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                                                        Calendar No. 95
109th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     109-63

======================================================================
 
                     YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK SCHOOLS

                                _______
                                

                 April 28, 2005.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Domenici, from the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 136]

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, to which was 
referred the bill (S. 136) to authorize the Secretary of the 
Interior to provide supplemental funding and other services 
that are necessary to assist certain local school districts in 
the State of California in providing educational services for 
students attending schools located within Yosemite National 
Park, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to adjust the 
boundaries of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and for 
other purposes, having considered the same, reports favorably 
thereon with amendments and recommends that the bill, as 
amended, do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    1. Beginning on page 3, strike line 21 and all that follows 
through page 4, line 8, and insert the following:
                  ``(A) Any law authorizing the collection or 
                expenditure of entrance or use fees at units of 
                the National Park System, including--
                          ``(i) the Land and Water Conservation 
                        Fund Act of 1965 (16 U.S.C. 4601-4 et 
                        seq.); and
                          ``(ii) the Federal Lands Recreation 
                        Enhancement Act (16 U.S.C. 6801 et 
                        seq.).
                  ``(B) Any unexpended receipts collected 
                through--
                          ``(i) the recreational fee 
                        demonstration program established under 
                        section 315 of the Department of the 
                        Interior and Related Agencies 
                        Appropriations Act, 1996 (16 U.S.C. 
                        4601-6a note; Public Law 104-134); or
                          ``(ii) the national park passport 
                        program established under section 602 
                        of the National Parks Omnibus 
                        Management Act of 1998 (16 U.S.C. 
                        5992).
                  ``(C) Emergency appropriations for flood 
                recovery at Yosemite National Park.''
    2. On page 6, line 11, delete ``(a)''.

                         Purpose of the Measure

    The purposes of S. 136 are to authorize the Secretary of 
the Interior to provide supplemental funding and other services 
necessary to assist the State of California or local 
educational agencies in California in providing educational 
services for students attending schools located within or near 
Yosemite National Park and to authorize the addition of 
approximately 4,500 acres to the Golden Gate National 
Recreation Area.

                          Background and Need

    Title I--Yosemite Schools Funding: The Yosemite Valley, EI 
Portal and Wawona schools are California public schools that 
primarily serve the children of employees who live and work in 
or near Yosemite National Park. Following historic floods in 
January 1997, the number of families living within Yosemite 
National Park declined sharply. Because the funding of schools 
in the State of California is based on average daily 
attendance, the reduced number of students attending the 
schools resulted in a corresponding reduction in school 
funding. This has left inadequate resources to pay for mandated 
levels of educational services and virtually no funds for 
construction, maintenance or other operations of the schools. 
Although funding was included in the FY 2000 Education 
Appropriations bill for the Mariposa County School District to 
maintain services at two of the three schools, obtaining 
special earmarks each year is an inefficient method to obtain 
school funding.
    The three schools, while in different locations, are in a 
similar situation in that access to other area schools is 
difficult. Yosemite Valley school is more than 1 hour from the 
town of Mariposa via a narrow mountainous road. EI Portal 
school is more than 40 minutes from Mariposa, and Wawona school 
is 30 minutes from Oakhurst over a narrow mountain road. All 
three schools are nearly 4,000 feet above sea level, and have 
many snow days. The roads between Yosemite National Park and 
the outlying communities are often closed due to weather or 
rockslide. It is nearly impossible and clearly dangerous to 
transport the students in these conditions.
    Although National Park Service (NPS) funds are not 
generally used for State educational purposes, there is one 
precedent. Since 1948, Yellowstone National Park has operated a 
park-based elementary school under statutory authority (16 
U.S.C. 40a) that allows the NPS to provide supplemental funding 
and facilities. Also, similar authority was provided at Grand 
Canyon National Park for a short time in the 1970's.
    S. 136 would authorize the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide supplemental funding for 4 years to assist the State of 
California or local school districts in providing educational 
services for students attending the three schools.
    Title II--Golden Gate National Recreation Area Addition: 
The Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) encompasses 
approximately 74,000 acres in several units in Marin, San 
Francisco, and San Mateo counties in northern California. The 
park's boundaries have been expanded several times since its 
establishment in 1972 to provide for the inclusion of 
additional lands. The most recent addition occurred in 2000, 
when 1,500 acres were added to the park.
    S. 136 would expand the GGNRA boundaries to include 
approximately 4,762 acres in San Mateo County, known generally 
as the ``Rancho Corral de Tierra'' property. Although 
negotiations to acquire these properties were occurring at the 
time of the 2000 additions, they were not completed in time for 
inclusion in that legislation.
    The lands to be added to the GGNRA by S. 136 include 
Montara Mountain and other coastal ridges. Rising 2,000 feet 
from the nearby coast, the mountain ridges contain the 
headwaters and most of the watershed for four coastal stream 
systems, and provide an important riparian habitat for 
threatened species such as the California red-legged frog and 
San Francisco garter snake. Montara Mountain is home to two 
plant species that are found nowhere else in the world: the 
Montara manzanita and blue lupine. The area also provides 
important open space and scenic values, with views over the 
entire San Francisco Bay area.

                          Legislative History

    S. 136 was introduced by Senator Feinstein on January 24, 
2005. During the 108th Congress, the Committee considered 
similar legislation, S. 302 and H.R. 620.
    S. 302, the GGNRA expansion bill, was introduced by 
Senators Feinstein and Boxer on February 5, 2003. At its 
business meeting on February 26, 2003, the Committee on Energy 
and Natural Resources ordered S. 302 favorably reported with 
amendment (S. Rept. 108-15). S. 302 passed the Senate with a 
technical amendment by unanimous consent on April 3, 2003.
    Similar legislation, S. 941, was introduced by Senators 
Feinstein and Boxer during the 107th Congress. The Subcommittee 
on National Parks held a hearing on S. 941 on July 26, 2001. At 
its business meeting on August 2, 2001, the Committee on Energy 
and Natural Resources ordered S. 941 favorably reported with 
amendments (S. Rept. 107-70). S. 941 passed the Senate by 
unanimous consent on October 17, 2001. The House of 
Representatives passed the bill amended with several unrelated 
measures on September 24, 2002. The Senate agreed to the House 
amendment, with an additional amendment, on November 19, 2002.
    H.R. 620, the Yosemite Schools bill, was introduced by 
Congressman Radanovich on February 5, 2003 and passed the House 
of Representatives by voice vote on March 25, 2003. The 
Subcommittee on National Parks held a hearing on H.R. 620 on 
September 9, 2003 (S. Hrg. 108-193). At the business meeting on 
March 24, 2004, the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources 
ordered H.R. 620 favorably reported (S. Rept. 108-255), with an 
amendment in the nature of a substitute and an amendment to the 
title. The amendment incorporated the text of S. 302 into H.R. 
620, along with several unrelated measures, and passed the 
Senate by unanimous consent on December 7, 2004. The House of 
Representatives did not consider the bill prior to the sine die 
adjournment of the 108th Congress.
    A bill similar to the original version of H.R. 620, H.R. 
3421, was introduced in the 107th Congress by Congressman 
Radanovich and passed the House on April 30, 2002. At the 
business meeting on October 8, 2004, the Committee on Energy 
and Natural Resources ordered the bill, with amendments, to be 
favorably reported, but the Senate failed to act prior to 
adjournment.
    At a business meeting on February 16, 2005, the Committee 
on Energy and Natural Resources ordered S. 136 favorably 
reported, with an amendment.

                        Committee Recommendation

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in an open 
business session on February 16, 2005, by a voice of a quorum 
present, recommends that the Senate pass S. 136, if amended as 
described herein.

                          Committee Amendment

    During its consideration of S. 136, the Committee adopted 
an amendment to clarify that funds collected in accordance with 
the Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (P.L. 108-447) and 
the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program (Section 315 of P.L. 
104-134) cannot be used to fund the schools. The Federal Lands 
Recreation Enhancement Act repealed the Recreation Fee 
Demonstration Program, although funds collected under the later 
program may continue to be expended. The Committee amendment 
clarifies that no revenues from either fee program may be 
transferred to the schools.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis

    Section 1 provides a table of contents.

          TITLE I--YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK AUTHORIZED PAYMENTS

    Section 101(a) authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide funds to the two named school districts for fiscal 
years 2006 through 2009 for educational services to dependents 
of park and concession employees. The Secretary's authority to 
make payments to the schools terminates if the State of 
California or local education agencies fail to provide funding 
to the schools that is no less than the amount provided in FY 
2005.
    Subsection (b) allows payments only for educational 
services that may be funded under this title and prohibits the 
funds from being used for construction, construction contracts 
or major improvements.
    Subsection (c) limits payments to the school district to 
the lesser of $400,000 in any fiscal year or the amount 
necessary to provide the educational services that are normally 
available to students in the State of California.
    Subsection (d) allows the Secretary to use funds available 
to the National Park Service from appropriations, donations or 
fees, except that fee revenues collected under the Land and 
Water Conservation Fund Act, the Federal Lands Recreation 
Enhancement Act, the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program or 
any other law authorizing the collection or expenditure of 
entrance or use fees at units of the National Park System may 
not be used.
    Section 102 provides the authority for the Secretary to 
locate park facilities outside of Yosemite National Park to 
support a transportation system.

   TITLE II--RANCHO CORRAL DE TIERRA GOLDEN GATE NATIONAL RECREATION 
                             ADJUSTMENT ACT

    Section 201 entitles this title the ``Rancho Corral de 
Tierra Golden Gate National Recreation Area Boundary Adjustment 
Act.''
    Section 202 amends section 2(a) of Public Law 92-589 to 
include several parcels of land comprising approximately 4,500 
acres known as the ``Rancho Corral de Tierra Additions'' to be 
included within the park boundary. This section also states 
that the Secretary may only acquire the described parcels of 
land from a willing seller.

                   Cost and Budgetary Considerations

    The following estimate of the costs of this measure has 
been provided by the Congressional Budget Office:

S. 136--A bill to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to provide 
        supplemental funding and other services that are necessary to 
        assist certain local school districts in the state of 
        California in providing educational services for students 
        attending schools located within Yosemite National Park, to 
        authorize the Secretary of the Interior to adjust the 
        boundaries of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area, and for 
        other purposes

    Summary: S. 136 would modify the boundary of the Golden 
Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) in California. The bill 
also would authorize the Secretary of the Interior to make 
payments to two California school districts that serve families 
of Yosemite National Park employees.
    CBO estimates that implementing S. 136 would cost $24 
million over the 2006-2010 period, assuming appropriation of 
the necessary amounts. The legislation could increase direct 
spending, but we estimate that any such effects would be 
insignificant. Enacting the bill would not affect revenues. S. 
136 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would 
impose no costs on state, local, or tribal governments. 
Enacting this legislation would benefit two California school 
districts.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: For this 
estimate, CBO assumes that S. 136 will be enacted by the start 
of fiscal year 2006 and that amounts necessary to implement the 
legislation will be appropriated for each fiscal year as 
needed. The estimated budgetary impact of S. 136 is shown in 
the following table. The costs of this legislation fall within 
budget function 300 (natural resources and environment).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                                                              2005     2006     2007     2008     2009     2010
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION
 
Estimated Authorization Level.............................        0       16        2        2        2        2
Estimated Outlays.........................................        0       16        2        2        2        2
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Basis of Estimate

            GGNRA additions
    Title II of S. 136 would expand the boundary of the GGNRA 
to include the 4,076-acre Rancho Corral de Tierra and over 300 
acres of property in the Devil's Slide area. Based on 
information provided by the National Park Service (NPS), CBO 
estimates that the agency would spend $15 million in 2006 to 
purchase the Rancho Corral de Tierra from the Peninsula Open 
Space Trust, a local nonprofit organization, which acquired the 
property in 2001 for $29.7 million. (We expect that the 
organization would recover the balance of the land's purchase 
price from private and state sources.)
    The cost of acquiring land within the Devil's Slide area is 
less certain because formal property appraisals have not yet 
been completed and because it is unclear how much of this 
acreage might be acquired by the state of California for a 
proposed highway diversion. Based on information provided by 
the NPS, CBO estimates that the agency would purchase about 300 
acres of land within the Devil's Slide area for a total cost of 
$5 million over the 2006-2010 period.
    Finally, CBO estimates that the cost to develop property 
added to the GGNRA would total about $500,000 in 2007. We also 
estimate that annual costs to administer the new lands would be 
roughly $300,000 starting in 2006.
            Yosemite school payments
    For each of fiscal years 2006 through 2010, title I of S. 
136 would authorize the Secretary of the Interior to pay a 
total of up to $400,000 to two California school districts that 
serve the families of Yosemite National Park employees. To make 
those payments, the bill would authorize the Secretary to use 
appropriated funds, donations, or offsetting receipts from 
certain fees collected by the NPS. Because CBO expects that 
there will be little or no receipts or donations available to 
the NPS for new uses, we estimate that implementing the bill 
would result in new discretionary spending of $400,000 a year 
through 2009, assuming appropriation of the necessary amounts. 
If any receipts or donations are deemed to be available for the 
payments, discretionary spending for this purpose would be 
less. Mandatory expenses would increase, but we estimate that 
any new mandatory spending would be insignificant.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 136 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments. Enacting this legislation would benefit two 
California school districts.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Megan Carroll and 
Deborah Reis Impact on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: 
Marjorie Miller; and Impact on the Private Sector: Selena 
Caldera.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      Regulatory Impact Evaluation

    In compliance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
evaluation of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in 
carrying out S. 136.
    The bill is not a regulatory measure in the sense of 
imposing Government-established standards or significant 
economic responsibilities on private individuals and 
businesses. No personal information would be collected in 
administering the program. Therefore, there would be no impact 
on personal privacy.
    Little, if any, additional paperwork would result from the 
enactment of S. 136.

                        Executive Communications

    On February 16, 2005, the Committee on Energy and Natural 
Resources requested legislative reports from the Department of 
the Interior and the Office of Management and Budget setting 
forth Executive agency recommendations on Title II of S. 136. 
These reports had not been received when this report was filed. 
During the 108th Congress, the Committee considered legislation 
similar to Title I (H.R. 620). The views of the Administration 
on Title I were included in testimony received by the Committee 
at a hearing on H.R. 620 on September 9, 2003, as follows:

   Statement of Richard Ring, Associate Director for Administration, 
Business Practices, and Workforce, Development, National Park Service, 
                       Department of the Interior

    Mr. Chairman, thank you for the opportunity to present the 
views of the Department of the Interior on H.R. 620, which 
would authorize assistance to the State of California or local 
educational agencies for educational services for students 
attending schools in Yosemite National Park and would authorize 
park facilities to be established outside the boundary of the 
park. This legislation was passed by the House on March 25, 
2003.
    The Department supports H.R. 620, as we believe that 
students who attend schools in Yosemite National Park should 
have access to educational services that are comparable to 
those that students elsewhere in California receive. The 
funding authorized by this bill would be a strictly limited 
provision of assistance to address a particularly severe 
situation for schools located in a national park. The 
Department also supports authorizing expenditures for 
facilities outside Yosemite, as this would enable the National 
Park Service to contribute to the regional transportation 
system being developed to serve Yosemite's visitors and 
employees.
    Schools have been located within Yosemite National Park for 
over 125 years to serve the needs of park employees and their 
children. At present, two elementary schools are located within 
the park, at Wawona and in Yosemite Valley. A third elementary 
school and a small high school are located in El Portal, the 
park's administrative site located on federal property just 
outside the park boundary. Most high-school age students attend 
the larger county high school in Mariposa because of the lack 
of opportunity for a comprehensive program at the El Portal 
school.
    The Yosemite Valley School has 42 students in grades 
kindergarten through eighth grade, divided into three classes. 
The amount of funding from the State of California, according 
to a formula based on average daily attendance, supports only 
two teachers.
    The school principal also serves as a teacher.
    The elementary school in El Portal has 53 students in seven 
grades, divided into multigraded classrooms. The Wawona school 
mirrors the old ``one-room'' schoolhouse, with 16 children in 
grades K-8, and one teacher. Because the current funding 
formula provides for only one teacher, the school is unable to 
serve more than 20 students. Consequently, in years when the 
maximum teacher-student ratio is reached, parents are left with 
the choice of either home-schooling their children or 
transporting them on their own to schools elsewhere.
    Because the schools in the park are located in remote 
areas, students at the Yosemite schools lack services that are 
normally available to students that attend schools elsewhere in 
the state. For example, access to teachers to serve students 
with special needs is very limited, and road and weather 
conditions can often restrict teachers' abilities to reach the 
park. Many facilities are in need of repair or do not meet 
state or federal standards.
    The quality of education that students receive in these 
schools suffers as a result of lack of funding and staffing. 
For example, because teachers in the Yosemite schools are 
responsible for multiple grade levels, they are at a 
disadvantage compared to teachers who are able to focus on the 
curriculum and standards for one grade. In addition to their 
educational duties, teachers must also tend to administrative 
duties normally performed by other employees. As a result, they 
are unable to give the time or attention necessary to provide 
the quality of education that the students deserve.
    Recruitment and retention of employees at Yosemite National 
Park is also adversely affected by the quality of the park 
schools. Many highly qualified National Park Service employees 
with school-age children who might otherwise be interested in 
applying for jobs at Yosemite are discouraged from doing so 
because of the school situation. Park employees often cite the 
schools as a major factor in their decision to transfer from 
Yosemite to other assignments.
    H.R. 620 authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide funds to the two school districts that administer 
schools at Yosemite for educational services to students who 
are dependents of park employees or who live on federal 
property in or near the park. The bill prohibits funds from 
being used for facility construction or major improvements, and 
limits the amount of funding that may be provided to the lesser 
of $400,000 annually or the amount necessary to provide 
students with educational services comparable to those received 
by other public school students in California. The bill allows 
funding for this purpose to be derived from appropriations, 
donations and fees, except that it prohibits the use of fees 
collected under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act, from 
the Recreational Fee Demonstration program, and from the 
National Park Passport program. Thelegislation also prohibits 
the use of emergency appropriations for Yosemite flood recovery for 
this purpose.
    We want to note that the proposal to assist Yosemite 
schools has been refined considerably since it was first 
introduced last Congress. The initial proposal was an 
indefinite authorization of funding with no limit on the dollar 
amount that could be spent or restriction on the use of the 
funds. During the last Congress, the Department worked closely 
with this committee, the House Resources Committee, and the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees to set limits on the 
amount, duration, use, and source of the funding authorized by 
this legislation. The result is that the proposal in its 
current form is now a tightly drawn authorization of a limited 
amount of federal assistance for what is a unique educational 
situation.
    We strongly believe that any assistance for schools 
authorized by this bill should be supplemental to Yosemite's 
annual budget and should not result in a reduction of the 
amount of funding available for park operations and 
maintenance.
    H.R. 620 also authorizes the Secretary to provide 
assistance for transportation systems and facilities outside 
the boundary of Yosemite National Park. It does so by extending 
to Yosemite the same authority Congress provided Zion National 
Park in 1996 to enter into agreements and expend funds outside 
the boundaries of the park. This bill explicitly allows 
appropriations to be used for `transportation systems' along 
with other administrative and visitor use facilities.
    This provision would allow the park to contribute 
financially to the regional transportation system that serves 
the park's visitors and employees. Developing this system has 
been a goal of the park since the adoption of the 1980 General 
Management Plan.
    In 1999 Mariposa, Merced, and Mono counties created a Joint 
Powers Authority as an entity to implement the Yosemite Area 
Regional Transportation System (YARTS) and entered into a 
Cooperative Agreement with Yosemite National Park. Now in its 
fourth successful year, YARTS provides an attractive 
alternative for visitors and employees without having to 
replace the use of private cars. In 2001, YARTS carried over 
38,000 passengers, including park employees, during Yosemite's 
prime visitor season (May through September). Many of these 
visitors chose to leave their cars at their motels or other 
locations outside the park. By choosing YARTS to access the 
Yosemite Valley, over 11,000 parking places were made available 
during the summer.
    During the initial two years, the National Park Service 
participated in the funding of this project using fee 
demonstration program authority. In its third year of 
operations, that funding was no longer available, and YARTS had 
to reduce the number of runs it provides. The regional 
transportation system is an important means to solve Yosemite's 
parking and congestion issues by reducing the amount of 
infrastructure development within the park, and thus 
substantially reducing the funding requirements for 
implementing the Yosemite Valley Plan. The Department believes 
that a small amount of federal assistance will help make YARTS 
an even bigger success.
    In addition, the authority provided by H.R. 620 would 
enable the National Park Service to establish visitor contact 
facilities in the park's gateway communities, as is called for 
in the Yosemite Valley Plan.
    In order to assure that the park has the ability to 
contribute to YARTS through all available transportation 
authorities, we suggest amendment H.R. 620 to make the 
transportation fee authority provided under Title V of the 
National Parks Omnibus Management Act of 1998 (P.L. 105-391) 
applicable to parks that fund transportation services through a 
cooperative agreement. The existing language allows parks to 
use that authority only in cases where transportation services 
are provided through a service contract. The text of this 
proposed amendment is attached.
    Mr. Chairman, this concludes my remarks. I would be happy 
to respond to any questions that you or the other members of 
the subcommittee may have.

                        Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
S. 136, as ordered reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

                           PUBLIC LAW 92-589


  AN ACT To establish the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in the 
              State of California, and for other purposes

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
the United States of America in Congress assembled,

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                       COMPOSITION AND BOUNDARIES

    Sec. 2. (a) [The recreation area shall comprise] (1) 
Initial lands.--The recreation area shall compromise the lands, 
waters, and submerged lands generally depicted on the map 
entitled: `Revised Boundary Map, Golden Gate National 
Recreation Area', numbered NRA-GG-80,003-K and dated October 
1978, plus those areas depicted on the map entitled `Point 
Reyes and GGNRA Amendments and dated October 25, 1979'. The 
authority of the Secretary to acquire lands in the tract known 
as San Francisco Assessor's Block number 1592 shall be limited 
to an area of not more than one and nine-tenths acres. 
Notwithstanding any other provision of this subchapter, the 
Secretary shall not acquire the Marin County Assessor's parcels 
numbered 199-181-01, 199-181-06, 199-181-08, 199-181-13, and 
199-181-14, located in the Muir Beach portion of the recreation 
area. For the purposes of this subchapter, the southern end of 
the town of Marshall shall be considered to be the Marshall 
Boat Works. [The following additional lands are also hereby 
included within the boundaries of the recreation area: Marin 
County Assessor's parcel numbered 119-040-04, 119-040-05, 119-
040-18, 166-202-03, 166-010-06, 166-010-07, 166-010-24, 166-
010-25, 119-240-19, 166-010-10, 166-010-22, 119-240-03, 119-
240-51, 119-240-52, 119-240-54, 166-101-12, 166-010-13, and 
119-235-10. The recreation area shall also include the lands 
and waters in San Mateo County generally depicted on the map 
entitled `Sweeney Ridge Addition, Golden Gate National 
Recreation Area', numbered NRA GG-80,OOO-A, and dated May 1980. 
The recreation area shall also include those lands acquired 
pursuant to the Golden Gate National Recreational Area Addition 
Act of 1992. The recreation area shall also include the lands 
generally depicted on the map entitled `Additions to Golden 
Gate National Recreation Area', numbered NPS-80,076, and dated 
July 2000/PWR-PLRPC.]
          (2) Additional lands.--In addition to the lands 
        described in paragraph (1), the recreation area shall 
        include the following:
                  (A) The parcels numbered by the Assessor of 
                Marin County, California, 119-040-04, 119-040-
                05, 119-040-18, 166-202-03, 166-010-06, 166-
                010-07, 166-010-24, 166-010-25 119-240-19, 166-
                010-10, 166-010-22, 119-240-03, 119-240-51, 
                119-240-52, 119-240-54, 166-010-12, 166-010-13, 
                and 119-235-10.
                  (B) Lands and waters in San Mateo County 
                generally depicted on the map entitled `Sweeney 
                Ridge Addition, Golden Gate National Recreation 
                Area', numbered NRA GG-80,000-A, and dated May 
                1980.
                  (C) Lands acquired under the Golden Gate 
                National Recreation Area Addition Act of 1992 
                (16 U.S.C. 460bb-1 note; Public Law 102-299).
                  (D) Lands generally depicted on the map 
                entitled `Additions to Golden Gate National 
                Recreation Area', numbered NPS-80-076, and 
                dated July 2000/PWR-PLRPC.
                  (E) Lands generally depicted on the map 
                entitled `Rancho Corral de Tierra Additions to 
                the Golden Gate National Recreation Area', 
                numbered NPS-80,079E, and dated March 2004.
          (3) Acquisition limitation.--The Secretary may 
        acquire land described in paragraph (2)(E) only from a 
        willing seller.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *