Report text available as:

  • TXT
  • PDF   (PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip ?
                                                       Calendar No. 137
108th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     108-69

======================================================================



 
              MOSQUITO ABATEMENT FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT

                                _______
                                

                 June 12, 2003.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Gregg, from the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
                   Pensions, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T



                         [To accompany S. 1015]

    The Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, to 
which was referred the bill (S. 1015) to authorize grants 
through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for 
mosquito control programs to prevent mosquito-borne diseases, 
and for other purposes, having considered the same, reports 
favorably thereon without amendment and recommends that the 
bill do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
  I. Purpose and need for legislation.................................1
 II. Summary..........................................................2
III. History of legislation and votes in committee....................2
 IV. Explanation of bill and committee views..........................3
  V. Cost estimate....................................................5
 VI. Regulatory impact statement......................................5
VII. Application of law to the legislative branch.....................5
VIII.Section-by-section analysis......................................5

 IX. Changes in existing law..........................................6

                  I. Purpose and Need for Legislation

    Public health officials are growing increasingly concerned 
about the spread of mosquito-borne diseases such as West Nile 
virus and malaria. Both diseases are spread by the bite of an 
infected mosquito. Both diseases can cause severe health 
complications and can be fatal. There is currently no vaccine 
for either West Nile virus or malaria.
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 
reports that all residents of areas where West Nile virus 
activity has been identified are at risk of contracting West 
Nile encephalitis, one of the most deadly sequelae of the 
disease. People over 50 years of age and the immune compromised 
have the highest risk of severe disease.
    Scientists are currently studying whether there is a link 
between the level of a person's overall health and his/her risk 
of getting severe disease. Although scientists at the National 
Institutes of Health (NIH) are conducting research for the 
development of a vaccine, there is currently no vaccine for 
West Nile virus. On August 21, 2002, the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) approved a national trial of alpha-
interferon to determine whether it could become the first 
specific therapy to treat West Nile virus.
    West Nile virus was first identified domestically in New 
York City in 1999, and in that year, the virus contributed to 
the death of seven people. As of January 29, 2003, 46 States 
have reported West Nile virus infections in mosquitoes, animals 
or humans. The number of human cases reported continues to 
rise, with CDC reporting 4007 human cases and 263 deaths as of 
early this year.
    Mosquito-borne diseases affect millions of people worldwide 
annually. The CDC reports that currently the most effective way 
to prevent transmission of West Nile virus and other mosquito-
borne disease to humans and other animals, or to control an 
epidemic once transmission has begun, is to reduce human 
exposure via mosquito control. States and local governments 
have established mosquito control programs to prevent and 
control the spread of mosquito-borne diseases. In general, 
these programs are primarily funded and maintained by local 
governments. However, many localities have not established 
mosquito control programs, nor have they completed a basic 
assessment of the need for such programs.

                              II. Summary

    S. 1015, the Mosquito Abatement for Safety and Health Act, 
establishes a temporary, one-time grant program for local 
governments or consortia thereof to implement mosquito control 
programs. The act establishes a grant program for States to 
help planning and coordination of control programs being 
carried out in the State. CDC is authorized to provide 
technical assistance to States and localities regarding the 
grants. NIH is authorized to enhance research on the control of 
vector populations responsible for transmitting human disease. 
Finally, the Secretary of Health and Human Services is 
authorized to provide a report to Congress on the use of public 
health pesticides, and the progress being made in ensuring a 
safe blood supply with respect to West Nile virus.

           III. History of Legislation and Votes in Committee

    On May 7, 2003, Senator Gregg, for himself and Senators 
Breaux, Landrieu, Alexander, Lincoln, Roberts, Clinton, Warner 
and DeWine, introduced S. 1015, to authorize grants through the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for mosquito control 
programs to prevent mosquito-borne diseases, and for other 
purposes. On May 14, 2003, the committee held an executive 
session to consider S. 1015. The committee approved S. 1015 by 
unanimous voice vote.

              IV. Explanation of Bill and Committee Views

    The committee recognizes the important role of local 
governments in developing and carrying out mosquito control 
programs. While this role may shift more to States or the 
Federal Government at some point in the future, the current 
status of local governments as the primary implementers of 
mosquito control was the basis for the design of grant programs 
to localities for this purpose.
    The committee recognizes the need for technical assistance 
to and coordination of local efforts by State and Federal 
Government. The committee affirms this role by authorizing a 
grant program for States for the purpose of providing 
coordination and planning of mosquito programs in the State. 
Further, the bill authorizes the CDC to provide technical 
assistance to States and localities in carrying out the grant 
program.
    The committee recognizes that a short-term grant program to 
many grantees could constitute a significant administrative 
burden on the Federal agency administering the program. As a 
result, the committee has taken a variety of legislative steps 
designed to reduce the number of applicants only to those most 
in need of grant funds and most able to effectively use such 
funds. Further, the bill encourages localities to apply with 
one another as one applicant in order to further reduce 
administrative pressures.
    The bill defines a political subdivision as the political 
jurisdiction immediately below the level of State government. 
The committee recognizes that some cities which have received 
mosquito control funds in the past from the CDC, while part of 
larger counties, may conduct mosquito control programs and 
function as a ``political jurisdiction immediately below the 
level of State government'' for the purposes of this bill. The 
committee encourages the Secretary to assess the special 
circumstances of such cities and, when appropriate, provide 
funding (provided the city meets all other requirements 
outlined by the act) to those cities, provided that the State 
within which such city is located does not object to receipt by 
such city of funds under this bill. Funds awarded to such city 
may not exceed the amount that otherwise would have been 
awarded to the larger county or counties, had mosquito control 
activities in the city been included in the county activities. 
Further, such city may not receive funding through more than 
one CDC award for mosquito control under this program, nor may 
the larger county receive funding for mosquito control 
activities within such city's limits.
    The committee recognizes that some small or rural States do 
not have sufficient capacity at the local level to apply for 
funds or to operate effective mosquito control programs, either 
because of minimal staff resources, lack of a health or 
environmental agency at the local level or other reasons. As a 
result, the committee expects that State governments may assist 
such localities in the application process or apply for funds 
on behalf of certain localities in the State. It is critical, 
however, that States who participate in the process in this 
way, serve as a funnel for grant funding to local governments 
to conduct the mosquito control activities rather than 
retaining grant funds for the operation of control programs at 
the State level. States who require funds to provide assistance 
to localities, such as planning and coordination, are 
encouraged to apply for the one-time planning grants provided 
by the legislation.
    The committee expects that funds will be distributed based 
on the need for initiation or improvement of control programs 
and on the severity of the mosquito-borne disease problem in a 
locality or region. Geographical or population size of the 
localityshould only be a factor in determining the amount of a 
grant to an applicant to the extent that such size is related to the 
scope, severity and cost of containing the mosquito-borne disease 
problem in the region.
    Likewise, the committee recognizes that the severity of the 
problem with mosquito-borne disease may be related to certain 
geographical characteristics of the locality that hinder 
mosquito control efforts. Such characteristics may include 
sheer territorial size, diluting staff resources with 
transportation time, requiring higher cost relating to removing 
reservoirs in vast stretches of land, reducing reservoirs or 
pesticide volume. These additional costs relating to 
geographical characteristics of an applicant should be 
considered by the CDC when determining grant awards.
    The committee recognizes the importance of comprehensive 
mosquito management programs in the prevention of mosquito-
borne disease. The committee encourages the Secretary to 
establish criteria that will be used in setting priorities for 
grant-making that recognize applicants with a demonstrated 
mosquito problem who are seeking to implement approaches 
designed to eradicate targeted mosquito populations before 
mosquito-borne disease outbreaks occur.
    The committee has included in the legislation provisions 
relating primarily to reducing the number of applicants to 
those most in need and most ready to effectively use funds. 
First, localities receive a larger grant award if they apply 
with one or more other localities. Second, localities must have 
completed a needs assessment and be effectively coordinated 
with their State government. Third, priority is given to 
localities in States who have applied for and obtained a 
planning grant. Priority is further given to localities who 
demonstrate a serious mosquito-borne disease problem or who 
have met specified criteria suggesting significant potential 
for mosquito-borne disease outbreaks. An exception to the 
$100,000 grant cap is available to the Secretary if the 
applicant demonstrates extreme need due to the size of the 
human population or the size of the mosquito problem. If the 
Secretary determines that the size of the mosquito population 
is related to the geographical size of a particular county, it 
is expected that the Secretary could use such information in 
certifying the waiver to the $100,000 cap.
    The committee is particularly concerned about two 
disturbing trends emerging during the West Nile virus season of 
2002. First, reports were made of inappropriate use of spraying 
with pesticides. The committee encourages the CDC, in 
collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 
to provide maximum oversight and assistance in this area for 
grantees, and for the Secretary to report to Congress on 
guidelines for public health pesticide use. Second, the 
discovery of transmission of West Nile virus through the blood/
organ supply is a cause for great concern about the safety of 
recipients of transfusion, organs and other blood products. The 
committee requires in the legislation a report from the 
Secretary to the committee on efforts being made to ensure a 
safe blood and organ supply with respect to West Nile virus.

                            V. Cost Estimate

    Due to the constraints the Congressional Budget Office 
estimate was not included in the report. When received by the 
committee, it will appear in the Congressional Record at a 
later time.

                    VI. Regulatory Impact Statement

    In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing rules of the Senate, the committee has determined that 
there will be minimal increases in the regulatory burden 
imposed by this bill.

           VII. Application of Law to the Legislative Branch

    The committee has determined that there is no legislative 
impact.

                   VIII. Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 establishes the short title as the ``Mosquito 
Abatement for Safety and Health Act.''

Section 2. Grant programs regarding control of mosquitoes

    Section 2 authorizes the Secretary, operating through the 
CDC, to make grants to States for the purpose of coordinating 
mosquito control programs. The Secretary must give preference 
to States that have one or more political subdivisions with an 
incidence or prevalence of mosquito-borne disease that is 
substantial relative to other States or who have met specified 
criteria suggesting significant potential for mosquito-borne 
disease outbreaks. To be eligible, a State must develop a plan 
for coordinating mosquito control programs in the State, taking 
into account any assessments or plans that have already been 
conducted by political subdivisions in the State. In developing 
the plan, the State must consult with political subdivisions. 
States must also agree to make grants to political subdivisions 
to conduct assessments, including entomological surveys of 
potential mosquito breeding areas, and to develop mosquito 
control plans. The assessment and planning grants to States may 
be as much as $10,000; no matching funds are required for 
eligibility. States must agree to monitor mosquito control 
programs, and submit a report to the Secretary. The State must 
agree that the grant will not be used to supplant existing 
State or local funds. A State may not receive more than one 
coordination grant.
    Section 2 also authorizes the Secretary, acting through the 
CDC, to make grants to political subdivisions of States for the 
operation of mosquito control programs to preventand control 
mosquito-borne disease. The Secretary must give preference to political 
subdivisions that (1) have an incidence or prevalence of mosquito-borne 
disease that is substantial relative to other areas, (2) demonstrate 
that the applicant will coordinate with contiguous political 
subdivisions, and (3) demonstrate that the State government for the 
applicant is committed to effectively coordinating control programs in 
the State. Further, political subdivisions must conduct a needs 
assessment, including an entomological survey of potential mosquito 
breeding areas, and develop a plan for a control program based on such 
assessment. Political subdivisions must produce $1 of matching funds 
for every $2 of Federal funds. The Secretary may waive such requirement 
given extraordinary economic conditions. The maximum Federal 
contribution may not exceed $100,000 per political subdivision, with 2 
exceptions. First, the Federal contribution may increase up to $110,000 
for grantees containing more than one political subdivision. Further, 
in areas of extreme need due to the size of the human or mosquito 
population, the Secretary may make an exception. Grantees must 
effectively evaluate and report to the Secretary the effectiveness of 
the program. Political subdivisions are limited to participating in 
only one grant application in order to ensure that each locality only 
receives one grant. Political subdivisions are defined.
    In Section 2, the CDC is authorized to provide training and 
technical assistance in the planning, development and operation 
of mosquito control programs, either directly or through awards 
of grants or contracts to public or private entities.
    Section 2 authorizes $100 million to be appropriated for 
fiscal year 2003 and such sums as necessary for fiscal years 
2004-2007. In the case of mosquito-borne disease constituting a 
public health emergency, the authorization is in addition to 
applicable authorizations under the Public Health Security and 
Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002.

Section 3. Research program at NIH

    Section 3 directs the National Institute of Environmental 
Health Sciences to conduct or support research to identify or 
develop methods of controlling the population of insects and 
vermin that transmit disease that have significant adverse 
health consequences for humans.

Section 4. Report

    Section 4 requires a report by Secretary on status of 
development of protocols to ensure blood supply safety with 
respect to West Nile Virus and on the benefits, risks and 
overall role of public health pesticides, including standards 
for use.

                      IX. Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with rule XXVI paragraph 12 of the Standing 
Rules of the Senate, the following provides a print of the 
statute or the part or section thereof to be amended or 
replaced (existing law proposed to be omitted is enclosed in 
black brackets, new matter is printed in italic, existing law 
in which no change is proposed is shown in roman):

PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



MOSQUITO ABATEMENT FOR SAFETY AND HEALTH ACT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                   Part B--Federal-State Cooperation


                               IN GENERAL

    Sec. 311. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


             PROJECT GRANTS FOR PREVENTIVE HEALTH SERVICES

    Sec. 317. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                          HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

    Sec. 317P. (a) Surveillance.--
          (1) In general.-- * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 317Q. SURVEILLANCE AND RESEARCH REGARDING MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary, acting through the Director 
of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, may award 
grants and cooperative agreements to public or nonprofit 
private entities (including health departments of States and 
political subdivisions of States, and including universities 
and other educational entities) for the collection, analysis, 
and reporting of data on Duchenne and other forms of muscular 
dystrophy. In making such awards, the Secretary may provide 
direct technical assistance in lieu of cash.
    (b) National Muscular Dystrophy Epidemiology Program.--The 
Secretary, acting through the Director of the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention, may award grants to public or 
nonprofit private entities (including health departments of 
States and political subdivisions of States, and including 
universities and other educational entities) for the purpose of 
carrying out epidemiological activities regarding Duchenne and 
other forms of muscular dystrophies, including collecting and 
analyzing information on the number, incidence, correlates, and 
symptoms of cases. In carrying out the preceding sentence, the 
Secretary shall provide for a national surveillance program. In 
making awards under this subsection, the Secretary may provide 
direct technical assistance in lieu of cash.
    (c) Coordination With Centers of Excellence.--The Secretary 
shall ensure that epidemiological information under subsections 
(a) and (b) is made available to centers of excellence 
supported under section 404E(b) by the Director of the National 
Institutes of Health.
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to carry out 
this section.

SEC. 317R. FOOD SAFETY GRANTS.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary may award grants to States 
and Indian tribes (as defined in section 4(e) of the Indian 
Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 
450b(e))) to expand participation in networks to enhance 
Federal, State, and local food safety efforts, including 
meeting the costs of establishing and maintaining the food 
safety surveillance, technical, and laboratory capacity needed 
for such participation.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--For the purpose of 
carrying out this section, there are authorized to be 
appropriated $19,500,000 for fiscal year 2002, and such sums as 
may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2003 through 
2006.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 317S. MOSQUITO-BORNE DISEASES; COORDINATION GRANTS TO STATES; 
                    ASSESSMENT AND CONTROL GRANTS TO POLITICAL 
                    SUBDIVISIONS.

    (a) Coordination Grants to States; Assessment Grants to 
Political Subdivisions.--
          (1) In general.--With respect to mosquito control 
        programs to prevent and control mosquito-borne diseases 
        (referred to in this section as ``control programs''), 
        the Secretary, acting through the Director of the 
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, may make 
        grants to States for the purpose of--
                  (A) coordinating control programs in the 
                State involved; and
                  (B) assisting such State in making grants to 
                political subdivisions of the State to conduct 
                assessments to determine the immediate needs in 
                such subdivisions for control programs, and to 
                develop, on the basis of such assessments, 
                plans for carrying out control programs in the 
                subdivisions.
          (2) Preference in making grants.--In making grants 
        under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall give 
        preference to states that have one or more political 
        subdivisions with an incidence, prevalence, or high 
        risk of mosquito-borne disease, or a population of 
        infected mosquitoes, that is substantial relative to 
        political subdivisions in other States.
          (3) Certain requirements.--A grant may be made under 
        paragraph (1) only if--
                  (A) the State involved has developed, or 
                agrees to develop, a plan for coordinating 
                control programs in the State, and the plan 
                takes into account any assessments or plans 
                described in subsection (b)(3) that have been 
                conducted or developed, respectively, by 
                political subdivisions in the State;
                  (B) in developing such plan, the State 
                consulted or will consult (as the case may be 
                under subparagraph (A)) with political 
                subdivisions in the State that are carrying out 
                or planning to carry out control programs;
                  (C) the State agrees to monitor control 
                programs in the State in order to ensure that 
                the programs are carried out in accordance with 
                such plan, with priority given to coordination 
                of control programs in political subdivisions 
                described in paragraph (2) that are contiguous;
                  (D) the State agrees that the State will make 
                grants to political subdivisions as described 
                in paragraph (1)(B), and that such a grant will 
                not exceed $10,000; and
                  (E) the State agrees that the grant will be 
                used to supplement, and not supplant, State and 
                local funds available for the purpose described 
                in paragraph (1).
          (4) Reports to secretary.--A grant may be made under 
        paragraph (1) only if the State involved agrees that, 
        promptly after the end of the fiscal year for which the 
        grant is made, the State will submit to the Secretary a 
        report that--
                  (A) describes the activities of the State 
                under the grant; and
                  (B) contains an evaluation of whether the 
                control programs of political subdivisions in 
                the State were effectively coordinated with 
                each other, which evaluation takes into account 
                any reports that the States received under 
                subsection (b)(5) from such subdivisions.
          (5) Number of grants.--A State may not receive more 
        than one grant under paragraph (1).
    (b) Prevention and Control Grants to Political 
Subdivisions.--
          (1) In general.--The Secretary, acting through the 
        Director of the Centers for Disease Control and 
        Prevention, may make grants to political subdivisions 
        of States or consortia of political subdivisions of 
        States, for the operation of control programs.
          (2) Preference in making grants.--In making grants 
        under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall give 
        preference to a political subdivision or consortium of 
        political subdivisions that--
                  (A) has--
                          (i) a history of elevated incidence 
                        or prevalence of mosquito-borne 
                        disease;
                          (ii) a population of infected 
                        mosquitoes; or
                          (iii) met criteria determined by the 
                        Secretary to suggest an increased risk 
                        of elevated incidence or prevalence of 
                        mosquito-borne disease in the pending 
                        fiscal year;
                  (B) demonstrates to the Secretary that such 
                political subdivision or consortium of 
                political subdivisions will, if appropriate to 
                the mosquito circumstances involved, 
                effectively coordinate the activities of the 
                control programs with contiguous political 
                subdivisions;
                  (C) demonstrates to the Secretary (directly 
                or through State officials) that the State in 
                which such a political subdivision or 
                consortium of political subdivisions is located 
                has identified or will identify geographic 
                areas in such State that have a significant 
                need for control programs and will effectively 
                coordinate such programs in such areas; and
                  (D) is located in a State that has received a 
                grant under subsection (a).
          (3) Requirement of assessment and plan.--A grant may 
        be made under paragraph (1) only if the political 
        subdivision or consortium of political subdivisions 
        involved--
                  (A) has conducted an assessment to determine 
                the immediate needs in such subdivision or 
                consortium for a control program, including an 
                entomological survey of potential mosquito 
                breeding areas; and
                  (B) has, on the basis of such assessment, 
                developed a plan for carrying out such a 
                program.
          (4) Requirement of matching funds.--
                  (A) In general.--With respect to the costs of 
                a control program to be carried out under 
                paragraph (1) by a political subdivision or 
                consortium of political subdivisions, a grant 
                under such paragraph may be made only if the 
                subdivision or consortium agrees to make 
                available (directly or through donations from 
                public or private entities) non-Federal 
                contributions toward such costs in an amount 
                that is not less than \1/3\ of such costs ($1 
                for each $2 of Federal funds provided in the 
                grant).
                  (B) Determination of amount contributed.--
                Non-Federal contributions required in 
                subparagraph (A) may be in cash or in kind, 
                fairly evaluated, including plant, equipment, 
                or services. Amounts provided by theFederal 
Government, or services assisted or subsidized to any significant 
extent by the Federal Government, may not be included in determining 
the amount of such non-Federal contributions.
                  (C) Waiver.--The Secretary may waive the 
                requirement established in subparagraph (A) if 
                the Secretary determines that extraordinary 
                economic conditions in the political 
                subdivision or consortium of political 
                subdivisions involved justify the waiver.
          (5) Reports to secretary.--A grant may be made under 
        paragraph (1) only if the political subdivision or 
        consortium of political subdivisions involved agrees 
        that, promptly after the end of the fiscal year for 
        which the grant is made, the subdivision or consortium 
        will submit to the Secretary, and to the State within 
        which the subdivision or consortium is located, a 
        report that describes the control program and contains 
        an evaluation of whether the program was effective.
          (6) Amount of grant; number of grants.--
                  (A) Amount of grant.--
                          (i) Single political subdivision.--A 
                        grant under paragraph (1) awarded to a 
                        political subdivision for a fiscal year 
                        may not exceed $100,000.
                          (ii) Consortium.--A grant under 
                        paragraph (1) awarded to a consortium 
                        of 2 or more political subdivisions may 
                        not exceed $110,000 for each political 
                        subdivision. A consortium is not 
                        required to provide matching funds 
                        under paragraph (4) for any amounts 
                        received by such consortium in excess 
                        of amounts each political subdivision 
                        would have received separately.
                          (iii) Waiver of requirement.--A grant 
                        may exceed the maximum amount in clause 
                        (i) or (ii) if the Secretary determines 
                        that the geographical area covered by a 
                        political subdivision or consortium 
                        awarded a grant under paragraph (1) has 
                        an extreme need due to the size or 
                        density of--
                                  (I) the human population in 
                                such geographical area; or
                                  (II) the mosquito population 
                                in such geographical area.
                  (B) Number of grants.--A political 
                subdivision or a consortium of political 
                subdivisions may not receive more than one 
                grant under paragraph (1).
    (c) Applications for Grants.--A grant may be made under 
subsection (a) or (b) only if an application for the grant is 
submitted to the Secretary and the application is in such form, 
is made in such manner, and contains such agreements, 
assurances, and information as the Secretary determines to be 
necessary to carry out this section.
    (d) Technical Assistance.--Amounts appropriated under 
subsection (f) may be used by the Secretary to provide training 
and technical assistance with respect to the planning, 
development, and operation of assessments and plans under 
subsection (a) and control programs under subsection (b). The 
Secretary may provide such technical assistance directly or 
through awards of grants or contracts to public and private 
entities.
    (e) Definition of Political Subdivision.--In this section, 
the term ``political subdivision'' means the local political 
jurisdiction immediately below the level of State government, 
including counties, parishes, and boroughs. If State law 
recognizes an entity of general government that functions in 
lieu of, and is not within, a county, parish, or borough, the 
Secretary may recognize an area under the jurisdiction of such 
other entities of general government as a political subdivision 
for purposes of this section.
    (f) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) In general.--For the purpose of carrying out this 
        section, there are authorized to be appropriated 
        $100,000,000 for fiscal year 2003, and such sums as may 
        be necessary for each of fiscal years 2004 through 
        2007.
          (2) Public health emergencies.--In the case of 
        control programs carried out in response to a mosquito-
        borne disease that constitutes a public health 
        emergency, the authorization of appropriations under 
        paragraph (1) is in addition to applicable 
        authorizations of appropriations under the Public 
        Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and 
        Response Act of 2002.
          (3) Fiscal year 2004 appropriations.--For fiscal year 
        2004, 50 percent or more of the funds appropriated 
        under paragraph (1) shall be used to award grants to 
        political subdivisions or consortia of political 
        subdivisions under subsection (b).

    Subpart 12--National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences


                        PURPOSE OF THE INSTITUTE

    Sec. 463. * * *

           APPLIED TOXICOLOGICAL RESEARCH AND TESTING PROGRAM

    Sec. 463A. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


      METHODS OF CONTROLLING CERTAIN INSECT AND VERMIN POPULATIONS

    Sec. 463B. The Director of the Institute shall conduct or 
support research to identify or develop methods of controlling 
insect and vermin populations that transmit to humans diseases 
that have significant adverse health consequences.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *