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110th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                      110-5

======================================================================



 
  SUPPORTING THE GOALS AND IDEALS OF NATIONAL ENGINEERS WEEK, AND FOR 
                             OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

  January 29, 2007.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Gordon of Tennessee, from the Committee on Science and Technology, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                       [To accompany H. Res. 59]

    The Committee on Science and Technology, to whom was 
referred the resolution (H. Res. 59) supporting the goals and 
ideals of National Engineers Week, and for other purposes, 
having considered the same, report favorably thereon without 
amendment and recommend that the resolution be agreed to.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    H. Res. 59 expresses the House of Representatives' support 
of the goals and ideals of National Engineers Week.

                BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION

    National Engineers Week, designated as February 18-24, 
2007, plays a significant role in raising public awareness of 
the important and positive contributions made by engineers to 
our quality of life. From helping the U.S. win the American 
Revolution to advancing computer and internet technologies 
today, engineers have played a critical role throughout our 
history. This resolution expresses the House of 
Representatives' support for the Week and its purpose of 
increasing understanding of and interest in engineering and 
technology careers and to promote literacy in math and science.

                       SUMMARY OF THE LEGISLATION

    The official title of the resolution as introduced is: 
`Supporting the goals and ideals of National Engineers Week, 
and for other purposes.'
    H. Res. 59 notes the many ways that engineers use their 
professional, scientific, and technical knowledge and skills in 
creative and innovative ways to fulfill society's needs, and 
states that the House of Representatives--
          (1) supports the goals and ideals of National 
        Engineers Week and its aims to increase understanding 
        of and interest in engineering and technology careers 
        and to promote literacy in math and science; and
          (2) will work with the engineering community to make 
        sure that the creativity and contribution of that 
        community can be expressed through research, 
        development, standardization, and innovation.

            LEGISLATIVE HISTORY AND COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    Congressman Lipinski introduced this resolution on January 
12, 2007 for himself, Mr. Akin, Mr. Calvert, Mr. Carnahan, Mr. 
Cleaver, Mr. Costello, Mr. Ehlers, Mr. Franks, Ms. Gillibrand, 
Mr. Gordon, Mr. Hinojosa, Mr. Holt, Mr. Honda, Mr. Inglis, Ms. 
Jackson-Lee, Ms. Johnson, Mr. Kuhl, Mr. Manzullo, Ms. Matsui, 
Mr. McCotter, Mr. McGovern, Ms. McMorris Rodgers, Mr. Neal, Mr. 
Petri, and Mr. Pickering. The resolution was referred to the 
Committee on Science and Technology. On January 24, 2007 the 
resolution was considered at a Science and Technology Committee 
mark-up session and was ordered favorably reported by voice 
vote.

                             ROLLCALL VOTES

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires each committee report to include the 
total number of votes cast for and against on each rollcall 
vote on a motion to report and on any amendment offered to the 
measure or matter, and the names of those members voting for 
and against. There were no rollcall votes on this resolution.

                      COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS

    With respect to the requirements of clause 3(c)(1) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in this report.

                          COST OF LEGISLATION

    With respect to the requirements of clause 3(d)(2) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, H. Res. 59 
is a sense of the House resolution and therefore does not have 
the force of law. As such, there is no cost associated with 
this legislation for fiscal year 2007, nor for any fiscal year 
thereafter.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(2) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, and 
308(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee 
advises that the resolution contains no measure that authorizes 
funding, so no comparison of the total estimated funding level 
for the relevant programs to the appropriate levels under 
current law is required.
    2. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(4) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding, so no statement of general performance and 
objectives for any measure that authorizes funding is required.
    3. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(3) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Committee advises that the resolution contains no measure that 
authorizes funding, so no cost estimate nor comparison for any 
measure that authorizes funding is required.

                   CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, committee reports on a bill or joint 
resolution of a public character shall include a statement 
citing the specific powers granted to the Congress in the 
Constitution to enact the measure. The Committee on Science and 
Technology finds that Congress has the authority to enact this 
measure pursuant to its powers granted under article I, section 
8 of the Constitution.

                       FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    The Resolution contains no federal mandates.

                        PREEMPTION CLARIFICATION

    Section 423 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
requires the report of any Committee on a bill or joint 
resolution to include a statement on the extent to which the 
bill or joint resolution is intended to preempt state, local, 
or tribal law. The Committee states that H. Res. 59 does not 
preempt any state, local, or tribal law.

                      ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act are created by this 
legislation.

                APPLICABILITY TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act. (Public Law 
104-1.)

         CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW MADE BY THE BILL, AS REPORTED

    H. Res. 59 makes no changes in existing law.

                PROCEEDINGS OF THE FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP

    Chairman Gordon. Next, we will take up H. Res. 59, 
supporting the goals and ideals of National Engineering Week.
    I now recognize Mr. Lipinski for 5 minutes to speak on the 
bill.
    Mr. Lipinski. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I will start by congratulating you for your well-deserved 
rise to Chairman of this Committee. And I would like to 
congratulate Ranking Member Hall for moving into his position 
as ranking member. I know you are going to do a lot of great 
things in this Congress.
    I am pleased to be here today for the markup today of H. 
Res. 59, supporting the goals and ideals of National Engineers 
Week. I would like to thank Mr. Inglis from South Carolina for 
joining me in introducing this legislation.
    Engineers have helped make our country great: from their 
service in the American Revolution to developing key modern 
industries, such as aerospace and energy. This resolution 
honors and recognizes the more than 2 million engineers in the 
United States and the contributions that they have made to our 
country.
    Engineers combine imagination and creativity with math, 
science, and technological training to solve human problems. 
Engineers, in the past, helped us build boats to travel across 
the seas, railroads to explore the west, and the Internet to 
communicate with the world.
    We need the innovative capabilities of engineers to 
confront the new challenges before us today. Engineers will 
help America develop energy independence, find solutions to 
confront global climate change, and make our Nation more 
secure.
    Now I have a unique perspective as one of only a handful of 
engineers in Congress. We probably have more lawyers on this 
Committee than we have engineers in Congress. I know the last 
Congress, I was one of nine House members with engineering 
degrees. I am not sure how that has changed this year, but I do 
know that we have added at least one engineer to the House and 
to this Committee, Jerry McNerney from California. And we are 
very fortunate that he brings his engineering expertise to our 
Committee. Certainly his engineering expertise far outshines 
mine, so I want to welcome Mr. McNerney to this Committee.
    Unfortunately, for America, this country is falling behind 
others in engineering. U.S. students continue to score below 
international averages on math and science tests, we are 
failing to graduate enough engineers, especially compared to 
countries such as China and India. There is some debate over 
the exact numbers of engineers in these countries, but there is 
no question we are behind other countries in 
graduatingengineers.
    The National Academy of Sciences' report, ``Rising Above 
the Gathering Storm'', emphasizes this worrisome development 
and the need for the Federal Government to take action to 
address the potential for a shortage of good engineers.
    We must do everything we can to encourage and inspire 
future engineers, and National Engineers Week is one step to 
accomplish this goal. National Engineers Week has inspired 
future engineers for more than 50 years. It aims to raise 
public awareness about engineers' contributions to society and 
our quality of life.
    Honored by the National Society of Professional Engineers, 
including more than 100 society, government, and business 
sponsors and affiliates, including Boeing, the American Society 
for Mechanical Engineers, the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, National Engineers Week draws upon local and 
regional experts to promote high levels of math, science, and 
technology literacy. Annually, it reaches thousands of parents, 
teachers, and students in communities across the country. From 
national and regional engineering competitions, such as Future 
of the City Competition, to events such as Introduce a Girl to 
Engineering Day, National Engineers Week helps inspire the next 
generation of American engineers and scientists.
    I would like to thank all of the engineers who have 
contributed so much to America and to honor them for their 
commitment to continue working to better our society. We 
certainly need more engineers in America for our economic 
security, our national security, and certainly, one of the 
biggest challenges, global climate change. I encourage all of 
my colleagues to support H. Res. 59.
    Mr. Lipinski. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I yield back the 
balance of my time.
    Chairman Gordon. I am pleased to recognize Mr. Inglis for 5 
minutes to present his opening remarks.
    Mr. Inglis. I start by congratulating Mr. Lipinski on the 
Vice-Chair role here on this Committee and by celebrating this 
bill that I am happy to be on with him.
    In 1951, the National Society of Professional Engineers 
established National Engineers Week. The purpose of the week is 
to increase understanding of and interest in engineering and 
technology careers and to promote K-12 literacy in math and 
science. It also showcases the contributions that engineers 
have made to society. It is celebrated, typically, during the 
week of George Washington's actual birthday, which is February 
22, as he steered our Nation toward technical advancements, 
invention, and education.
    Among many other credits, George Washington had an order 
made at Valley Forge for more engineers and engineering 
education, which led to the creation of the U.S. Army Engineers 
School. This bill is designed to respond to what Tom Friedman 
calls ``The Silent Crisis'' of a lack of engineering and 
science technology math education in our country, and I am 
happy to join Mr. Lipinski in urging the Committee to pass the 
bill.
    Chairman Gordon. Without objection, all members' opening 
statements will be placed in the record at this point.
    Mr. McNerney from California is recognized.
    Mr. McNerney. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    I salute you and the ranking member for your dedication to 
bipartisanship and for working together towards solving the 
problems that we are facing.
    My father started out in labor but moved into engineering, 
and my mother often told me that it would be the engineers that 
would help us solve the problems that are facing us, such as 
global warming.
    While I have had the pleasure of following my father into 
an engineering career, I can tell you that some of the most 
rewarding moments of my life were in pursuit of engineering 
goals. I have also noted, throughout my career, that engineers 
are among the most ethical and hard working people that I have 
had the pleasure of working with in any pursuit.
    I think this is a very important bill, because it will help 
encourage our young people into this field of engineering. I 
agree wholeheartedly with my mother that it will be the 
engineers that will help us solve these problems of 
transportation, global warming, and many of the other problems 
that face us in our Nation. I urge everyone to support this 
bill.
    Thank you.
    Chairman Gordon. Any other comments? I ask unanimous 
consent that the bill is considered as read and open to 
amendment at any point. Without objection, so ordered.
    [H. Res. 59 follows:]

                               H. Res. 59

    Whereas engineers use their professional, scientific, and 
technical knowledge and skills in creative and innovative ways 
to fulfill society's needs;
    Whereas engineers have helped meet the major technological 
challenges of our time--from rebuilding towns devastated by 
natural disasters to designing an information superhighway that 
will speed our country into the future;
    Whereas engineers are a crucial link in research, 
development, and demonstration and in transforming scientific 
discoveries into useful products, and we will look more than 
ever to engineers and their knowledge and skills to meet the 
challenges of the future;
    Whereas engineers play a crucial role in developing the 
consensus engineering standards that permit modern economies 
and societies to exist;
    Whereas the 2006 National Academy of Sciences report 
entitled ``Rising Above the Gathering Storm'' highlighted the 
worrisome trend that fewer students are now focusing on 
engineering in college at a time when increasing numbers of 
today's 2,000,000 United States engineers are nearing 
retirement;
    Whereas the National Society of Professional Engineers 
through National Engineers Week and other activities is raising 
public awareness of engineers' significant, positive 
contributions to societal needs;
    Whereas National Engineers Week activities at engineering 
schools and in other forums are encouraging our young math and 
science students to see themselves as possible future engineers 
and to realize the practical power of their knowledge;
    Whereas National Engineers Week has grown into a formal 
coalition of more than 70 engineering, education, and cultural 
societies, and more than 50 major corporations and government 
agencies;
    Whereas National Engineers Week is celebrated during the 
week of George Washington's birthday to honor the contributions 
that our first President, a military engineer and land 
surveyor, made to engineering; and
    Whereas February 18 to 24, 2007, has been designated by the 
President as National Engineers Week: Now, therefore, be it
  Resolved, That the House of Representatives--
          (1) supports the goals and ideals of National 
        Engineers Week and its aims to increase understanding 
        of and interest in engineering and technology careers 
        and to promote literacy in math and science; and
          (2) will work with the engineering community to make 
        sure that the creativity and contribution of that 
        community can be expressed through research, 
        development, standardization, and innovation.

    Chairman Gordon. Are there any amendments? Hearing none, 
the vote is on the bill. All of those in favor, signify by 
saying aye. Opposed, nay. In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes 
have it.
    Mr. Hall. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Committee favorably 
report H. Res. 59 to the House with the recommendation that the 
bill do pass. Furthermore, I move that the staff be instructed 
to prepare the legislative report and make necessary technical 
and conforming changes, and that the Chairman take all 
necessary steps to bring the bill before the House for 
consideration.
    Chairman Gordon. The question is on the motion to report 
the bill favorably. Those in favor of the motion will signify 
by saying aye. Opposed, nay. The ayes appear to have it. The 
resolution is favorably reported.
    Without objection, the motion is considered as laid on the 
table. I move that members have 2 subsequent calendar days in 
which to submit supplemental minority or additional views on 
the measure. I move pursuant to Clause 1 of Rule 22 of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives that the Committee 
authorize the Chairman to offer such motions as may be 
necessary in the House to adopt and pass H. Res. 59. Without 
objection, so ordered.