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109th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     109-674

======================================================================



 
PROMOTING ANTITERRORISM CAPABILITIES THROUGH INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION 
                                  ACT

                                _______
                                

 September 25, 2006.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. King of New York, from the Committee on Homeland Security, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 4942]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Homeland Security, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 4942) to establish a capability and office to 
promote cooperation between entities of the United States and 
its allies in the global war on terrorism for the purpose of 
engaging in cooperative endeavors focused on the research, 
development, and commercialization of high-priority 
technologies intended to detect, prevent, respond to, recover 
from, and mitigate against acts of terrorism and other high 
consequence events and to address the homeland security needs 
of Federal, State, and local governments, having considered the 
same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend 
that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Purpose and Summary..............................................     4
Background and Need for Legislation..............................     4
Hearings.........................................................     5
Committee Consideration..........................................     5
Committee Votes..................................................     5
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................     6
Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives............     6
New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures     6
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................     6
Federal Mandates Statement.......................................     6
Earmarks.........................................................     8
Advisory Committee Statement.....................................     8
Constitutional Authority Statement...............................     8
Applicability to Legislative Branch..............................     8
Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation...................     9
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............    10
Additional Views.................................................    16

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Promoting Antiterrorism Capabilities 
Through International Cooperation Act''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  The Congress finds the following:
          (1) The development and implementation of technology is 
        critical to combating terrorism and other high consequence 
        events and implementing a comprehensive homeland security 
        strategy.
          (2) The United States and its allies in the global war on 
        terrorism share a common interest in facilitating research, 
        development, testing, and evaluation of technologies that will 
        aid in detecting, preventing, responding to, recovering from, 
        and mitigating against acts of terrorism.
          (3) Certain United States allies in the global war on 
        terrorism, including Israel, the United Kingdom, Canada, 
        Australia, and Singapore have extensive experience with, and 
        technological expertise in, homeland security.
          (4) The United States and certain of its allies in the global 
        war on terrorism have a history of successful collaboration in 
        developing mutually beneficial technologies in the areas of 
        defense, agriculture, and telecommunications.
          (5) The United States and its allies in the global war on 
        terrorism will mutually benefit from the sharing of 
        technological expertise to combat domestic and international 
        terrorism.
          (6) The establishment of an office to facilitate and support 
        cooperative endeavors between and among government agencies, 
        for-profit business entities, academic institutions, and 
        nonprofit entities of the United States and its allies will 
        safeguard lives and property worldwide against acts of 
        terrorism and other high consequence events.

SEC. 3. PROMOTING ANTITERRORISM THROUGH INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION ACT.

  (a) In General.--The Homeland Security Act of 2002 is amended by 
inserting after section 313 (6 U.S.C. 193) the following new section:

``SEC. 314. PROMOTING ANTITERRORISM THROUGH INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION 
                    PROGRAM.

  ``(a) Definitions.--In this section:
          ``(1) Director.--The term `Director' means the Director 
        selected under subsection (c)(1).
          ``(2) International cooperative activities.--The term 
        `international cooperative activities' includes--
                  ``(A) coordinated research projects, joint research 
                projects, or joint ventures;
                  ``(B) joint studies or technical demonstrations;
                  ``(C) coordinated field exercises, scientific 
                seminars, conferences, symposia, and workshops;
                  ``(D) training of scientists and engineers;
                  ``(E) visits and exchanges of scientists, engineers, 
                or other appropriate personnel;
                  ``(F) exchanges or sharing of scientific and 
                technological information; and
                  ``(G) joint use of laboratory facilities and 
                equipment.
          ``(3) Under secretary.--The term `Under Secretary' means the 
        Under Secretary for Science and Technology of the Department of 
        Homeland Security.
          ``(4) Institution of higher education.--The term `institution 
        of higher education' has the meaning given such term in section 
        101(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).
  ``(b) International Cooperative Activities.--
          ``(1) Authorization.--The Under Secretary is authorized to 
        carry out international cooperative activities to support the 
        responsibilities specified under section 302.
          ``(2) Mechanisms and equitability.--In carrying out this 
        section, the Under Secretary may award grants to and enter into 
        cooperative agreements or contracts with United States 
        governmental organizations, businesses, federally funded 
        research and development centers, institutions of higher 
        education, and foreign public or private entities. The Under 
        Secretary shall ensure that funding and resources expended in 
        international cooperative activities will be equitably matched 
        by the foreign partner organization through direct funding or 
        funding of complementary activities, or through provision of 
        staff, facilities, materials, or equipment.
          ``(3) Cooperation.--The Under Secretary is authorized to 
        conduct international cooperative activities jointly with other 
        agencies.
          ``(4) Foreign partners.--Under this section, the Under 
        Secretary may form partnerships with United States allies in 
        the global war on terrorism, including Israel, the United 
        Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Singapore, and other countries as 
        appropriate.
          ``(5) Exotic diseases.--As part of the international 
        cooperative activities authorized in this section, the Under 
        Secretary may facilitate the development of information sharing 
        and other types of cooperative mechanisms with foreign 
        countries, including nations in Africa, to strengthen American 
        preparedness against threats to the Nation's agricultural and 
        public health sectors from exotic diseases.
  ``(c) Office and Director.--
          ``(1) Establishment.--The Under Secretary shall establish the 
        Science and Technology Homeland Security International 
        Cooperative Programs Office to facilitate international 
        cooperative activities throughout the Science and Technology 
        Directorate. The Office shall be headed by a Director, who 
        shall be selected by and shall report to the Under Secretary.
          ``(2) Responsibilities of the director.--
                  ``(A) Development of mechanisms.--The Director shall 
                be responsible for developing, in coordination with the 
                Department of State and other Federal agencies, 
                mechanisms and legal frameworks to allow and to support 
                international cooperative activities in support of 
                homeland security research.
                  ``(B) Identification of partners.--The Director shall 
                facilitate the matching of United States entities 
                engaged in homeland security research with non-United 
                States entities engaged in homeland security research 
                so that they may partner in homeland security research 
                activities.
                  ``(C) Coordination.--The Director shall ensure that 
                the activities under this subsection are coordinated 
                with those of other components of the Department and of 
                other relevant research agencies.
                  ``(D) Conferences and workshops.--The Director, 
                periodically, shall support the planning and execution 
                of international homeland security technology workshops 
                and conferences to improve contact among the 
                international community of technology developers and to 
                help establish direction for future technology goals.
          ``(3) Program manager authority.--This subsection shall not 
        be construed to limit the ability of a program manager to 
        initiate or carry out international cooperative activities 
        provided that such activities are appropriately coordinated 
        with the office established under this subsection.
  ``(d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of Homeland Security for international 
cooperative activities authorized under this section $25,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 2007 through 2010.
  ``(e) Report to Congress on International Cooperative Activities.--
          ``(1) Initial report.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
        of enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary, acting through 
        the Director, shall transmit to the Congress a report 
        containing--
                  ``(A) a brief description of each partnership formed 
                under subsection (b)(4), including the participants, 
                goals, and amount and sources of funding; and
                  ``(B) a list of international cooperative activities 
                underway, including the participants, goals, expected 
                duration, and amount and sources of funding, including 
                resources provided to support the activities in lieu of 
                direct funding.
          ``(2) Updates.--At the end of the fiscal year that occurs 5 
        years after the transmittal of the report under subsection (a), 
        and every 5 years thereafter, the Under Secretary, acting 
        through the Director, shall transmit to the Congress an update 
        of the report required under subsection (a).''.
  (b) Table of Contents Amendment.--The table of contents of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 is amended by adding after the item 
relating to section 313 the following new item:

``Sec. 314. Promoting antiterrorism through international cooperation 
program.''.

                          Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 4942 is to establish a capability and 
office to promote cooperation between entities of the United 
States and its allies in the global war on terrorism for the 
purpose of engaging in cooperative endeavors focused on the 
research, development, and commercialization of high-priority 
technologies intended to detect, prevent, respond to, recover 
from, and mitigate against acts of terrorism and other high 
consequence events and to address the homeland security needs 
of Federal, State, and local governments.

                  Background and Need for Legislation

    Securing one's homeland is not a mission unique to the 
United States. Like the United States, our allies in the global 
war on terrorism, such as the State of Israel, the United 
Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, and the 
Commonwealth of Australia, confront countless challenges in 
protecting their people and property. Indeed, many of our 
Nation's allies have extensive experience with terrorism and 
technological expertise in homeland security. It is, therefore, 
not surprising that our Nation and its allies share a common 
need for, and interest in, researching, developing, testing, 
and evaluating homeland security-related technologies.
    When most Americans think about homeland security, they 
usually do not think about science and technology. They think 
of police officers, firefighters, and emergency medical 
technicians--not academics, scientists, or engineers. They 
think of police stations, fire houses, and hospitals--not 
laboratories, think tanks, universities, and technology 
companies. They think of the courageous public servants who put 
their safety at risk to protect our lives and property--not the 
technology that enables them to do their jobs effectively and 
efficiently. Yet, developing and deploying innovative, cutting-
edge homeland security-related technology is essential to 
defeating terrorism.
    Until the Department of Homeland Security's Directorate of 
Science and Technology was established, there had never been a 
Federal Department or agency dedicated exclusively to 
researching, developing, testing, and evaluating technologies 
for homeland security. Given the fact that the Directorate of 
Science and Technology is now only little more than three years 
old, it is absolutely imperative for the Department of Homeland 
Security to leverage the scientific and technological assets 
and knowledge available from multiple sources, whether those 
sources are domestic, such as the National laboratories, 
academic institutions, or the private sector, or international.
    Consequently, our Nation should make every possible effort 
to benefit from the ``lessons learned'' by our allies in the 
global war on terrorism and to collaborate with them, when 
appropriate, in developing mutually beneficial homeland 
security-related technologies. Such international collaboration 
is not new. The United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom 
have an impressive history of working cooperatively and 
successfully to develop agricultural, defense, 
telecommunications, and other technologies mutually beneficial 
to each country. Indeed, the Israel-United States Binational 
Industrial Research and Development (BIRD) Foundation and the 
U.S.-Israel Science and Technology Foundation are just two of 
many currently existing science and technology programs 
designed to stimulate, promote and support international 
industrial research and development.
    However, in light of the grave threat faced by our Nation, 
the Committee believes that the Department of Homeland Security 
needs to do more to develop and foster international 
cooperative activities. This legislation, therefore, would 
establish a new office within the Department of Homeland 
Security's Directorate of Science and Technology to promote 
international cooperative activity in support of homeland 
security research, development, testing, and evaluation. 
Specifically, H.R. 4942 would direct the Under Secretary for 
Science and Technology to establish a Science and Technology 
Homeland Security International Cooperative Programs Office to 
be responsible for, among other things, developing strategic 
priorities for international cooperative activity, facilitating 
such international activity by identifying and matching 
domestic and foreign entities engaged in homeland security 
research and development, and providing funds for such 
international cooperative partnerships.

                                Hearings

    No Committee hearings were held on H.R. 4942.

                        Committee Consideration

    H.R. 4942 was introduced by Mr. King of New York, Mr. 
Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Reichert, and Mr. Pascrell on 
March 14, 2006, and referred solely to the Committee on 
Homeland Security. On March 15, 2006, H.R. 4942 was 
subsequently referred to the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Science, and Technology.
    On March 15, 2006, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Science, and Technology met in open markup 
session and forwarded H.R. 4942 favorably to the Full Committee 
without amendment, by voice vote.
    On June 14, 2006, the Full Committee met in open markup 
session and ordered H.R. 4942 reported to the House, amended, 
by voice vote.

                            Committee Votes

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the Committee to list the record votes 
on the motion to report legislation and amendments thereto.
    On June 14, 2006, the Full Committee favorably ordered H.R. 
4942 to be reported to the House, amended, by voice vote.
    The following amendment was offered:
    An Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute (#1) offered by 
Mr. King; was AGREED TO, without amendment, by voice vote.
    On March 15, 2006, the Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Science, and Technology forwarded H.R. 4942 to 
the Full Committee for consideration, without amendment, by 
voice vote.

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee has held oversight 
hearings and made findings that are reflected in this report.

         Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives

    The purpose of H.R. 4942, the Promoting Antiterrorism 
Capabilities Through International Cooperation Act is to 
stimulate, promote, and support cooperation between entities in 
the United States and its allies in the Global War on Terrorism 
on research, development, testing, and evaluation of high-
priority technologies intended to detect, prevent, respond to, 
recover from, and mitigate against acts of terrorism. 
Specifically, H.R. 4942 directs the Under Secretary for Science 
and Technology of the Department of Homeland Security to 
establish a Science and Technology Homeland Security 
International Cooperative Programs Office to facilitate 
international cooperative activities, such as international 
homeland security technology workshops and conferences and 
joint ventures between U.S. public and private entities and 
those of our allies with technological expertise in combating 
terrorism. At its most fundamental level, H.R. 4942 is designed 
to expedite the deployment of safe and effective homeland 
security technologies to those who need it.

   New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee finds that H.R. 
4942, the Promoting Antiterrorism Capabilities Through 
International Cooperation Act, would result in no new or 
increased budget authority, entitlement authority, or tax 
expenditures or revenues.

                  Congressional Budget Office Estimate

    The Committee adopts as its own the cost estimate prepared 
by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

                       Federal Mandates Statement

    The Committee adopts as its own the estimate of Federal 
mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, June 27, 2006.
Hon. Peter T. King,
Chairman, Committee on Homeland Security,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 4942, the 
Promoting Antiterrorism Capabilities Through International 
Cooperation Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Jason 
Wheelock.
            Sincerely,
                                          Donald B. Marron,
                                                   Acting Director.
    Enclosure.

H.R. 4942--Promoting Antiterrorism Capabilities Through International 
        Cooperation Act

    Summary: H.R. 4942 would establish the International 
Cooperative Programs Office within the Science and Technology 
Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The 
office would be directed to facilitate and support cooperation 
on homeland security research between the United States and its 
allies, and would be charged with appropriately matching U.S. 
and foreign entities engaged in such research.
    The bill would authorize the appropriation of $25 million a 
year for the 2007-2010 period to fund joint research efforts, 
studies, and other cooperative activities between the United 
States and its allies. The Under Secretary of Science and 
Technology of DHS would be responsible for ensuring that 
funding and resources expended by the United States in such 
joint efforts be equitably matched by foreign partners. CBO 
estimates that implementing H.R. 4942 would cost $85 million 
over the 2007-2011 period, assuming the appropriation of the 
specified amounts.
    H.R. 4942 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 4942 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget functions 050 
(national defense) and 750 (administration of justice).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
                                                                       2007     2008     2009     2010     2011
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorization Level................................................       25       25       25       25        0
Estimated Outlays..................................................        6       16       22       23       18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: The bill would authorize the 
appropriation of $25 million a year for the 2007-2010 period to 
fund joint research efforts between the United States and its 
allies, and to establish the Office of Science and Technology 
Homeland Security International Cooperative Programs Office in 
DHS. The Director of the new office would report to the Under 
Secretary for Science and Technology and would be responsible 
for:
           Promoting cooperative research between the 
        United States and its allies on homeland security 
        technologies;
           Facilitating the matching of U.S. entities 
        engaged in homeland security research with appropriate 
        foreign research partners;
           Ensuring that activities of the office are 
        coordinated with other parts of DHS and other relevant 
        research agencies; and
           Planning and executing conferences and 
        workshops to improve contact among technology 
        developers and to help establish direction for future 
        technology goals.
    For this estimate, CBO assumes that H.R. 4942 will be 
enacted late in 2006 and that the authorized amounts will be 
provided in annual appropriation acts. Using historical 
spending patterns for these types of programs, CBO estimates 
that implementing H.R. 4942 would cost $85 million over the 
2007-2011 period, assuming the appropriation of the specified 
amounts.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 4942 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would not affect the budgets of state, 
local, or tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Jason Wheelock. Impact 
on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Melissa Merrell. 
Impact on the Private Sector: Carla-Marie Ulerie.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                                Earmarks

    In compliance with H. Res. 1000, (109th Congress), no 
providing authority, including budget authority, or 
recommending the exercise of authority, including budget 
authority, for a contract, loan, loan guarantee, grant, loan 
authority, or other expenditure with or to a non-Federal entity 
are included in H.R. 4942.

                      Advisory Committee Statement

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that the 
Constitutional authority for this legislation is provided in 
Article I, section 8, clause 1, which grants Congress the power 
to provide for the common Defense of the United States.

                  Applicability to Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

             Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation


Section 1. Short title

    This section cites the measure as the ``Promoting 
Antiterrorism Capabilities Through International Cooperation 
Act.''

Section 2. Findings

    This section contains six (6) findings of Congress 
supporting the need for the legislation.

Section 3. Promoting Antiterrorism Capabilities Through International 
        Cooperation Act

    This section amends the ``Homeland Security Act of 2002'' 
(Public Law No. 107-296) by inserting after section 313 a new 
section entitled, ``Promoting Antiterrorism Through 
International Cooperation Program.''
            Subsection (a)--Definitions
    This subsection provides a number of definitions. Among 
other definitions, the term ``international cooperative 
activity'' includes coordinated research projects, joint 
research projects, or joint ventures, joint studies or 
technical demonstrations, coordinated field exercises, 
scientific seminars, conferences, symposia, and workshops, 
training of scientists and engineers, visits and exchanges, and 
joint use of laboratory facilities and equipment.
            Subsection (b)--International Cooperative Activities
    This subsection directs the Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology of the Department of Homeland Security to carry out 
international cooperative activities. Specifically, the Under 
Secretary may facilitate such international cooperative 
activity through grants, cooperative agreements, or contracts 
with U.S. governmental organizations, businesses, federally 
funded research and development centers, institutions of higher 
education, and foreign public and private entities. This 
subsection also requires the Under Secretary to ensure that 
foreign partner organizations equitably match U.S. funding 
expended through direct funding or funding of complementary 
activities, or through provision of staff, facilities, 
material, or equipment.
    This subsection specifies that the Under Secretary should 
seek to partner with U.S. allies in the global war on 
terrorism, including the State of Israel, the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, the Commonwealth of 
Australia, and the Republic of Singapore. Finally, as part of 
the Department's international cooperative activities, the 
Under Secretary should work with nations in Africa to 
facilitate the development of information sharing and other 
types of cooperative mechanisms to strengthen American 
preparedness against threats to our Nation's agricultural 
sector and public health from exotic diseases.
            Subsection (c)--Office and director
    This subsection directs the Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology of the Department of Homeland Security to establish 
a Science and Technology Homeland Security International 
Cooperative Programs Office (Office) to facilitate 
international cooperative activities throughout the Directorate 
of Science and Technology. The Director of this Office, who 
shall report directly to the Under Secretary, will be 
responsible for:
          (1) developing mechanisms and legal frameworks to 
        allow and support international cooperative activity in 
        support of homeland security research;
          (2) identifying and matching domestic entities 
        engaged in homeland security research with foreign 
        entities so that they may partner in homeland security 
        research activities;
          (3) ensuring coordination of international 
        cooperative activities carried out by the Office with 
        the activities of other components of the Department 
        and other relevant research agencies; and
          (4) holding international homeland security 
        technology workshops and conferences.
    The Science and Technology Homeland Security International 
Cooperative Programs Office should play a central role in 
fostering the development of new international cooperative 
activities. However, once international programs and 
relationships have been established and partnerships and 
umbrella agreements are in place, Program Managers throughout 
the Science and Technology Directorate may continue to manage 
and support such activities without additional approval or 
direction being required from the Office. This section should 
not be construed as limiting program managers' ability to 
initiate or carry out cooperative activities; however, for 
tracking and coordination purposes, the Office should continue 
to be aware of any such activities underway.
            Subsection (d)--Authorization of appropriations
    This subsection authorizes $25 million for international 
cooperative activities for each of the Fiscal Years 2007 
through 2010.
            Subsection (e)--Report
    The subsection requires the Under Secretary for Science and 
Technology of the Department of Homeland Security, acting 
through the Director of the Science and Technology Homeland 
Security International Cooperative Programs Office, to submit, 
within 180 days after enactment, a report to Congress that: (1) 
describes each international partnership, including the 
participants, goals, and amount and sources of funding; and (2) 
lists each international cooperative activity underway, 
including the participants, goals, expected duration, and 
amount and sources of funding. The Under Secretary shall submit 
an updated report to Congress every five years thereafter.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is 
printed in italic and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

  (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Homeland 
Security Act of 2002''.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is 
as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
     * * * * * * *

    TITLE III--SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SUPPORT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

     * * * * * * *
Sec. 314. Promoting antiterrorism through international cooperation 
          program.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE III--SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY IN SUPPORT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 314. PROMOTING ANTITERRORISM THROUGH INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION 
                    PROGRAM.

  (a) Definitions.--In this section:
          (1) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the 
        Director selected under subsection (c)(1).
          (2) International cooperative activities.--The term 
        ``international cooperative activities'' includes--
                  (A) coordinated research projects, joint 
                research projects, or joint ventures;
                  (B) joint studies or technical 
                demonstrations;
                  (C) coordinated field exercises, scientific 
                seminars, conferences, symposia, and workshops;
                  (D) training of scientists and engineers;
                  (E) visits and exchanges of scientists, 
                engineers, or other appropriate personnel;
                  (F) exchanges or sharing of scientific and 
                technological information; and
                  (G) joint use of laboratory facilities and 
                equipment.
          (3) Under secretary.--The term ``Under Secretary'' 
        means the Under Secretary for Science and Technology of 
        the Department of Homeland Security.
          (4) Institution of higher education.--The term 
        ``institution of higher education'' has the meaning 
        given such term in section 101(a) of the Higher 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001(a)).
  (b) International Cooperative Activities.--
          (1) Authorization.--The Under Secretary is authorized 
        to carry out international cooperative activities to 
        support the responsibilities specified under section 
        302.
          (2) Mechanisms and equitability.--In carrying out 
        this section, the Under Secretary may award grants to 
        and enter into cooperative agreements or contracts with 
        United States governmental organizations, businesses, 
        federally funded research and development centers, 
        institutions of higher education, and foreign public or 
        private entities. The Under Secretary shall ensure that 
        funding and resources expended in international 
        cooperative activities will be equitably matched by the 
        foreign partner organization through direct funding or 
        funding of complementary activities, or through 
        provision of staff, facilities, materials, or 
        equipment.
          (3) Cooperation.--The Under Secretary is authorized 
        to conduct international cooperative activities jointly 
        with other agencies.
          (4) Foreign partners.--Under this section, the Under 
        Secretary may form partnerships with United States 
        allies in the global war on terrorism, including 
        Israel, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, 
        Singapore, and other countries as appropriate.
          (5) Exotic diseases.--As part of the international 
        cooperative activities authorized in this section, the 
        Under Secretary may facilitate the development of 
        information sharing and other types of cooperative 
        mechanisms with foreign countries, including nations in 
        Africa, to strengthen American preparedness against 
        threats to the Nation's agricultural and public health 
        sectors from exotic diseases.
  (c) Office and Director.--
          (1) Establishment.--The Under Secretary shall 
        establish the Science and Technology Homeland Security 
        International Cooperative Programs Office to facilitate 
        international cooperative activities throughout the 
        Science and Technology Directorate. The Office shall be 
        headed by a Director, who shall be selected by and 
        shall report to the Under Secretary.
          (2) Responsibilities of the director.--
                  (A) Development of mechanisms.--The Director 
                shall be responsible for developing, in 
                coordination with the Department of State and 
                other Federal agencies, mechanisms and legal 
                frameworks to allow and to support 
                international cooperative activities in support 
                of homeland security research.
                  (B) Identification of partners.--The Director 
                shall facilitate the matching of United States 
                entities engaged in homeland security research 
                with non-United States entities engaged in 
                homeland security research so that they may 
                partner in homeland security research 
                activities.
                  (C) Coordination.--The Director shall ensure 
                that the activities under this subsection are 
                coordinated with those of other components of 
                the Department and of other relevant research 
                agencies.
                  (D) Conferences and workshops.--The Director, 
                periodically, shall support the planning and 
                execution of international homeland security 
                technology workshops and conferences to improve 
                contact among the international community of 
                technology developers and to help establish 
                direction for future technology goals.
          (3) Program manager authority.--This subsection shall 
        not be construed to limit the ability of a program 
        manager to initiate or carry out international 
        cooperative activities provided that such activities 
        are appropriately coordinated with the office 
        established under this subsection.
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to 
be appropriated to the Secretary of Homeland Security for 
international cooperative activities authorized under this 
section $25,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2007 through 
2010.
  (e) Report to Congress on International Cooperative 
Activities.--
          (1) Initial report.--Not later than 180 days after 
        the date of enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary, 
        acting through the Director, shall transmit to the 
        Congress a report containing--
                  (A) a brief description of each partnership 
                formed under subsection (b)(4), including the 
                participants, goals, and amount and sources of 
                funding; and
                  (B) a list of international cooperative 
                activities underway, including the 
                participants, goals, expected duration, and 
                amount and sources of funding, including 
                resources provided to support the activities in 
                lieu of direct funding.
          (2) Updates.--At the end of the fiscal year that 
        occurs 5 years after the transmittal of the report 
        under subsection (a), and every 5 years thereafter, the 
        Under Secretary, acting through the Director, shall 
        transmit to the Congress an update of the report 
        required under subsection (a).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *




                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

    On June 14, 2006, the Committee on Homeland Security 
reported H.R. 4942, the ``Promoting Antiterrorism Capabilities 
Through International Cooperation Act,'' out of Committee on 
voice vote. This is legislation that many of us, as Members of 
the Select Committee on Homeland Security in the 108th 
Congress, have supported for several years. We are heartened 
that our colleagues across the aisle accepted Ranking Member 
Bennie G. Thompson's (D-MS) and Subcommittee on Emergency 
Preparedness, Science and Technology Ranking Member Bill 
Pascrell's (D-NJ) January 2005 invitation to join us in working 
toward passing this legislation in the 109th Congress.
    The Department of Defense and private organizations, such 
as the Bird Foundation and the U.S. Israel Science and 
Technology Foundation, have successfully developed 
international technology sharing programs in the national 
security arena for many years. The legislation passed on 
Wednesday will provide the Department of Homeland Security with 
the authority to replicate those efforts with regards to 
homeland security technologies. Our analysis shows that many 
nations, including Israel, Canada, the United Kingdom, and 
Australia, already utilize advanced homeland security 
technologies and techniques that, if used by our federal 
government, could improve our security efforts.
    One provision that we are especially pleased with 
encourages the United States to create a new relationship with 
an African nation in order to develop better means for 
protecting our nation's agriculture and public health from 
exotic diseases.
    It is common sense that Congress should do all it can to 
make sure nations are working together in the War on Terror. If 
enacted into law, we believe this bill will help ensure the 
Department of Homeland Security takes better advantage of the 
experience and resources of our allies. As a result, we hope it 
receives a vote in the full House as soon as possible.

                                   Bennie G. Thompson.
                                   Zoe Lofgren.
                                   Bob Etheridge.
                                   Kendrick B. Meek.
                                   Loretta Sanchez.
                                   Bill Pascrell, Jr.
                                   Jim Langevin.
                                   Edward J. Markey.
                                   Jane Harman.
                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Donna M. Christensen.
                                   Norm Dicks.
                                   Peter DeFazio.
                                   Sheila Jackson-Lee.
                                   Eleanor Holmes Norton.