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110th Congress                                            Rept. 110-708
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 1

======================================================================



 
                 NUCLEAR FORENSICS AND ATTRIBUTION ACT

                                _______
                                

                 June 11, 2008.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, from the Committee on Homeland Security, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 2631]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Homeland Security, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 2631) to strengthen efforts in the Department of 
Homeland Security to develop nuclear forensics capabilities to 
permit attribution of the source of nuclear material, having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Purpose and Summary..............................................     4
Background and Need for Legislation..............................     4
Hearings.........................................................     4
Committee Consideration..........................................     4
Committee Votes..................................................     5
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................     5
New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures     5
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................     5
Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives............     6
Congressional Earmarks, Limited Tax Benefits, and Limited Tariff 
  Benefits.......................................................     6
Federal Mandates Statement.......................................     7
Advisory Committee Statement.....................................     7
Constitutional Authority Statement...............................     7
Applicability to Legislative Branch..............................     7
Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation...................     7
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............     8
Committee Correspondence.........................................    11

    The amendments are as follows:
    Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Nuclear Forensics and Attribution 
Act''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) The threat of a nuclear terrorist attack on American 
        interests, both domestic and abroad, is one of the most serious 
        threats to the national security of the United States. In the 
        wake of an attack, attribution of responsibility would be of 
        utmost importance. Because of the destructive power of the 
        weapon, there could be little forensic evidence except the 
        radioactive material in the bomb itself.
          (2) Through advanced nuclear forensics, using both existing 
        techniques and those under development, it may be possible to 
        identify the source and pathway of a weapon or material after 
        it is interdicted or detonated. Though identifying intercepted 
        smuggled material is now possible in some cases, pre-detonation 
        forensics is a relatively undeveloped field. The post-
        detonation nuclear forensics field is also immature, and the 
        challenges are compounded by the pressures and time constraints 
        of performing forensics after a nuclear or radiological attack.
          (3) A robust and well-known capability to identify the source 
        of nuclear or radiological material intended for or used in an 
        act of terror could also deter prospective proliferators. 
        Furthermore, the threat of effective attribution could compel 
        improved security at material storage facilities, preventing 
        the unwitting transfer of nuclear or radiological materials.
          (4)(A) In order to identify special nuclear material and 
        other radioactive materials confidently, it is necessary to 
        have a robust capability to acquire samples in a timely manner, 
        analyze and characterize samples, and compare samples against 
        known signatures of nuclear and radiological material.
          (B) Many of the radioisotopes produced in the detonation of a 
        nuclear device have short half-lives, so the timely acquisition 
        of samples is of the utmost importance. Over the past several 
        decades, the ability of the United States to gather atmospheric 
        samples--often the preferred method of sample acquisition has 
        diminished. This ability must be restored and modern techniques 
        that could complement or replace existing techniques should be 
        pursued.
          (C) The discipline of pre-detonation forensics is a 
        relatively undeveloped field. The radiation associated with a 
        nuclear or radiological device may affect traditional forensics 
        techniques in unknown ways. In a post-detonation scenario, 
        radiochemistry may provide the most useful tools for analysis 
        and characterization of samples. The number of radiochemistry 
        programs and radiochemists in United States National 
        Laboratories and universities has dramatically declined over 
        the past several decades. The narrowing pipeline of qualified 
        people into this critical field is a serious impediment to 
        maintaining a robust and credible nuclear forensics program.
          (5) Once samples have been acquired and characterized, it is 
        necessary to compare the results against samples of known 
        material from reactors, weapons, and enrichment facilities, and 
        from medical, academic, commercial, and other facilities 
        containing such materials, throughout the world. Some of these 
        samples are available to the International Atomic Energy Agency 
        through safeguards agreements, and some countries maintain 
        internal sample databases. Access to samples in many countries 
        is limited by national security concerns.
          (6) In order to create a sufficient deterrent, it is 
        necessary to have the capability to positively identify the 
        source of nuclear or radiological material, and potential 
        traffickers in nuclear or radiological material must be aware 
        of that capability. International cooperation may be essential 
        to catalogue all existing sources of nuclear or radiological 
        material.

SEC. 3. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS FOR FORENSICS 
                    COOPERATION.

  It is the sense of the Congress that the President should--
          (1) pursue bilateral and multilateral international 
        agreements to establish, or seek to establish under the 
        auspices of existing bilateral or multilateral agreements, an 
        international framework for determining the source of any 
        confiscated nuclear or radiological material or weapon, as well 
        as the source of any detonated weapon and the nuclear or 
        radiological material used in such a weapon;
          (2) develop protocols for the data exchange and dissemination 
        of sensitive information relating to nuclear or radiological 
        materials and samples of controlled nuclear or radiological 
        materials, to the extent required by the agreements entered 
        into under paragraph (1); and
          (3) develop expedited protocols for the data exchange and 
        dissemination of sensitive information needed to publicly 
        identify the source of a nuclear detonation.

SEC. 4. RESPONSIBILITIES OF DOMESTIC NUCLEAR DETECTION OFFICE.

  (a) Additional Responsibilities.--Section 1902 of the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002 (as redesignated by Public Law 110-53; 6 U.S.C. 
592) is amended--
          (1) in subsection (a)--
                  (A) in paragraph (9), by striking ``and'' after the 
                semicolon;
                  (B) by redesignating paragraph (10) as paragraph 
                (14); and
                  (C) by inserting after paragraph (9) the following:
          ``(10) develop and implement, with the approval of the 
        Secretary and in coordination with the heads of appropriate 
        departments and agencies, methods and capabilities to support 
        the attribution of nuclear or radiological material to its 
        source when such material is intercepted by the United States, 
        foreign governments, or international bodies or is dispersed in 
        the course of a terrorist attack or other nuclear or 
        radiological explosion;
          ``(11) establish, within the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
        Office, the National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center to 
        provide centralized stewardship, planning, assessment, gap 
        analysis, exercises, improvement, and integration for all 
        Federal nuclear forensics activities to ensure an enduring 
        national technical nuclear forensics capability to strengthen 
        the collective response of the United States to nuclear 
        terrorism or other nuclear attacks;
          ``(12) establish a National Nuclear Forensics Expertise 
        Development Program which--
                  ``(A) is devoted to developing and maintaining a 
                vibrant and enduring academic pathway from 
                undergraduate to post-doctorate study in nuclear and 
                geochemical science specialties directly relevant to 
                technical nuclear forensics, including radiochemistry, 
                geochemistry, nuclear physics, nuclear engineering, 
                materials science, and analytical chemistry; and
                  ``(B) shall--
                          ``(i) make available for undergraduate study 
                        student scholarships, with a duration of up to 
                        four years per student, which shall include, 
                        whenever possible, at least one summer 
                        internship at a national laboratory or 
                        appropriate Federal agency in the field of 
                        technical nuclear forensics during the course 
                        of the student's undergraduate career;
                          ``(ii) make available for graduate study 
                        student fellowships, with a duration of up to 
                        five years per student, which--
                                  ``(I) shall include, whenever 
                                possible, at least two summer 
                                internships at a national laboratory or 
                                appropriate Federal agency in the field 
                                of technical nuclear forensics during 
                                the course of the student's graduate 
                                career; and
                                  ``(II) shall require each recipient 
                                to commit to serve for two years in a 
                                post-doctoral position in a technical 
                                nuclear forensics-related specialty at 
                                a national laboratory or appropriate 
                                Federal agency after graduation;
                          ``(iii) make available to faculty awards, 
                        with a duration of three to five years each, to 
                        ensure faculty and their graduate students a 
                        sustained funding stream; and
                          ``(iv) place a particular emphasis on 
                        reinvigorating technical nuclear forensics 
                        programs, while encouraging the participation 
                        of undergraduate students, graduate students, 
                        and university faculty from historically Black 
                        colleges and universities, Hispanic-serving 
                        institutions, and Tribal Colleges and 
                        Universities;
          ``(13) provide an annual report to Congress on the activities 
        carried out under paragraphs (10), (11), and (12); and''; and
          (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection:
  ``(b) Definitions.--In this section:
          ``(1) Historically black college or university.--The term 
        `historically Black college or university' has the meaning 
        given the term `part B institution' in section 322(2) of the 
        Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1061(2)).
          ``(2) Hispanic-serving institution.--The term `Hispanic-
        serving institution' has the meaning given that term in section 
        502 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1101a).
          ``(3) Tribal college or university.--The term `Tribal College 
        or University' has the meaning given that term in section 
        316(b) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
        1059c(b)).''.
  (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated the sum of $30,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2009, 
2010, and 2011 to carry out paragraphs (10) through (13) of section 
1902(a) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as added by subsection 
(a) of this section.

  Amend the title so as to read:

    A bill to strengthen efforts in the Department of Homeland Security 
to develop nuclear forensics capabilities to permit attribution of the 
source of nuclear material, and for other purposes.

                          Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 2631 is to strengthen efforts in the 
Department of Homeland Security to develop nuclear forensics 
capabilities to permit attribution of the source of nuclear 
material.

                  Background and Need for Legislation

    A nuclear device detonated within the United States is the 
gravest threat we face as a Nation. Should such an event occur, 
rapid attribution is critical. Rapid attribution is also 
important should a weapon or special nuclear material be 
interdicted. A strong nuclear forensics capability will act as 
a deterrent and guide possible response to a nuclear incident. 
This being the case, H.R. 2631 is a necessary step to 
strengthen and coordinate United States' nuclear forensics 
capabilities.

                                Hearings

    On October 10, 2007, the Subcommittee on Emerging Threats, 
Cybersecurity and Science and Technology held a hearing on H.R. 
2631, the Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act. The 
Subcommittee received testimony from Hon. Adam B. Schiff, the 
Representative in Congress from the Twenty--Ninth District in 
the State of California; Mr. Vayl Oxford, Director, Domestic 
Nuclear Detection Office, Department of Homeland Security; Dr. 
Steven Aoki, Deputy Under Secretary for Counterterrorism, 
National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy; 
Mr. Mike Evenson, Associate Director for Operations, Defense 
Threat Reduction Agency, Department of Defense; Dr. Vahid 
Majidi, Assistant Director, Weapons of Mass Destruction 
Directorate, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Department of 
Justice; Mr. Andrew Grant, Acting Director for WMD Terrorism, 
Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, 
Department of State; and Dr. Carol Burns, Group Leader, Nuclear 
and Radiochemistry, Chemistry Division, Los Alamos National 
Laboratory.

                        Committee Consideration

    H.R. 2631 was introduced in the House on June 7, 2007, by 
Mr. Schiff, Mr. Langevin, and three original co-sponsors, and 
referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition 
to the Committee on Foreign Affairs. Within the Committee, H.R. 
2631 was referred to the Subcommittee on Subcommittee on 
Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and Science and Technology.
    The Subcommittee on Emerging Threats, Cybersecurity, and 
Science and Technology met on October 31, 2007, to consider 
H.R. 2631 and forwarded the bill to the Full Committee for 
consideration, amended, by voice vote.
    The following amendment was offered:
          An Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute offered by 
        Mr. Langevin, (#1), was AGREED TO by voice vote.
          The title was amended so as to read ``To strengthen 
        efforts in the Department of Homeland Security to 
        develop nuclear forensics capabilities to permit 
        attribution of the source of nuclear material, and for 
        other purposes.''
    The Committee on Homeland Security considered H.R. 2631 on 
May 20, 2008, and ordered the measure reported to the House 
with a favorable recommendation, as amended, by unanimous 
consent.
    The following amendment was offered:
          An Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute offered by 
        Mr. Langevin (#1); was AGREED TO by the unanimous 
        consent.

                            Committee Votes

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the Committee to list the recorded 
votes on the motion to report legislation and amendments 
thereto.
    No recorded votes occurred on H.R. 2631 in the Committee.

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee has held oversight 
hearings and made findings that are reflected in this report.

   New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee finds that H.R. 
2631, the Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act, would result 
in no new or increased budget authority, entitlement authority, 
or tax expenditures or revenues.

                  Congressional Budget Office Estimate

    The Committee adopts as its own the cost estimate prepared 
by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

                                                      June 3, 2008.
Hon. Bennie G. Thompson,
Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 2631, the Nuclear 
Forensics and Attribution Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Mark 
Grabowicz.
            Sincerely,
                                                   Peter R. Orszag.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 2631--Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act

    Summary: H.R. 2631 would authorize the appropriation of $30 
million for each of fiscal years 2009 through 2011 for the 
Domestic Nuclear Detection Office in the Department of Homeland 
Security to develop programs to improve nuclear forensics and 
attribution (the process of identifying the source of nuclear 
or radiological material). CBO estimates that implementing the 
bill would cost $90 million over the 2009-2013 period, subject 
to appropriation of the authorized amounts. Enacting H.R. 2631 
would not affect direct spending or revenues.
    H.R. 2631 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of S. 2631 is shown in the following table. 
CBO assumes that the amounts authorized by the bill will be 
appropriated near the start of each fiscal year and that 
outlays will follow the historical rate of spending for similar 
activities. The costs of this legislation fall within budget 
function 750 (administration of justice).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                          2009-
                                                        2009      2010      2011      2012      2013      2013
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level.................................        30        30        30         0         0        90
Estimated Outlays...................................         9        18        30        21        12        90
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 2631 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs: Mark Grabowicz; Impact 
on state, local, and tribal governments: Melissa Merrell; 
Impact on the private sector: Paige Piper/Bach.
    Estimate approved by: Theresa Gullo, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, H.R. 2631 contains the following 
general performance goals, and objectives, including outcome 
related goals and objectives authorized.
    H.R. 2631 authorizes, in statute, the National Technical 
Nuclear Forensics Center within the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
Office at the Department of Homeland Security. This Office will 
coordinate nuclear forensics efforts across the Federal 
government, in order to ensure information sharing and reduce 
redundant efforts of the various Federal agencies involved in 
nuclear forensics, to include the Departments of Homeland 
Security, Energy, Defense, Justice, and State. This legislation 
will also help ensure future development of the scientific and 
technical workforce needed to carry out nuclear forensics 
activities. The legislation also promotes international 
cooperation and information sharing to aide nuclear forensics 
activities.

   Congressional Earmarks, Limited Tax Benefits, and Limited Tariff 
                                Benefits

    In compliance with rule XXI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, this bill, as reported, contains no 
congressional earmarks, limited tax benefits, or limited tariff 
benefits as defined in clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of the rule 
XXI.

                       Federal Mandates Statement

    The Committee adopts as its own the estimate of Federal 
mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act.

                      Advisory Committee Statement

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that the 
Constitutional authority for this legislation is provided in 
Article I, section 8, clause 1, which grants Congress the power 
to provide for the common Defense of the United States.

                  Applicability to Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

             Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation


Section 1. Short title

    This section states that this act may be cited as ``The 
Nuclear Forensics and Attribution Act''.

Section 2. Findings

    This section sets forth Congressional findings with respect 
to the need for a robust nuclear forensics attribution program 
since the threat of a nuclear terrorist attack is the most 
serious threat to the U.S.

Section 3. Sense of Congress on international agreements for forensics 
        cooperation

    This section expresses the sense of Congress that the 
President should: Pursue bilateral and multilateral agreements 
with other nations to establish an international framework for 
determining the source of any confiscated or detonated nuclear 
material or weapon; develop protocols for the dissemination of 
sensitive information relating to nuclear materials; and 
publicly identify the source of a nuclear detonation.

Section 4. Responsibilities of the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office

    This section amends section 1902 of the Homeland Security 
Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-296) to require the Secretary of 
Homeland Security to: Develop and implement, in coordination 
with other Federal agencies, capabilities to support 
attribution of intercepted nuclear or radiological material; 
establish, within the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office the 
National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center; ensure a nuclear 
forensics workforce by developing and maintaining academic 
scholarships and fellowships, which include a requirement of 
service in a field relevant to nuclear forensics after 
completion of education; and report annually to the Congress on 
progress in the mandated areas.
    The Committee recognizes that technical nuclear forensics 
capabilities exist within several agencies across the U.S. 
Government, including the Department of Energy, the Department 
of Defense, the Department of Justice, and the Department of 
State. The National Technical Nuclear Forensics Office should 
serve as the coordinator of these efforts to ensure the 
efficacy of current work and that a robust workforce is 
fostered to support these efforts in the future.
    The Committee recognizes the workforce in the technical 
fields of nuclear forensics has been evaporating over the past 
thirty years. Without a qualified workforce, we cannot attain 
the level of preparedness against the threat of nuclear 
terrorism the Nation needs.
    The Committee makes special note that the bill, as amended, 
includes a provision to provide scholarships and fellowships 
for those pursuing careers in technical nuclear forensics.
    Equally important, the bill mandates a two-year commitment 
of service within the Federal technical nuclear forensics 
workforce for fellows of the program after graduation. This 
will ensure that taxpayers are assured a beneficial return on 
the Nation's investment in education.
    This section authorizes $30 million for each of the fiscal 
years 2009, 2010, and 2011 to carry out the purposes of this 
measure.
    The Committee notes that the National Technical Nuclear 
Forensics Center (NTNFC) received $15 million in appropriations 
for Fiscal Year 2008 and the request for Fiscal Year 2009 is 
$17.9 million. H.R. 2631, as reported, not only requires the 
Secretary to coordinate with other Federal Agencies and 
countries to enhance our Nation's nuclear forensic capabilities 
but also places additional requirements on the NTNFC to 
continue to develop and improve these capabilities and develop 
educational programs to ensure a capable workforce. Therefore 
the Committee supports the authorization of $30 million per 
year for FY 2009, 2010, and 2011.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE XIX--DOMESTIC NUCLEAR DETECTION OFFICE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 1902. MISSION OF OFFICE.

  (a) Mission.--The Office shall be responsible for 
coordinating Federal efforts to detect and protect against the 
unauthorized importation, possession, storage, transportation, 
development, or use of a nuclear explosive device, fissile 
material, or radiological material in the United States, and to 
protect against attack using such devices or materials against 
the people, territory, or interests of the United States and, 
to this end, shall--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (9) further enhance and maintain continuous awareness 
        by analyzing information from all Office mission-
        related detection systems; [and]
          (10) develop and implement, with the approval of the 
        Secretary and in coordination with the heads of 
        appropriate departments and agencies, methods and 
        capabilities to support the attribution of nuclear or 
        radiological material to its source when such material 
        is intercepted by the United States, foreign 
        governments, or international bodies or is dispersed in 
        the course of a terrorist attack or other nuclear or 
        radiological explosion;
          (11) establish, within the Domestic Nuclear Detection 
        Office, the National Technical Nuclear Forensics Center 
        to provide centralized stewardship, planning, 
        assessment, gap analysis, exercises, improvement, and 
        integration for all Federal nuclear forensics 
        activities to ensure an enduring national technical 
        nuclear forensics capability to strengthen the 
        collective response of the United States to nuclear 
        terrorism or other nuclear attacks;
          (12) establish a National Nuclear Forensics Expertise 
        Development Program which--
                  (A) is devoted to developing and maintaining 
                a vibrant and enduring academic pathway from 
                undergraduate to post-doctorate study in 
                nuclear and geochemical science specialties 
                directly relevant to technical nuclear 
                forensics, including radiochemistry, 
                geochemistry, nuclear physics, nuclear 
                engineering, materials science, and analytical 
                chemistry; and
                  (B) shall--
                          (i) make available for undergraduate 
                        study student scholarships, with a 
                        duration of up to four years per 
                        student, which shall include, whenever 
                        possible, at least one summer 
                        internship at a national laboratory or 
                        appropriate Federal agency in the field 
                        of technical nuclear forensics during 
                        the course of the student's 
                        undergraduate career;
                          (ii) make available for graduate 
                        study student fellowships, with a 
                        duration of up to five years per 
                        student, which--
                                  (I) shall include, whenever 
                                possible, at least two summer 
                                internships at a national 
                                laboratory or appropriate 
                                Federal agency in the field of 
                                technical nuclear forensics 
                                during the course of the 
                                student's graduate career; and
                                  (II) shall require each 
                                recipient to commit to serve 
                                for two years in a post-
                                doctoral position in a 
                                technical nuclear forensics-
                                related specialty at a national 
                                laboratory or appropriate 
                                Federal agency after 
                                graduation;
                          (iii) make available to faculty 
                        awards, with a duration of three to 
                        five years each, to ensure faculty and 
                        their graduate students a sustained 
                        funding stream; and
                          (iv) place a particular emphasis on 
                        reinvigorating technical nuclear 
                        forensics programs, while encouraging 
                        the participation of undergraduate 
                        students, graduate students, and 
                        university faculty from historically 
                        Black colleges and universities, 
                        Hispanic-serving institutions, and 
                        Tribal Colleges and Universities;
          (13) provide an annual report to Congress on the 
        activities carried out under paragraphs (10), (11), and 
        (12); and
          [(10)] (14) perform other duties as assigned by the 
        Secretary.
  (b) Definitions.--In this section:
          (1) Historically black college or university.--The 
        term ``historically Black college or university'' has 
        the meaning given the term ``part B institution'' in 
        section 322(2) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 
        U.S.C. 1061(2)).
          (2) Hispanic-serving institution.--The term 
        ``Hispanic-serving institution'' has the meaning given 
        that term in section 502 of the Higher Education Act of 
        1965 (20 U.S.C. 1101a).
          (3) Tribal college or university.--The term ``Tribal 
        College or University'' has the meaning given that term 
        in section 316(b) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 
        (20 U.S.C. 1059c(b)).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *