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110th Congress                                            Rept. 110-576
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                      Part 1

======================================================================



 
 GREEN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER 
                                  ACT

                                _______
                                

                 April 10, 2008.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 5161]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 5161) to provide for the establishment of Green 
Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer 
Centers, and for other purpose, having considered the same, 
report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend that 
the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................4
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................4
   V. Hearing Summary.................................................7
   V. Committee Actions...............................................7
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................8
 VII. Section-by-Section Analysis (by Title and Section)..............9
VIII. Committee Views................................................10
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................11
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................11
  XI. Compliance with Public Law 104-4...............................11
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............11
XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........12
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................12
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................12
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................12
XVII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........12
XVIII.Earmark Identification.........................................12

 XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported..........12
  XX. Committee Recommendations......................................16
 XXI. Proceedings of the Subcommittee Markup.........................17
XXII. Proceedings of the Full Committee Markup.......................40

                              I. Amendment

    The amendment is as follows:
    Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Green Transportation Infrastructure 
Research and Technology Transfer Act''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) Transportation infrastructure contributes to the 
        pollution of surface and ground water because it is comprised 
        of impervious surfaces that concentrate contaminants which are 
        introduced into the water supply during storms.
          (2) Scientists and engineers have developed numerous 
        technologies that can be incorporated into transportation 
        infrastructure which control stormwater and mitigate nonpoint 
        source water pollution.
          (3) There has not been widespread implementation of green 
        transportation infrastructure by governments or private 
        industry because of technical, regulatory, and social barriers, 
        such as restrictive designs and lack of training and awareness 
        for builders.
          (4) The Federal Highway Administration, in partnership with 
        the Environmental Protection Agency, has the technical 
        expertise and capacity to promote the use of green 
        transportation infrastructure technologies by State and local 
        governments and private industry through education and outreach 
        and technical assistance programs.

SEC. 3. REGIONAL GREEN TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTERS.

  (a) Establishment.--Subchapter I of chapter 55 of title 49, United 
States Code, is amended by inserting after section 5505 following new 
section:

``SEC. 5505A. REGIONAL GREEN TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTERS.

  ``(a) Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology 
Transfer.--The Secretary of Transportation shall make grants to 
university transportation centers established pursuant to section 5505 
or 5506, or to consortia consisting of such a center and one or more 
institutions of higher education, to carry out research and development 
and technology transfer activities in the field of green transportation 
infrastructure.
  ``(b) Objectives.--Grant funds provided under this section may be 
used to--
          ``(1) generate innovative and cost-effective approaches to 
        mitigating environmental impacts throughout the lifecycle of 
        transportation infrastructure;
          ``(2) develop holistic approaches to integrating green 
        infrastructure into existing wastewater management systems;
          ``(3) promote adoption of innovative green transportation 
        infrastructure systems by State and local governments and the 
        private sector; and
          ``(4) manage technology transfer programs to disseminate 
        information on best management practices in the area of green 
        transportation infrastructure to State and local governments 
        and the private sector.
  ``(c) Selection of Grant Recipients.--
          ``(1) Applications.--In order to be eligible to receive a 
        grant under this section, a university transportation center or 
        consortium shall submit to the Secretary an application that is 
        in such form and contains such information as the Secretary may 
        require.
          ``(2) Merit review; priority.--Grants shall be awarded under 
        this section on a merit-reviewed competitive basis.
          ``(3) Regional centers.--To the greatest extent practicable, 
        the Secretary shall ensure that there is at least one grant 
        recipient from each of the 10 United States Government regions 
        that comprise the Standard Federal Regional Boundary System.
          ``(4) Selection criteria.--Except as otherwise provided by 
        this section, the Secretary shall select each recipient of a 
        grant under this section through a merit-reviewed competitive 
        process on the basis of the following:
                  ``(A) Demonstrated expertise in transportation 
                research and environmental impacts of transportation 
                infrastructure.
                  ``(B) Demonstrated research capacity and technology 
                transfer resources.
                  ``(C) Existing or proposed partnerships with State 
                and local governments and private industry involved in 
                transportation-related construction, environmental 
                impact mitigation, or other areas related to green 
                transportation infrastructure research to help set 
                research priorities and facilitate technology transfer.
                  ``(D) Capability to provide leadership in developing 
                national best management practices, regional best 
                management practices, or both in the field of green 
                transportation infrastructure.
                  ``(E) Expertise in specific regional climate 
                characteristics which impact the effectiveness of green 
                transportation infrastructure technologies and 
                practices.
                  ``(F) Demonstrated ability to disseminate results of 
                research and education programs through a statewide or 
                regionwide continuing education program.
                  ``(G) The strategic plan the recipient proposes to 
                carry out under the grant.
  ``(d) Activities.--The types of activities the Secretary may support 
under this section include the following:
          ``(1) Research and development of innovative technologies, 
        construction techniques, or best management processes that 
        mitigate the environmental impact of transportation 
        infrastructure, including--
                  ``(A) assessments of the lifecycle environmental 
                impact of local existing or planned transportation 
                infrastructure;
                  ``(B) integration of green transportation 
                infrastructure elements into existing transportation or 
                waste water management systems; and
                  ``(C) research, development, testing, and evaluation 
                of new technologies or best management practices.
          ``(2) Establishment and operation of a regional technology 
        transfer program to disseminate information on new technologies 
        and best management practices to State and local governments, 
        institutions of higher learning, and private industry in the 
        region.
          ``(3) Study of the impact of State, local, and Federal 
        regulations on the implementation of green transportation 
        infrastructure technologies and practices. These studies shall 
        include collaboration with appropriate Federal agencies and 
        industries to evaluate the effect of and possible changes to 
        Federal and State regulations that impede implementation of 
        green transportation infrastructure.
          ``(4) Public education campaigns to raise awareness of the 
        benefits of green transportation infrastructure technologies, 
        including activities to raise awareness and foster 
        collaboration among regional governments, private industry, and 
        other public and private stakeholders.
  ``(e) Annual Meeting.--The Secretary shall convene an annual meeting 
of the Centers and consortia receiving grants pursuant to this section 
in order to foster evaluation, collaboration, and communication among 
participants and disseminate best management practices.
  ``(f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this section $6,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Amounts appropriated pursuant 
to this section shall be in addition to amounts otherwise appropriated 
for university transportation centers established pursuant to section 
5505 or 5506.
  ``(g) Definition.--In this section, the term `green transportation 
infrastructure' includes infrastructure that--
          ``(1) preserves and restores natural processes, landforms 
        (such as floodplains), natural vegetated stream side buffers, 
        wetlands, or other topographical features that can slow, 
        filter, and naturally store stormwater runoff and floodwaters 
        for future water supply and recharge of natural aquifers;
          ``(2) utilizes natural design techniques that infiltrate, 
        filter, store, evaporate, and detain water close to its source;
          ``(3) minimizes the use of impervious surfaces in order to 
        slow or infiltrate precipitation;
          ``(4) minimizes lifecycle energy consumption, including 
        during construction, maintenance, use by vehicles, and 
        destruction and recycling; and
          ``(5) minimizes lifecycle air pollution.''.
  (b) Conforming Amendment.--The table of sections for such subchapter 
is amended by inserting after the item relating to section 5505 the 
following new item:

``5505A. Regional Green Transportation Research Centers.''.

SEC. 4. GREEN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE AMENDMENTS.

  Section 504 of title 23, United States Code, is amended--
          (1) in subsection (a)(3)--
                  (A) in subparagraph (A)(ii)--
                          (i) by striking ``and'' at the end of 
                        subclause (V);
                          (ii) by striking the period at the end of 
                        subclause (VI) and inserting ``; and''; and
                          (iii) by adding at the end the following new 
                        subclause:
                                  ``(VII) the use of green 
                                transportation infrastructure (as 
                                defined in section 5505A(g) of title 
                                49) for environmental protection and 
                                mitigating environmental impacts of 
                                transportation construction.''; and
                  (B) by adding at the end the following new 
                subparagraph:
                  ``(D) Interagency coordination.--The Institute shall 
                coordinate the development of curriculum and courses 
                with other Federal agencies with expertise in the 
                course subject areas.''; and
          (2) in subsection (b)(2)(A)(i) by striking ``and traffic 
        safety countermeasures'' and inserting ``traffic safety 
        countermeasures, and options with respect to green 
        transportation infrastructure (as defined in section 5505A(g) 
        of title 49)''.

                              II. Purpose

    The purpose of this bill is to expand the use of green 
transportation infrastructure technologies through university 
research programs, public awareness campaigns, and training and 
technology transfer programs for builders and transportation 
policymakers. The programs authorized in this bill are carried 
out by the Research and Innovative Technology Administration 
and Federal Highway Administration of the U.S. Department of 
Transportation.

                III. Background and Need for Legislation


             ENVIRONMENTAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH RUNOFF

    Infrastructure, such as roads and parking lots, comprised 
of surfaces that are impervious to water, can have significant 
impacts on an area's natural hydrology, potentially resulting 
in flooding, pollution, or aquatic ecosystem destruction. 
Stormwater runoff washes over agricultural land, lawns, urban 
areas, and other types of human land-use areas, introducing 
chemicals like fertilizers, heavy metals, and harmful bacteria 
into water ecosystems such as streams, lakes, and rivers. 
Transportation infrastructure is a major contributor to this 
type of pollution. This type of non-localized pollution is 
responsible for over 80 percent of the contamination of the 
nation's surface water. Thus, development of new transportation 
infrastructure has a significant and far-ranging environmental 
impact.

                  GREEN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE

    To be effective in countering the negative impact of 
rainfall runoff, mitigation measures must meet the goals of 
reducing the speed and volume of flow and treating or reducing 
pollutants. Green transportation infrastructure uses innovative 
materials, structural measures, and design techniques to 
address these goals. Structural measures are installations like 
infiltration basins and trenches, detention and retention 
ponds, constructed wetlands, vegetated swales and filter 
strips, and filtration systems. Stormwater managers generally 
choose a treatment by evaluating the amount of land available, 
the cost of implementation, operation and maintenance of the 
technology, and treatment objectives such as cleanliness. 
However, many local governments are also constrained by 
environmental regulations that stipulate specific methods for 
reducing water pollution, and are unable to include innovative 
green infrastructure technologies and techniques in their 
stormwater management plans.

                        CURRENT FEDERAL PROGRAMS

    While most of the decisions regarding implementation of 
green transportation infrastructure are made at the state and 
local level, there are Federal programs addressing the issue of 
non-point source water pollution control in transportation 
infrastructure. The Green Highways Partnership (GHP) is the 
primary Federal vehicle for encouraging the use of green 
transportation infrastructure by state and local governments 
and private industry. EPA and FHWA are the main Federal 
participants in the partnership, which includes state 
departments of transportation, trade organizations, municipal 
governments, and non-profit organizations. The Partnership's 
activities focus on planning and design, construction, and 
operation and maintenance of green transportation 
infrastructure, and include pilot projects that demonstrate 
cost-effective, environmentally-sound, transportation 
infrastructure technologies that meet state performance 
requirements. There are also additional ongoing programs at the 
U.S. Department of Transportation and EPA in support of 
research, development, and transfer of green transportation 
infrastructure technologies.

                          REMAINING CHALLENGES

    Though research has shown significant benefits in terms of 
stormwater management and control of non-point source water 
pollution, technologies such as bioswales and pervious pavement 
have not been adopted in many jurisdictions or by significant 
numbers of private entities. There are numerous barriers to 
full adoption of green infrastructure, including technical 
problems, regulatory challenges, and slow industry adoption of 
new practices. The installation of green transportation 
infrastructure can be impeded by problems of high cost and 
availability of space for technologies. Climate conditions can 
also present unique challenges to implementation; for example, 
in areas where very cold weather is common, technologies that 
retain water for slow filtration are susceptible to freezing. 
Also, the construction industry tends to be risk-averse, and 
hence reluctant to adopt technologies that may be considered 
experimental or unproven because of concerns about high cost, 
reliability, maintenance, or simply confusion about the best 
products to use. The slow adoption of these technologies has 
also led to a shortage of trained contractors who are able to 
properly design and install integrated systems, making 
implementation more difficult and costly.
    Though Federal, state, and local government agencies have 
taken an active role in promoting the use of green 
transportation infrastructure, those same entities have often 
erected regulatory barriers which prevent widespread 
implementation. For example, though the Office of Water has 
been a strong advocate for green infrastructure projects, there 
are regulatory barriers internal to the EPA that prevents those 
projects from moving forward. The Clean Water Act, under the 
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit 
program, gives EPA the authority to regulate sources of water 
that release pollutants into ground and surface water. The 
program is administered on a regional level, and regional 
administrators have discretion in classifying green 
infrastructure technologies that serve as sources of water 
covered by NPDES. If technologies such as pervious pavement or 
bioswales, which filter runoff before it flows into the ground 
or surface water, are considered ``point sources'' then EPA 
regulations that require permitting procedures act as a 
significant disincentive to use these technologies.
    State and local authorities can sometimes also be 
impediments to implementation of green transportation 
infrastructure. Unlike Federal laws that specifically disallow 
the use of green technologies without extensive permitting, 
state and local authorities tend to fail to explicitly allow 
their use. As a result, governments or private companies within 
the jurisdiction who propose the use of green transportation 
infrastructure are not given approval simply because the 
innovative technologies have not been previously considered by 
the regulating authority. The problem then becomes self-
perpetuating, as these local governments block all potential 
demonstration projects, and continue to deny builders permits 
on the basis that there have been no successful demonstration 
projects. While many cities have acted as leaders in the green 
transportation infrastructure initiative, the challenge remains 
to greatly expand its acceptance by local jurisdictions.

     OPTIONS FOR PROMOTING IMPLEMENTATION OF GREEN TRANSPORTATION 
                             INFRASTRUCTURE

    One of the primary reasons policymakers and builders resist 
incorporating green transportation infrastructure technologies 
into their design plans is lack of understanding of the variety 
of uses and their effectiveness in local environments. 
Insufficient data and information about its effectiveness in 
mitigating pollution are disincentives for incorporating green 
infrastructure into stormwater management systems because of 
the need for accountability for expenditures of public funds. 
Also, there are still relatively few engineers trained in 
design, installation, and maintenance methods, which prevents 
even interested localities from implementing green 
infrastructure plans.
    The U.S. Department of Transportation's University 
Transportation Centers, authorized under the Safe, Accountable, 
Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act--A Legacy for 
Users (SAFETEA-LU), are uniquely suited to meet the research 
needs to fill the gaps in data and engineering information that 
prevent the widespread implementation of green transportation 
infrastructure projects. This program funds university research 
centers around the country to focus on state of the art 
transportation research and workforce development. These 
Centers bring together experts in multidisciplinary fields to 
address transportation challenges including congestion, safety 
issues, and energy efficiency. A number of Centers currently 
highlight sustainability as the theme of their research 
projects, and green transportation infrastructure is a natural 
component of a sustainability portfolio.
    The National Highway Institute (NHI), part of the Federal 
Highway Administration, is a key resource for transportation 
workers to learn about new construction and design concepts, 
and as such is an excellent partner for technology transfer 
from the University Transportation Centers. NHI has provided 
training for transportation workers in diverse subjects, 
including improving road safety for pedestrians and bicyclists, 
managing roads in inclement weather, and traffic management. 
Green transportation infrastructure curriculum would augment 
NHI's excellent course offerings by providing builders with 
guidance on design, construction, and maintenance of green 
infrastructure from a trusted source. Using NHI to deliver 
information on green infrastructure technology and processes 
would help overcome some of the biases against this type of 
design and ensure that all localities are able to implement the 
most effective green infrastructure systems for their unique 
needs.

                          IV. Hearing Summary

    On Thursday, May 10, 2007, the Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation held a hearing to examine options for 
construction technologies and materials available for 
transportation infrastructure that contribute to stormwater 
management and control of non-point source water pollution. 
Witnesses testified on the barriers to widespread 
implementation of green transportation infrastructure and made 
recommendations for Federal action to promote its use.
    The Subcommittee heard from Ms. Gloria Shepherd, Associate 
Administrator for Planning, Environment, and Realty at the 
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) of the U.S. Department of 
Transportation (DOT); Mr. Benjamin Grumbles, Assistant 
Administrator for the Office of Water at the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency (EPA); Mr. Sam Adams, Commissioner of Public 
Utilities for the City of Portland, Oregon; Mr. Dan Huffman, 
managing director for national resources for the National Ready 
Mixed Concrete Association (NRMCA); and Mr. Hal Kassoff, senior 
vice president for sustainable development at Parsons 
Brinckerhoff. The witnesses discussed the various types of 
green infrastructure available for use in the transportation 
sector and the environmental and cost benefits that 
infrastructure provides. They also noted the various technical, 
regulatory, and social barriers to implementation of green 
transportation infrastructure systems and suggested Federal 
support for research and development to provide better data and 
best practices for designing and building these systems.

                          V. Committee Actions

    The Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation heard 
testimony in the 110th Congress relevant to the programs 
authorized in H.R. 5161 at a hearing held May 10, 2007. During 
those hearings, the Subcommittee heard testimony from the 
Associate Administrator for Planning, Environment and Realty at 
the Federal Highway Administration; the Assistant Administrator 
for Water at the Environmental Protection Agency, and 
representatives of local government and industry.
    On January 29, 2008, Representative David Wu, Chairman of 
the Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation of the Committee 
on Science and Technology, introduced H.R. 5161, the Green 
Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer 
Act, a bill to provide for the establishment of Green 
Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer 
Centers, and for other purpose.
    The Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation met to 
consider H.R. 5161 on Thursday, February 7, 2008 and considered 
the following amendment to the bill:
    1. Mr. Ehlers offered an amendment to Section 3 to limit 
eligibility for grants under that section to existing 
University Transportation Centers receiving grants under 
section 5505 or 5506 of the U.S. Code, and to authorize $6 
million in appropriations for fiscal years 2009 and 2010. The 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Hall moved that the Subcommittee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 5161, as amended, to the full Committee. The motion 
was agreed to by a voice vote.
    The Committee on Science and Technology met to consider 
H.R. 5161 on February 27, 2008 and considered the following 
amendments to the bill:
    1. Mr. Wu offered an amendment to Section 3 to allow 
universities that are not current University Transportation 
Center (UTC) program participants to form consortia with 
existing UTCs to apply for university research grants. The 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    2. Mr. Inglis offered an amendment to authorize the 
Secretary of Transportation to require cost-sharing by industry 
and consortia partners for research as part of the green 
transportation infrastructure component of the University 
Transportation Centers program. The amendment was withdrawn.
    3. Mr. Inglis offered an amendment to specify that design 
and building code restrictions can impede implementation of 
green transportation infrastructure, and to recommend that 
grant recipient conferences offer opportunities for peer review 
and evaluation. The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    Mr. Baird moved that the Committee favorably report the 
bill, H.R. 5161, as amended to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill, as amended, do pass, and that the 
staff be instructed to make technical and conforming changes to 
the bill, as amended, and prepare the legislative report and 
that the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring the bill 
before the House for consideration. The motion was agreed to by 
voice vote.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    H.R. 5161 authorizes the U.S. Department of Transportation 
to provide grants to national and regional university 
transportation centers to carry out research and technology 
transfer in the field of green transportation infrastructure. 
Applicants are limited to existing centers receiving grants 
under section 5505 or 5506 of the U.S. Code or consortia of 
universities including at least one previously authorized 
university transportation center. Grant recipients are selected 
via a merit-based competition with preference given to those 
institutions demonstrating expertise in the environmental 
effects of transportation infrastructure; research capacity and 
technology transfer resources; partnerships with government and 
industry; and other attributes. Authorized activities include 
research and development of innovative infrastructure 
technologies; establishment of regional technology transfer 
programs; studies of the impact of government regulations on 
implementation of green infrastructure programs; and public 
education campaigns aimed at public and private stakeholders. 
The bill requires the Secretary of Transportation to convene an 
annual meeting of Centers to foster collaboration and 
dissemination of findings. H.R. 5161 authorizes $6 million per 
fiscal year for fiscal years 2009 and 2010 for grants to the 
university transportation centers. To promote technology 
transfer, the bill requires the Federal Highway Administration 
to incorporate education and training on green transportation 
infrastructure into its National Highway Institute curriculum 
which is offered to transportation workers nationwide. Finally, 
the bill defines green transportation infrastructure as 
infrastructure that preserves and restores natural processes 
and landforms, uses natural design techniques to manage 
stormwater; and minimizes lifecycle energy consumption and air 
pollution.

       VII. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill (by Section)


Sec. 1: Short title

    ``Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and 
Technology Transfer Act.''

Sec. 2: Findings

    Finds that innovative transportation infrastructure can be 
used to mitigate water pollution, and that technical and social 
barriers to implementing these technologies can be overcome 
with research and technology transfer assistance from the U.S. 
Department of Transportation.

Sec. 3: Regional Green Transportation Research Centers

    Amends the existing authorization for university 
transportation centers or consortia to provide grants focusing 
on green transportation infrastructure in regions around the 
U.S. The objectives of these grants include developing 
innovative transportation infrastructure technologies that 
mitigate environmental damage from runoff, and encouraging 
governments to adopt these technologies and integrate them into 
existing infrastructure through technology transfer programs.
    Activities will include: 1) research and development of 
green infrastructure technologies, techniques and best 
management practices; 2) establishment of a technology transfer 
program; 3) assessment of the impact of regulations on the 
adoption of green transportation infrastructure locally; and 4) 
public education efforts for local decision makers.
    Grant recipients will be selected on a competitive basis 
with preference given to those applicants demonstrating 
expertise in transportation and green infrastructure research, 
existing partnerships with state and local governments, and 
technology transfer programs. Only those applicants currently 
receiving University Transportation Center funding, or 
consortia including at least one existing University 
Transportation Center, will be eligible for grants.
    Defines green transportation infrastructure as 
infrastructure that preserves and restores natural processes 
and landforms, uses natural design techniques to manage 
stormwater; and minimizes lifecycle energy consumption and air 
pollution.
    Authorizes $6 million per year for fiscal years 2009 and 
2010 to carry out this section.

Sec. 4: Green transportation infrastructure amendments

    Amends authorization of the Federal Highway 
Administration's National Highway Institute (NHI) to include 
green transportation infrastructure as a course topic. 
Instructs NHI to collaborate with other federal agencies with 
expertise in this field when designing curriculum.

                         VIII. Committee Views

    The Committee strongly believes that the Federal government 
must take an active role in promoting and supporting the use of 
low cost, energy efficient, innovative, green transportation 
infrastructure solutions for mitigating water pollution by 
state and local governments. Currently, while the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Department of 
Transportation (DOT) are funding research and education and 
facilitating collaboration on green infrastructure projects 
among some stakeholders, there is not a coordinated effort by 
the Federal government to ensure that data and best practices 
are available to end users. Additionally, some Federal 
regulations impede the use of green transportation 
infrastructure, thereby providing strong disincentives to State 
and local government investments in these technologies by state 
and local governments.
    Though additional research on the benefits of green 
transportation infrastructure is needed to identify appropriate 
systems for a variety of users, existing projects around the 
United States have demonstrated that these techniques and 
technologies have great promise for mitigating water pollution 
from roads and other paved surfaces. Low cost, green 
infrastructure installations in Portland, Oregon; Chicago, 
Illinois, and elsewhere have slowed runoff and cut down on 
pollution while maintaining the surrounding aesthetic 
characteristics.
    University-based research is an essential component of any 
Federal effort to encourage the adoption of green 
transportation infrastructure by state and local governments. 
Local policymakers and industry representatives agree that a 
major impediment to implementing green infrastructure projects 
is the lack of data about effectiveness in mitigating 
pollution, as well as a lack of region-specific engineering and 
design guidance. The Committee believes that University 
Transportation Centers (UTCs), which are skilled in both 
transportation-related R&D; and technology transfer, are the 
most appropriate resource for users of green transportation 
infrastructure.
    H.R. 5161 authorizes $6 million in annual funding to the 
Department of Transportation for research grants to existing 
UTCs and consortia of institutions that include at least one 
UTC. The Committee intends for the authorized funding to 
support research grants to approximately twelve awardees; ten 
regional Centers and two national Centers. The regional Centers 
will carry out research and technology transfer programs 
customized to the needs of State and local governments and 
industry. The grantees should involve government 
representatives, associations and coalitions of regional 
governments, and industry groups in their research planning to 
ensure that the Centers efforts will address the needs of end 
users.
    The National Highway Institute (NHI) also has an important 
role in technology transfer to the transportation industry. 
Witnesses before the Committee noted that innovations in 
transportation are often slow to be adopted because of 
reticence within the industry to change long-standing 
practices. NHI has an established relationship with the 
transportation industry, serving as a source of mandatory and 
elective education and training for officials and contractors. 
It can act as a trusted resource to promote and normalize the 
use of green transportation infrastructure through the addition 
of curriculum on design and installation.

                           IX. Cost Estimate

    A cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of 
the Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted to 
the Committee on Science and Technology prior to the filing of 
this report and is included in Section X of this report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    H.R. 5161 does not contain new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
5161 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    H.R. 5161 would direct the Federal Highway Administration 
(FHWA) to make grants to institutions of higher education to 
carry out research and development on green transportation 
infrastructure. Under the bill, the term green transportation 
infrastructure includes infrastructure that preserves natural 
processes, treats water close to its source, minimizes the use 
of impervious surfaces, and minimizes energy use and air 
pollution. Assuming appropriation of the specified amounts, CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 5161 would cost $12 million 
over the 2009-2013 period.
    The bill would authorize the appropriations of $6 million 
for each of fiscal years 2009 and 2010. H.R. 5161 would direct 
FHWA to make grants to university transportation centers to 
carry out research and development regarding transportation 
infrastructure that has a limited impact on the natural 
environment. Under current law, there are 60 such centers, and 
H.R. 5161 would require that 10 of them receive such grants.
    Enacting the legislation would not affect direct spending 
or revenues. The bill contains no intergovernmental or private-
sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    The CBO staff contact for this estimate is Sarah Puro. This 
estimate was approved by Peter H. Fontaine, Assistant Director 
for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 5161 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    The oversight findings and recommendations of the Committee 
on Science and Technology are reflected in the body of this 
report.

      XIII. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House rule XIII, the goals of 
H.R. 5161 are to promote the use of green transportation 
infrastructure for stormwater management and pollution 
mitigation through programs to carry out research and 
development, collect data, develop best practices, and support 
technology transfer to government and private stakeholders.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United 
States grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 5161.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 5161 does not establish nor authorize the 
establishment of any advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 5161 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

                      XVII. Earmark Identification

    H.R. 5161 does not contain any congressional earmarks, 
limited tax benefits, or limited tariff benefits as defined in 
clause 9(d), 9(e), or 9(f) of rule XXI.

     XVIII. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

       XIX. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, As Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

                      TITLE 49, UNITED STATES CODE




           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
SUBTITLE III--GENERAL AND INTERMODAL PROGRAMS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 CHAPTER 55--INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION


                          SUBCHAPTER I--GENERAL

Sec.
5501.  National Intermodal Transportation System policy.
     * * * * * * *
5505A. Regional Green Transportation Research Centers.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 5505A. REGIONAL GREEN TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH CENTERS.

  (a) Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and 
Technology Transfer.--The Secretary of Transportation shall 
make grants to university transportation centers established 
pursuant to section 5505 or 5506, or to consortia consisting of 
such a center and one or more institutions of higher education, 
to carry out research and development and technology transfer 
activities in the field of green transportation infrastructure.
  (b) Objectives.--Grant funds provided under this section may 
be used to--
          (1) generate innovative and cost-effective approaches 
        to mitigating environmental impacts throughout the 
        lifecycle of transportation infrastructure;
          (2) develop holistic approaches to integrating green 
        infrastructure into existing wastewater management 
        systems;
          (3) promote adoption of innovative green 
        transportation infrastructure systems by State and 
        local governments and the private sector; and
          (4) manage technology transfer programs to 
        disseminate information on best management practices in 
        the area of green transportation infrastructure to 
        State and local governments and the private sector.
  (c) Selection of Grant Recipients.--
          (1) Applications.--In order to be eligible to receive 
        a grant under this section, a university transportation 
        center or consortium shall submit to the Secretary an 
        application that is in such form and contains such 
        information as the Secretary may require.
          (2) Merit review; priority.--Grants shall be awarded 
        under this section on a merit-reviewed competitive 
        basis.
          (3) Regional centers.--To the greatest extent 
        practicable, the Secretary shall ensure that there is 
        at least one grant recipient from each of the 10 United 
        States Government regions that comprise the Standard 
        Federal Regional Boundary System.
          (4) Selection criteria.--Except as otherwise provided 
        by this section, the Secretary shall select each 
        recipient of a grant under this section through a 
        merit-reviewed competitive process on the basis of the 
        following:
                  (A) Demonstrated expertise in transportation 
                research and environmental impacts of 
                transportation infrastructure.
                  (B) Demonstrated research capacity and 
                technology transfer resources.
                  (C) Existing or proposed partnerships with 
                State and local governments and private 
                industry involved in transportation-related 
                construction, environmental impact mitigation, 
                or other areas related to green transportation 
                infrastructure research to help set research 
                priorities and facilitate technology transfer.
                  (D) Capability to provide leadership in 
                developing national best management practices, 
                regional best management practices, or both in 
                the field of green transportation 
                infrastructure.
                  (E) Expertise in specific regional climate 
                characteristics which impact the effectiveness 
                of green transportation infrastructure 
                technologies and practices.
                  (F) Demonstrated ability to disseminate 
                results of research and education programs 
                through a statewide or regionwide continuing 
                education program.
                  (G) The strategic plan the recipient proposes 
                to carry out under the grant.
  (d) Activities.--The types of activities the Secretary may 
support under this section include the following:
          (1) Research and development of innovative 
        technologies, construction techniques, or best 
        management processes that mitigate the environmental 
        impact of transportation infrastructure, including--
                  (A) assessments of the lifecycle 
                environmental impact of local existing or 
                planned transportation infrastructure;
                  (B) integration of green transportation 
                infrastructure elements into existing 
                transportation or waste water management 
                systems; and
                  (C) research, development, testing, and 
                evaluation of new technologies or best 
                management practices.
          (2) Establishment and operation of a regional 
        technology transfer program to disseminate information 
        on new technologies and best management practices to 
        State and local governments, institutions of higher 
        learning, and private industry in the region.
          (3) Study of the impact of State, local, and Federal 
        regulations on the implementation of green 
        transportation infrastructure technologies and 
        practices. These studies shall include collaboration 
        with appropriate Federal agencies and industries to 
        evaluate the effect of and possible changes to Federal 
        and State regulations that impede implementation of 
        green transportation infrastructure.
          (4) Public education campaigns to raise awareness of 
        the benefits of green transportation infrastructure 
        technologies, including activities to raise awareness 
        and foster collaboration among regional governments, 
        private industry, and other public and private 
        stakeholders.
  (e) Annual Meeting.--The Secretary shall convene an annual 
meeting of the Centers and consortia receiving grants pursuant 
to this section in order to foster evaluation, collaboration, 
and communication among participants and disseminate best 
management practices.
  (f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to 
be appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this section 
$6,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2009 and 2010. Amounts 
appropriated pursuant to this section shall be in addition to 
amounts otherwise appropriated for university transportation 
centers established pursuant to section 5505 or 5506.
  (g) Definition.--In this section, the term ``green 
transportation infrastructure'' includes infrastructure that--
          (1) preserves and restores natural processes, 
        landforms (such as floodplains), natural vegetated 
        stream side buffers, wetlands, or other topographical 
        features that can slow, filter, and naturally store 
        stormwater runoff and floodwaters for future water 
        supply and recharge of natural aquifers;
          (2) utilizes natural design techniques that 
        infiltrate, filter, store, evaporate, and detain water 
        close to its source;
          (3) minimizes the use of impervious surfaces in order 
        to slow or infiltrate precipitation;
          (4) minimizes lifecycle energy consumption, including 
        during construction, maintenance, use by vehicles, and 
        destruction and recycling; and
          (5) minimizes lifecycle air pollution.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


                      TITLE 23, UNITED STATES CODE



           *       *       *       *       *       *       *
CHAPTER 5--RESEARCH, TECHNOLOGY, AND EDUCATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Sec. 504. Training and education

  (a) National Highway Institute.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Courses.--
                  (A) In general.--The Institute shall--
                          (i) * * *
                          (ii) continually develop courses 
                        relating to the application of emerging 
                        technologies for--
                                  (I) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                                  (V) expediting the planning 
                                and development of 
                                transportation projects; [and]
                                  (VI) the intermodal movement 
                                of individuals and freight[.]; 
                                and
                                  (VII) the use of green 
                                transportation infrastructure 
                                (as defined in section 5505A(g) 
                                of title 49) for environmental 
                                protection and mitigating 
                                environmental impacts of 
                                transportation construction.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (D) Interagency coordination.--The Institute 
                shall coordinate the development of curriculum 
                and courses with other Federal agencies with 
                expertise in the course subject areas.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (b) Local Technical Assistance Program.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Grants, cooperative agreements, and contracts.--
        The Secretary may make grants and enter into 
        cooperative agreements and contracts to provide 
        education and training, technical assistance, and 
        related support services to--
                  (A) assist rural, local transportation 
                agencies and tribal governments, and the 
                consultants and construction personnel working 
                for the agencies and governments, to--
                          (i) develop and expand expertise in 
                        road and transportation areas 
                        (including pavement, bridge, concrete 
                        structures, intermodal connections, 
                        safety management systems, intelligent 
                        transportation systems, incident 
                        response, operations, [and traffic 
                        safety countermeasures] traffic safety 
                        countermeasures, and options with 
                        respect to green transportation 
                        infrastructure (as defined in section 
                        5505A(g) of title 49));

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     XX. Committee Recommendations

    On February 27, 2008, the Committee on Science and 
Technology favorably reported the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act by a voice 
vote, and recommended its enactment.


 XXI: PROCEEDINGS OF THE MARKUP BY THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON TECHNOLOGY AND 
   INNOVATION ON H.R. 5161, THE GREEN TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE 
                  RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACT

                              ----------                              


                       THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2008

                  House of Representatives,
         Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 10:15 a.m., in 
Room 2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. David Wu 
[Chairman of the Subcommittee] presiding.
    Chairman Wu. Good morning. The Subcommittee on Technology 
and Innovation will now come to order. Pursuant to notice, the 
Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation meets to consider the 
following measures: H.R. 4847, the United States Fire 
Administration Reauthorization Act of 2007. It appears to me 
that we are no longer in 2007. Is that going to be an 
administrative amendment? Terrific--as read, 2007; H.R. 5161, 
the Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology 
Transfer Act, and H.R. 3916, To provide for the next generation 
of border and maritime security technologies.
    We will now proceed with the markup, beginning with opening 
statements, and the Chairman recognizes himself.
    First of all, I would like to welcome everyone to the first 
Science and Technology Committee markup of 2008. We had a very 
productive first session in 2007, and I am looking forward to 
working with my colleagues to pass more good legislation this 
year. Today we will be considering three bills, each of which 
deals with protecting and enhancing our nation's critical 
infrastructure our environment. H.R. 4847, introduced by the 
Vice Chair of the Subcommittee, Representative Mitchell, the 
gentleman from Arizona, and with Subcommittee Ranking Member 
Gingrey as an original co-sponsor, reauthorizes the United 
States Fire Administration. USFA is an important resource for 
our nation's firefighters, providing training, fire safety 
awareness for the public, data collection services, and fire-
suppression and prevention research and technology. I am 
pleased we are considering H.R. 4847 today, a bill worked on 
hard by both Republicans and Democrats, and will authorize USFA 
to continue its role as a leader and resource for the Nation's 
fire service, and help enable firefighters to meet the dynamic 
and growing mission of the fire service in the 21st century.
    We will also be considering H.R. 5161, the Green 
Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer 
Act. As you may remember, this past May, we heard from the 
Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of 
Transportation, as well as local governments and industry. They 
agreed that we have a great opportunity in this country to 
manage and protect our water resources through the use of 
innovative technologies and also serve as transportation 
infrastructure and as means for managing and filtering 
stormwater runoff.
    The EPA witness, Assistant Administrator for Water, Ben 
Grumbles, is already making a great effort to promote the 
expanded use of such infrastructure around the U.S., but he and 
the other witnesses found a number of barriers, which this bill 
works to overcome through research and education programs at 
the U.S. Department of Transportation.
    Finally, H.R. 3916, introduced by Ranking Member Hall, 
authorizes programs at the Department of Homeland Security to 
improve the technology used to protect the Nation's borders and 
ports of entry. Border security officers have an incredibly 
difficult job. It is part law enforcement, part first 
responder, part diplomat, and part detective. It is clear that 
these agents need the help of new technology to do their jobs 
better and to make our borders more secure. Technology can act 
as additional eyes and ears for Border Patrol agents.
    This bill has special importance for me, as these 
technologies help reinforce security efforts at ports in 
addition to land borders. The Port of Portland processed more 
than fourteen million tons of cargo in 2007, and our 
international airport also screened in a number of people 
coming in from overseas. I know that the hardworking officers 
managing security at the Port of Portland could use the 
assistance of these innovative technologies.
    These three bills share an important common theme: the use 
of research and technology to solve some of our nation's most 
pressing problems. I am eager to join my colleagues on both 
sides of the aisle in advancing these important objectives.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Wu follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chairman David Wu
    First of all, I'd like to welcome everyone to the first Science and 
Technology Committee markup of 2008. We had a very productive first 
session, and I'm looking forward to working with my colleagues to pass 
good legislation this year. Today we will be considering three bills, 
each of which deals with protecting and enhancing our nation's critical 
infrastructure and environment.
    H.R. 4847, introduced by the Vice Chair of the Subcommittee, 
Representative Mitchell, and with Subcommittee Ranking Member Gingrey 
as an original co-sponsor, reauthorizes the U.S. Fire Administration. 
The U.S. Fire Administration is an important resource for our nation's 
firefighters, providing training, fire safety awareness for the public, 
data collection services, and fire suppression and prevention research 
and technology.
    I am pleased we are considering H.R. 4847 today, a bipartisan piece 
of legislation that will authorize USFA to continue its role as a 
leader and resource for the Nation's firefighters, and help 
firefighters save lives and meet the dynamic mission of the fire 
service in the 21st century.
    We will also be considering H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act. This past May this 
subcommittee held a hearing that included witnesses from the 
Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Transportation, 
and representatives of local government and industry. The witnesses 
agreed that we have a great opportunity to manage and protect our 
nation's water resources by using of innovative techniques and 
technologies that simultaneously serve as transportation infrastructure 
and as means for managing and filtering stormwater.
    The EPA witness, Assistant Administrator for Water Ben Grumbles, is 
already making great efforts to promote the expanded use of green 
infrastructure around the U.S. But he and the other witnesses described 
a number of barriers, which this bill works to overcome through 
research and education efforts at the U.S. Department of 
Transportation.
    Finally, H.R. 3916, introduced by Ranking Member Hall, authorizes 
programs at the Department of Homeland Security to improve the 
technology used to protect the Nation's borders and ports of entry. 
Border security officers have an incredibly difficult job. It is part 
law enforcement, part first responder, part diplomat, and part 
detective. It is clear that these agents need the help of new 
technology to do their jobs better and to make our borders more secure. 
Technology can act as additional eyes and ears for Border Patrol 
agents.
    This bill has special importance for me, as these technologies help 
reinforce security efforts at ports in addition to land borders. The 
Port of Portland processed more than fourteen million tons of cargo in 
2007, and I know that the hardworking officers managing security there 
could use the assistance these innovative technologies would provide.
    These three bills share an important common theme--the use of 
research and technology to solve some of our nation's most pressing 
problems. I'm eager to join my colleagues on both sides of the aisle in 
advancing this important legislation.

    Chairman Wu. And now, I recognize the Ranking Member of the 
Subcommittee, Dr. Gingrey, the gentleman from Georgia, to 
present his opening remarks.
    Mr. Gingrey. Chairman Wu, I thank you for holding this 
subcommittee markup on the three pieces of legislation that 
address a wide range of issues under the jurisdiction of the 
Technology and Innovation Subcommittee. We have the privilege 
today to be conducting the Science Committee's first official 
business of the year, and the 2nd session of 110th Congress.
    Today, we consider H.R. 4847, the United States Fire 
Administration Reauthorization Act of 2007; H.R. 5161, the 
Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology 
Transfer Act; and finally, H.R. 3916, a border-security 
technology bill.
    As we consider each piece of legislation, we will reaffirm 
that the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee plays an 
important role in a number of issues urgently facing our 
country. Today, we will be examining issues facing first 
responders in local communities on a daily basis, the impact 
that our transportation infrastructure has on the contamination 
of our water supplies, and developing the next-generation 
technologies for the Federal Government to keep our borders 
secure.
    Mr. Chairman, I want to also thank you for the way the 
Subcommittee has conducted the process by which each piece of 
legislation is being considered today. Each of the bills being 
marked up today has gone through a--what we all refer to and 
know as regular order. The Subcommittee held an individual 
hearing on each bill, last year in 2007, and that provided 
Members with the opportunity to ask questions of these experts, 
in order for us to be better informed as we crafted each bill 
to, hopefully, perfection or near-perfection.
    Furthermore, Mr. Chairman, I want to thank you. I want to 
thank you for allowing us to work in a bipartisan manner on 
each piece of legislation. As these three bills demonstrate, we 
can accomplish more for the American people when Republicans 
and Democrats work together. Mr. Chairman, I applaud you and 
your staff for working with me and my Republican staff on the 
Committee to balance all perspectives to make these bills sound 
policy.
    So Mr. Chairman, I hope this markup is an indication of how 
we can expect the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee to 
continue to operate throughout the year 2008. I look forward to 
working with you on these issues that we will discuss and 
debate today, as well as other matters that will come before 
the Subcommittee for the rest of this year.
    And with that, Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Gingrey follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Phil Gingrey
    Chairman Wu, I want to thank you for holding this subcommittee 
mark-up on three pieces of legislation that address a wide range of 
issues under the jurisdiction of the Technology and Innovation 
Subcommittee. We have the privilege today to be conducting the Science 
Committee's first official business of this year and the 2nd Session of 
the 110th Congress.
    Today, we consider H.R. 4847, the United States Fire Administration 
Reauthorization Act of 2007; H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act; and H.R. 3916, a 
border security technology bill.
    As we consider each piece of legislation, we will reaffirm that the 
Technology and Innovation Subcommittee plays an important role in a 
number of issues currently facing our country. Today, we will be 
examining issues facing first responders in local communities on a 
daily basis; the impact that our transportation infrastructure has on 
the contamination of our water supplies; and developing next generation 
technologies for the Federal Government to keep our borders secure.
    Mr. Chairman, I want to also thank you for the way the Subcommittee 
has conducted the process by which each piece of legislation is being 
considered today. Each of the bills being marked up today has gone 
through regular order. The Subcommittee held an individual hearing on 
each bill in 2007, providing Members the opportunity to ask questions 
of the experts in order for us to be better informed as we crafted each 
bill. Furthermore Mr. Chairman, I also want to thank you for allowing 
us to work in a bipartisan manner on each piece of legislation. As 
these three bills demonstrate, we can accomplish more for the American 
people when Republicans and Democrats work together. Mr. Chairman, I 
applaud you and your staff for working with me and the Republican staff 
on the Committee to balance all perspectives to make these bills into 
sound policy. Mr. Chairman, I hope that this markup is an indication of 
how we can expect the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee to 
continue to operate throughout 2008. I look forward to working with you 
on these issues that we will discuss and debate today, as well as other 
matters that will come before the Subcommittee for the rest of the 
year.
    With that Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Wu. Thank you very much, Dr. Gingrey, and without 
objection, Members may place statement may place statements in 
the record at this point.
    We will now move to consider H.R. 5161, the Green 
Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer 
Act.
    And I yield myself five minutes to describe this bill.
    H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure Research 
and Technology Transfer Act, authorizes research and education 
programs within the Federal Highway Administration and the 
Research and Innovative Technology Administration at university 
transportation centers.
    Green infrastructure includes materials and design 
techniques that help mitigate water pollution by managing, 
reducing, and filtering runoff. These programs at the 
Department of Transportation will advance the understanding of 
the benefits of green transportation infrastructure and its 
impact on the environment and help policy-makers and builders 
make smart decisions about where and how to include green 
infrastructure in their transportation systems.
    The activities can include research and development of 
green infrastructure technologies, technology-transfer 
programs, assessment of the impact of regulations on the 
adoption of these green technologies at a local level, and 
education campaigns. The bill also authorizes FWHA to 
incorporate green infrastructure design-and-construction 
training in the National Highway Institute curriculum, which is 
offered to state and local highway contractors and workers.
    The green transportation infrastructure is a simple, 
exciting, potentially cost-saving set of technologies that can 
help solve substantial pollution problems in our communities 
while increasing energy efficiency. I look forward to working 
with Members of the Committee and Subcommittee to pass this 
legislation. And I now recognize Dr. Gingrey to present any 
remarks he may have on this legislation.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Wu follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chairman David Wu
    This past May, the Technology and Innovation subcommittee held a 
hearing that included witnesses from the Environmental Protection 
Agency, the U.S. Department of Transportation, and representatives of 
local government and industry. The witnesses agreed that we have a 
great opportunity to manage and protect our nation's water resources 
through the use of innovative techniques and technologies that 
simultaneously serve as transportation infrastructure and as means for 
managing and filtering stormwater. Green infrastructure includes 
materials and design techniques that help mitigate water pollution by 
managing and filtering runoff. The EPA witness at the May hearing, 
Assistant Administrator for Water Ben Grumbles, is already making great 
efforts to promote the expanded use of green infrastructure around the 
U.S. But he and the other witnesses described a number of barriers to 
implementing green infrastructure programs around the United States; 
barriers which this bill works to overcome through research and 
education efforts at the U.S. Department of Transportation.
    H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and 
Technology Transfer Act, authorizes research and education programs 
within the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Research and 
Innovative Technology Administration (RITA)'s University Transportation 
Centers.
    These new programs at the Department of Transportation will advance 
the understanding of the benefits of green transportation 
infrastructure and its impact on the environment, and help policy-
makers and builders make smart decisions about where and how to include 
green infrastructure in their transportation systems. The bill 
authorizes grants to existing University Transportation Centers for 
research and development of green infrastructure technologies; 
technology transfer programs; assessment of the impact of regulations 
on the adoption of these green technologies at a local level; and 
education campaigns aimed at local officials and builders.
    The bill also authorizes FWHA to incorporate green infrastructure 
design and construction training in the National Highway Institute 
(NHI) curriculum which is offered to State and local highway 
contractors and workers.
    Green transportation infrastructure is a simple and exciting set of 
technologies that can help solve substantial pollution problems in our 
communities, while increasing energy efficiency and potentially 
decreasing total cost. I look forward to working with Members of the 
Committee to pass this bill.

    Mr. Gingrey. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I commend you for 
bringing forward this legislation, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act, that 
address an overlooked and important water contamination and 
pollution problem in our country, and I am glad to be working 
with you on this issue.
    While we all know that the Nation's roads and highways are 
a vital part of our transportation infrastructure, few realize 
the persistent problem that can be created due to rainwater 
runoff from these asphalt and concrete pavements. As rainwater 
flows along the surface of our highways, it accumulates and 
carries pollutants, such as oil and grease from the vehicles 
that pass overhead. Left unchecked, this water, along with 
these pollutants, unfortunately finds its way into our 
freshwater lakes, our rivers, and our aquifers. This runoff is 
part of what is known as non-point-source pollution, and it is 
currently the leading cause of water quality problems. 
Additionally, these pollutants can have a tremendous impact on 
freshwater ecosystems and have the potential of becoming a part 
of drinking water supplies across the country.
    Mr. Chairman, the importance of adequate freshwater 
supplies is not lost on me. The State of Georgia, as I think 
most of you know, is still suffering from the effects of last 
year's historic drought and more is predicted for this year. 
The most serious and immediate problem has been the dwindling 
water supply at our reservoirs, which are critical to the water 
supply of millions of people in North Georgia, metropolitan 
Atlanta, and yes, downstream in the States of Alabama and 
Florida, and their businesses.
    Mr. Chairman, for the areas in the Northwest and Georgia 
and across the country that have been affected by severe 
drought over this past year, it is imperative to keep our 
precious freshwater supplies free from contamination, and I am 
happy to see that your legislation addresses these very serious 
issues. H.R. 5161 provides the direction and the means by which 
existing university transportation centers can develop the 
technologies and the methods needed to help mitigate water 
pollution caused by our roads and our highways. Additionally, 
this legislation provides for the dissemination of information 
through technology-transfer programs by using grants, 
partnerships, and collaboration between university 
transportation centers, this bill works to ensure clean 
freshwater supplies for our nation by limiting the presence of 
pollutants caused by runoff from our roads and our highways.
    Mr. Chairman, thank you again for bringing forward this 
legislation, and I urge all of my colleagues on the 
subcommittee to support H.R. 5161. And I yield back.
    Chairman Wu. Thank you very much, Dr. Gingrey. Does anyone 
else wish to be recognized?
    I ask unanimous consent that the bill is considered as read 
and open to amendment at any point and that Members proceed 
with amendments in the order of the roster. Without objection, 
so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from Michigan, Dr. Ehlers. Are you ready to 
proceed with your amendment?
    Mr. Ehlers. Yes, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Wu. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. An amendment to H.R. 5161, offered by Mr. Ehlers 
of Michigan.
    Chairman Wu. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with the 
reading. Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman from Michigan for five minutes to 
explain his amendment.
    Mr. Ehlers. I thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I do want to 
indicate my support for the bill and list, in addition to the 
list of pollutants offered by Mr. Gingrey, who represents the 
South. I speak on behalf of the frozen North, and we have other 
pollutants which are used to try to melt the ice, sometimes 
salt, sometimes other combinations of chemicals, and these also 
do end up getting into the environment in various ways, so 
that's an additional reason to support the bill.
    My amendment is a relatively minor one, having to do with 
the technical aspects of the bill, and having the research 
done, instead of having it open to all universities, my bill 
would provide that it be done through the 60 university 
transportation centers which we already have throughout the 
country. They have been established to perform transportation-
related research, and by using the funds from this bill at the 
transportation centers, you actually can save money because the 
grants, instead of going to centers which would have to use 
part of the grant money to establish the mechanisms for 
research, by sending it to current University Technology 
centers, you are eliminating some of the overhead that you 
might encounter if it were made available to all individuals. 
The university transportation centers have been established for 
a number of years in some cases, but there are a number of them 
which were developed just recently as a result of the safety 
legislation we passed.
    I ask for the support of the amendment. I think it would 
make for the use of the funds from the bill more efficient, and 
would achieve better results, because it would go to people who 
are constantly dealing with transportation issues. Also as a 
Member of the Transportation Committee, I would say that I am 
sure that if this bill is jointly referred to the 
Transportation Committee, it would make it much more likely 
that this bill will zoom through the Transportation Committee 
without them making major changes to it, so I hope that this 
will help.
    With that, I yield back.
    Chairman Wu. I thank the gentleman from Michigan, and it is 
my intention to support the amendment.
    Is there any further discussion on the amendment? If not--I 
recognize the gentleman from Texas.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I will be brief. I just want to 
express my support and the support of this side for the 
amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan, Dr. Ehlers.
    His amendment improves the legislation by directing the 
efforts to develop contaminated rainwater runoff mitigation 
techniques through existing university transportation centers, 
and that is where we already know the needed expertise exists. 
And additionally, Dr. Ehlers's amendment also authorizes 
reasonable funds to accomplish the task of these university 
transportation centers that are set forth in this bill.
    Mr. Chairman, it is a good amendment, and I urge our 
colleagues on this side to support the amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Wu. Thank you very much, Mr. Hall, and actually, 
Mr. Hall would you care to yield some of your time before 
yielding it back to Dr. Ehlers. I believe Dr. Ehlers has----
    Mr. Hall. I would be honored to yield. I reserve the 
balance of my time, and I yield at this time to Dr. Ehlers.
    Mr. Ehlers. I thank the gentleman for yielding.
    Just a few additional points, not directly relating to the 
bill, but it is important to recognize the difficulties that we 
face in what I earlier called the frozen North. There is a lot 
of news today about Wisconsin having had a big snowfall and 
freeways to a standstill and so forth. In Michigan, we deal 
with that amount of snow in a couple of weeks, and it brings 
unique problems to the North, and particularly unique 
environmental problems. Currently, as of this week--or as of 
yesterday, in fact--we received some more snow, and we are, I 
think, now up to 54 inches in my hometown of Grand Rapids for 
the season, and we expect to hit 80, perhaps 90. That creates 
unique demands and creates unique dangers for the environment 
in the way it is handled. And this is just an example. I am 
sure in Oregon, you have that in the mountainous areas; in 
Washington, even more so.
    So I think this bill will really be very helpful to these 
states in dealing with the problem. In addition, Michigan has 
an incredible freeze/thaw cycle. We get snow, and it melts; we 
get snow; it melts. And that is murderous for the roads, and so 
a lot of repairs have to be done, which also have a chance for 
environmental pollution, because they involve just putting--
because you can't lay asphalt in the middle of the winter, it 
involves putting the asphalt down in a way that means it gets 
into the environment pretty readily.
    So there is a lot of work that needs to be done here, and I 
commend you for offering this bill, and I thank Mr. Hall for 
yielding and for his support of the amendment.
    Mr. Hall. I really and truly yield back the balance of my 
time.
    Chairman Wu. Thank you very much, and I thank both 
gentleman, and particularly the gentleman from Michigan for 
this amendment, which I do support.
    The weather at sea level in Oregon is one kind of weather. 
I have a different weather, where I am, about 800 or 1,000 feet 
up in the Portland Metropolitan area. I have a little freeze/
thaw cycle demonstration going on in my driveway, and if you 
are 4,000 or 6,000 in Oregon, you have an entirely different 
climate at this time of year to deal with. And I think the 
gentleman from Michigan properly points out that the current 
transportation research centers are regionally distributed to 
deal with the differing problems of the different regions, but 
also interconnected in a way so that they can share data, so 
that folks in, say, Redmond Oregon can get the data that they 
need from, perhaps, a center in Michigan on freeze/thaw cycles, 
which may be similar.
    Are there any other comments or statements on this 
amendment? Hearing none, the vote occurs on the amendment. All 
in favor, please, say aye. Those opposed, say no. The ayes have 
it, and the amendment is agreed to.
    Are there any other amendments? Hearing none, the vote is 
on the bill H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure 
Research and Technology Transfer Act, as amended. All of those 
in favor will say aye. All those opposed will say no. In the 
opinion of the Chair, the ayes have it.
    I will now recognize Mr. Hall to make a motion.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Subcommittee 
favorably report H.R. 5161, as amended, to the Full Committee. 
Furthermore, I move that staff be instructed to prepare the 
Subcommittee legislative report and make necessary technical 
and conforming changes to the bill, as amended, in accordance 
with the recommendation of the Subcommittee. I yield back.
    Chairman Wu. The question is on the motion to report the 
bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify by 
saying aye; opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the bill is 
favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon 
the table. Subcommittee Members may submit additional or 
Minority views on the measure.
    I want to thank Members of the Committee and the 
Subcommittee for their attendance, and with our typical, 
across-the-aisle-workmanship is not the right term, but our 
work across the aisle, and our head-spinning efficiency. We 
have again moved multiple pieces of legislation and conclude 
this subcommittee markup. Thank you all very much.
    [Whereupon, at 11:05 a.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


        H.R. 5161, Section-by-Section Analysis, Amendment Roster






                     Section-by-Section Analysis of
           H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure
                  Research and Technology Transfer Act

Sec. 1. Short Title

    ``Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology 
Transfer Act''

Sec. 2. Findings

    Finds that innovative transportation infrastructure can be used to 
mitigate water pollution, and that technical and social barriers to 
implementing these technologies can be overcome with research and 
technology transfer assistance from the U.S. Department of 
Transportation.

Sec. 3. Regional Green Transportation Research Centers

    Amends the existing authorization for university transportation 
centers to create centers focusing on green transportation 
infrastructure in regions around the U.S. The objectives of these 
centers include developing innovative transportation infrastructure 
technologies that mitigate environmental damage from runoff, and 
encouraging governments to adopt these technologies and integrate them 
into existing infrastructure through technology transfer programs.
    Activities will include: 1) research and development of green 
infrastructure technologies, techniques and best management practices; 
2) establishment of a technology transfer program; 3) assessment of the 
impact of regulations on the adoption of green transportation 
infrastructure locally; and 4) public education efforts for local 
decision-makers.
    Grant recipients will be selected on a competitive basis, with 
preference given to those applicants demonstrating expertise in 
transportation and green infrastructure research, existing partnerships 
with State and local governments, and technology transfer programs.
    Defines green transportation infrastructure as infrastructure that 
preserves and restores natural processes and landforms, uses natural 
design techniques to manage stormwater; and minimizes life cycle energy 
consumption and air pollution.
    Authorizes such sums as may be necessary to carry out this section.

Sec. 4. Green transportation infrastructure amendments

    Amends authorization of the Federal Highway Administration's 
National Highway Institute (NHI) to include green transportation 
infrastructure as a course topic. Instructs NHI to collaborate with 
other federal agencies with expertise in this field when designing 
curriculum.




XXII: PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP ON H.R. 5161, THE GREEN 
   TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ACT

                              ----------                              


                      WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2008

                  House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.

    The Committee met, pursuant to call, at 10:06 a.m., in Room 
2318 of the Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Bart Gordon 
[Chairman of the Committee] presiding.
    Chairman Gordon. The Committee will come to order pursuant 
to notice the Committee on Science and Technology meets to 
consider the following measures: H.R. 4847, the United States 
Fire Administration Reauthorization Act of 2007; H.R. 5161, the 
Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology 
Transfer Act; and H.R. 3916, To provide for the next generation 
of border and maritime security technologies.
    I would like to welcome everyone to this morning's markup, 
the first Full Committee markup of 2008. Today we will consider 
the three bills reported out of the Technology and Innovation 
Subcommittee with unanimous support. These three bills deal 
with public safety, improving the environment and border 
security, addressing some of the Nation's most pressing issues.
    H.R. 4847, introduced by the Vice Chair of the 
Subcommittee, Representative Mitchell, and co-sponsored by the 
Subcommittee Ranking Member Gingrey, reauthorizes the U.S. Fire 
Administration.
    The U.S. Fire Administration is an important resource for 
our nation's firefighters, providing training, fire safety 
awareness for the public, data collection, and R&D; on fire 
suppression and prevention research and technology.
    This important bill will help ensure the continued success 
of the USFA in its mission to protect lives and property from 
fire.
    We will also consider H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act, introduced 
by Chairman Wu.
    This bipartisan bill supports the development and use of 
green technology to protect our nation's water supply through 
innovative technologies and materials that can be integrated 
into transportation infrastructure such as roads and parking 
lots. By filtering stormwater and slowing runoff, green 
infrastructure mitigates pollution while saving money and 
energy.
    The bill builds upon the good work going on now in the 
Department of Transportation to promote green infrastructure 
widespread use.
    Finally, H.R. 3916, introduced by Ranking Member Hall, 
authorizes programs at the Department of Homeland Security to 
improve technology used to protect the Nation's borders and 
ports of entry.
    Border Patrol agents are responsible for securing nearly 
7,000 miles of land borders to the north and south, as well as 
95,000 miles of shoreline. Technology can play a vital role in 
extending observational capabilities, helping Border Patrol 
agents locate suspects, and monitor the border more 
efficiently.
    Mr. Hall's bill authorizes important programs to enhance 
the Border Patrol's ability to carry out its mission by 
supporting short- and long-term research priorities. It also 
ensures that new technologies will be useful to Border Patrol 
agents by mandating that DHS work to meet cost and training 
needs to end-users when developing these technologies.
    I want to commend the T&I; Subcommittee for bringing these 
issues to the Committee's attention. All three of these bills 
were developed via a regular order process of identifying the 
problem, holding a hearing, and then developing legislation.
    I strongly support each of these bills and look forward to 
working with my colleagues on the Committee to advance this 
important legislation.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Gordon follows:]
               Prepared Statement of Chairman Bart Gordon

Full Committee Mark-Up:

 H.R. 4847, the United States Fire Administration 
Reauthorization Act of 2007;

  H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure Research 
and Technology Transfer Act;

 H.R. 3916, To provide for the next generation of border and 
maritime security technologies

    I'd like to welcome everyone to this morning's markup, the first 
Full Committee markup of 2008.
    Today we will consider three bills reported out of the Technology 
and Innovation Subcommittee with unanimous support. These three bills 
deal with public safety, improving the environment and border 
security--addressing some of the Nation's most pressing issues.
    H.R. 4847, introduced by the Vice Chair of the Subcommittee, 
Representative Mitchell, and co-sponsored by Subcommittee Ranking 
Member Gingrey, reauthorizes the U.S. Fire Administration. The U.S. 
Fire Administration is an important resource for our nation's 
firefighters, providing training, fire safety awareness for the public, 
data collection, and R&D; on fire suppression and prevention research 
and technology. This important bill will help ensure the continued 
success of the USFA in its mission to protect lives and property from 
fire.
    We will also consider H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act, introduced by 
Chairman Wu. This bipartisan bill supports the development and use of 
green technology to protect our nation's water supply through 
innovative techniques and materials that can be integrated into 
transportation infrastructure such as roads and parking lots. By 
filtering stormwater and slowing runoff, green infrastructure mitigates 
pollution while saving money and energy. This bill builds upon the good 
work going on at the Department of Transportation to promote green 
infrastructure's widespread use.
    Finally, H.R. 3916, introduced by Ranking Member Hall, authorizes 
programs at the Department of Homeland Security to improve the 
technology used to protect the Nation's borders and ports of entry. 
Border Patrol agents are responsible for securing nearly seven thousand 
miles of land borders to the North and South, as well as ninety-five 
thousand miles of shoreline. While our current corps of Border Patrol 
agents is doing a commendable job, their job is daunting. Technology 
can play a vital role in extending observational capabilities, helping 
Border Patrol agents locate suspects and monitor the border more 
effectively.
    Mr. Hall's bill authorizes important programs to enhance the Border 
Patrol's ability to carry out its mission by supporting short- and 
long-term research priorities. It also ensures that new technologies 
will be useful to Border Patrol agents by mandating that DHS work to 
meet cost and training needs of end-users when developing these 
technologies.
    I want to commend the T&I; Subcommittee for bringing these issues to 
the Committee's attention. All three of these bills were developed via 
a regular order process of identifying the problem, holding a hearing, 
and then developing legislation.
    I strongly support each of these bills, and look forward to working 
with my colleagues on the Committee to advance this important 
legislation.

    Chairman Gordon. I now recognize Mr. Hall to present his 
opening remarks.
    Mr. Hall. I thank you, Chairman Gordon. I am looking 
forward to a productive start for the Committee in this second 
session of the 110th Congress.
    Today the Full Committee is considering three bills 
previously considered by the Technology and Innovation 
Subcommittee. As you have said to begin with, we will be 
considering the reauthorization for the United States Fire 
Administration. USFA provides critical support to our nation's 
firefighters through training, through research and 
development, and logistical support. This is an extremely 
important agency in this committee's jurisdiction, and I would 
like to thank Mr. Mitchell and Dr. Gingrey for their hard work 
over the past few months on this matter.
    Now, we will be considering Mr. Wu's Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Bill, which provides funding for the Department 
of Transportation's University Transportation Centers to 
examine and hopefully implement technologies that significantly 
reduce non-point source water pollution from our roadways and 
other paved surfaces.
    Finally, H.R. 3916, a bill near and dear to me, focuses on 
the technology needs for the Border Patrol and the U.S. Coast 
Guard. I started writing this bill last year in response to a 
real need to develop and employ next generation technologies to 
help secure our border. I am pleased that many Members of the 
Committee on both sides of the aisle have co-sponsored this 
bill, and I would like to thank all of you for supporting my 
bill. I thank you, Chairman Gordon, specifically for your 
support and guidance.
    These are all significant pieces of legislation that the 
Committee can be proud of advancing. I look forward to working 
with Chairman Gordon to ensure that these bills continue to 
progress through their other committee referrals and onto the 
House Floor.
    I yield back.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Thank you Chairman Gordon, I'm looking forward to a productive 
start for the Committee in this second session of the 110th Congress. 
Today the Full Committee is considering three bills previously 
considered by the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee. To begin 
we'll be considering the reauthorization for the United States Fire 
Administration (USFA). USFA provides critical support to our nation's 
firefighters through training, research and development, and logistical 
support. This is an extremely important agency in this committee's 
jurisdiction and I'd like to thank Mr. Mitchell and Dr. Gingrey for 
their hard work over the past few months on this matter.
    Next we'll be considering Mr. Wu's green transportation 
infrastructure bill, which provides funding for the Department of 
Transportation's University Transportation Centers to examine and 
hopefully implement technologies that significantly reduce non-point 
source water pollution from our roadways and other paved surfaces.
    Finally, H.R. 3916, a bill near and dear to me, focuses on the 
technology needs of the Border Patrol and U.S. Coast Guard. I began 
writing this bill last year in response to a real need to develop and 
employ next generation technologies to help secure our border. I'm 
pleased that many Members of this committee on both sides of the aisle 
have co-sponsored the bill and I'd like to thank all of you for 
supporting my bill.
    These are all significant pieces of legislation that the Committee 
can be proud of advancing. I look forward to working with Chairman 
Gordon to ensure that these bills continue to progress through their 
other Committee referrals and onto the House Floor.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Hall. You can be assured 
that we will all be working together to see these bills go to 
the Floor and then find a way to the Senate.
    We will now consider H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act.
    I yield to the Chairman of the Technology and Innovation 
Subcommittee, Mr. Wu, five minutes to describe his bill.
    Mr. Wu. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    In May of last year, the Technology and Innovation 
Subcommittee held a hearing on Green Transportation 
Infrastructure, challenges to access and implementation. It 
includes witnesses from the Environmental Protection Agency, 
the U.S. Department of Transportation, and representatives from 
local government and private industry.
    The witnesses agreed that we have a great opportunity to 
manage and protect our nation's water resources through the use 
of innovative techniques and technologies that are 
simultaneously a part of transportation infrastructure and a 
means for managing and filtering stormwater. Green 
infrastructure includes materials and design techniques that 
help mitigate water pollution by managing and filtering runoff.
    The EPA witness at the May hearing, Assistant Administrator 
for Water, Ben Grumbles, is already making great efforts to 
promote the use of green infrastructure around the United 
States. But he and the other witnesses described a number of 
barriers to implementation of green programs; barriers which 
this bill works to overcome through research and education 
efforts at the U.S. Department of Transportation.
    H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure Research 
and Technology Transfer Act, authorizes research and education 
programs within the Federal Highway Administration and Research 
and Innovative Technology Administration's University 
Transportation Centers.
    These new programs at the Department of Transportation will 
advance the understanding of the benefits of green 
transportation infrastructure and its impact on the environment 
and help policy-makers and builders make informed decisions 
about where and how to include green infrastructure in their 
transportation systems.
    The bill authorizes grants to existing University 
Transportation Centers for research and development of green 
infrastructure technologies, technology transfer programs, 
assessment of the impact of regulations on the adoption of 
these green technologies at a local level, and education 
campaigns aimed at local officials and builders.
    I will offer a manager's amendment today that will allow 
other universities with existing expertise in green 
infrastructure to form consortia with University Transportation 
Centers.
    The bill also authorizes FWHA to incorporate green 
infrastructure design and construction training in the National 
Highway Institute curriculum, which is offered to State and 
local highway contractors and workers.
    Green transportation infrastructure is a simple and 
exciting set of technologies that can help solve substantial 
pollution problems in our communities while increasing energy 
efficiency and potentially decreasing total costs.
    I look forward to working with Members of the Committee to 
pass this bill. I greatly appreciate the cooperation of Members 
on both sides of the aisle, and I strongly urge every Committee 
Member to support this commonsense legislation.
    I yield back the balance of my time.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Wu follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chairman David Wu
    Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    This past May, the Technology and Innovation Subcommittee held a 
hearing entitled ``Green Transportation Infrastructure: Challenges to 
Access and Implementation'' that included witnesses from the 
Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Transportation, 
and representatives of local government and industry.
    The witnesses agreed that we have a great opportunity to manage and 
protect our nation's water resources through the use of innovative 
techniques and technologies that are simultaneously a part of 
transportation infrastructure and as means for managing and filtering 
stormwater.
    Green infrastructure includes materials and design techniques that 
help mitigate water pollution by managing and filtering runoff.
    The EPA witness at the May hearing, Assistant Administrator for 
Water Ben Grumbles, is already making great efforts to promote the use 
of green infrastructure around the U.S. But he and the other witnesses 
described a number of barriers to implementing green infrastructure 
programs; barriers which this bill works to overcome through research 
and education efforts at the U.S. Department of Transportation.
    H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and 
Technology Transfer Act authorizes research and education programs 
within the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and Research and 
Innovative Technology Administration (RITA)'s University Transportation 
Centers.
    These new programs at the Department of Transportation will advance 
the understanding of the benefits of green transportation 
infrastructure and its impact on the environment, and help policy-
makers and builders make informed decisions about where and how to 
include green infrastructure in their transportation systems.
    The bill authorizes grants to existing University Transportation 
Centers for research and development of green infrastructure 
technologies; technology transfer programs; assessment of the impact of 
regulations on the adoption of these green technologies at a local 
level; and education campaigns aimed at local officials and builders.
    I will offer a manager's amendment today that will allow other 
universities with expertise in green infrastructure to form consortia 
with University Transportation Centers.
    The bill also authorizes FWHA to incorporate green infrastructure 
design and construction training in the National Highway Institute 
(NHI) curriculum which is offered to State and local highway 
contractors and workers.
    Green transportation infrastructure is a simple and exciting set of 
technologies that can help solve substantial pollution problems in our 
communities, while increasing energy efficiency and potentially 
decreasing total cost. I look forward to working with Members of the 
Committee to pass this bill. I strongly urge every Committee Member to 
support this common sense bill.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Wu. It is my understanding 
we are going to be having votes in about 10 or 15 minutes, but 
I think we have time to complete these important bills.
    Mr. Hall, you are recognized.
    Mr. Hall. That is the Chairman's instructions to be brief.
    This bill provides direction exactly as Mr. Wu indicated. 
It provides for dissemination additionally of information 
through Technology Transfer Programs and also encourages State 
and local governments and private industry to adopt green 
infrastructure systems and construction techniques.
    I would have preferred to stick with the language of the 
Ehlers amendment that was agreed to in Subcommittee. It was, 
but I understand the Majority's desire to ensure that relevant 
expertise at other institutions may be included at the 
discretion of current UTCs.
    So I don't oppose the gentleman's amendment. I support his 
amendment, and I thank you, again, for bringing this 
legislation.
    [The prepared statement of Mr. Hall follows:]
           Prepared Statement of Representative Ralph M. Hall
    Statement on H.R. 5161 and Manager's Amendment
    Mr. Chairman, thank you for bringing forward this legislation--the 
Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer 
Act--that provides a way to develop more ecologically friendly highways 
and other transportation infrastructure.
    H.R. 5161 provides the direction and means by which existing 
university transportation centers can develop the technologies and 
methods needed to help mitigate water pollution due to rainwater runoff 
from our roads and highways, reduce the impact of our transportation 
infrastructure on the environment, and decrease the energy needed to 
construct and maintain our transportation infrastructure.
    Additionally, this legislation provides for the dissemination of 
information through technology transfer programs and also encourages 
State and local governments, and private industry to adopt green 
infrastructure systems and construction techniques. By using grants, 
partnerships and collaboration between university transportation 
centers, this bill works to ensure that our nation's transportation 
system will become more environmentally friendly.
    Mr. Wu will be proposing an amendment to ensure that university 
transportation centers have flexibility to include additional 
institutions of higher education. I would prefer to stick to the 
language in the Ehlers amendment that was agreed to in Subcommittee, 
but understand the Majority's desire to ensure that relevant expertise 
at other institutions may be included at the discretion of current 
UTCs. Therefore, I will not oppose the gentleman's amendment.
    Mr. Chairman, thank you again for bringing this legislation before 
us. I urge all of my colleagues on the Committee to support H.R. 5161 
and the amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Hall.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    Ms. Johnson, who is an important lady, because she is going 
to be dealing with this in the Transportation Committee.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I simply want to 
thank you and Mr. Wu and Mr. Hall. Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Ms. Johnson.
    Mr. Ehlers is recognized.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Just a brief comment 
on the one amendment by Mr. Wu.
    As you recall, during the Subcommittee markup, I added an 
amendment to require that the funding go to the University 
Transportation Center Program, which is a well-established 
program. I notice Mr. Wu has an amendment to expand that 
slightly to allow the University Transportation Centers to 
develop consortia with other universities with particular 
expertise in the topic before them. And I just want the 
Committee to know that I have no objection to that amendment. I 
think it actually, if the other universities involved have the 
appropriate expertise, it, in fact, could strengthen the 
program and still maintain the requirement that the funding go 
through the UTCs.
    So thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Dr. Ehlers.
    Does anyone else wish to be recognized?
    If not, then I ask unanimous consent that the resolution is 
considered as read and open to amendment at any point and that 
the Members proceed with the amendments in the order of the 
roster.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    The first amendment on the roster is the manager's 
amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon, Mr. Wu. Are you 
ready to proceed?
    Mr. Wu. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment number 001, amendment to H.R. 5161, 
offered by Mr. Wu of Oregon.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman from Oregon for five minutes to 
explain his amendment.
    Mr. Wu. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    This amendment makes a minor change to H.R. 5161, and the 
current language limits eligibility for green transportation 
infrastructure research grants to those universities already 
participating in the University Transportation Center Program. 
And this would allow more additional funding authorized by this 
bill to go towards research instead of additional overhead and 
administrative costs.
    My amendment makes a small change to H.R. 5161 to allow 
other universities, which may have existing expertise in 
related topics, to form consortia with existing UTCs in order 
to apply for grants.
    This amendment preserves the benefits of the earlier 
limitation but allows UTCs to take advantage of the expertise 
of researchers at other institutions.
    This amendment also clarifies that universities receiving 
grants must have strong relationships with local and State 
governments in discussing research priorities. As we heard 
during our May hearing and during our recent Subcommittee 
markup, the types of green transportation infrastructure that 
are most effective vary strongly from region to region, and the 
bill deliberately provides grants to universities in different 
parts of the country to address this regional variability, 
ensuring that State and local transportation officials who are 
intimately familiar with how their regional climate affects 
transportation infrastructure, that they are involved in 
research planning as another way to ensure that end-user needs 
are met by the research performed by UTCs.
    [The prepared statement of Chairman Wu follows:]
                Prepared Statement of Chairman David Wu
    Mr. Chairman, this amendment makes minor changes to H.R. 5161 which 
improve the Department of Transportation's ability to encourage the 
implementation of innovative, cost effective green transportation 
infrastructure.
    The current language limits eligibility for green transportation 
infrastructure research grants to those universities already 
participating in the University Transportation Center program, thus 
allowing more of the additional funding authorized in H.R. 5161 to go 
towards research instead of overhead and administrative costs.
    This amendment makes a small change to H.R. 5161, as amended, to 
allow other universities which may have expertise in related topics to 
form consortia with existing UTCs in order to apply for grants. This 
amendment preserves the benefits of the earlier limitation, but allows 
UTCs to take advantage of the expertise of researchers at other 
institutions with backgrounds in materials, engineering, design, and 
other fields related to green transportation infrastructure.
    This amendment also clarifies that universities receiving grants 
must have strong relationships with local and State governments for the 
purpose of discussing research priorities.
    As we heard during our May hearing and during our recent 
Subcommittee markup, the types of green transportation infrastructure 
that work most effectively vary from region to region.
    The bill deliberately provides grants to universities in different 
parts of the country to address this regional variability. Ensuring 
that State and local transportation officials, who are intimately 
familiar with how their regional climate affects transportation 
infrastructure, are involved in research planning is another way to 
ensure that end-user needs are met by the research performed by the 
UTCs.
    I have worked with the Republican Members of the Committee and 
appreciate their assistance and input. I encourage the Members to adopt 
this amendment.

    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Wu.
    Mr. Wu. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. Is there further discussion on the 
amendment?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor say, 
aye. Opposed, no. The amendment, the ayes have it. The 
amendment is agreed to.
    The second amendment on the roster is an amendment offered 
by the gentleman from South Carolina, Mr. Inglis. Are you ready 
to commence?
    Mr. Inglis. I am, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. The Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment number 041, amendment to H.R. 5161, 
offered by Mr. Inglis of South Carolina.
    Chairman Gordon. I ask unanimous consent to dispense with 
the reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    I recognize the gentleman from South Carolina for five 
minutes to explain his amendment.
    Mr. Inglis. And I will be briefer than that, Mr. Chairman, 
to say this, that we have, this amendment would make it so that 
industry and others in private sector could participate in the 
centers, both in the funding and in the progress of the 
research.
    As I understand it, that concept is best considered under 
safety reauthorization and so with the Chairman's commitment to 
work toward that end, to allow a cooperation between the 
private sector and the public sector, I would be happy to 
withdraw my amendment.
    Chairman Gordon. Thank you, Mr. Inglis. Oh, I am sorry. 
Okay. Excuse me. What was it?
    Mr. Inglis. What I was saying, Mr. Chairman, is that I 
understand it is probably best to consider this in SAFETEA09LU 
reauthorization, and therefore if the Chairman would join with 
me in an effort to make it possible for the private sector to 
participate, set up a structure so the private sector could 
participate in the funding and the research at these centers, 
then perhaps we could take it up as part of the SAFETEA 09LU 
reauthorization.
    Chairman Gordon. Certainly, Mr. Inglis. We welcome your 
suggestions, and we will continue to work through this, and we 
have a number of Members of the Transportation Committee on 
this committee also, and we will try to work with them.
    Mr. Inglis. I am happy to withdraw the amendment, Mr. 
Chairman.
    Chairman Gordon. And did you, the amendment is withdrawn. 
Did you have a second amendment?
    Mr. Inglis. Yes, I do.
    Chairman Gordon. Then the Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment number 042, amendment to H.R. 5161, 
offered by Mr. Inglis of South Carolina.
    Chairman Gordon. The third amendment on the roster is 
amendment offered by the--I ask unanimous--well, excuse me. I 
ask unanimous consent to dispense with the reading.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    And I recognize the gentleman from South Carolina for five 
minutes to explain his amendment.
    Mr. Inglis. And, Mr. Chairman, I believe these are some 
technical changes that your side has agreed to, so I hope in 
the interest of time we can proceed swiftly on these technical 
changes.
    Chairman Gordon. Mr. Inglis, you have done good inventing 
these, and they are approved.
    Is there further discussion?
    If no, the vote occurs on the amendment. All in favor, say 
aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it, and the amendment is agreed 
to.
    Are there other amendments?
    If no, then the vote is on the bill, H.R. 5161, as amended. 
All those in favor will say, aye. All opposed, no. In the 
opinion of the Chair the ayes have it.
    I recognize Mr. Baird for a motion.
    Mr. Baird. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee 
favorably report H.R. 5161, as amended, to the House with the 
recommendation that the bill do pass. Furthermore, I move that 
the staff be instructed to prepare the legislative report and 
make necessary technical and conforming changes, and that the 
Chairman take all necessary steps to bring the bill before the 
House for consideration.
    Chairman Gordon. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye. All opposed, aye. The ayes have it. The motion 
is favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion is reconsidered, to 
reconsider is laid upon the table. Members will have two 
subsequent calendar days in which to submit supplemental, 
Minority, or additional views on the measure, ending Monday, 
March the 3rd, at 9:00 a.m.
    I move pursuant to Clause 1 of Rule 22 of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives that the Committee authorize the 
Committee to offer such motions as may be necessary in the 
House to adopt and pass H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act, as 
amended.
    Without objection, so ordered.
    Let me make this suggestion. We have one more bill. Mr. 
Hall has put a lot of work into this bill, and you know, I 
don't think we should give it shortchange here.
    So we can either move forward, or we can move forward 
promptly, or we can go and have a vote.
    Mr. Hall. It has been suggested we do opening statements 
and then do amendments. If we are going to do that, we might as 
well come back.
    Chairman Gordon. Okay. And again, Mr. Hall has put a lot of 
time and effort into this important bill on----
    Mr. Hall. It is not my time. It is your time and the 
Committee's time. They have really worked hard on it, and I 
think their input----
    Chairman Gordon. I agree, and so this shouldn't be rushed. 
We have one vote. Let us go vote, and we will come back and 
proceed with this important amendment, important bill.
    [Whereupon, at 10:49 a.m. the Committee recessed, to 
reconvene at 11:10 a.m. the same day.]
    Let me thank the Members for coming back from the last 
vote. This was an important bill, and I appreciate your 
attendance. I want to thank the staff for the hard work that 
they have put in and the good work on doing this. I think we 
did a good day's work today, and I thank everyone.
    The meeting is adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 11:32 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]
                               Appendix:

                              ----------                              


   Subcommittee Markup Report, H.R. 5161 as amended, Amendment Roster




                  COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

               SUBCOMMITTEE ON TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

                    REPORT FROM SUBCOMMITTEE MARKUP

                            FEBRUARY 7, 2008

           H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation Infrastructure
                  Research and Technology Transfer Act

I. Purpose

    The purpose of this bill is to expand the use of green 
transportation infrastructure technologies through university research 
programs, public awareness campaigns, and training and technology 
transfer programs for builders and transportation policy-makers. The 
programs authorized in this bill are carried out by the Research and 
Innovative Technology Administration and Federal Highway Administration 
of the U.S. Department of Transportation.

II. Background and Need for Legislation

Environmental Problems Associated with Runoff
    Development of infrastructure, such as roads and parking lots, that 
are comprised of surfaces that are impervious to water can have 
significant impacts on an area's natural hydrology, potentially 
resulting in flooding, pollution, or aquatic ecosystem destruction. 
Stormwater runoff washes over agricultural land, lawns, urban areas, 
and other types of human land-use areas, introducing chemicals like 
fertilizers, heavy metals, and harmful bacteria into water ecosystems 
such as streams, lakes, and rivers. Highway and other transportation 
installations are major contributors to this type of pollution. This 
type of non-localized pollution emission is responsible for over 80 
percent of the degradation of the Nation's surface water. Thus, 
development of transportation infrastructure has a significant and far-
ranging environmental impact.

Green Transportation Infrastructure
    To be effective in countering the negative impact of rainfall 
runoff, mitigation measures must meet the goals of reducing the speed 
and volume of flow and treating or reducing pollutants. Green 
transportation infrastructure uses innovative materials, structural 
measures, and design techniques to address these goals. Structural 
measures are installations like infiltration basins and trenches, 
detention and retention ponds, constructed wetlands, vegetated swales 
and filter strips, and filtration systems. Stormwater managers 
generally choose a treatment by evaluating the amount of land 
available, the cost of implementation, operation and maintenance of the 
technology, and treatment objectives such as cleanliness. However, many 
local governments are also constrained by environmental regulations 
that stipulate specific methods for reducing water pollution, and are 
unable to include innovative green infrastructure technologies and 
techniques in their stormwater management plans.

Current Federal Programs
    While most of the decisions regarding implementation of green 
transportation infrastructure are made at the State and local level, 
there are federal programs addressing the issue of non-point source 
water pollution control in transportation infrastructure. The Green 
Highways Partnership (GHP) is the primary federal vehicle for 
encouraging the use of green transportation infrastructure by State and 
local governments and private industry. EPA and FHWA are the main 
federal participants in the partnership, which includes State 
departments of transportation, trade organizations, municipal 
governments, and non-profit organizations. The Partnership's activities 
focus on planning and design, construction, and operation and 
maintenance of green transportation infrastructure, and include pilot 
projects that demonstrate cost-effective, environmentally-sound 
transportation infrastructure technologies that meet State performance 
requirements. There are also additional ongoing programs at the U.S. 
Department of Transportation and EPA in support of research, 
development, and transfer of green transportation infrastructure 
technologies.

Remaining Challenges
    Though research has shown significant benefits in terms of 
stormwater management and control of non-point source water pollution, 
technologies such as bioswales and pervious pavement have not been 
adopted in many jurisdictions or by significant numbers of private 
entities. There are numerous barriers to full adoption of green 
infrastructure, including technical problems, regulatory challenges, 
and slow industry adoption of new practices. The installation of green 
transportation infrastructure can be impeded by problems of high cost 
and availability of space for technologies. Climate conditions can also 
present unique challenges to implementation; for example, in areas 
where very cold weather is common, technologies that retain water for 
slow filtration are susceptible to freezing. Also, the construction 
industry tends to be risk-averse, and hence reluctant to adopt 
technologies that may be considered experimental or unproven because of 
concerns about high cost, reliability, maintenance, or simply confusion 
about the best products to use. The slow adoption of these technologies 
has also led to a shortage of trained contractors who are able to 
properly design and install integrated systems, making implementation 
more difficult and costly.
    Though Federal, State, and local government agencies have taken an 
active role in promoting the use of green transportation 
infrastructure, those same entities have often erected regulatory 
barriers which prevent widespread implementation. For example, though 
the Office of Water has been a strong advocate for green infrastructure 
projects, there are regulatory barriers internal to the EPA that 
prevents those projects from moving forward. The Clean Water Act, under 
the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit 
program, gives EPA the authority to regulate sources of water that 
release pollutants into ground and surface water. The program is 
administered on a regional level, and regional administrators have 
discretion in classifying green infrastructure technologies that serve 
as sources of water covered by NPDES. If technologies such as pervious 
pavement or bioswales, which filter runoff before it flows into the 
ground or surface water, are considered ``point sources'' then EPA 
regulations that require permitting procedures act as a significant 
disincentive to use these technologies.
    State and local authorities can sometimes also be impediments to 
implementation of green transportation infrastructure, unlike federal 
laws that specifically disallow the use of green technologies without 
extensive permitting, State and local authorities tend to fail to 
explicitly allow their use. As a result, governments or private 
companies within the jurisdiction who propose the use of green 
transportation infrastructure are not given approval simply because the 
innovative technologies have not been previously considered by the 
regulating authority. The problem then becomes self-perpetuating, as 
these local governments block all potential demonstration projects, and 
continue to deny builders permits on the basis that there have been no 
successful demonstration projects. However, many cities have acted as 
leaders in the green transportation infrastructure initiative, but the 
challenge remains to universalize its acceptance across local 
jurisdictions.

Options for Promoting Implementation of Green Transportation 
        Infrastructure
    One of the primary reasons policy-makers and builders resist 
incorporating green transportation infrastructure technologies into 
their design plans is lack of understanding of the different options. 
Insufficient data and information about its effectiveness in mitigating 
pollution are disincentives for incorporating green infrastructure into 
stormwater management systems because of the need for accountability 
for expenditures of public money. Also, there are still relatively few 
engineers trained in design, installation and maintenance methods, 
preventing even interested localities from implementing green 
infrastructure plans.
    The U.S. Department of Transportation's University Transportation 
Centers, authorized under the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient 
Transportation Equity Act--A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA09LU), are 
uniquely suited to meet the research needs to fill the gaps in data and 
engineering information that prevent the widespread implementation of 
green transportation infrastructure projects. This program funds 
university research centers around the country to focus on state-of-
the-art transportation research and workforce development. These 
Centers bring together experts in multi-disciplinary fields to address 
transportation challenges including congestion, safety issues, and 
energy efficiency.
    A number of Centers currently highlight sustainability as the theme 
of their research projects, and green transportation infrastructure is 
a natural component of a sustainability portfolio.
    The National Highway Institute (NHI), part of the Federal Highway 
Administration, is a key resource for transportation workers to learn 
about new construction and design concepts, and as such is an excellent 
partner for technology transfer from the University Transportation 
Centers. NHI has provided training for transportation workers in 
diverse subjects, including improving road safety for pedestrians and 
bicyclists, managing roads in inclement weather, and traffic 
management. Green transportation infrastructure curriculum would 
augment NHI's excellent course offerings by providing builders with 
guidance on design, construction, and maintenance of green 
infrastructure from a trusted source. Using NHI to deliver information 
on green infrastructure technology and processes would help overcome 
some of the biases against this type of design and ensure that all 
localities are able to implement the most effective green 
infrastructure systems for their unique needs.

III. Subcommittee Actions

    The Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation heard testimony in 
the 110th Congress relevant to the programs authorized in H.R. 5161 at 
a hearing held May 10, 2007. During those hearings, the Subcommittee 
heard testimony from the Associate Administrator for Planning, 
Environment and Realty at the Federal Highway Administration; the 
Assistant Administrator for Water at the Environmental Protection 
Agency, and representatives of local government and industry.
    On January 29, 2008, Representative David Wu, Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation of the Committee on Science 
and Technology, introduced H.R. 5161, the Green Transportation 
Infrastructure Research and Technology Transfer Act, a bill to provide 
for the establishment of Green Transportation Infrastructure Research 
and Technology Transfer Centers, and for other purposes.
    The Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation met to consider H.R. 
5161 on Thursday, February 7, 2008 and considered the following 
amendment to the bill:

I221. Mr. Ehlers offered an amendment to Section 3 to limit eligibility 
for grants under that section to existing University Transportation 
Centers receiving grants under section 5505 or 5506 of the U.S. Code, 
and to authorize $6 million in appropriations for fiscal years 2009 and 

    2010. The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.Mr. Gingrey moved 
that the Subcommittee favorably report the bill, H.R. 5161, as amended, 
to the Full Committee. The motion was agreed to by a voice vote.

IV. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    H.R. 5161 authorizes the U.S. Department of Transportation to 
provide grants to national and regional university transportation 
centers to carry out research on and technology transfer in the field 
of green transportation infrastructure. Applicants are limited to 
existing centers receiving grants under section 5505 or 5506 of the 
U.S. Code. Grant recipients are selected via a merit-based competition, 
with preference given to those institutions demonstrating expertise in 
the environmental effects of transportation infrastructure; research 
capacity and technology transfer resources; partnerships with 
government and industry; and other attributes. Authorized activities 
include research and development of innovative infrastructure 
technologies; establishment of regional technology transfer programs; 
studies of the impact of government regulations on implementation of 
green infrastructure programs; and public education campaigns aimed at 
public and private stakeholders. The bill requires the Secretary of 
Transportation to convene an annual meeting of Centers to foster 
collaboration and dissemination of findings. H.R. 5161 authorizes $6 M 
per fiscal year for fiscal years 2009 and 2010 for grants to the 
university transportation centers. To promote technology transfer, the 
bill requires the Federal Highway Administration to incorporate 
education and training on green transportation infrastructure into its 
National Highway Institute curriculum which is offered to 
transportation workers nationwide. Finally, the bill defines green 
transportation infrastructure as infrastructure that preserves and 
restores natural processes and landforms, uses natural design 
techniques to manage stormwater; and minimizes life cycle energy 
consumption and air pollution.

V. Section-by-Section Analysis of the Bill, as reported by the 
                    Subcommittee

Sec. 1. Short Title

    ``Green Transportation Infrastructure Research and Technology 
Transfer Act''

Sec. 2. Findings

    Finds that innovative transportation infrastructure can be used to 
mitigate water pollution, and that technical and social barriers to 
implementing these technologies can be overcome with research and 
technology transfer assistance from the U.S. Department of 
Transportation.

Sec. 3. Regional Green Transportation Research Centers

    Amends the existing authorization for university transportation 
centers to create centers focusing on green transportation 
infrastructure in regions around the U.S. The objectives of these 
centers include developing innovative transportation infrastructure 
technologies that mitigate environmental damage from runoff, and 
encouraging governments to adopt these technologies and integrate them 
into existing infrastructure through technology transfer programs.
    Activities will include: 1) research and development of green 
infrastructure technologies, techniques and best management practices; 
2) establishment of a technology transfer program; 3) assessment of the 
impact of regulations on the adoption of green transportation 
infrastructure locally; and 4) public education efforts for local 
decision-makers.
    Grant recipients will be selected on a competitive basis, with 
preference given to those applicants demonstrating expertise in 
transportation and green infrastructure research, existing partnerships 
with State and local governments, and technology transfer programs. 
Only those applicants currently receiving University Transportation 
Center funding will be eligible for grants.
    Defines green transportation infrastructure as infrastructure that 
preserves and restores natural processes and landforms, uses natural 
design techniques to manage stormwater; and minimizes life cycle energy 
consumption and air pollution.
    Authorizes $6 M per year for fiscal years 2009 and 2010 to carry 
out this section.

Sec. 4: Green transportation infrastructure amendments

    Amends authorization of the Federal Highway Administration's 
National Highway Institute (NHI) to include green transportation 
infrastructure as a course topic. Instructs NHI to collaborate with 
other federal agencies with expertise in this field when designing 
curriculum.