                        with a major in mathematics, science, 
                        or engineering and to obtain teacher 
                        certification or licensing;
                          (ii) a description of the field 
                        teaching experiences proposed; and
                          (iii) evidence of agreements between 
                        the applicant and the schools or school 
                        districts that are identified as the 
                        locations at which field teaching 
                        experiences will occur;
                  (D) a description of the programs required 
                under subsection (a)(3)(A)(iii) and (B)(iii), 
                including activities to assist new teachers in 
                fulfilling their service requirements under 
                this section; and
                  (E) an identification of the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty 
                and its education faculty who will carry out 
                the development and implementation of the 
                program as required under subsection (a)(4).
          (2) Review of applications.--In evaluating the 
        applications submitted under paragraph (1), the 
        Director shall consider, at a minimum--
                  (A) the ability of the applicant to 
                effectively carry out the program;
                  (B) the extent to which the applicant's 
                mathematics, science, or engineering faculty 
                and its education faculty have worked or will 
                work collaboratively to design new or revised 
                curricula that recognizes the specialized 
                pedagogy required to teach mathematics, 
                science, and technology effectively in 
                elementary and secondary schools;
                  [(B)] (C) the extent to which the applicant 
                is committed to making the program a central 
                organizational focus;
                  [(C)] (D) the degree to which the proposed 
                programming will enable scholarship or stipend 
                recipients to become successful mathematics and 
                science teachers;
                  [(D)] (E) the number and quality of the 
                students that will be served by the program; 
                and
                  [(E) the ability of the applicant to recruit 
                students who would otherwise not pursue a 
                career in teaching.]
                  (F) the ability of the applicant to recruit 
                students who are individuals identified in 
                section 33 or 34 of the Science and Engineering 
                Equal Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 
                1885b).
  (c) Scholarship Requirements.--
          (1) In general.--Scholarships under this section 
        shall be available only to students who are--
                  (A)  * * *
                  (B) in the last [2 years] 3 years of a 
                baccalaureate degree program.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Amount.--The Director shall establish for each 
        year the amount to be awarded for scholarships under 
        this section for that year, which shall be not less 
        than [$7,500] $10,000 per year, except that no 
        individual shall receive for any year more than the 
        cost of attendance at that individual's institution. 
        Individuals may receive a maximum of [2 years of 
        scholarship support] 3 years of scholarship support, 
        unless the Director establishes a policy by which part-
        time students may receive additional years of support.
          (4) Service obligation.--If an individual receives a 
        scholarship, that individual shall be required to 
        complete, within [6 years] 8 years after graduation 
        from the baccalaureate degree program for which the 
        scholarship was awarded, 2 years of service as a 
        mathematics or science teacher for each year a 
        scholarship was received, with a maximum service 
        requirement of 6 years. [Service required under this 
        paragraph shall be performed in a high-need local 
        educational agency.]
          (5) Exception.--The period of service obligation 
        under paragraph (4) is reduced by 1 year for 
        scholarship recipients whose service is performed in a 
        high-need local educational agency.
  (d) Stipends.--
          (1) In general.--Stipends under this section shall be 
        available only to mathematics, science, and engineering 
        professionals who, while receiving the stipend, are 
        enrolled in a program [to receive certification or 
        licensing to teach] established under subsection 
        (a)(3)(B).
          (2) Selection.--Individuals shall be selected to 
        receive stipends under this section primarily on the 
        basis of academic merit and professional achievement, 
        with consideration given to financial need and to the 
        goal of promoting the participation of individuals 
        identified in section 33 or 34 of the Science and 
        Engineering Equal Opportunities Act (42 U.S.C. 1885a or 
        1885b).
          (3) Duration.--Individuals may receive a maximum of 
        [1 year] 16 months of stipend support.
          (4) Service obligation.--If an individual receives a 
        stipend under this section, that individual shall be 
        required to complete, within [6 years] 4 years after 
        graduation from the program for which the stipend was 
        awarded, 2 years of service as a mathematics or science 
        teacher [for each year a stipend was received]. Service 
        required under this paragraph shall be performed in a 
        high-need local educational agency.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (g) Failure to Complete Service Obligation.--
          (1)  * * *
          (2) Amount of repayment.--(A) If a circumstance 
        described in paragraph (1) occurs before the completion 
        of one year of a service obligation under this section, 
        the United States shall be entitled to recover from the 
        individual, within one year after the date of the 
        occurrence of such circumstance, an amount equal to--
                  (i)  * * *
                  (ii) the interest on the amounts of such 
                awards which would be payable if at the time 
                the awards were received they were loans 
                bearing interest at the maximum legal 
                prevailing rate, as determined by the 
                [Treasurer of the United States,] Treasurer of 
                the United States.
        [multiplied by 2.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (i) Definitions.--In this section--
          (1)  * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) the term ``mathematics, science, or engineering 
        professional'' means a person who holds a 
        baccalaureate, masters, or doctoral degree in science, 
        mathematics, or engineering and is working in or had a 
        career in that field or a related area;
          (4) the term ``scholarship'' means an award under 
        subsection (c); [and]
          (5) the term ``stipend'' means an award under 
        subsection (d)[.]; and
          (6) the term ``teacher leader'' means a mathematics 
        or science teacher who works to improve the instruction 
        of mathematics or science in kindergarten through grade 
        12 through--
                  (A) participating in the development or 
                revision of science, mathematics, engineering, 
                or technology curricula;
                  (B) serving as a mentor to mathematics or 
                science teachers;
                  (C) coordinating and assisting teachers in 
                the use of hands-on inquiry materials, 
                equipment, and supplies, and when appropriate, 
                supervising acquisition and repair of such 
                materials;
                  (D) providing in-classroom teaching 
                assistance to mathematics or science teachers; 
                and
                  (E) providing professional development, for 
                the purposes of training other teacher leaders, 
                to mathematics and science teachers.
  (j) Mathematics and Science Scholarship Gift Fund.--In 
accordance with section 11(f) of the National Science 
Foundation Act of 1950, the Director is authorized to accept 
donations from the private sector to support scholarships, 
stipends, or internships associated with programs under this 
section.
  (k) Assessment of Teacher Service and Retention.--Not later 
than 4 years after the date of enactment of this subsection, 
the Director shall transmit to Congress a report on the 
effectiveness of the program carried out under this section. 
The report shall include the proportion of individuals 
receiving scholarships or stipends under the program who --
          (1) fulfill their service obligation required under 
        this section in a high-need local educational agency;
          (2) elect to fulfill their service obligation in a 
        high-need local educational agency but fail to complete 
        it, as defined in subsection (g);
          (3) remain in the teaching profession beyond their 
        service obligation; and
          (4) remain in the teaching profession in a high-need 
        local educational agency beyond their service 
        obligation.
  (l) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to 
be appropriated to the Director for the Robert Noyce Teacher 
Scholarship Program--
          (1) $70,000,000 for fiscal year 2008;
          (2) $101,000,000 for fiscal year 2009;
          (3) $133,000,000 for fiscal year 2010;
          (4) $164,000,000 for fiscal year 2011; and
          (5) $196,000,000 for fiscal year 2012.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     XX. Committee Recommendations

    On March 28, 2007, the Committee on Science and Technology 
favorably reported H.R. 362, as amended, by a voice vote and 
recommended its enactment.




 XXII. PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 362, ``10,000 
     TEACHERS, 10 MILLION MINDS'' SCIENCE AND MATH SCHOLARSHIP ACT

                              ----------                              


                        WEDNESDAY, MAY 28, 2007

                  House of Representatives,
                       Committee on Science and Technology,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:07 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Gordon. Good morning. The Committee on Science and 
Technology will come to order.
    Pursuant to notice, the Committee meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 362, ``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million 
Minds'' Math and Science Scholarship Act; H. Con. Res. 76, 
Honoring the 50th Anniversary of the International Geophysical 
Year; and H.R. 252, Recognizing the 45th Anniversary of John 
Herschel Glenn Jr.'s Historic Achievement in Becoming the First 
United States Astronaut to Orbit the Earth.
    We will now proceed with the markup.
    Today, we are meeting to markup three bipartisan bills.
    I realize that I am starting to sound like a broken record, 
but I sincerely hope that the Committee on Science and 
Technology is a place where Members of both parties can come 
together to get work done on important issues in a bipartisan 
way.
    The important, non-partisan issue of this markup is 
competitiveness. This is one of the most critical issues facing 
our nation today. H.R. 362, the ``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million 
Minds'' Science and Math Scholarship Act, which I sponsored and 
which my friend, Ralph Hall, co-sponsored, takes a big step 
forward in dealing with the vital issues.
    Together with H.R. 363, which this committee reported out 
earlier this month, these bills take the recommendations from 
the National Academy of Sciences ``Rising Above the Gathering 
Storm'' report, and turn them into real legislation that will 
make a difference.
    In addition to H.R. 362, we are also marking up two other 
bills.
    H. Con. Res. 76 is a resolution honoring the 50th 
anniversary of the International Geophysical Year, an 
international cooperative initiative that led to significant 
advances in space and Earth science, and which was marked by 
the dawn of the Space Age.
    H.Res. 252 recognizes the 45th anniversary of John Glenn's 
historic space mission, in which he became the first American 
to orbit the Earth.
    The space race of the 1950's and 1960's helped advance--to 
drive scientific achievement and technological innovation in 
the 20th century, and it is fitting that today, as we honor the 
scientific and technological achievements of the past, we are 
also helping to ensure this country's ability to make these 
great gains in the future.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Gordon follows:]
               Prepared Statement of Chairman Bart Gordon
    Today we are meeting to markup three bipartisan bills.
    I realize that I'm starting to sound like a broken record, but I 
sincerely hope that the Committee on Science and Technology is a place 
where Members of both parties can come together to get work done on 
important issues in a bipartisan way.
    The important, non-partisan issue of this markup is U.S. 
competitiveness. This is one of the most critical issues facing our 
nation today. H.R. 362, the ``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds'' 
Science and Math Scholarship Act, which I sponsored and Ralph Hall co-
sponsored, takes a big step forward in dealing with this vital issue.
    Together with H.R. 363, which this committee reported out earlier 
this month, these bills take recommendations from the National Academy 
of Sciences ``Rising Above the Gathering Storm'' report, and turn them 
into real legislation that will make a difference.
    In addition to H.R. 362, we are also marking up two other bills.
    H. Con. Res. 76 is a resolution honoring the 50th anniversary of 
the International Geophysical Year, an international cooperative 
initiative that led to significant advances in space and Earth science, 
and which was marked by the dawn of the Space Age.
    H.Res. 252 recognizes the 45th anniversary of John Glenn's historic 
space mission in which he became the first American to orbit the Earth.
    The space race of the 1950's and 1960's helped to drive scientific 
achievement and technological innovation in the 20th century.
    It is fitting that today, as we honor the scientific and 
technological achievements of the past, we are also helping to insure 
this country's ability to make these great gains in the future.

    Chairman Gordon. I recognize Mr. Hall to present his 
opening remarks.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I thank you, of course, as usual, 
as normal, for calling this markup today.
    We have before us three measures, as you have stated, and a 
very important piece of innovation and competitiveness agenda 
that targets improving the caliber of our future K-12 math and 
science teachers and two space-related resolutions.
    With regard to H.R. 362, I am very pleased to see us 
considering the bill. It has many of the elements that this 
committee passed last year. As I have stated before, I am 
especially pleased to see that we are using the University of 
Texas's UTeach program for the basis for a scholarship program 
for STEM students who commit to teaching K-12 science and math 
classes after graduation.
    Now I understand that there will be an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute offered to H.R. 362, which includes 
agreed-upon improvements to the bill.
    Mr. Chairman, I really do thank you for working with our 
side, as you have always done, on making these improvements, 
not only to the underlying measure, but also with regards to 
H.R. 524, the Partnership for Access to Laboratory Science Act, 
which I believe is also going to be offered as an amendment to 
H.R. 362.
    Okay. With that, I yield back my time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Mr. Chairman, thank you for calling this markup today. We have 
before us three measures: an important piece of the innovation and 
competitiveness agenda that targets improving the caliber of our future 
K-12 math and science teachers and two space-related resolutions.
    With regard to H.R. 362, I am pleased to see us considering a bill 
that has many of the elements that this committee passed last year. As 
I have stated before, I am especially pleased to see that we are using 
the University of Texas UTeach program as the basis for a scholarship 
program for STEM students who commit to teaching K-12 science and math 
classes after graduation.
    I understand there will be an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute offered to H.R. 362 which includes agreed upon improvements 
to the bill. I thank the Chairman for working with our side on making 
these improvements not only to the underlying measure, but also with 
regards to H.R. 524, the Partnerships for Access to Laboratory Science 
Act, which I believe is also going to be offered as an amendment to 
H.R. 362. I recognize the hard work that Ms. Johnson and Dr. Ehlers 
have made in ensuring that the areas where NSF has real expertise are 
prioritized. I would have preferred to have seen statutory language 
prohibiting federal funding from being used for the purchase of lab 
equipment and the maintenance of lab facilities in this amendment. I 
appreciate the willingness of the majority to work with us to ensure 
that report language is strongly worded to emphasize that it is the 
Committee's intent for the non-federal partners to provide the funding 
for equipment and facility maintenance and improvements.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Hall, for your support of 
the bill and, more importantly, for your good additions to make 
a good bill even better.
    Without objection, Members may place statements in the 
record at this point.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Hooley follows:]
          Prepared Statement of Representative Darlene Hooley
    Mr. Chairman, I move to strike the requisite number of words.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I wanted to speak briefly in support of 
this legislation, H.R. 362, and applaud you for your leadership in 
bringing this important legislation before the Full Committee.
    As we all know, the idea for this legislation was included in the 
Augustine Report that was compiled by the National Academies of 
Science. The Report identified this initiative as being the most 
important step to increase America's talent pool by vastly improving K-
12 science and mathematics education.
    As the Members of this committee know, the key to the United States 
maintaining its position at the forefront of global innovation and 
technology is to get more students interested in the STEM fields.
    Our nation's economic vitality is derived in large part from the 
productivity of well-trained people and the steady stream of scientific 
and technical innovations they produce.
    After years of inattention and neglect, this legislation is an 
important first step towards a re-investment in our nation's STEM 
education. And it will in turn positively benefit the American 
Competitiveness Initiative.
    Once again, I applaud the Chairman for his leadership on this issue 
and I urge my colleagues to support this legislation.
    Thank you and I yield back the balance of my time.

    [The prepared statement of Mr. Mitchell follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Harry E. Mitchell
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I taught high school in Arizona for 28 years, and I know that my 
fellow teachers work hard and do a good job with the resources they 
have.
    But I was also a State Senator for eight years, and I know our 
schools need help. Arizona's students are below the national averages 
in every subject area. On average, Arizona's teachers teach six 
children more per class than the national average.
    That's a problem.
    Arizona must increase the number of highly qualified teachers and 
lower the student to teacher ratio.
    As a former educator, I understand first-hand the impact education 
that has on our children and their future. I appreciate Chairman 
Gordon's leadership on this issue, and I am pleased to see the 
Chairman's legislation works to increase the number of qualified 
science and math teachers.
    Ensuring that our students receive a first-rate education is vital 
not only to Arizona's but our nation's future. As a former teacher, I 
believe that if we want to successfully compete and prosper in the 21st 
Century, we must make education a national priority.
    The National Academy of Science was asked how the United States can 
accomplish this goal. Their report, Rising Above the Gathering Storm, 
recommends action to recruit highly qualified science and math teachers 
and implement programs to strengthen the skills of our current 
teachers.
    I wholeheartedly agree.
    To continue to compete in the global economy we need to increase 
the number of science and technology graduates and our schools need the 
resources to successfully educate our children.
    Today, we are considering a bill to address this issue and I look 
forward to working on it.
    I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Gordon. We will now consider H.R. 362, ``10,000 
Teachers, 10 Million Minds'' Science and Math Scholarship Act, 
and I yield myself five minutes to describe this bill.
    In 2005, the National Academies, and I might add, at the 
request of Chairman Sherry Boehlert and myself, assembled a 
Blue Ribbon Committee to address concerns about the national 
prosperity and the global economy of the 21st century. This 
committee was chaired by Norm Augustine and was comprised of a 
broad spectrum of national leaders in academia, industry, and 
government. The Committee's report was entitled ``Rising Above 
the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a 
Brighter Economic Future.'' That report, which was released in 
its present form just three weeks ago, presents recommendations 
that the Nation must follow to maintain its competitiveness in 
a global economy.
    And what is the highest-priority recommendation of the 
report? What did this distinguished committee tell us is most 
important for the future economic health of our nation?
    Here is the first recommendation from the report: 
``Increase America's talent pool by vastly improving K-12 
science and mathematic education.'' And that is what H.R. 362 
will do.
    The Gathering Storm report goes on to tell us where the 
focus should be in efforts to improve K-12 science and 
mathematic education. In brief, it says focus on the teachers. 
And that is what H.R. 362 will do.
    The bill implements all the action items from the Gathering 
Storm report that address the report's first recommendation. 
The bill will create thousands of new teachers with content and 
expertise in teaching in their area--or their area of teaching 
via the North Scholarship Program at NSF. The bill will create 
summer institutes and graduate programs that provide sustained, 
content-oriented, professional development to teachers through 
math-science partnerships at the NSF, and the bill will create 
centers for improvement of undergraduate education in STEM 
fields via the STEP program at NSF.
    To maintain our nation's high standard of living, we will 
need to sustain our world-class science and technology 
enterprise that creates innovative, new products and high-
paying jobs. To sustain this science and technology enterprise, 
we need to--a workforce that is prepared in a world-class math 
and science education system.
    But American students have performed poorly on an 
assortment of international tests in math and science 
achievement. That does not bode well for the future. That is 
the ``gathering storm'' on the horizon. To rise above it, we 
need to reform the math and science teaching profession, and 
that is what H.R. 362 will do.
    The stakes are high, and the concern is urgent, and I urge 
support of this bill.
    And let me also put the Members on notice that this bill is 
supported by, you know, so many folks, that it is really hard--
and I am not going to go over all of them, but the Business 
Roundtable, the--excuse me, you know, every kind of math and 
science and education, physics group that there is has--and 
this--I am just going to read you some of the ones that are 
sort of interesting: the American Society for Heating, 
Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers, I mean, this 
cuts across a lot of folks; the Business Roundtable; the 
Association of Community Colleges, the Hispanic Association of 
Colleges and Universities, every kind of teacher group, the 
Semiconductor Industry Association. There is just an enormous 
amount of support for this bill.
    And let me also say that when Norm Augustine first spoke to 
us, I mentioned to him that what he brought to us wasn't 
particularly ground-breaking. He didn't bring us any new ideas. 
All he did was take what we know and what has been told to us 
over and over and made a compilation. And this bill, my bill, 
is not very creative, either. I even plagiarized the name that 
he used: ``10,000 Teachers for 10 Million Minds.''
    So we are not trying to break new ground here. We are just 
trying to act on what we know needs to be done.
    And I recognize Mr. Hall to present any remarks on his 
own--any of his remarks on the bill.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I just, once again, want to thank 
you and your staff for working with our staff in improving the 
underlying bill.
    I yield back.
    Chairman Gordon. Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Gordon. Yes, Mr. Rohrabacher.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. First of all, let me add, this bill we are 
talking about basically provides scholarships for students who 
would then teach in high school and other mathematics and 
science courses, is that right?
    Chairman Gordon. Well, it does a couple of things. One, it 
does provide competitive scholarships for students that will go 
into math, science, and education and agree to teach for five 
years.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Agree to teach for five years.
    Chairman Gordon. Right. In addition to that, it provides 
stipends for existing math and science teachers to come back to 
school in the summer and get their certification.
    The reason for that is it is amazing to think about this, 
but over 50 percent of the math teachers in K-12 have neither a 
major or a certification to teach math. Ninety-two percent of 
the physical science teachers have neither a major or a 
certification to teach physical science. So that is--you know, 
that is a big part of it. As Mr. Hall points out, we also use 
the University of Texas's well-documented success in curriculum 
in trying to do this, also.
    So that is the thrust of it.
    Mr. Rohrabacher. Well, as you know, Mr. Chairman, I have--I 
support the concept of scholarships in exchange for service, 
which I consider to be a twofer and something that would be 
very justifiable. And I am likely to support this legislation.
    However, let me just note that providing scholarships is, 
in reality, another form of remuneration. I mean, this is 
what--this is another form of providing a benefit for someone 
in order to pay them for a service. And of course, I have tried 
to put that to work here for the Federal Government, NASA and 
others, saying that they can have scholarship programs 
providing for young people who will then work for NASA or that 
government agency.
    But in this case, when we are talking about public 
education, let us remember that as we provide this remuneration 
for science and math teachers, it is because we are having to 
do this and the shortage that exists, exists because of 
policies by the education establishment that all teachers, no 
matter what they are teaching, have to make the same pay. And 
overnight, this problem in our country could be solved if we 
simply stepped back from this policy and the political people 
in this country did not support this nonsensical theory that 
someone who is teaching gymnastics in sixth grade has to earn 
as much as a sixth grade science teacher or basket weaving or 
home economics or whatever that is, that there are a lot of 
classes that can be taught, there are a lot of people waiting 
to teach social sciences in these schools, like history and 
other things, which, by the way, have a value to them. But 
right now, we have a shortage, and we are not permitted to pay 
mathematics and science teachers more money, and that is why we 
have this shortage.
    Now we are making up for that. This is--and I will likely, 
as I say, support the bill. But let us not forget that the 
fundamental problem is being caused by a nonsensical policy 
that should be changed at the local level.
    And that is what I have to say about it.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Rohrabacher. I have heard 
your basket-weaving speech before. We don't have jurisdiction 
on that in this committee, but we--this is a, for lack of a 
better term, I think, a back-door way to approach it. The five 
years is important, because half of teachers drop out in the 
first five years, and so there will be a mentoring program, 
also, to keep them there.
    But thanks for your good comment.
    Is--does anyone else like to be recognized?
    Ms. Hooley.
    Ms. Hooley.--very--oops. Thank you for turning on my mike.
    Briefly, in support of this legislation, as a former 
teacher and also watching my children go through high school 
and how difficult it was to find, particularly math, teachers 
in the high school level, people that were willing to teach 
math. This has been a problem for a long time, and as we know, 
the Augustine report says that this is an important thing to 
do.
    So I think we have to do this where we just have to 
increase that talent pool by improving K-12 science and math 
education. If we are going to maintain our front in innovation 
and technology, we have to get more students interested in the 
STEM fields.
    Our Nation's economic vitality is derived, in a large part, 
from productivity of well-trained people and the steady stream 
of scientific and technical innovations they produce.
    After years of inattention and neglect, this legislation is 
a critical first step towards reinvestment in our nation's STEM 
education. It will, in turn, positively benefit the American 
Competitiveness Initiative.
    And once again, I applaud the Chairman for his leadership 
on this issue, and I urge my colleagues to support it.
    Thank you. Thanks for your hard work.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you. I didn't realize you were a 
teacher. What subject?
    Ms. Hooley. I taught high school, and I taught music, 
teaching--I mean reading, physical education, science, health--
--
    Chairman Gordon. Okay.
    Ms. Hooley. I was at a small school.
    Chairman Gordon. You were a renaissance teacher.
    Ms. Hooley. And I couldn't decide what I wanted to do when 
I grew up.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Bilbray is recognized for five 
minutes.
    Mr. Bilbray. Yes, Mr. Chairman.
    I--you know, first of all, let me make a comment that Mr. 
Rohrabacher and I don't agree on a lot of things, but I think, 
in all fairness, even though it is not our committee----
    Chairman Gordon. A lot of folks don't agree with Dana on a 
lot of things.
    Mr. Bilbray. Dana and my disagreements usually happen when 
we are out surfing, but that is a different story.
    But I mean, we shouldn't just pass over his statement about 
the fact that the educational institutions have a--government 
has a quasi-monopoly on this range to such--you know, the 
monopoly is so large that there is an impact on this idea. And 
his concept of us at least raising the issue, and we should 
raise it to our friends that are in the teachers associations 
and stuff about the fact that this one-size-fits-all salary 
just does not reflect the reality out there, and they have got 
to rethink. And I think that we should be the voices and the 
willingness to raise this, Democrats or Republicans.
    So I think he gets--I think he, really, has said a good 
point that none of us want to talk about or think about, and I 
think if we really care about this issue, we at least have got 
to be willing to broach that and raise that issue. And I--that 
is a huge leap, I understand.
    But going back to the original bill, one of the 
opportunities, I think, we have missed from--learning from 
history is a great, great contribution that the GI bill made, 
not just to the veterans but to the educational institutions, 
because they were taking people that were coming out of a real-
world experience, not just walking out of educational 
institutions, and bringing that experience into the classroom 
with their degree to be able to teach. And I would really love 
to see us really understand and work with the Veterans 
Committee, which I happen to serve on, that--looking at a GI 
bill that really encourages our veterans to go back into 
education and then stay in education and get back in and teach 
our kids, because I just think the benefit of education, of 
having people that have not just spent their whole life in a--
in the educational environs. It really, really can be reflected 
in the successes that we had in the past, especially during the 
1960s and that period.
    So I would--I will support the bill, but I would just ask 
all of us to look at ways, as we talk about taking care of the 
veterans that are coming back from this conflict, one way they 
can--we can serve them and serve our children of the future is 
to try to have--formulate a strategy to get them involved in 
the educational institutions.
    And I yield back, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Bilbray, as we deal with other 
competitiveness issues and these types of issues later in this 
Congress, when appropriate, we would welcome for you and Dana 
or anyone else to--if you want to bring a witness to be a part 
of a panel to discuss a disparity in salaries, we would welcome 
you participating in that way.
    Mr. Bilbray. And, Mr. Chairman, let me clarify. I actually, 
you know, studied and wanted to be a history teacher, but I 
couldn't pull the academics, so I ended up getting stuck in 
Congress instead.
    Chairman Gordon. All right. Well, you are in good company.
    Mr. McNerney is recognized.
    Mr. McNerney. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    And thank you, the Ranking Member and all of the staff, for 
putting together this bill.
    Education is dear to me. I have a Ph.D. in math, and I have 
to say that those are some of the finest years of my life 
studying mathematics and enjoying the beauty of it.
    And what I would like to do is see that more young people 
appreciate not only the power and effectiveness of mathematics, 
but also--and science, but also the beauty and the power that 
this brings to your life.
    Education is, really, an investment in our future, and 
education--the investment we put into education is paid back 
ten-fold by the contributions that individuals that are highly 
educated and appreciate that education contribute back to 
society. So it is not just something that we remunerate. It is 
something that we invest. It is something that we get paid back 
for.
    And it is also a responsibility, because as we look at the 
educational performance of our children and we see that they 
are falling behind and that there are countries out there that 
are putting out this investment on their children, and--they 
are going to be outperforming us in the future, as I know we 
are all aware of. I did make an effort to finish the ``Rising 
Above the Gathering Storm,'' and I am really only about a third 
or halfway through it, but I certainly see the need.
    And I urge all Members to support this bill. It is very 
important to our nation. It is very important to our future.
    Thank you. I yield back.
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Gingrey is recognized.
    Mr. Gingrey. Mr. Chairman, thank you. I got here so early 
this morning I just felt like I had to say a word or two.
    But in regard to the comments on my side over here, Mr. 
Rohrabacher and Mr. Bilbray, I think they bring up a good 
point.
    But the purpose of the bill--and I would say that we really 
need to do both. I think we need to do exactly what Dana had 
suggested. But in regard to this bill, I think what we need to 
keep in mind is we are trying to ``rise above the gathering 
storm,'' Mr. Chairman, as you pointed out. And it is not just a 
matter of trying to improve math and science engineering 
education and giving teachers an opportunity, incentivize them 
to do that and to go back into the classroom, but the purpose 
is to excite our young students at the K-12 level to go on and 
pursue a career themselves in math and science and engineering. 
They, themselves, likely, might not go into teaching, but they 
go into industry and innovation and help this country ``rise 
above the gathering storm.'' So that is what it is all about.
    And I--Mr. Chairman, I commend you for it. It is a great 
bill, and I am fully supportive, and I yield back.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Gingrey.
    And let me also point out that the purpose of the--as you 
said, the purpose of the bill is to get those teachers that 
know their subjects so they can inspire kids. But it is not 
just to create a few Dr. Ehlers, you know, or in terms of real 
top-notch, investigative scientists. It is so that those folks 
getting out of high school can work at a higher level and get a 
better job and understand what is going on. I mean, that is 
what 95 percent of this is just helping everyday people be able 
to work more productively and get a better job.
    Anyone----
    Mr. Baird. I just would echo that, Mr. Chairman.
    I had a series of hearings--actually meetings in my 
district two weeks ago with members of the National Science 
Foundation, the Superintendent of Public Instruction, and I 
think the gentleman from California made excellent points about 
this, about the need for pay differentials.
    But your point about making sure people can get jobs, I 
spoke with a major employer, prepared to invest a couple 
hundred million dollars in my community, bring 200 new jobs, 
but they lack the ability to find people who could just add 
positive and negative numbers, do a scatter plot, calculate an 
average, understand what a standard deviation meant. That 
rudimentary knowledge was potentially costing us $200 million 
of investment and 200 new jobs. And it wasn't that that 
investment wasn't going to go somewhere. It was going to go 
somewhere. Those jobs were going to go somewhere. The question 
was, would they be in America or overseas. If we can't answer 
the question affirmatively that we have the human resources who 
are educated to do this kind of basic work, we will lose the 
jobs, and we will lose our competitiveness.
    And I applaud you for your leadership. I can tell you, the 
people back home who employ students who graduated without 
adequate understanding of science and math applaud you as well. 
They are grateful to see this, that, on a bipartisan effort, we 
are coming together to solve this problem, and I celebrate your 
work.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Baird.
    Let me--again, let me say that all I did was plagiarize 
this report, and I think most all of you are co-sponsors of 
this, so you know, you are as much responsible as I am, and 
everybody should go home and take credit for this.
    Mr. Baird. Are we called ``plagiarizers'' as well? That 
didn't work for Senator Biden a few years ago. I----
    Chairman Gordon. We are acknowledging it.
    Dr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Just a few comments to follow-up the earlier comments.
    But first of all, it is--none of us are planning to run for 
President, and so I think we can get by with plagiarizing.
    Secondly, I was somewhat relieved when Ms. Hooley was 
giving the list of the things she taught that she didn't come 
up to basket weaving, or we might have had a little problem 
here.
    I also want to thank Dr. McNerney for his comments, because 
what we really want to do in the math and science instruction 
is to have the students reach the point that he was talking 
about, where--the subject of the intrinsic beauty of 
mathematics and science becomes apparent to the student, and 
that is when they really begin enjoying it and start to 
consider it as a career. And it takes a uniquely-qualified 
teacher to be able to bring that forward and to share that 
experience with the students. And that is what we are all about 
here, trying to develop good teachers. And once they reach that 
point where they can share that beauty with the kids and enjoy 
it themselves, they are likely to stay in the teaching 
profession.
    And in regard to the comments of Mr. Rohrabacher, I have 
argued for years in my speeches that there should be a pay 
differential for math and science teachers, and perhaps for 
some others. I fail to understand why the largest--one of the 
largest institutions in our society should be expected to 
deviate from the norms of our society, which is free enterprise 
and entrepreneurship and payment according to ability and what 
one brings to the job. We are--our entire economy is based on 
that precept, and yet, we get into the schools, everyone is 
supposed to be paid the same. And part of it is simply because 
the math and science teachers are badly outnumbered by the 
other teachers, and so you go with the crowd in a situation 
like that. And the easiest way is to pay everyone the same: no 
differentiation, no merit. And as a result, the good people 
tend to leave. The math and science teachers tend to leave 
because they can get a much higher salary. I think it is 
essential that we develop a different approach to the payment 
of teachers if we want to keep these teachers. The retention 
figures are horrendous, as the Chairman well knows, and 
especially the retention figures are horrendous for math and 
science teachers. And we simply have to change that. You have 
to meet the market in today's world, and that is what we have 
to do in the schools.
    So thank you for bringing this bill forward, Mr. Chairman. 
I appreciate it. I am happy to be a co-sponsor, and I can't 
wait to see the results of it.
    Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers.
    Do you think we should extend that hearing to whether 
Members of Congress should be paid the same?
    Mr. Ehlers. Well, since most of us didn't come here for the 
money, it is probably not a factor. But I think pay 
differential would be good.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay.
    I understand that we are going to have--unfortunately, have 
votes about 10:45, and so we do want to try to--Ms. Woolsey.
    Ms. Woolsey. Very quickly.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, for this good legislation, and of 
course, I support it, but as the mother of ``Go Girl'' 
legislation to encourage young girls and young women and their 
families to put--keep them in math, science, and technology 
when they are so good at it in the young ages, I believe now 
that it is beyond just girls. I mean, we can't leave out just 
50 percent of our population and expect to catch up with the 
rest of the world at all and not have a flat economy and a flat 
world. But I believe this goes beyond ``Go Girl.'' It goes in 
the right direction, and I am totally supportive of it.
    Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Woolsey.
    And if I might, unless something is just burning at you, I 
would suggest that we try to move forward with this markup so 
that we--so that it doesn't inconvenience you to have to come 
back.
    Is there--do you want to say how it is going to affect 
Arizona?
    We will deal with that in a moment. Okay.
    I ask unanimous consent that the bill is considered as read 
and open to amendments at any point and that Members proceed 
with the amendments in the order of the roster. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is the Chair's amendment 
offered in the nature of a substitute. I ask unanimous consent 
that the amendment be--in the nature of a substitute be treated 
as original text for purposes of the amendment under the Five-
Minute Rule.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment in the nature of----
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading.
    Without objection, no offense, so ordered.
    The Clerk. None taken.
    Chairman Gordon. I recognize myself for five minutes to 
explain the substitute amendment.
    This amendment, which has been developed in a bipartisan 
manner, and which I authored with Ranking Member Hall, 
incorporates several small improvements to the original bill. 
The main changes make the following--and let me--I am going to 
summarize this very quickly.
    Our Republican friends, as well as different folks in 
outside groups, came to us with suggestions, things like the 
Noyce Scholarship should be--have a five-year period rather 
than a four-year period. Basically, we have a number of these 
small, little changes. I will be happy to go over them in 
more--if anybody would like to, but it has been well-vetted by 
the minority.
    So if there are no specific changes, then I will say, is 
there any further discussion to the amendment?
    Mr. Hall.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I just, once again, want to thank 
you and your staff for working with our staff to improve the 
underlying bill.
    I yield back to you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Hall.
    The second amendment on the roster is offered by the 
gentlelady from Texas, Ms. Johnson.
    Are you ready to proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. Yes.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will----
    The Clerk. Amendment offered by----
    Chairman Gordon. Once again, I ask unanimous consent to 
dispense with the reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    The gentlelady is recognized for five minutes to explain 
her amendment.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman, and I thank 
the Committee for considering this important legislation.
    This amendment incorporates an important policy objective 
originating from my dear friend and colleague. And Dr. Ehlers 
joins me in co-sponsoring. He is not a Member of this 
committee, however he has offered this several times.
    This provision is called the PALS Act, which stands for 
Partnerships for Access to Laboratory Sciences. And it exists 
independently as H.R. 524. It is supported by the American 
Chemical Society, National Science Teachers Association, and 
others. It would award grants to partnerships that have a high-
needs school or college or university or a business or a non-
profit organization to--the grant is to be used for teacher 
enhancement, laboratory equipment, curriculum development, and 
other elements to give high-needs schools what they need to 
lessen the achievement disparities that currently exist.
    As a witness at the March 8 Subcommittee hearing, there was 
testimony saying there are many schools in this Nation that 
don't have science labs, and many schools don't have teachers 
whose backgrounds are strong enough to do their jobs well. 
Dallas, Texas has quite a high-needs school, but we also have 
shining examples of successful partnerships. One of the best 
high schools in the Nation is located in a high-need area. The 
science and engineering magnet has its own electron microscope 
for student research and fully-equipped engineering and robotic 
labs capable of college-level experiments.
    In 1999, Texas Instruments, working with engineering 
professors at Southern Methodist University, helped design the 
first high school engineering course in the Nation that 
incorporates the fundamentals of digital signal processing in 
at the science and engineering magnet in the Dallas Public 
School system. The partnership with TI enables students to see 
firsthand how science, math, and technology come together to 
create cool products like Sony music chips. The project has 
been expanded and demonstrates impressive results in keeping 
students interested in technology careers. There are many other 
good things to say about them. It was listed as the number one 
public high school by several magazines last year. And TI has 
just been phenomenal in its support.
    So I request permission to submit this additional 
information to the record and ask for the adoption of this 
amendment.
    Thank you.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I thank the Committee for considering 
an amendment offered jointly by me and by Dr. Ehlers, Ranking Member of 
the Subcommittee on Research and Science Education.
    This amendment incorporates an important policy objective 
originating from my dear friend and colleague, Mr. Ruben Hinojosa, who 
is not a Member of this committee. The provision is called the PALS 
Act, which stands for ``Partnerships for Access to Laboratory 
Sciences.'' The PALS Act exists independently as H.R. 524.
    Supported by the American Chemical Society, the National Science 
Teachers Association and others, the PALS program would award grants to 
partnerships that include:

          a high need school

          a college or university, and

          a business or nonprofit organization.

    The grant monies are to be used for teacher enrichment, laboratory 
equipment, curriculum development and other elements to give high-need 
schools what they need to lessen the achievement disparities that 
currently exist.
    As witnesses at the March 8th Subcommittee hearing testified, there 
are many schools in this nation who don't have science labs. Many 
schools don't have teachers whose backgrounds are strong enough to do 
their jobs well.
    Dallas, Texas, has quite a few high-need schools. But we also have 
shining examples of successful partnerships.
    Townview is one of the best high schools in the Nation--and it is 
located in a high-need area. The Townview Science and Engineering 
Magnet School has its own electron microscope for student research and 
fully equipped engineering and robotics labs capable of college level 
experiments.
    In 1999, Texas Instruments, working with engineering professors at 
Southern Methodist University, helped design the first high school 
engineering course in the Nation that incorporates the fundamentals of 
digital signal processing at Townview Science and Engineering Magnet in 
the Dallas Public School system.
    The partnership between T.I. and Townview enabled students to see 
first-hand how science, math and technology come together to create 
cool products, like Sony Music clips. The project has been expanded and 
demonstrates impressive results in keeping students interested in 
technology careers.
    There are many other good things to say about Townview. . .and 
T.I., and I request permission to submit this additional information 
into the Record, Mr. Chairman.
    I want to note to the Committee that the PALS provision was, 
unfortunately, reduced to a ``demonstration grant,'' rather than the 
full-scale initiative originally intended by Mr. Hinojosa.
    However, one advantage is that it gives NSF greater freedom to 
implement the pilot program and an opportunity to evaluate what 
strategies work, and may be scaled-up later on.
    Dr. Ehlers has been a strong partner in our efforts to lessen the 
achievement gap in our nation's high-need schools. I thank him for his 
advocacy and collaboration.
    Dr. Ehlers and I aim to try to address the disparity issue with Mr. 
Hinojosa's provision today. I want thank all of the staff who spent 
time negotiating the provisions of this amendment, especially those 
representing Hinojosa, Gordon, Hall, Ehlers, and myself. Thanks also to 
Subcommittee Chairman Baird for his tireless support on the high-needs 
schools and disparities issues.
    Finally, I thank the Chairman and Ranking Member for consideration 
of this amendment and urge my colleagues to support it.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back.

    Chairman Gordon. Without objection, so ordered.
    Dr. Ehlers, you were a major part of this amendment. Would 
you like to say amen?
    Mr. Ehlers. Yes. Amen.
    If I may, I would like to say a little more, although, 
since you are concerned about the time----
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Ehlers, I have been informed that the 
vote is pushed back a little bit later than 10:45, so please--
you----
    Mr. Ehlers. All right. So I will ask unanimous consent for 
the majority--my statement to be entered into the record, and I 
will try to summarize it.
    This is a bill that I worked on and introduced last year, 
and we are pleased to see it incorporated into this section.
    One hundred and fifty years ago, this bill would not have 
been necessary, perhaps not even a hundred years ago, because 
most everyone lived on the farm, and on the farm you learn some 
basic ideas of mechanics and science.
    But in today's world, we need laboratory science in the 
schools. Children have to have that experience. I personally 
think they should have it at every grade level from pre-school 
through grad school.
    This bill is an attempt to introduce lab science in the 
high schools, make certain that every student has an 
opportunity to experience laboratory science, to actually sit 
and do experiments with real equipment on real objects, and 
that is essential to their experience if they are going to 
continue in science and to thoroughly learn science.
    One other point I would mention, recent research by Carl 
Wieman, who has testified before this committee a number of 
times, is a Nobel Prize winner from the University of Colorado, 
and he has done extensive research in this and is finding that 
simulations can also be a very effective way of teaching 
laboratory experience. So that is something I hope the National 
Science Foundation could pursue as well.
    But this bill will give teachers training and professional 
development on how to use laboratories, how to teach 
laboratories properly, and will provide some funding for--
particularly in schools without the means to have laboratories.
    So I unanimously request the rest of the statement be 
entered into the record, and I strongly support this amendment.
    Thank you.

    [The prepared statement of Mr. Ehlers follows:]
         Prepared Statement of Representative Vernon J. Ehlers
    I am very pleased that, early in this session, my colleagues, 
Representative Hinojosa and Representative Johnson, introduced a bill 
to improve high school laboratory science, particularly for those in 
highest need. This amendment is essentially that bill with some small 
changes.
    Last year the National Research Council's report on the state of 
high school laboratory science made it very clear that if U.S. high 
schoolers today are lucky enough to have any laboratory experience it 
is probably not a very good one. Furthermore, many students start 
college with no laboratory experience and are subsequently less likely 
to pursue science degrees. The report also established that there is 
very little research on the subject of successful laboratories. It is 
my hope that these pilot projects will help to add to the research 
available to schools interested in adding or improving laboratory 
science.
    I want to thank my colleagues for including in this amendment a 
requirement for professional development to be a part of every high 
school laboratory grant. The Research and Science Education 
Subcommittee heard from witnesses two weeks ago who emphasized--as this 
committee has frequently heard--the importance of a well-trained 
teacher. It is my belief that any high school laboratory will only be 
successful if the teacher is given special training to teach laboratory 
science.
    I believe the intent of this amendment meshes well with the goals 
of the Chairman's bill (H.R. 362) and I am pleased to support both.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers. You are a great 
value added to this committee.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    Mr. Hall is recognized.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I will be very brief.
    I recognize the hard work that Mrs. Johnson and Dr. Ehlers 
have made in an area where NSF has real expertise to prioritize 
the--I would have preferred to have seen statutory language 
prohibiting federal funding from being used for the purchase of 
lab equipment and the maintenance of lab facilities in this 
amendment. However, I appreciate the willingness of you to work 
with us and the majority to work with us to ensure that report 
language is strongly worded to emphasize that it is the 
Committee's intent for the non-federal partners to provide the 
funding for equipment and facility maintenance and 
improvements.
    So I think that is something that would be very helpful.
    I yield back my time.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Hall, you certainly have our 
commitment on that.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If not, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Those opposed, no. The ayes have it. The amendment is 
agreed to.
    The third amendment on the roster is also offered by the 
gentlelady from Texas, Ms. Johnson. Are you ready to proceed 
with your amendment?
    Ms. Johnson. Yes.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment offered----
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    The amendment I am offering today----
    Chairman Gordon. The gentlelady is recognized for five 
minutes. Excuse me.
    Ms. Johnson. The amendment I am offering today deals with 
Section 205 of H.R. 362. The section addresses the STEM Talent 
Expansion Program, called the STEP program. STEP aims to 
encourage colleges and universities to increase the number of 
STEM graduates at the higher-education level, particularly 
under-represented minorities. Grant funds may be used to 
promote interdisciplinary teaching, undergraduate research and 
mentoring initiatives, bridge programs to help students at 
community colleges transfer credits into the program, and other 
important projects.
    The law is currently written so that NSF must ``strive to 
increase the numbers of STEM graduates who are women, 
minorities, and individuals with disabilities.'' This program 
is important, because I live right in the midst of a number of 
needs. The majority of my constituents in Dallas are under-
represented in STEM fields. Twenty percent of the public school 
student body have access to the school I just spoke of, but 
eighty percent do not, and they need encouragement to make it 
through in an education system filled with obstacles, no 
pipeline, and little hope. And my amendment would make a small 
addition to the text of Section 205 that would make a big 
difference to me and my constituents. And it states that in 
awarding grants for this program, the NSF Director shall 
endeavor to ensure that a wide variety of science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematic fields and types of institutions of 
higher education, including two-year colleges, are covered. My 
amendment changes the language to say ``including two-year 
colleges and minority-serving institutions.'' Minority-serving 
institutions are historically black colleges and universities, 
Hispanic-serving institutions, tribal colleges and 
universities, and institutions that serve Asian American and 
Pacific Islanders and persons with disabilities. Hometown 
examples of a Texas college that Mr. Hall has served on the 
Board, the Texas Southern University, Laredo College, and there 
are probably over 50 minority-serving institutions in Texas 
alone. My amendment calls greater attention to the minority-
serving institutions in an effort to give them a fair chance to 
apply for a STEP grant.
    As I said, Mr. Chairman, this is a small change, and I 
encourage my colleagues to support this provision aimed at 
diversifying a highly-skilled STEM workforce.
    And I might also add, Mr. Chairman, that that is one of the 
reasons why I agree with Mr. Rohrabacher, because we have--most 
of our teachers do not have a major in the subjects in which 
they teach. That does not speak well for the areas that we have 
the greatest need.
    I thank you very much, and I hope I will get support for 
this amendment.
    [The prepared statement of Ms. Johnson follows:]
       Prepared Statement of Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    The amendment I am offering today deals with Section 205 of H.R. 
362, the Section addressing the STEM Talent Expansion Program, called 
the STEP program.
    STEP aims to encourage colleges and universities to increase the 
number of STEM graduates at the higher education level, particularly 
under-represented minorities.

                   Grant funds may be used to promote

          interdisciplinary teaching,

          undergraduate research,

          mentoring initiatives,

          bridge programs to help students at community 
        colleges transfer credits into Bachelor's programs,

          and other important projects.

    The law is currently written so that NSF must, quote, ``strive to 
increase,'' the numbers of STEM graduates who are women, minorities, 
and individuals with disabilities.
    This program is important to me. The majority of my constituents in 
Dallas are under-represented in STEM fields, and they need 
encouragement to make it through an education system filled with 
obstacles, no pipeline, and little hope.
    My amendment would make a small addition to the text in Section 205 
that would make a big difference to me and my constituents.
    Section 205 states that, ``in awarding grants for this program, the 
NSF Director shall endeavor to ensure that a wide variety of science, 
technology, engineering and mathematics fields and types of 
institutions of higher education, including two-year colleges, are 
covered.''
    My amendment changes the language to say, ``including two-year 
colleges and minority-serving institutions.''

                 ``Minority-Serving Institutions'' are

          Historically Black Colleges and Universities,

          Hispanic Serving Institutions,

          Tribal Colleges and Universities, and

          institutions that serve Asian Americans and Pacific 
        Islanders and persons with disabilities.

    Hometown examples are Paul Quinn College in Dallas; Texas Southern 
University in Houston; Laredo College. . .there are nearly 50 MSIs in 
Texas alone.
    My amendment calls greater attention to MSIs in an effort to give 
them a fair chance to apply for a STEP grant.
    As I said, Mr. Chairman, this is a small change, and I encourage my 
colleagues to support this provision aimed at diversifying our highly-
skilled STEM workforce.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Johnson.
    Would anyone else like to be recognized on that amendment?
    If not, I want to recognize myself for just a moment.
    You know, I think that every Member of Congress brings 
different sets of experiences to Congress, and because of that, 
we are able to make better decisions and those life skills. I 
think any type of group can make better decisions when you have 
a diversity of backgrounds. And that is the reason, when we 
tried to put together our majority staff, that we reached out 
to minorities and to women, and I am telling you, it is--it was 
tough. We had a difficult time, and we did not do as good a job 
as I would have liked. And I think it is a real-world 
demonstration that, particularly within women and minorities, 
that that is the greatest area for potential that we have in 
terms of boosting up those folks that want to go into these 
areas. And I think this is a good amendment, and I commend the 
gentlelady for bringing it.
    And if there are no further discussions, then all in favor, 
say aye. Those opposed, say no. The ayes have it, and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much.
    Chairman Gordon. The fourth amendment on the roster is 
offered by the gentlelady from Arizona, Ms. Giffords.
    Are you ready to proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Giffords. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I do have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment, and I 
ask unanimous consent to dispense with the reading. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The gentlelady is recognized for five minutes to explain 
her amendment.
    Ms. Giffords. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Thank you, Ranking Member Hall, for hearing this amendment.
    We all sat here just a couple weeks ago to hear from Norm 
Augustine and members of the panel that spoke about the 
``Rising Above the Gathering Storm'' and the problems that we 
face.
    The National Science Foundation's Science, Technology, 
Engineering, and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program seeks to 
increase the number of students that are going to be receiving 
associate degrees, baccalaureate degrees, concentrations, and 
certificates in STEM fields.
    NSF provides grants to institutions of higher education to 
support certain activities, such as student mentoring, 
interdisciplinary teaching, undergraduate research, and 
internships in order to achieve the program's goal.
    What I am offering today, Mr. Chairman, is to amend the 
STEM Talent Expansion Program. The current statute requires NSF 
to strive to increase the number of STEM graduates among women 
and minorities who are currently under-represented in those 
fields, and I think we would all agree that that is important.
    But what this amendment specifies is that NSF should also 
strive to increase the number of STEM graduates among students 
in secondary schools with high concentrations of children from 
low-income families. And the purpose of this, Mr. Chairman, 
Ranking Member Hall, is to help increase participation in STEM 
fields of students in poor and rural areas and urban regions.
    The authors of the ``Gathering Storm'' report stated that 
they are worried about the future prosperity of the United 
States, and I believe they meant the entire United States, not 
just certain areas. So we must increase our number of STEM 
professionals across the entire country.
    They go on to write that half of undergraduate students who 
enter college, intending to earn a science or engineering 
major, actually completed a major, as you so--spoke earlier , 
Mr. Chairman, in one of those fields. Many of those students 
could have succeeded if they were given enough support in the 
early days of their undergraduate experience.
    So it is clear, to me, that we have to do more to help 
students who graduate from schools in poor, rural, or urban 
areas of our country, and the STEM Talent Expansion Program can 
do just that.
    I think we all take seriously the challenges that we have 
before us as we try to lead in the 21st century.
    Again, Mr. Chairman, Ranking Member Hall, my amendment will 
help students from low-income, rural, and urban areas get the 
support that they need as well to help pursue an education and 
a career in science, mathematics, technology and engineering.
    And I request the support from Members on both sides of the 
aisle.
    So thank you.
    [The prepared statement by Ms. Giffords follows:]
        Prepared Statement of Representative Gabrielle Giffords
    Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Thank you Mr. Chairman.
    The National Science Foundation's Science, Technology, Engineering, 
and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program seeks to increase the number 
of students receiving associate or baccalaureate degrees, 
concentrations, and certificates in STEM fields.
    NSF provides grants to institutions of higher education to support 
activities, such as student mentoring, interdisciplinary teaching, 
undergraduate research, and internships in order to achieve the 
program's goal.
    What I am offering would amend the STEM Talent Expansion Program.
    Current statute requires NSF to strive to increase the number of 
STEM graduates among women and minorities who are currently under-
represented in those fields.
    My amendment specifies that NSF should also strive to increase the 
number of STEM graduates among students from secondary schools with 
high concentrations of children from low-income families.
    My purpose in doing this is to help increase participation in STEM 
fields of students from poor rural and urban regions.
    The authors of the Gathering Storm report stated that they are 
``worried about the future prosperity of the United States'' and that 
we must increase our number of STEM professionals.
    They go on to write that fewer than half of undergraduate students 
who entered college intending to earn a science or engineering major 
actually completed a degree in one of those subjects. Many of these 
students could have ``succeeded if they were given enough support in 
the early days of their undergraduate experience.''
    It is clear that we must do more to help students who graduated 
from schools in poor rural and urban areas, and the STEM Talent 
Expansion Program can do just that.
    I take this challenge very seriously, and I want to do my part to 
ensure that we in the United States continue to lead in the 21st 
century.
    Dr. Sue Adams, a Professor in the Math Department at the University 
of Arizona told me that ``our students from poor urban and rural 
schools must be given the support needed to be successful. Anything 
less is unacceptable. . .. It is these skills that will arm students 
with the necessary tools to address the challenges of the rapidly 
changing technological society.''
    My amendment will help students from low-income rural and urban 
areas get the support they need to pursue an education and a career in 
science, math, technology, and engineering.

    Chairman Gordon. Are there further discussions for this 
good amendment?
    If not, then all in favor, say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes 
have it. The amendment is agreed to.
    The fifth amendment of the roster is offered by the 
gentlelady from Arizona.
    Are you ready to proceed with your amendment?
    Ms. Giffords. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I do have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment. I ask 
unanimous consent to dispense with the reading. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The gentlelady is recognized for five minutes to explain 
her amendment.
    Ms. Giffords. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Thank you, Ranking Member Hall.
    What I am offering here is an amendment to the provision of 
H.R. 362 that authorizes NSF to support summer teacher 
institutes. It requires NSF to give priority to grant 
applications that propose programs that will attract teachers 
to the summer institutes from high-need school systems, that is 
schools that have a high concentration of children from low-
income families that are--currently experience a shortage of 
highly-qualified teachers.
    During this--doing this will help train teachers from poor, 
rural, and urban areas to teach challenging courses in math and 
science, including AP and IB courses.
    Let me give you an example, Mr. Chairman and Ranking Member 
Hall.
    I want--I have to talk about Arizona.
    I had an education summit out in Cochise County. My 
district is over 9,000 square miles. Most people recognize the 
City of Tucson, but there are many other smaller cities in my 
district, including a town called Bisbee, which used to be the 
big mining capital of Arizona, and, certainly, of the west.
    We had a--one of the top five teachers in the state that 
came from Bisbee to testify about the fact that her top student 
that went on to the University of Arizona was told the first 
week of classes that they would be skipping the first two 
chapters because they had received that in their AP biology 
course in high school. And she came before us and she said, 
``We failed our student,'' because this student said to the 
teacher, ``I don't know what AP is.'' The fact that in these 
rural areas they don't have the teachers that are qualified to 
be teaching these AP courses is something, Mr. Chairman, I 
think, that we are all concerned about.
    The ``Gathering Storm'' report states that without 
fundamental knowledge and skills, the majority of students 
scoring below certain levels that we see around the country is 
going to provide for the lack of foundation for good jobs and 
participation across society. We know that low-income students, 
70 percent of their middle school math teachers majored in a 
subject other than math in colleges you so--spoke about, and 
these numbers are staggering.
    So again, getting back to the ``Gathering Storm'' report, 
it says very bluntly, and I think we take it seriously, 
accelerated math and science courses are less frequently 
offered in rural and city schools than in suburban ones. How to 
achieve an equitable distribution of funding and high-quality 
teaching should be a top priority issue for the United States.
    My amendment, Mr. Chairman, addresses this head on. To 
remain competitive, we have to address all of the states and 
all of the areas in our country, and I respectfully ask for 
support for my amendment.
    [The prepared statement by Ms. Giffords follows:]
        Prepared Statement of Representative Gabrielle Giffords
    Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Thank you Mr. Chairman.
    What I am offering amends the provision in H.R. 362 that authorizes 
NSF to support summer teacher institutes.
    It requires NSF to give priority to grant applications that propose 
programs that will attract teachers to the summer institutes from high-
need school systems--that is, schools that have a high concentration of 
children from low income families and that are experiencing a shortage 
of highly qualified teachers.
    Doing this will help train teachers from poor rural and urban 
regions to teach challenging courses in math and science, including AP 
and IB courses.
    As the results of the 2005 National Assessment of Educational 
Progress (NAEP) showed us, we must do much more to ensure that our 
students are learning math and science. Only 36 percent of fourth 
graders and 30 percent of eighth graders performed at or above the 
``proficient'' level in math. Only 29 percent of fourth graders, 32 
percent of 8th graders, and 18 percent of 12th graders performed at or 
above the ``proficient'' level in science.
    The Gathering Storm report states that ``without fundamental 
knowledge and skills, the majority of students scoring below this 
level--particularly those below the ``basic'' level--lack the 
foundation for good jobs and full participation in society.''
    One of the main reasons for this situation in many of our poor 
rural and urban schools is the lack of math and science content 
knowledge of our classroom teachers. Most of these same teachers work 
extremely hard and do their best to teach their students. Too many, 
however, simply do not have an academic background in math and science.
    For low-income students, 70 percent of their middle school math 
teachers majored in a subject other than math in college. The numbers 
are truly staggering.
    Karen Nicodemus is President of Cochise College, which is in a part 
of my district that many would consider the Wild West with towns like 
Tombstone, stated that, ``Although the shortage of highly qualified 
math and science teachers cuts across all education sectors, we should 
not lose sight of the fact that in rural districts, especially those 
serving low-income families, the shortage is even more acute and 
problematic. To engage more students in pursing STEM opportunities, we 
have to provide teachers with professional development opportunities 
that will translate into challenging and exciting lessons for our 
students at all levels. . .. We do a disservice to our brightest high 
school students, when small, rural schools lack the resources. . .to 
provide Advanced Placement or higher level math and science classes.''
    Indeed, the Gathering Storm report says bluntly that ``accelerated 
math and science courses are less frequently offered in rural and city 
schools than in suburban ones. How to achieve an equitable distribution 
of funding and high-quality teaching should be a top-priority issue for 
the United States.''
    My amendment addresses this challenge head on. It will provide more 
opportunities for math and science teachers in our most challenging 
schools in rural and urban areas to get the professional development 
and training they need. Our children will benefit tremendously.
    To remain competitive in our 21st century global economy, it is 
critical that we reform math and science education in America. All 
children, especially those in our rural and urban schools, should have 
the opportunity to become leaders in science and engineering.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Giffords, for your value 
added.
    Is there further discussion on the amendment?
    If not, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. All opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the amendment is 
agreed to.
    Are there other amendments?
    Mr. Akin. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment, and I 
ask unanimous consent to dispense with the reading. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    The gentleman from Missouri is recognized for five minutes 
to explain his amendment.
    Mr. Akin. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    One of the things, as a guy that has grown up in 
engineering, I at least have a little bit of understanding of, 
and that is how fast science and technology moves in our world, 
how that field is continuously changing and tremendously 
dynamic. And I thank you, Mr. Chairman, for the excellent bill 
that you have going here, and I am very supportive of the 
section. It is Section 204, which says we are going to take a 
look at the good materials that can be found and used and 
distributed to help get kids going in math and science.
    One thing that would scare me would be if we got to the 
point, from a government point of view, that we start to freeze 
everything and say, ``Well, you have got to do it this, that, 
or the other way.'' My amendment simply says that the 
recommendations made under this section is not going to be 
considered some mandate for it has to be done just in a certain 
way. I think that was implied in the way it is written. I am 
very supportive of it, and I really thank the majority party 
for working with me on this amendment.
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Again, thank you, Mr. Akin, for your value 
added.
    Let me just point out that we have a better bill today, 
because it was vetted. The minority, outside, different various 
folks have made different recommendations, and we have tried to 
alter it for that.
    This amendment we just received minutes ago, and we--
certainly, we want to accept the amendment, but it just makes 
everybody's job easier to have recommendations earlier so they 
can be vetted. But again, this is a good amendment, and we will 
accept it.
    Is there anyone else?
    Mr. Ehlers. Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. Just to comment on this, and not to speak 
against the amendment, but just to clarify some of the issues.
    We have--we face a major problem in this nation, because 
the people and the children are very mobile, and there is one 
area that we should have a national standard, although I hate 
to use the word ``standard,'' but that is in the sequencing of 
topics, because math and science are sequential. And we--you 
get into a lot of problems because of the variety of math and 
science programs.
    Let me give you some examples.
    Suppose you have a student attending a school where 
fractions are taught in the fall and percentages are taught in 
the spring. In January, that student transfers because the 
family moves. He gets--ends up in another school that teaches 
percentages in the fall and fractions in the spring. That 
student is going to get a double-dose of fractions and will not 
learn percentages.
    Now there is much to be said for a national agreement. I 
hate to use the word ``standard,'' but a national agreement 
about the sequence in which subjects should be taught, so that 
any student can be assured, and parents can be assured, that 
whenever they move, their student will fit right into the same 
sequence, even though it may be taught from a different 
textbook. At least they will have the same sequence.
    And that is something that I am working on separately, 
perhaps through ``No Child Left Behind,'' but I just wanted to 
take this opportunity to say we do have a problem by not 
maintaining a national agreement on that, and we should attack 
that problem.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Baird. Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Gordon. Dr. Baird.
    Mr. Baird. I would like to echo Dr. Ehlers' observation, 
and he and I have discussed this issue before.
    If you look at--if you read the ``Rising Above the 
Gathering Storm,'' they talk about at least exploring the 
possibility of a voluntary model national curriculum. If you 
look at many of the nations internationally who are exceeding 
our performance on math and science in later grades, they have, 
precisely, national curricula.
    We are, as Dr. Ehlers said, a tremendously mobile society. 
I have school districts in my district that have 40 percent 
turnover--schools, rather, individual schools, 40 percent 
turnover every single year. So we look at AYPs and we look at 
``No Child Left Behind,'' et cetera, you have got a school 
where 40 percent of the kids weren't here last year, meaning 
they didn't necessarily get the curriculum and sequence that 
the other kids got. And every time a new child arrives in a new 
school, that school has to somehow assess where that child 
should be. Those kids fall out of the sequence of the other 
kids. There is tremendous inefficiency, and they often feel 
stupid. They feel left behind. They lack--there is a great 
word. They lack propaedeutic knowledge. Propaedeutic knowledge 
is the knowledge that you must have before learning something 
else. And if you miss that, you fall off the pace line, and I 
don't think we do those kids a service. And oftentimes, I think 
those kids are often kids, maybe from, perhaps, less stable 
families, lower-income families, possibly, who already have 
three strikes against them. And I don't necessarily--because I 
don't think it is the intent of the legislation before us today 
to establish a national curriculum. I don't see this as, 
necessarily, a harmful amendment, but I would certainly not 
endorse this if it precluded this committee from discussing the 
pros and cons of some form of standardized sequence of 
instruction in the math and sciences so that kids who move 
across this country, as they do many times, can do so 
relatively seamlessly. There has got to be enormous expense to 
our hodgepodge approach to education in this country, an 
enormous inefficiency, and I think this committee, and possibly 
the other committees and jurisdiction might want to look at 
that. I know it is an--people who say, ``Well, it is all about 
local control.'' I am going to go out on a limb and suggest--I 
would guess 99.9 percent of the people who advocate against a 
national standard couldn't name a single school board member in 
their local control jurisdiction nor could they tell you 
anything about the sequence of curricula. So we talk about 
local control as a--that nobody can raise any questions about, 
but I think if you look at the international competition, they 
have national curricula, and they follow through that. And I 
think we ought to at least discuss that.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Baird.
    I--counsel informs me that this is a very narrow amendment 
to a very narrow section, that it would not stop discussion or 
implementations of sequencing or, for that matter, for general 
agreement as to how to proceed in a uniform method.
    Mr. Baird. I respect that. And based on that, I certainly 
wouldn't oppose it today, but I would urge this committee to 
raise this as a possible question for exploration, how--just 
how diverse are our courses across this country, how frequently 
do students move across educational jurisdictions, what are the 
costs and benefits of that, and might we not be able to do a 
better job of meeting those students' needs?
    Chairman Gordon. Just like, to a great extent, our parents 
got one job and stayed there, our kids are in a much different 
situation. It is a much more mobile society, and those are very 
good points that are raised.
    Are there further discussions--yes, sir.
    Mr. Smith. I would like to just add, as an educator by 
training and a practitioner for a few years, that I understand 
the arguments being made. I also would like to suggest that 
there could be a scenario where a fourth grade class mastered 
fractions early on, and I would hate to see a class held back 
from excelling even further because they are tied to a timeline 
where the professionalism and very good judgment of a highly-
trained educator is disregarded in trusting that judgment of 
whether or not to move ahead. You know. If there is a new 
student who moves in, I can understand that, and teachers are 
trained to accommodate that. So I think we should move 
cautiously when we look at these things, but certainly, I do 
support the amendment.
    Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Smith.
    Are there other--does anyone else have discussion?
    If not, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Opposed, say no. The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed 
to.
    Are there other amendments to the amendment in the nature 
of a substitute?
    If there is not, the vote occurs on the amendment in the 
nature of a substitute. All in favor, say aye. All opposed, no. 
The ayes have it. The amendment is agreed to.
    The vote is on the bill, H.R. 362, as amended. All of those 
in favor will say aye. All those opposed will say no. Excuse 
me. All of those in favor, say aye. All of those opposed, no. 
The ayes have it.
    I recognize Mr. Hall to offer a motion.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I now move that the Committee 
favorably report H.R. 362, as amended, to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill, as amended, do pass. Furthermore, 
I move that the staff be instructed to prepare the legislative 
report and make necessary technical and conforming changes, and 
that the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring the bill 
before the House for consideration.
    Chairman Gordon. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it. The bill is 
favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion is reconsidered--to 
reconsider is laid upon the table. And I move that Members have 
two subsequent calendar days in which to submit supplemental, 
minority, or additional views on the measure. I move pursuant 
to Clause 1 of Rule 22 of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives that the Committee authorize the Chairman to 
offer such motions as may be necessary in the House to adopt 
and pass H.R. 362, ``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds'' 
Science and Math Scholarship Act, as amended. Without 
objection, so ordered.
    Let me say that this is--and I thank all of you for your 
cooperation--this is a high priority for the House leadership. 
And my understanding, this bill will be up either the first or 
second week after we return from the recess. And again, I hope 
all of you will take the credit you deserve.
    I want--let me, again, thank all you Members today. This 
has been another, I think, productive markup, bipartisan, non-
partisan, that I hope that everyone will go home and take 
credit for it, because you all deserve it.
    And I will see you on the Floor probably the first week 
that we come back.
    And the Committee is adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 11:17 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


   H.R. 362, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendment Roster, H.R. 362 
                          Substitute Amendment






                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
   H.R. 362, ``10,000 Teachers, 10 Million Minds'' Science and Math 
                            Scholarship Act

Summary

    The bill implements most of the K-12 science education 
recommendations of the National Academies report, ``Rising Above the 
Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter 
Economic Future.'' It establishes a teacher education program at the 
National Science Foundation (NSF) to encourage math, science, and 
engineering faculty to work with education faculty to improve the 
education of mathematics and science teachers and to provide 
scholarships to students in science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics (STEM) fields who commit to become mathematics and science 
teachers at elementary and secondary schools; authorizes summer teacher 
training institutes at NSF and DOE to improve the content knowledge and 
pedagogical skills of in-service mathematics and science teachers, 
including preparing them to teach challenging course in science and 
math such as the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate 
courses; requires that NSF include support for Master's degree programs 
for in-service mathematics and science teachers within the NSF Math and 
Science Partnerships; and authorizes funding for the NSF STEM Talent 
Expansion program and expands the program to include centers for 
improving undergraduate STEM education.

Sectional Summary of Bill

Section 1  Table of contents.

Section 2  Findings on the role of NSF in K-12 and undergraduate STEM 
education.

Section 3  Definitions used in the bill.

Title I--Science Scholarships

Section 101  Short title of the bill.

Section 102  Findings relating the bill to the National Academies 
report recommendations.

Section 103  Policy objective of the bill--to increase by 10,000 
annually the number of capable K-12 science and math teachers.

Section 104  Amends the NSF Noyce Scholarship program, established by 
the NSF Authorization Act of 2002, to create incentives for colleges 
and universities to improve the training of STEM teachers and increases 
the size and duration of the scholarships provided for majors in STEM 
fields who pursue teaching credentials:

          Provides competitive awards to institutions of higher 
        education (or consortia of such institutions) that (1) 
        establish cross-department faculty teams (STEM faculty along 
        with education faculty) to develop courses of instruction 
        leading to baccalaureate degrees in STEM fields and also 
        preparing graduates to become certified or licensed to teach in 
        a K-12 classroom, and (2) administer scholarships for students 
        during their sophomore through senior years and summer 
        internships during their freshman years.

          Requires early field teaching experiences for student 
        teachers in the program under the supervision of highly 
        experienced and effective teachers.

          Requires awardees to provide professional development 
        and mentoring support to scholarship recipients, after 
        matriculation.

          Sets scholarship amounts at the cost of attendance at 
        particular institutions, not to exceed $10,000 per year, and 
        provides up to three years of scholarship support for any 
        individual.

          Requires scholarship recipients to commit to teaching 
        for up to six years following graduation (the period of 
        teaching commitment is based on the number of years of 
        scholarship support), reduces the commitment by one year for 
        individuals who teach at high-need schools, and converts the 
        scholarships to loans if the teaching commitment is not met.

          Authorizes the NSF to accept donations from the 
        private sector to help support scholarships and internships.

          Authorizes $70 million for NSF for FY 2008, $101 
        million for FY 2009, $133 million for FY 2010, $164 million for 
        FY 2011, and $196 million for FY 2012.

Title II--Mathematics and Science Education Improvement

Section 201 amends the NSF Math and Science Education Partnerships 
program established by the NSF Authorization Act of 2002:

          Authorizes the development of Master's degree 
        programs for in-service mathematics and science teachers.

          Authorizes teacher training activities to prepare 
        teachers to teach challenging courses in mathematics and 
        science, including Advanced Placement and International 
        Baccalaureate courses, and provides for mentoring by 
        professional scientists, mathematicians, and engineers.

Section 202 addresses teacher institute programs at NSF and DOE:

          Directs NSF to establish a grant program to support 
        summer or academic year teacher institutes and authorizes 
        summer teacher institutes as a component of the NSF 21st 
        Century program. Such summer institutes are required to include 
        teacher training activities to prepare teachers to teach 
        challenging courses in mathematics and science, including 
        Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate courses.

          Authorizes $32 million for NSF for FY 2008, $35.2 
        million for FY 2009, and $38.7 million for FY 2010, $42.6 
        million for FY 2011, and $46.8 million for FY 2012.

          The following amounts are authorized for the existing 
        Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development program at 
        DOE: $3 million for FY 2008, $8 million for FY 2009, and $10 
        million for each year FY 2010 through FY 2012.

Section 203 requires NSF, under the Math and Science Partnership 
program, to develop and implement Master's degree programs for in-
service mathematics and science teachers, who attend on a part-time 
basis and who will be able to complete the degree requirements within 
three years. The programs have the following features:

          Provide stipends to defray the cost of attendance for 
        teachers in the program.

          Allow for support for the development of the courses 
        of instruction and related educational materials and equipment 
        (offering of online learning is an option).

          Require the distribution of awards among institutions 
        of different sizes and geographic locations.

    Authorizes $46 million for NSF for FY 2008, $50.6 million for FY 
2009, $55.7 million for FY 2010, $61.2 million for FY 2011, and $67.3 
million for FY 2012.

Section 204: (1) Establishes a national panel of experts to identify 
and collect K-12 mathematics and science teaching materials that have 
been demonstrated to be effective and to recommend the development of 
new materials in areas where effective materials do not exist; and (2) 
directs NSF and the Department of Education to develop ways to 
disseminate effective materials and support efforts to develop new 
materials, in accordance with the recommendations of the national 
panel.

Section 205 amends the NSF STEM Talent Expansion Program established 
under the NSF Authorization Act of 2002 to create centers for 
improvement of undergraduate education in STEM fields, including:

          Centers for the development of undergraduate 
        curriculum and teaching methods and for training faculty and 
        teaching assistants in effective pedagogical practices.

          Assessment of the effectiveness of the centers and 
        dissemination of information about materials and methods 
        developed.

    Authorizes $44 million for NSF for the STEM Talent Expansion 
program for FY 2008, of which $4 million is available for centers; $55 
million for FY 2009, of which $10 million is available for centers; and 
$60 million for each year of FY 2010 through FY 2012, of which $10 
million is available in each year for centers.


                     H.R. 362 Substitute Amendment

          Inserts ``technology'' in all references to K-12 
        science and mathematics education.

          Allows Noyce Program scholarship recipients to 
        complete program within five years, rather than in four years.

          For review of applications under the Noyce program, 
        adds the requirement for NSF to consider the ability of the 
        applicant to attract women and minority students.

          Revises Noyce program reporting requirements to track 
        proportion of graduates who teach in high-need schools, who 
        fail to fulfill their teaching commitment in a high-need 
        school, and who persist in teaching beyond their service 
        commitment, including in high-need schools.

          Provides a single authorization of appropriations for 
        each year of the Noyce program (removes floors and ceilings for 
        ``capacity building activities'').

          Replaces references to AP and IB courses with 
        ``challenging math, science, and technology college-preparatory 
        courses, including AP and IB courses''.

          Allows part-time Masters' degree programs to cover 
        three years, rather than being limited to two years.

          Redefines ``high-need local education agency''--
        concentration of children from low income families AND shortage 
        of highly qualified teachers.

          Eliminates the term ``master teacher'' in favor of 
        ``teacher leader.''