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108th Congress                                                   Report
 1st Session                 SENATE                              108-44
======================================================================
 
 AUTHORIZING APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2004 FOR INTELLIGENCE AND 
 INTELLIGENCE-RELATED ACTIVITIES OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT, THE 
   COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT ACCOUNT, AND THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 
        RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY SYSTEM, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

                  May 8, 2003.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Roberts, from the Select Committee on Intelligence, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1025]

    The Select Committee on Intelligence (SSCI or Committee), 
having considered the original bill (S. 1025), to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2004 for intelligence and 
intelligence-related activities of the United States 
Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central 
Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for 
other purposes reports favorably thereon and recommends that 
the bill pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   page
Classified Supplement to the Committee Report....................     2
Section-by-Section Analysis and Discussion.......................     2
Committee Comments on Fiscal Year 2004 Intelligence Authorization 
  Bill and Other Matters.........................................    12
Intelligence Community Management, Planning, and Performance:
    Intelligence Community strategic and performance planning....    12
    Intelligence Community compliance with Federal financial 
      accounting standards.......................................    13
    National Security Agency budget, acquisition, and 
      compensation reform........................................    15
    Defense Finance and Accounting Service and the National 
      Security Agency............................................    19
    Authority for Intelligence Community elements of Department 
      of Defense to award personal service contracts.............    19
    Report on detail of civilian intelligence personnel 
      throughout the Intelligence Community and the Department of 
      Defense....................................................    19
    Protection of certain Intelligence Community personnel from 
      tort liability.............................................    20
    Modification of authority to obligate and expend certain 
      funds for intelligence activities..........................    20
    Modification of notice and wait requirements on projects to 
      construct or improve Intelligence Community facilities.....    20
    Provision of affordable living quarters for certain students 
      working at National Security Agency Laboratory.............    21
    Repeal of certain Intelligence Community reporting 
      requirements...............................................    21
    Cancellation of other Intelligence Community reporting 
      requirements...............................................    22
    Central Intelligence Agency Act of 1949 notification 
      requirements...............................................    22
Information Collection, Analysis, and Dissemination:
    ``Hard Target'' human intelligence...........................    23
    Pilot Program on analysis of signals and other intelligence 
      by intelligence analysts of various elements of the 
      Intelligence Community.....................................    24
    Pilot program on training for intelligence analysts..........    25
    Report on modifications of policy and law on classified 
      information to facilitate sharing of information for 
      national security purposes.................................    26
    Report on data-mining capabilities for the Intelligence 
      Community..................................................    27
Security and Counterintelligence:
    Protecting against unauthorized disclosures of classified 
      information................................................    28
    Coordination of United States Government research on security 
      evaluations................................................    29
    Report on cleared insider threats to classified computer 
      networks...................................................    30
    Report on security background investigations and security 
      clearance procedures of the Federal Government.............    30
    Report on United States dependence on computer hardware and 
      software manufactured overseas.............................    30
Summary of Reporting Requirements................................    31
Committee Action.................................................    32
Estimate of Costs................................................    32
Evaluation of Regulatory Impact..................................    33
Changes in Existing Law..........................................    33

             CLASSIFIED SUPPLEMENT TO THE COMMITTEE REPORT

    The classified nature of United States intelligence 
activities prevents the Committee from disclosing the details 
of its budgetary recommendations in this Report. The Committee 
has prepared a classified supplement to this Report which 
contains (a) the Classified Annex to this Report and (b) the 
classified Schedule of Authorizations which is incorporated by 
reference in the Act and has the same legal status as public 
law. The Classified Annex to this Report explains the full 
scope and intent of the Committee's action as set forth in the 
classified Schedule of Authorizations. Reports required by the 
Classified Annex and this Report have been incorporated by 
reference in Section 105 of the Bill. In addition, the 
Committee expects the Intelligence Community to comply with any 
other directions as requirements contained therein as it would 
any other statutory requirement.
    The classified supplement to the Committee Report is 
available for review by any Member of the Senate, subject to 
the provisions of Senate Resolution 400 of the 94th Congress.
    The classified supplement is made available to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence 
of the House of Representatives and to the President. The 
President shall provide for appropriate distribution within the 
Executive Branch.

              SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS AND EXPLANATION

    The following is a section-by-section summary of the fiscal 
year 2004 Intelligence Authorization Bill. Following the 
section-by-section analysis and explanation is a more detailed 
discussion of the provisions contained in the Bill and of the 
Committee's related comments.

                    Title I--Intelligence Activities


Section 101. Authorization of appropriations

    Section 101 lists the U.S. Government departments, 
agencies, and other elements for which the Act authorizes 
appropriations for intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities for fiscal year 2004.

Section 102. Classified schedule of authorizations

    Section 102 makes clear that the details of the amounts 
authorized to be appropriated for intelligence and 
intelligence-related activities and applicable personnel 
ceilings covered under this title for fiscal year 2004 are 
contained in a classified Schedule of Authorizations. The 
Schedule of Authorizations shall be made available to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and House of 
Representatives, to the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence of the House of Representatives, and to the 
President.

Section 103. Personnel ceiling adjustments

    Section 103 authorizes the Director of Central 
Intelligence, with the approval of the Director of the Office 
of Management and Budget (OMB), in fiscal year 2004 to 
authorize employment of civilian personnel in excess of the 
personnel ceilings applicable to the components of the 
Intelligence Community under section 102 by an amount not to 
exceed two percent of the total of the ceilings applicable 
under section 102. The Director of Central Intelligence may 
exercise this authority only if necessary to the performance of 
important intelligence functions. Any exercise of this 
authority must be reported to the Intelligence Committees.

Section 104. Intelligence Community Management Account

    Section 104 authorizes appropriations for the Community 
Management Account (CMA) of the Director of Central 
Intelligence and sets the personnel end-strength for the 
Intelligence Community Management Staff (CMS) for fiscal year 
2004.
    Subsection (a) authorizes appropriations of $198,390,000 
for fiscal year 2004 for the activities of the CMA of the 
Director of Central Intelligence. Subsection (a) also 
authorizes funds identified for advanced research and 
development to remain available for two years.
    Subsection (b) authorizes 310 full-time personnel for 
elements within the CMA for fiscal year 2004 and provides that 
such personnel may be permanent employees of the CMA element or 
detailed from other elements of the U.S. Government.
    Subsection (c) authorizes additional appropriations and 
personnel for the CMA as specified in the classified Schedule 
of Authorizations and permits the additional funding for 
research and development to remain available through September 
30, 2005.
    Subsection (d) requires that, except as provided in section 
113 of the National Security Act of 1947, personnel from 
another element of the U.S. Government be detailed to an 
element of the CMA on a reimbursable basis, or for temporary 
situations of less than one year on a non-reimbursable basis.
    Subsection (e) authorizes $37,090,000 of the amount 
authorized in subsection (a) to be made available for the 
National Drug Intelligence Center (NDIC). Subsection (e) 
requires the Director of Central Intelligence to transfer these 
funds to the Department of Justice to be used for NDIC 
activities under the authority of the Attorney General, and 
subject to section 103(d)(1) of the National Security Act.

Section 105. Incorporation of reporting requirements

    Section 105 incorporates reporting requirements in the 
conference report to the Act, and the House and Senate reports 
on the associated Bills, and the classified annexes thereto, 
into the Act.

Section 106. Preparation and submittal of reports, reviews, studies, 
        and plans relating to intelligence activities of Department of 
        Defense or the Department of Energy

    Section 106 governs preparation and submittal of reports 
relating to Department of Defense (DoD) or Department of Energy 
(DoE).

 Title II--Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System


                    Authorization of Appropriations


Section 201. Authorization of appropriations

    Section 201 authorizes appropriations in the amount of 
$226,400,000 for fiscal year 2004 for the Central Intelligence 
Agency Retirement and Disability Fund.

                     Title III--General Provisions


                Subtitle A--Recurring General Provisions


Section 301. Increase in employee compensation and benefits authorized 
        by law

    Section 301 provides that funds authorized to be 
appropriated by this Act for salary, pay, retirement, and other 
benefits for Federal employees may beincreased by such 
additional or supplemental amounts as may be necessary for increases in 
such compensation or benefits authorized by law.

Section 302. Restriction on conduct of intelligence activities

    Section 302 provides that the authorization of 
appropriations by the Act shall not be deemed to constitute 
authority for the conduct of any intelligence activity that is 
not otherwise authorized by the Constitution or laws of the 
United States.

                        Subtitle B--Intelligence


Section 311. Modification of authority to obligate and expend certain 
        funds for intelligence activities

    Section 311 amends the National Security Act of 1947 by 
removing the ``unforeseen requirements'' criterion from section 
504(a)(3)(B) of the Act (50 U.S.C. 414(a)(3)) (relating to the 
funding of certain intelligence activities by reprogramming).

Section 312. Modification of notice and wait requirements on projects 
        to construct or improve Intelligence Community facilities

    Section 312 amends section 602 of the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 (Public Law 103-359) to 
change unprogrammed construction notice and wait periods and to 
raise notification thresholds for certain construction and 
renovation projects. Section 312(b) amends section 602(b)(2) of 
the Act to authorize the Director of Central Intelligence and 
Secretary of Defense to initiate within seven days (vice 21 
days) of congressional notification unprogrammed construction 
projects in excess of the amount specified in section 602(a) of 
the Act. The provision separately authorizes, in emergencies, 
commencement of construction immediately upon notification 
despite the 7-day waiting period that would normally apply, 
subject to a joint Director of Central Intelligence-Secretary 
of Defense determination that ``an emergency relating to the 
national security or the protection of health, safety, or 
environmental quality exists and that delay would harm any or 
all of those interests.'' For projects that primarily concern 
subsection (b)(3) authorizes the Director of Central 
Intelligence to make the required determination unilaterally.

Section 313. Use of funds for counterdrug and counterterrorism 
        activities for Colombia

    Section 313 authorizes the use of funds designated for 
intelligence or intelligence-related purposes for assistance to 
the Government of Colombia for counterdrug activities for 
fiscal year 2004 (and any unobligated funds designated for such 
purposes for prior years) to be utilized to support a unified 
campaign against narcotics trafficking and against activities 
by organizations (such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of 
Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and the 
United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC)), and to take 
actions to protect human health and welfare in emergency 
circumstances, including undertaking rescue actions. A similar 
provision was enacted as Section 501 of the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-306).

Section 314. Pilot program on analysis of signals and other 
        intelligence by intelligence analysts of various elements of 
        the Intelligence Community

    Section 314 requires the National Security Agency (NSA) to 
develop a pilot program to improve the ability of analysts in 
other intelligence agencies to obtain access to and analyze 
data collected and held by NSA while retaining appropriate 
handling safeguards.

Section 315. Pilot program on training for intelligence analysts

    Section 315 proposes that a Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTC)-like Intelligence Analyst Program be established by the 
Assistant Director of Central Intelligence for Analysis and 
Production (ADCI/A&P;). The goal of the program should be to 
recruit entry-level analysts and operations specialists with 
enhanced analytic and foreign language skills who are committed 
to a career in the Intelligence Community.

Section 316. Extension of National Commission for the Review of the 
        Research and Development Program of the United States 
        Intelligence Community

    Concerning Section 316, because of military operations to 
disarm Iraq, Senate organizational issues, and other 
priorities, the Senate leadership has not yet appointed 
Commission members. This section extends theCommission to 
permit appointment of members and commencement of the Commission's 
duties.

                        Subtitle C--Surveillance


Section 321. Clarification and modification of sunset of surveillance-
        related amendments made by USA PATRIOT Act of 2001

    Regarding Section 321(a) of this measure, it should be 
recalled that Section 224 of the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 
(Public Law 107-56 (Oct. 26, 2001)) contained language that 
would terminate certain provisions of that Act on December 31, 
2005. Section 224 clearly assumed, but did not explicitly 
provide, that the pre-existing text of laws modified by the Act 
would be restored upon operation of this ``sunset'' clause. 
This has raised some concern on account of the provisions of 1 
U.S.C.108, which provides as a general rule of statutory 
construction that ``[w]henever an Act is repealed, which 
repealed a former Act, such former Act shall not thereby be 
revived, unless it shall be expressly so provided.'' The 
Committee believes that because the USA PATRIOT Act ``sunset'' 
clause does not involve the ``repeal'' of actual ``Acts,'' that 
1 U.S.C. 108 would in all likelihood not affect the coherence 
of Section 224 of the Act. Nevertheless, in order to provide 
absolute clarity, the Committee provides in this section that 
laws modified by those sections of the USA PATRIOT Act listed 
in Section 224 will return to their pre-USA PATRIOT Act form 
after the operation of the ``sunset'' provision.
    Section 216 of the USA PATRIOT Act modified authorities 
relating to the use of pen registers and trap and trace 
devices. Section 204 of the Act clarified that intelligence 
exceptions continued to apply to limitations on the 
interception and disclosure of wire, oral, and electronic 
communications, notwithstanding the modifications of Section 
216. Section 224 of the Act contains a sunset provision that 
excludes section 216, but includes section 204. This omission 
of Section 204 from the sections excluded from ``sunset'' 
creates a technical anomaly. Section 321(b) corrects the 
technical oversight and removes Section 204 of the Act from the 
sunset provision. If not removed, valuable and necessary 
intelligence exemptions to the pen register and trap and trace 
provision would be lost after December 31, 2005.

                          Subtitle D--Reports


Section 331. Report on cleared insider threats to classified computer 
        networks

    Section 331 requires the Director of Central Intelligence, 
in conjunction with the Secretary of Defense, to provide, in a 
one-time report to Congress, an assessment of the national 
security risks posed by ``cleared insiders'' that are inherent 
in current computer security practices within the Intelligence 
Community and DoD.

Section 332. Report on security background investigations and security 
        clearance procedures of the Federal Government

    Section 332 requires the Director of Central Intelligence, 
in coordination with the Secretary of Defense, to provide a 
report on the adequacy and future direction of security 
background investigations and clearance procedures within the 
U.S. Government.

Section 333. Report on detail of civilian intelligence personnel among 
        elements of the Intelligence Community and the Department of 
        Defense

    Section 333 requires the Director of Central Intelligence, 
in conjunction with the Secretary of Defense, to provide an 
assessment to Congress of ways to ease movement of civilian 
intelligence personnel between various elements of the 
Intelligence Community to respond more flexibly and effectively 
to the shifting needs of intelligence collection and analysis.

Section 334. Report on modifications of policy and law on classified 
        information to facilitate sharing of information for national 
        security purposes

    Section 334 requests that the President review Executive 
Orders 12333 and 12598 and submit a report within 6 months on 
potential changes to the Executive Orders or legislative 
actions which could be applied to facilitate information 
sharing and data access across the Intelligence Community.

Section 335. Report of Secretary of Defense and Director of Central 
        Intelligence on strategic planning

    Section 335 requires the Secretary of Defense and the 
Director of Central Intelligence, jointly, to report not later 
than February 15, 2004, on progress toward establishing an 
independent, comprehensive, analytical capability to assess 
collection program alternatives, as well as the steps taken to 
better coordinate DoD and Intelligence Community strategic 
planning.

Section 336. Report on United States dependence on computer hardware 
        and software manufactured overseas

    Section 336 directs the Director of Central Intelligence to 
prepare a thorough evaluation of the trends and the strategic 
implications of increasing United States reliance on foreign 
hardware and software.

Section 337. Report on lessons learned from military operations in Iraq

    Section 337 requires the Director of Central Intelligence 
to submit a report regarding intelligence lessons learned as a 
result of Intelligence Community support to military operations 
during the course of Operation Iraqi Freedom. The report must 
be submitted to the appropriate committees not later than one 
year after enactment of this Act.

Section 338. Reports on conventional weapons and ammunition obtained by 
        Iraq in violation of certain United Nations Security Council 
        resolutions

    Section 338 requires the Director of the Defense 
Intelligence Agency (DIA), not later than 120 days after the 
cessation of hostilities in Iraq, to submit a preliminary 
report to certain specified committees regarding conventional 
weapons and ammunition obtained by Iraq in violation of 
applicable United Nations resolutions. A final report is 
required not later than 270 days after the cessation of 
hostilities in Iraq. Given the May 1, 2003 remarks by the 
President concerning the conclusion of major combat operations 
in Iraq, the Committee believes there has been a cessation of 
hostilities in Iraq as of that date for purposes of this 
reporting requirement.

Section 339. Repeal of certain report requirements relating to 
        intelligence activities

    Section 339 eliminates certain reporting requirements that 
no longer have enough utility in the legislative oversight 
process to justify the burdens they impose upon intelligence 
agencies that are hard at work protecting the United States 
against international terrorism, supporting our troops in 
combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, and otherwise safeguarding and 
advancing our national security. This section identifies a 
number of reports for elimination.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Section 351. Extension of suspension of reorganization of Diplomatic 
        Telecommunications Service Program Office

    Section 351 extends for an indefinite period the suspension 
authorized in section 311 of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for fiscal year 2002, Public Law 107-108 (Dec. 28, 2001), and 
extended by section 351 of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2003, Public Law 107-306 (Nov. 27, 2002). 
Section 311 of the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2002 suspended the provisions of the Intelligence 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (22 U.S.C. 7301 et seq.) 
that required reorganization of the Diplomatic 
Telecommunications Service Program Office (DTS-PO). Section 315 
of this Act extends the suspension until 60 days after the 
appropriate congressional committees are notified by the 
Secretary of State or the Director of OMB, or the Director's 
designees, that the present operating framework for the DTS-PO 
has been terminated. In designating officials under this 
section, the Committee expects that the Director of OMB shall 
designate at least those officials referenced in the Classified 
Annex to this Bill.

Section 352. Modifications of authorities on explosive materials

    Section 352 amends the Safe Explosives Act, Public Law 107-
296, Secs. 1121-28 (Nov. 25, 2002), to ensure that the 
provision provides sufficient authority for the Secretary of 
Defense and the Director of Central Intelligence to conduct, 
respectively, authorized military and intelligence activities 
of the U.S. Government. In addition, the provision makes minor 
technical corrections to certain other provisions in the Act.

Section 353. Modification of prohibition on the naturalization of 
        certain persons

    Section 353 amends section 313(e)(4) of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1424(e)(4)), bringing the provision 
into essential conformity with the determination process 
established in comparable provisions of law governing the 
admission or expedited naturalization of certain aliens and 
their immediate family members, based on the alien having 
contributed to the national security or intelligence mission of 
the United States. Under section 7 of the Central Intelligence 
Agency Act of 1949 (CIA Act) (50 U.S.C. 403h), section 316(f) 
of the INA (8 U.S.C. 1427(f)), and section 305 of Public Law 
104-293 (Oct. 11, 1996) (8 U.S.C. 1427 note), admission 
determinations regarding an alien's national security or 
intelligence mission contribution are made by the Director of 
Central Intelligence, the Attorney General, and (formerly) the 
Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization. Unlike those 
provisions, section 313(e)(4) requires consultation with the 
Secretary of Defense. This difference from comparable 
determination processes has created implementation 
difficulties. This amendment to section 313(e)(4) leaves the 
determination process to the Director of Central Intelligence, 
the Attorney General, and the Secretary of Homeland Security, 
reflecting the transfer of responsibility for adjudication of 
naturalization petitions from the Commissioner of Immigration 
and Naturalization to the Department of Homeland Security. See 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, Public Law 107-296 (Nov. 25, 
2002). The Secretary of Defense may still request the 
naturalization of a particular alien by forwarding to the 
Director of Central Intelligence the names of aliens who have 
made a national security or intelligence contribution to DoD. 
Moreover, when DoD activities are relevant to the 
determination, consultation with the Secretary of Defense would 
still be required.

Section 354. Modification to definition of financial institution in the 
        Right to Financial Privacy Act

    Section 354 provides enhanced authority for authorized 
Intelligence Community collection activities designed to 
prevent, deter, and disrupt activities directed against the 
United States. This section expands the definition of 
``financial institution'' for purposes of section 1114 of the 
Right to Financial Privacy Act (12 U.S.C. 3414). Section 1114 
currently permits U.S. Government authorities engaged in 
counterintelligence or foreign intelligence activities to 
obtain certain financial records. The definition of ``financial 
institution'' in the Right to Financial Privacy Act--
essentially unmodified since the Act became law in 1978--
significantly excludes certain entities that provide financial 
services to the public. Financial records maintained by these 
entities are not covered by the Act and, thus, are not 
accessible by counterintelligence and foreign intelligence 
elements of the U.S. Government under the Act, limiting the 
effectiveness of national security investigations. In order to 
expand the definition of ``financial institution'' for purposes 
only of section 1114, this subsection adopts, in part, the 
definition of ``financial institution'' found in section 
5312(a)(2) of title 31, United States Code. The expansion of 
this definition is consistent with the definition used in 
section 804(5) of the Counterintelligence and Security 
Enhancements Act of 1994, Public Law 103-359 (50 U.S.C. 438).

Section 355. Coordination of Federal Government research on security 
        evaluations

    Section 355 requires that the National Science Foundation 
and the Office of Science and Technology jointly submit to 
Congress a written report identifying the research most likely 
to advance the understanding of the use of certain assessments 
of individuals in security evaluations; distinguish between 
short-term and long-term areas of research in order to maximize 
the utility of short-term and long-term research on such 
assessments; identify the Federal agencies best suited to 
support such research; and develop recommendations for 
coordinating future Federally-funded research for the 
development, improvement, or enhancement of security 
evaluations.

Section 356. Technical Amendments

    Section 356 corrects now-erroneous citations to section 
103(c)(6) of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 403-
3(c)(7)), which was redesignated section 103(c)(7) by section 
901 of the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001, Public Law 107-56 (Oct. 26, 
2001), thus necessitating the technical correction made by this 
section. This section also corrects incorrect cross-references 
in Section 15 of the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403o) and Section 11 of 
the National Security Agency Act of 1959 (50 U.S.C. 402 note) 
to the authorities of the General Services Administration (GSA) 
special policemen. The authorities of GSA special policemen 
were transferred to ``officers and agents of the Department of 
Homeland Security'' pursuant to Section 1706(b)(1) of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002, Public Law 107-296 (Nov. 25, 
2002) (40 U.S.C. 1315). This section provides technical 
corrections to the referenced statutes.

                 Title IV--Central Intelligence Agency


Section 401. Amendment to certain Central Intelligence Agency Act of 
        1949 notification requirements

    Section 401 amends the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403e(b)(5)) to 
exempt section 4(b)(1) implementing regulations from the prior 
notification requirements of section 4(b)(5). To the extent the 
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) adopts unique allowances and 
benefits under section 4(b)(2) or (b)(3) or adopts or modifies 
regulations under section 4(b)(4), notification of the 
Intelligence Committees prior to implementation is still 
required.

Section 402. Protection of certain Central Intelligence Agency 
        personnel from tort liability

    Section 402 provides protections from tort liability for 
certain specified CIA personnel (and, with respect to specified 
NSA personnel, Section 502) when those personnel take 
reasonable action, including the use of force, (1) to protect 
an individual in their presence from a ``crime of violence'', 
(2) to assist an individual who has suffered, or is threatened 
with, bodily harm, or (3) to prevent the escape of an 
individual who the personnel reasonably believe to have 
committed a crime of violence in their presence.

Section 403. Repeal of obsolete limitation on use of funds in Central 
        Services Working Capital Fund

    Section 403 modifies the CIA Central Services Program (CSP) 
by removing the technically expired requirements of section 
21(f)(2)(B) of the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403u(f)(2)(B)).

Section 404. Technical amendment to Federal Information Security 
        Management Act of 2002

    Section 404 is a technical amendment to the Federal 
Information Security Management Act of 2002. Section 1001(b)(1) 
of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and Section 301(b)(1) of 
the E-Government Act of 2002 amended title 44, United States 
Code, to require an annual independent evaluation of 
information security programs. As enacted, only an Inspector 
General created by the Inspector General Act of 1978 or an 
independent external auditor may perform the evaluation 
required by these provisions. Section 404 clarifies that 
Inspectors General authorized by other statutes (e.g., Section 
17 of the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403q)) may also perform the 
required evaluation.

          Title V--Department of Defense Intelligence Matters


Section 501. Protection of operational files of the National Security 
        Agency

    Section 501 allows the Director of NSA, in coordination 
with the Director of Central Intelligence, to exempt certain 
operational files of NSA from search and review under the 
Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. 552. This section 
would allow exemptions for files concerning the activities of 
NSA that document the means by which foreign intelligence or 
counterintelligence is collected through scientific and 
technical systems. This exemption authority parallels that 
currently enjoyed by CIA, the National Imagery and Mapping 
Agency (NIMA), and the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO).

Section 502. Provision of affordable living quarters for certain 
        students working at National Security Agency laboratory

    Section 502 amends section 2195 of title 10, United States 
Code, to permit the Director of NSA to provide and pay for 
living quarters for Cooperative Education Program and Summer 
Program students to address an existing housing shortage.

Section 503. Protection of certain National Security Agency personnel 
        from tort liability

    Section 503 provides protections from tort liability for 
certain designated NSA personnel when those personnel take 
specified actions. The protections are similar to those 
afforded certain CIA personnel under Section 402.

Section 504. Authority for Intelligence Community elements of 
        Department of Defense to award personal service contracts

    Section 504 provides authority for Intelligence Community 
elements of DoD to award personal services contracts, similar 
to the CIA's existingauthority for personal services contracts 
under Section 8 of the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403j(a)(1)).

COMMITTEE COMMENTS ON FISCAL YEAR 2004 INTELLIGENCE AUTHORIZATION BILL 
                           AND OTHER MATTERS

    The Committee is mindful of the many sacrifices over the 
last year made by members of the Intelligence Community around 
the world. The Committee expresses its profound gratitude to 
them, and offers its heartfelt condolences to the families of 
those who made the supreme sacrifice.

      INTELLIGENCE COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT, PLANNING, AND PERFORMANCE

    The Committee has been vigilant and will continue to 
vigorously oversee the management, planning, and performance of 
the Intelligence Community. We have grown concerned with--and 
the Administration has continually raised--the issue of 
bureaucratic impediments to the prosecution of the important 
national security mission of the Intelligence Community. To 
address these impediments, the Committee has repealed or 
modified statutory requirements on the Intelligence Community 
that no longer serve a legitimate oversight purpose, are 
unnecessary obstacles to the implementation of new initiatives, 
or fail to account for the passage of time. The Committee 
remains concerned, however, with several management issues 
still unresolved by the Intelligence Community.

Intelligence Community strategic and performance planning

            Fiscal year strategic and performance plans
    For the last two fiscal years, the Committee has expressed 
in its report language an interest in strategic and performance 
planning within the Intelligence Community. In response, the 
CMS in 2002 submitted strategic and performance plans for the 
Intelligence Community as a whole, as well as for selected 
agencies within the National Foreign Intelligence Program 
(NFIP). These documents were the first-ever plans coordinated 
across the Intelligence Community aimed at establishing 
performance measures aligned with the stated goals and 
priorities of the Director of Central Intelligence.
    While the Committee was pleased with this first effort by 
CMS and the Intelligence Community, Senate Report 107-149 
contained suggestions for improvements to future reports. 
Specifically, the Committee was concerned that the Intelligence 
Community's initial performance plans focused more on 
increasing intelligence capabilities than on the value that 
such capabilities would add to achieving the Intelligence 
Community's missions. As such, the Committee directed that the 
fiscal year 2004 performance plans include ``mission-based'' 
performance measures linking Intelligence Community 
capabilities to the stated strategic goals of the Director of 
Central Intelligence. The Committee believes that these mission 
oriented performance measures should complement the budget 
process within the CMS and the agencies within the NFIP. For 
this reason, the Committee also directed that the fiscal year 
2004 performance plans include specific information on how the 
agencies utilized them in preparing their respective sections 
of the fiscal year 2004 budget for the NFIP.
    On February 25, 2003, the CMS submitted to the Committee 
the Fiscal Year 2004-2009 Intelligence Community Strategy, as 
well as the strategies for the component agencies. The 
Committee, however, has yet to receive an updated Intelligence 
Community performance plan for fiscal year 2004 and has 
received only two fiscal year 2004 performance plans for 
individual Intelligence Community components. These documents 
were due to Congress by March 1, 2003. Although the Committee 
understands that the CMS is still editing and revising the 
performance plans submitted by the component agencies, no 
extension of the March 1, 2003, deadline has been requested. 
The Committee is disappointed that the Intelligence Community 
has not completed these valuable documents in time to support 
the Committee's authorization for this fiscal year or to inform 
the Intelligence Community's own planning processes. The 
Committee looks forward to receiving the performance plans and 
expects that CMS will submit them in the near future. Before 
submitting these reports, CMS should coordinate their efforts 
with the office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Intelligence to ensure that requirements in CMS performance 
reports do not conflict with commitments that Intelligence 
Community agencies within DoD make as part of the DoD strategic 
and performance planning processes.
            Strategic planning for sensors and platforms
    The Committee is aware of no capability within DoD or the 
Intelligence Community for objectively, independently, and 
comprehensively evaluatingalternative sensor and platform 
architectures and capabilities. There are some capabilities within 
different agencies and departments, but none that are available, 
independent of the program offices, to model and assess cross-program 
trades without regard to the location of the sensor or platform (air, 
space, land, or sea) or the level of compartmentation. Consequently, 
although DoD and Intelligence Community officials expend substantial 
effort and time evaluating program trades, they do so without the 
benefit of the rigorous quantitative modeling necessary to optimize 
collection capabilities and architectures. Given the vast sums involved 
in these programs, even modest increases in the efficiency of resource 
allocation could lead to substantial benefits. Further, the Committee 
notes that the national military strategy, as well as the Defense 
Planning Guidance, have been developed in recent years without the 
participation of the Director of Central Intelligence or his staff, 
notwithstanding the growing importance of intelligence to military 
operations and the need to build forces commensurate to validated 
threats.
    Accordingly, in Section 335, the Committee requires the 
Secretary of Defense and the Director of Central Intelligence 
to jointly report on progress toward establishing an 
independent, comprehensive, analytical capability to assess 
collection program alternatives, as well as the steps taken to 
better coordinate DoD and Intelligence Community strategic and 
budgetary planning.

Intelligence Community compliance with Federal financial accounting 
        standards

    In Senate Report 107-63, the Committee conveyed its concern 
with the Intelligence Community's financial management 
practices and required the Director of Central Intelligence and 
the Secretary of Defense to task the appropriate statutory 
Inspectors General to perform an audit of the form and content 
of the Fiscal Year 2001 financial statements of NSA, DIA, NIMA, 
and CIA. This audit was designed to ascertain if these agencies 
were able to produce financial statements that met Federal 
Government financial accounting standards and OMB requirements. 
The NRO was not included in this requirement because its 
financial statements have been audited by an independent public 
accounting firm for the past three years.
    The resulting DoD and CIA Inspectors General reports found 
that NSA, DIA, NIMA, and CIA could not produce auditable 
financial statements. Among the faults depicted were the 
improper preparation of selected required statements, failure 
to use accrual accounting, inability to reconcile the fund 
balance with Treasury, and inaccurate reporting of property, 
plant, and equipment. The Committee found the lack of internal 
controls reflected by these problems of great concern.
    Senate Report 107-63 also mandated that the Director of 
Central Intelligence, in consultation with the Secretary of 
Defense, should ensure that NSA, DIA, NIMA, and CIA all receive 
an audit of their financial statements no later than March 1, 
2005, to be executed by a statutory Inspector General or a 
qualified independent public accountant. The Committee 
acknowledged that NSA, DIA, and NIMA may be affected by DoD 
plans to implement a DoD-wide Financial Management 
Modernization Program, which is not expected to be completed 
before 2007. For example, the DoD Inspector General noted that 
NSA halted its plan to purchase a compliant accounting system 
based on guidance from the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller). This, in turn, affected DIA and NIMA, which both 
use portions of the NSA accounting system.
    In Senate Report 107-149, to facilitate adequate oversight 
of the Intelligence Community's financial management systems 
and practices, the Committee directed that the Deputy Director 
of Central Intelligence for Community Management provide the 
Intelligence Committees with a report on how CMS is structured 
to monitor Intelligence Community compliance with the Chief 
Financial Officers Act and related OMB guidance. The report 
recently provided to the Committee by CMS included plans to 
monitor the ability of each agency to produce a financial 
statement audit by 2005 and a description of the ability of CMS 
to assess the financial systems of each agency in order to 
generate required oversight information.
    Prior to the 2005 audit requirement, and as follow-on to 
the initial Inspectors General reports, Public Law 107-306 
contained a statutory requirement for annual reports from each 
agency head describing the activities their organization had 
undertaken to produce auditable financial statements. 
Additionally, the annual agency reports required by Public Law 
107-306 were to include a description of the impact of the DoD 
modernization program and the steps being taken to make current 
systems compliant with Federal standards in the interim. As of 
this writing, no such report has been received from NSA, DIA, 
NIMA, or CIA. The Committee notes that, due to the shift of 
certain report due dates in Public Law 107-306,some confusion 
existed as to the actual due date of these reports. CMS recently 
coordinated interim responses from the subject agencies. The Committee, 
however, is concerned that this initial failure to consult the 
Committee on the due date is an indication that the Intelligence 
Community still lacks the appropriate level of interest in responsible 
financial management.
    While the Committee has not received direct agency 
responses, it notes that the DoD Inspector General 
independently provided the Committee with follow-up reports 
that addressed the soundness of the fiscal year 2002 financial 
statements of DIA and NIMA, as well as the adequacy of their 
related procedures and controls. The DoD Inspector General 
found that the financial statements of these agencies were 
still unreliable. The reports determined that neither agency 
dedicated the proper resources to the financial management and 
reporting function and had not addressed the lack of internal 
controls or deficiencies related to reconciling the data 
contained in the various financial statements. The reports 
noted that the existing noncompliant budgeting systems and the 
current DoD financial management modernization program hampered 
the agencies. The DoD Inspector General recommended that the 
agencies institute improved internal control procedures and 
devote the appropriate resources toward the preparation of 
financial statements that will meet OMB and DoD standards. A 
similar follow-up report on NSA is in progress.
    The CMS report on its oversight capabilities noted that the 
respective DoD agency heads, not the Director of Central 
Intelligence, have direct financial management authority and 
responsibility for their agencies. Thus, the agency directors, 
not the CMS, should provide the annual reports describing the 
activities that each agency has undertaken to produce auditable 
financial statements. Furthermore, in response to known 
difficulties in acquiring the systems necessary to produce 
financial statements, the Committee has indicated its 
willingness to address the issue of extending the 2005 audit 
requirement. However, in the absence of the required progress 
reports from the directors of NSA, DIA, NIMA, and CIA, the 
Committee has elected to delay a decision on the deferral of 
the 2005 audits, pending the receipt of these progress reports 
by December 1, 2003. The Committee has recently learned that a 
decision on the contractor for the new DoD financial management 
architecture is forthcoming. In light of this imminent 
selection, the Committee believes the December 1, 2003 deadline 
will provide the agencies with ample time to assess the impact 
of the new architecture.

National Security Agency budget, acquisition, and compensation reform

            Congressional Budget Justification Book
    The Committee commends the Director of NSA for the progress 
made in the presentation and format of the Congressional Budget 
Justification Book (CBJB) for the Administration's request for 
fiscal year 2004. When compared to previous submissions, NSA's 
CBJB represents a good faith effort to project to Congress an 
accurate, comprehensible request. The new budget structure and 
attendant cross-walk, while complex, are understandable. Much 
remains to be done, but the progress displayed in this single 
year is noteworthy.
            Acquisition
    The Committee continues to be concerned with the state of 
the NSA acquisition process and frustrated by the lack of 
progress realized in remedying this problem over the past three 
years. The Administration's budget request sustains the long 
overdue increase for the Consolidated Cryptologic Program (CCP) 
executed by NSA. Last year's significant increase over the 
previous year coupled with the fiscal year 2004 requested 
increase, will allow NSA to continue its transformation 
initiative while supporting the global war on terrorism and the 
war to liberate Iraq. These significant investments will lead 
to major acquisition programs designed to modernize the Signals 
Intelligence (SIGINT) enterprise for the future. The lack of a 
fundamentally sound acquisition process, however, raises 
concerns with respect to the efficiency and execution of these 
major acquisitions.
    The Committee's concern with the health of the NSA 
acquisition process is not new. In both fiscal year 2002 and 
2003, the Committee noted significant shortfalls and 
recommended actions that would correct the documented 
deficiencies. In both the Fiscal Year 2002 and 2003 
Intelligence Authorization Act Conference Reports, lack of a 
credible NSA acquisition process was noted, along with several 
recommendations for corrective actions. While NSA has made 
modest progress in some of the various components of a good 
acquisition process, reports from oversight departments within 
the Administration point out one glaring fault in the roadto 
progress: the authority of the NSA Senior Acquisition Executive (SAE) 
is not commensurate with that needed to empower him to take the 
necessary actions to correct even the most elementary deficiencies. The 
NSA SAE has not been given the requisite authority by the Director of 
NSA to bring the agency's acquisition process up to acceptable DoD 
standards.
    In June 2000, the SAEs for the Intelligence Community and 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, 
Communications and Intelligence (ASD(C3I)), in response to a 
Congressionally Directed Action (CDA), provided a report titled 
``Independent Review of the National Security Agency 
Acquisition Process'', which they have updated on a periodic 
basis. These reviews have covered nine specific components that 
can contribute to attaining the DoD standard for acquisition 
performance. The review is metrics based. The nine categories 
are evaluated on a ``red, yellow, green'' criteria and an 
assessment measurement has been added for implementation. While 
marginal progress has been noted, none of the nine criteria has 
yet to be judged fully green, and none of the implementation 
ratings is above 2 on a 1-4 scale. After three years, the 
average for the nine categories is ``yellow--Process and 
Structure Identified.'' The average assessment is 1.4, with the 
definition of a 2 rating being ``Process immature; inconsistent 
application or effectiveness.'' A rating of 1 is defined as 
``Process ineffective or limited acceptance and practice.'' 
Perhaps the most glaring area reviewed is titled ``Establish a 
dedicated SAE reporting directly to the [Director of NSA].'' 
This category actually moved down from ``Yellow/Green'' to 
``Yellow'' over the last evaluation period and is judged to be 
at implementation level 1. Establishing an NSA SAE that reports 
directly to the Director of NSA can be remedied easily, and the 
fact that the rating associated with this component has moved 
backward is of great concern to the Committee. To hire the very 
best NSA SAE is commendable; to deny that individual the 
necessary authority to make a difference is an opportunity 
missed.
    The Committee recommends that the Director of NSA take the 
following actions immediately: (1) Clarify the lines of 
authority to and responsibility of the NSA SAE for program 
execution; (2) Align Program Manager (PM) and Acquisition 
Program Manager (APM) acquisition responsibilities under the 
NSA SAE; (3) Establish clear budgetary authority for the NSA 
SAE over all budgets associated with major acquisition 
programs; (4) Establish clear reporting and evaluation lines 
from the PMs and APMs to the NSA SAE; (5) Provide the NSA SAE 
true management power over the acquisition decision process. 
The requirement for acquisition decisions to be made by 
consensus must be eliminated. Acquisition management groups 
made up of non-acquisition professionals must be made advisory 
only, and the NSA SAE must not be forced to form a consensus 
within these groups to enable an acquisition decision.
    The Committee greatly appreciates the efforts by CMS and 
DoD to remedy this problem and requests that an update to the 
February 2003 report be submitted to the Committee no later 
than August 30, 2003.
            Acquisition baseline
    For the past two years, the Committee has made an issue of 
the inadequacy of the NSA acquisition baseline. It is very 
difficult for the Committee to understand what needs to be done 
to modernize NSA when NSA cannot provide an adequate baseline 
of ongoing development and acquisition programs, projects, and 
activities. A great deal of funding has been appropriated to 
NSA over the past year, and there is little doubt that more 
will be required to ensure that the country has the very best 
SIGINT capability in the world. The results witnessed during 
the ongoing global war on terrorism and the support provided to 
our troops in Iraq has been excellent. But our successes will 
not be lost on future enemies, and the threat will evolve to 
defeat our present capabilities. Transformation is expensive, 
and the Committee wants to support the Director of NSA in this 
effort, but without the knowledge of what is actually being 
funded at NSA, it is difficult to sustain support for 
increasing levels of authorization.
    The Committee has fenced funds over the past two fiscal 
years to try to bring command attention to this problem. 
Submissions to date have shown progress, but are not 
comprehensive in identifying known projects and programs that 
are being funded in the CCP. Several projects listed in the 
CBJB requesting continued funding in fiscal year 2004 are not 
currently listed in the project baseline provided to the 
Committee. It is imperative that the baselining effort be put 
under competent, empowered authority with clear direction to 
develop a complete and comprehensive baseline. Future funding 
requests will be balanced against the NSA acquisition baseline 
so it is in the agency's best interest to get this done right, 
and soon.
    The Committee directs NSA, beginning the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2004, to submit quarterly to the Committee a 
document baselining allprograms, projects, and activities 
ongoing within the CCP. This document should be prepared by the NSA SAE 
in conjunction with the Chief Financial Manager--the only two 
authorities below the Director of NSA who have the ability to validate, 
track, and link NSA programs, projects, and activities to acquisition 
schedules and funding authorizations. These quarterly reports will 
integrate each entry in the baseline to a master schedule and link the 
various entries showing dependencies and functional similarities. 
Specific requirements will be listed with the entries such that 
customer relationships are understood and definable. Ideally, the NSA 
acquisition baseline can be fully automated and put online so that all 
members of the SIGINT enterprise can understand what projects, 
programs, and activities are ongoing to reduce redundancies and 
facilitate technology exchange. Rates of expenditures by appropriations 
will be reflected in these quarterly submissions.
            Menwith Hill Station
    The Committee is encouraged by the budgetary increase 
requested to improve the condition of the facilities and 
infrastructure at Menwith Hill Station. There may be an 
opportunity to improve these conditions even further with a 
process known as the ``Public Private Partnership''--a process 
used effectively by other organizations in the United Kingdom. 
This acquisition method is used to establish a long-term 
contract for acquiring, building, and updating facilities and 
could benefit both infrastructure and mission support. The 
``Public Private Partnership'' is frequently coupled with a 
``Private Financing Initiative'' that leverages private 
financing to provide capital funding for infrastructure 
projects. In the United Kingdom, the Ministry of Defence is 
moving positively to this acquisition method and the method 
might have considerable benefit to United States interests in 
the United Kingdom, as well.
    The Committee directs that the Director of NSA review the 
``Public Private Partnership''--and the ``Private Financing 
Initiative'' concepts for application to Menwith Hill Station 
and report to the Committee the findings of the review no later 
than June 13, 2003. The report should describe the benefits of 
this approach, identify any potential issues, and recommend 
whether this acquisition method should be executed by the U.S. 
Government. The report should capitalize on the experience 
gained by the host government, particularly the experiences of 
the General Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) in their recent 
initiatives in this regard. The review will be coordinated with 
the U.S. Executive Agent for the United Kingdom and the on-
going Menwith Hill Transition Team.
            National Security Agency Compensation Reform
    The NSA has briefed the Committee on the proposed 
implementation of its new Compensation Reform Plan. Changing 
compensation systems is difficult in any work force, and the 
Committee is pleased to see that the NSA leadership has taken 
the time to ensure that all employees are informed of the need 
for change and of the impacts on them of the new system. As a 
necessary precursor to any new compensation plan, the Committee 
has supported the implementation of a new employee performance 
evaluation mechanism. The Committee strongly believes that any 
new evaluation mechanism should be implemented at least a year 
before initiation of a revised compensation plan. The Committee 
will closely follow both the implementation of the new employee 
performance evaluation mechanism and the initiation of the 
pilot compensation reform initiative at NSA.

Defense Finance and Accounting Service and the National Security Agency

    The NSA is making progress in its financial and accounting 
practices. Additional work remains to be done, however, and 
resources will be required to modernize this critical part of 
the NSA business practice.
    The Committee has been advised that the Defense Finance and 
Accounting Service (DFAS) is considering moving certain aspects 
of the NSA support centers to a centralized accounting and 
finance structure under the control of DFAS. The Director of 
NSA is making progress in modernizing his business practices. 
Separation of the finance function from his authority would not 
support the overall objectives of this Committee to improve the 
acquisition business area at NSA. Therefore, the Committee 
directs that DFAS brief the Committee before any transfer of 
authority, personnel, or resources is considered or affected.
    The Deputy Director of Central Intelligence for Community 
Management will notify the Committee of any efforts by DFAS to 
transfer accounting or finance authorities from any NFIP 
components prior to such transfer. No transfer will be affected 
without the approval of this Committee.

Authority for Intelligence Community elements of Department of Defense 
        to award personal service contracts

    Intelligence Community elements of DoD frequently have a 
temporary need for additional personnel with specific expertise 
to meet unanticipated, yet significant, operational 
requirements that necessitate a bolstering of organizational 
and personnel efforts created by world events. Current examples 
include experts on al-Qa'ida, the countries of the Middle East, 
chemical and biological warfare, and Islamic militant 
personalities, along with linguists to support interrogation of 
detainees and review of captured documents. Under current law, 
U.S. Government agencies generally must choose between hiring 
additional personnel as government employees or contracting for 
their services under the restrictive provisions for the 
temporary or intermittent employment of experts and consultants 
under section 3109 of title 5, United States Code. The 
Committee provides relief from these more restrictive 
authorities by granting authority for Intelligence Community 
elements of DoD to award personal services contracts 
notwithstanding any other provision of law. This authority is 
similar to that already exercised by CIA under Section 8 of the 
CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403j(a)(1)). This provision will optimize 
the capabilities of Intelligence Community elements of DoD in 
the performance of their roles in the global war on terrorism 
and in the execution of future national security missions.

Report on detail of civilian intelligence personnel throughout the 
        Intelligence Community

    The Committee is aware that DoD uses a system for quickly 
and rapidly moving Senior Executive Service employees from one 
component to another to respond flexibly and effectively to 
shifting needs and to implement policy guidance from seniors. 
The Committee believes that the Intelligence Community should 
study a similar system. To that end, Section 333 requires the 
Director of Central Intelligence, in conjunction with the 
Secretary of Defense, to provide an assessment to Congress of 
ways to ease movement of civilian intelligence personnel 
between the various elements of the Intelligence Community to 
respond to the shifting needs of intelligence collection and 
analysis.

Protection of certain Intelligence Community personnel from tort 
        liability

    Specified law enforcement and Diplomatic Security Service 
officers are provided protections from tort liability pursuant 
to section 627 of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency 
Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1999 (Public Law 105-277) 
when they take reasonable action, including the use of force, 
(1) to protect an individual in their presence from a ``crime 
of violence'', (2) to assist an individual who has suffered, or 
is threatened with, bodily harm, or (3) to prevent the escape 
of an individual who the personnel reasonably believe to have 
committed a crime of violence in their presence. The Committee 
extends these protections from tort liability to certain 
specified personnel of CIA and NSA. When these highly trained 
CIA and NSA professionals are on official duty and take 
reasonable actions to protect and aid individuals in their 
presence, they should not be deprived of protections from tort 
liability that other similarly situated personnel of the 
Federal Government are granted under existing law. In 
recognition of the current potential exposure of these 
personnel to tort liability and the protections in law for 
other personnel of the U.S. Government, the Committee (in 
Sections 402 and 503) extends the protections of section 627 of 
Public Law 105-277 to these specified CIA and NSA personnel.

Modification of authority to obligate and expend certain funds for 
        intelligence activities

    Section 504 of the National Security Act of 1947 (50 USC 
414) requires that funds appropriated to an intelligence agency 
for an intelligence or intelligence-related activity may be 
obligated or expended only if such funds are specifically 
authorized for use for such activities. Although reprogrammings 
to meet a higher-priority intelligence need are permitted upon 
notification to the Intelligence Committees, Section 
504(a)(3)(B) also mandates that the need be based on 
``unforeseen requirements.'' The ``unforeseen requirements'' 
criterion in Section 504 tied the hands of Congress and the 
Intelligence Community in unnecessary and time-consuming legal 
debates over proposed reprogrammings.
    In Section 311 of the Bill, the Committee amends Section 
504 to delete the ``unforseen requirements'' criterion, 
ensuring that the Intelligence Community--in cooperation with 
the Intelligence Committees--can react more quickly to confront 
higher-priority intelligence needs. Elimination of this 
requirement will permit reprogrammings to be reviewed on the 
basis ofrelative needs and priorities. The provision will also 
provide the Intelligence Community and Congress with flexibility to 
resolve differences between funds appropriated for intelligence and 
intelligence-related activities but not specifically authorized, and 
vice versa.

Modification of notice and wait requirements on projects to construct 
        or improve intelligence community facilities

    Section 602 of the Intelligence Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1995, Public Law 103-359 (Oct. 14, 1994) (50 U.S.C. 
403-2b) placed certain notification requirements for 
unprogrammed Intelligence Community construction and renovation 
projects. Since passage of the original notification 
requirements over eight years ago, construction costs have 
grown steadily--particularly those costs related to security 
and information technology. Moreover, in recognition of the 
Intelligence Community's need for increased agility to meet 
shifting threats, the Committee has lowered the ``notice-and-
wait'' period associated with certain unprogrammed construction 
and renovation projects from 21 days to 7 days and added an 
additional emergency category in which only notice (and no 
wait) would be required. The Committee expects that the 
emergency category would be used only in the most extraordinary 
circumstances.

Provision of affordable living quarters for certain students working at 
        National Security Agency laboratory

    Student programs are essential for NSA to compete in the 
highly challenging labor market and to ensure that it remains a 
competitive, prospective employer for students with hard-to-
find scientific and technical skills. The single biggest 
obstacle identified by NSA to the growth of these student 
programs is a lack of affordable short-term housing in and 
around NSA. By permitting the Director of NSA to pay for living 
quarters for certain students in specified NSA programs, 
Section 502 seeks to ensure that future students are not 
deterred from seeking a valuable and beneficial employment 
opportunity with NSA simply because of the unavailability of 
affordable, short-term housing.

Repeal of certain Intelligence Community reporting requirements

    The Committee maintains that ad hoc reporting requirements 
and other CDAs imposed by Congress upon the Intelligence 
Community are a vital tool of legislative oversight and are 
often highly valuable to various committees. Unfortunately, 
these reporting obligations have proven easier to impose than 
to remove. As a result, the Intelligence Community has faced 
ever-increasing reporting burdens, even when the practical 
utility of specific reports to Congress has largely lapsed. As 
the reporting burdens multiplied, the fragmented and 
unsystematic nature of reporting requirements led the 
Intelligence Community to become lax about fulfilling its 
obligations to provide the requested reports in a timely and 
effective manner. In sum, neither Congress nor the Executive 
Branch was well served by the reporting and CDA process that 
had developed.
    In Title VIII of the Intelligence Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2003, Congress took steps to rationalize and 
structure the previously ad hoc reporting process--organizing 
and incorporating the myriad existing requirements into a 
single reporting structure, imposing clear deadlines, and 
reemphasizing that the Intelligence Community is required by 
law to comply with all such requirements.
    The Committee is resolved to building upon prior efforts to 
bring the reporting/CDA process under control. In this bill, 
the Committee takes affirmative steps to eliminate reporting 
requirements that no longer have sufficient utility in the 
legislative oversight process to justify the burdens imposed 
upon intelligence agencies hard at work protecting the United 
States against international terrorism, supporting our troops 
in combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, and otherwise safeguarding 
and advancing our national security. Section 339 identifies a 
number of reports for elimination and changes one semiannual 
report to an annual report.
    Periodic reports are often very important tools of 
legislative oversight, but there can be no substitute for 
taking affirmative steps to request information from the 
Intelligence Community as an everyday part of effective 
oversight. The Committee anticipates that the elimination of 
these and other reporting requirements will in no way diminish 
the vigor of intelligence oversight, will contribute to the 
Intelligence Community's ability to accomplish its important 
national security missions, and will not otherwise effect (and 
will hopefully improve) the Community's willingness to fulfill 
the day-to-day requests of the Intelligence Committees.

Cancellation of other Intelligence Community reporting requirements

    In addition to the modifications to certain statutory 
reporting obligations, the following reports required to be 
submitted by Committee reports from previous fiscal years shall 
be deemed cancelled when the fiscal year 2004 Intelligence 
Authorization Bill is reported by the Committee. Thereafter, 
the Executive Branch need not submit:
          a. Recurring report(s) on comprehensive annual 
        reviews of customer satisfaction created under 
        ``Customer Satisfaction With Intelligence Collection 
        and Analysis and Production,'' National Foreign 
        Intelligence Program, discussed on p. 4, Senate Report 
        106-48, Authorizing Appropriations for Fiscal Year 2000 
        for the Intelligence Activities of the United States 
        Government and the Central Intelligence Agency 
        Retirement and Disability System and for Other 
        Purposes; and
          b. Recurring report on the Intelligence Community's 
        information infrastructure, created under ``Assessment 
        of the Intelligence Community's Information 
        Infrastructure'' on p. 17, Senate Report 105-185, 
        Authorizing Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1999 for the 
        Intelligence Activities of the United States Government 
        and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and 
        Disability System and for Other Purposes.

Central Intelligence Agency Act of 1949 notification requirements

            Section 4(b)(5) of the Central Intelligence Agency Act of 
                    1949
    Section 4(b) of the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 403e(b)(5)) permits 
CIA to authorize and implement certain allowances and benefits 
for payment to officers and employees of CIA and to personnel 
detailed or assigned to CIA. Section 4(b)(5) requires CIA to 
submit all regulations authorizing allowances and benefits 
under section 4(b) to the Intelligence Committees prior to 
implementation. This notification requirement was included to 
ensure that the Intelligence Committees were apprised of CIA's 
use of the broad authority conferred by section 4(b)--
particularly with respect to sections 4(b)(2) and (b)(3), which 
authorize CIA to adopt Agency-unique allowances and benefits 
under certain circumstances.
    Under section 4(b)(1), however, CIA may adopt only 
allowances and benefits comparable to those authorized for 
members of the Foreign Service under the Foreign Service Act of 
1980 or other applicable laws. Section 4(b)(1) does not 
authorize CIA to adopt Agency-unique allowances and benefits 
such as those authorized under sections 4(b)(2) and (3). 
Section 4(b)(5), however, still requires that the Intelligence 
Committees be notified prior to implementation of section 
4(b)(1) allowances and benefits. The notification requirement 
for these section 4(b)(1) regulations adds nearly a month to 
CIA's process for implementation of employee-friendly policies 
that enhance morale or meet recruitment and retention 
concerns--allowances and benefits already authorized for 
members of the Foreign Service. In order to speed 
implementation of these section 4(b)(1) allowances and 
benefits, the Committee amends section 4(b)(5) to exempt 
section 4(b)(1) implementing regulations from the prior 
notification requirement.
            Section 21(f)(2)(B) of the Central Intelligence Agency Act 
                    of 1949
    The Committee removes the technically expired requirements 
of section 21(f)(2)(B) of the CIA Act (50 U.S.C. 
403u(f)(2)(B)). This subparagraph required the Director of 
Central Intelligence to obtain the approval of the Director of 
OMB and to notify the Intelligence Committees before expending 
amounts in the CSP Working Capital Fund that are attributable 
to certain fees imposed and collected under the program. 
Although CIA has continued to comply with the terms of this 
expired mandate, the approval and notification requirements set 
forth in the subparagraph are no longer necessary given CIA 
experience using CSP authorities. Removing the requirement of 
subparagraph (f)(2)(b) will not deprive OMB of its oversight 
role with respect to the CSP. Moreover, the Committee expects 
that CIA will also continue to comply with other generally 
applicable requirements for informing Congress of information 
relating to the management of the CSP, such as the requirements 
of Title V of the National Security Act of 1947.

          INTELLIGENCE COLLECTION, ANALYSIS, AND DISSEMINATION

``Hard Target'' Human Intelligence

    The invaluable contributions of accurate Human Intelligence 
(HUMINT) to United States efforts in Operation Enduring 
Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and the global war on 
terrorism are evident.
    Particularly in the context of the 107th Congress's Joint 
Inquiry into the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, 
various Committee Members expressed concern about the need for 
more vigorous HUMINT collection--especially unilateral 
collection--under non-official cover and from non-traditional 
HUMINT ``platforms.'' Some experts have even suggested the need 
for the creation of a small, highly-specialized semi- or fully-
independent HUMINT entity charged with collecting against non-
traditional targets and rogue states that traditionally have 
proven highly resistant to HUMINT penetration involving 
traditional official-cover operations.
    Without endorsing such a radical solution at this time, the 
Committee attaches the highest degree of importance to far more 
aggressive and sustained non-traditional HUMINT collection 
program. The Intelligence Community must act now to meet the 
United States requirement for much improved HUMINT collection 
against hard targets. This will require diligent effort and new 
approaches to HUMINT management within existing agency 
components. The Committee hopes and expects that the Director 
of Central Intelligence will ensure the implementation and 
success of such changes within the Intelligence Community.

Pilot program on analysis of signals and other intelligence by 
        intelligence analysts of various elements of the Intelligence 
        Community

    The Committee has become increasingly concerned in recent 
years about bureaucratic and cultural obstacles to effective 
information and data sharing. Such resistance to data access by 
``outsiders'' within the Intelligence Community--let alone to 
other entities such as analysts at the new Department of 
Homeland Security--causes at least three serious problems.
    First, it impedes the ability of the Intelligence Community 
to adopt state-of-the-art data-mining and analytical tools that 
are badly needed to help analysts cope with the flood of 
information brought in by collection components. Cutting-edge 
analytical tools, many of which are already in use in the 
private sector, increasingly involve innovative automated or 
computer-assisted tools to perform large-scale, multi-database 
analysis and pattern recognition. Using such approaches within 
the Intelligence Community, however, cannot proceed far without 
a significant revision of current orthodoxy as to information 
``ownership'' and control.
    Second, barriers to data access inhibit the Intelligence 
Community's ability to understand, correlate, and assess 
information that they already possess. Data-control 
restrictions sometimes impede sharing within an individual 
element of the Community, as well as between elements, limiting 
the effectiveness of analytical work far beyond what is 
necessary to protect highly sensitive information from undue 
risk of compromise.
    Third, barriers to data access prevent the Community from 
employing other elements' analysts in understanding available 
information--both for the basic purpose of reducing data 
overload, and for more sophisticated goals like applying fresh 
analytical perspectives and experience to existing analytical 
tasks. The Committee supports additional analytic views to 
issues, and those views can only be enriched when informed by 
access to all available information and data.
    The NSA, in particular, is an analytical organization that 
is far too small to handle the volumes of data that it 
collects. The reluctance of NSA to give other agency analysts 
access to data that NSA analysts do not have time or priority 
to review--even when such analysts are as well trained as NSA 
personnel in protecting ``U.S. person'' information--has 
prevented the use of non-NSA analytic manpower to help narrow 
the gap between collection and analysis and to ensure that more 
of the unevaluated NSA data is reviewed by an analyst. It has 
also drained NSA of trained analysts, because the agency elects 
to send many of its analysts to other agencies and 
organizations to supervise and regulate the small degree of NSA 
information sharing that does occur.
    If other agency analysts were properly trained in the rules 
and procedures governing the handling of SIGINT information (as 
many are) and these analysts enjoyed the trust of NSA, such 
analysts would provide ``value added'' beyond their numbers. 
Many NSA liaison officers who are now situated in other 
Intelligence Community agencies to provide those agencieswith 
the ability to access NSA data could return to full-time NSA analytical 
work.
    It has proven difficult to achieve significant improvements 
in data sharing and information access within and between 
elements of the United States Intelligence Community. The 
events of September 11, 2001--and the record of the Community's 
preparedness for these terrorist atrocities, as detailed by the 
Senate and House Intelligence Committees' Joint Inquiry during 
the 107th Congress--make immediate action and cooperation 
imperative. Accordingly, in Section 314, the Committee requires 
that concrete steps be taken to pave the way for a future of 
vastly improved data sharing and information analysis within 
the Intelligence Community.
    Section 314 requires NSA to develop a pilot program to 
improve the ability of analysts in other Intelligence Community 
elements to obtain access to and analyze data collected and 
held by NSA, while retaining appropriate handling safeguards. 
The pilot program's objectives are: (a) to augment the 
Intelligence Community's ability to undertake true ``all-source 
fusion'' analysis in support of intelligence requirements by 
helping build a legal and practical foundation for increased 
inter-agency cooperation and data sharing; (b) to increase to 
the maximum practicable extent the proportion of NSA-collected 
information that is reviewed and assessed by intelligence 
analysts; and (c) to reduce the drain on NSA analytical 
manpower caused by current barriers to inter-agency information 
sharing.
    Not later than December 31, 2003, therefore, NSA must begin 
to implement a program to:
          a. Develop efficient and effective methods for 
        certifying that designated analysts from other agencies 
        are properly trained in the relevant procedures for 
        handling SIGINT information and for ``minimizing'' any 
        ``U.S. person'' information that might be contained 
        therein so that such analysts may be given access to 
        NSA databases in an identical fashion to NSA analysts; 
        those analysts from other agencies will be designated 
        as requiring such access by the head of their parent 
        agency, who will retain full accountability for the 
        analytic products produced by such agency's analysts; 
        and
          b. Explore and improve innovative ways to allow other 
        agencies to apply their analytical expertise to NSA 
        data, including the use of ``detailees in place'' 
        (i.e., other-agency employees who are notionally 
        detailed to NSA, thus becoming part of the SIGINT 
        enterprise while remaining at their home agency).

Pilot program on training for intelligence analysts

    Current programs that encourage students to pursue 
educational programs relevant to national security or foreign 
language training have not produced the number of qualified 
analysts or foreign language experts necessary to meet the 
ongoing needs of the Intelligence Community. Although the David 
L. Boren National Security Education Act of 1991, Title VIII, 
Public Law 102-183 (Dec. 4, 1991) moves in the right direction, 
the David L. Boren National Security Education Program (NSEP) 
places students in national security positions throughout the 
Federal Government, not merely within the analytic components 
of the Intelligence Community.
    To address the shortage in language proficient and area 
expert analytic capabilities within the Intelligence Community, 
the Committee proposes the Director of Central Intelligence 
establish a ROTC-like Intelligence Analyst Program. This 
program should seek to increase the number of qualified entry-
level intelligence professional analysts available to the 
Intelligence Community. The goal of the program should be to 
recruit entry-level analysts and operations specialists with 
enhanced analytic and foreign language skills who are committed 
to a career in the Community. The Committee believes this 
program should be national in scope (conducted at universities 
throughout the United States), able to identify individuals 
interested in working in the Intelligence Community, able to 
provide financial assistance to participants, and capable of 
providing guidance to participants in selecting courses that 
would be most useful for an intelligence analyst's career. The 
program should also include educating participants on the 
various analytic specialties and opportunities within the 
Intelligence Community. Prerequisites of the program, and 
financial assistance thereunder, should include the ability to 
obtain a security clearance and a commitment for service within 
the Intelligence Community.
    The Committee is pleased that the ADCI/A&P; has expressed 
strong support of the goals of this initiative. Moreover, the 
Committee believes that the ADCI/A&P; is the proper entity to 
manage such a pilot program forapproximately 150 students in 
fiscal year 2004. Therefore, the Committee recommends an increase of 
$8.0 million to the ADCI/A&P; to create and manage this pilot program.

Report on modifications of policy and law on classified information to 
        facilitate sharing of information for national security 
        purposes

    The Committee is concerned that Executive Orders 12333 and 
12958 and related regulations and policies may inappropriately 
limit the effective sharing of intelligence information and 
data. The Committee therefore has several provisions within the 
Bill to improve sharing within the Intelligence Community to 
enhance the quality and timeliness of intelligence products. 
Furthermore, it is the sense of the Committee that information 
sharing will become increasingly important as the Department of 
Homeland Security endeavors to move critical information in 
both directions between the Intelligence Community and 
regional, state, and local governments.
    Of particular concern to the Committee are various sections 
in Executive Orders 12333 and 12958 that the Administration 
should expeditiously review to accurately reflect the movement 
to electronic data collection and storage and to address the 
requirement to more effectively assess and share pertinent 
national security information. The war on terrorism and the 
proliferation of weapons of mass destruction require foreign 
and domestic and national and local partners to effectively 
collaborate on analysis and coordinate on operations. Achieving 
this aim will require the U.S. Government to move beyond the 
paradigm imposed by individual agency ``ownership'' of 
information. In that regard, the Committee notes that agencies 
that collect information often do not have the requisite 
analytic workforce to fully exploit the data they collect. 
Further, expanded access to data--providing it is done 
securely--will foster more rapid access and more competitive 
analysis and exploitation. Notwithstanding extremely sensitive 
security, operational, and related matters, the President 
should continue to encourage broader and more secure exchange 
of information within the Intelligence Community and between 
the Community and its many consumers. Executive Order 12958 
should be revised not only to remove restrictive impediments 
within the Executive Order as to the inter-agency sharing of 
classified information, but also to facilitate sharing and 
access (except in narrowly defined circumstances). Executive 
Order 12333 similarly needs to be revised such that other 
organizations besides NSA can engage in SIGINT activities, 
specifically analysis of SIGINT information that has been 
lawfully collected.
    Revisions to Executive Orders 12333 and 12958 are needed, 
but represent one of many issues that need to be addressed to 
achieve greater teamwork in the defense of the nation. 
Technical solutions, such as the need to implement machine-
enabled processes to automatically tag data, are needed to 
facilitate efficient access and analysis. Further, the 
Intelligence Community must recognize that information sharing 
cannot succeed without revised security policies and 
technologies. This Bill, therefore, requires several related 
reports, including reviews of security clearance procedures, 
the threats to networks posed by ``cleared insiders,'' and the 
growing reliance of the United States on foreign hardware and 
software. Only with a broad approach, encompassing policy and 
technology and security and sharing, can we achieve the maximum 
advantages offered by modern information technologies and a 
highly-trained and motivated workforce.
    The Committee requests that the President review Executive 
Orders 12333 and 12598 and submit a report within 6 months on 
potential changes to the Executive Orders or legislative 
actions which could be applied to facilitate information 
sharing and data access across the Intelligence Community.

Report on data-mining capabilities for the Intelligence Community

    Data mining is emerging as potentially one of the most 
valuable tools for Intelligence Community analysts. Data mining 
involves the use of data analysis tools to discover previously 
unknown, valid patterns and relationships in large data sets. 
This technology has the potential to provide intelligence 
analysts with the capability to identify terrorists, to 
recognize the development and proliferation of weapons of mass 
destruction, and to detect illicit narcotics activity (e.g., 
communications, money transfers, and travel) by examining 
voluminous records.
    The Committee is concerned, however, that components of the 
Intelligence Community are investing in a variety of data-
mining capabilities without sufficient coordination of 
Community-wide data-mining requirements. Strategic planning in 
this area is vital to ensure that there is no redundancy of 
effort and that interface standards are in place to enable 
collaboration and cross-program application, as required.
    Accordingly, the Committee directs that the Chief 
Information Officer for the Intelligence Community (CIO) and 
the ADCI/A&P; jointly review data-mining capabilities throughout 
the Intelligence Community and assess which capabilities meet 
Intelligence Community analytic requirements. The CIO will 
publish guidelines to the Community on standards and protocols 
to enable cross-agency interfaces for migration and data-level 
information exchange. The results of this assessment should be 
included in a written report to the House and Senate 
Intelligence Committees (submitted no later than December 1, 
2003) and should include funding requirements for respective 
data-mining capabilities.

                    SECURITY AND COUNTERINTELLIGENCE

    Although the Committee has sought to eliminate or limit the 
number of reporting obligations placed on the Intelligence 
Community, several issues--from security investigations of U.S. 
Government personnel to the protection of the sensitive 
national security information maintained by the U.S. 
Government--require closer examination. To that end, the bill 
contains a number of one-time reports that will aid the 
Committee in the careful analysis of the issues presented.

Protecting against unauthorized disclosures of classified information

    For some time, the Committee has been greatly concerned 
about the dangers posed to United States national security from 
the epidemic of ``leaking''--when persons with detailed access 
to highly sensitive national security information reveal it to 
unauthorized persons. As President Bush, Secretary of Defense 
Rumsfeld, Attorney General Ashcroft, Federal Bureau of 
Intelligence Director Mueller, Director of Central Intelligence 
Tenet, and many other government officials have repeatedly 
emphasized, unauthorized disclosures of national security 
information impose huge and ongoing costs. Such leaks give 
valuable intelligence to our adversaries, can cost the lives of 
intelligence sources, imperil foreign government liaison 
relationships, compromise collection capabilities, imperil the 
lives of American servicemen and women and the public at large, 
and greatly impede the U.S. Government ability to protect and 
advance vital national security interests in the war on 
terrorism, in fighting foreign espionage, and in prosecuting 
military campaigns in Iraq and elsewhere. Such leaks also cost 
the American taxpayer vast sums of money, because capabilities 
compromised due to leaks must be slowly, laboriously, and 
expensively rebuilt--or new and costly substitutes must be 
found.
    In the Intelligence Authorization Bill for Fiscal Year 
2001, Congress attempted to pass legislation making it a felony 
to disclose properly classified information. President Clinton 
vetoed the legislation, however, and the Authorization Act was 
only made law after Congress had removed the section 
criminalizing unauthorized disclosures. Understanding that such 
a broad measure still appears to lack political support--
despite the demonstrable costs that today's ``leak culture'' 
has imposed, especially since September 11, 2001--the Committee 
wishes to encourage the Executive Branch to adopt a new and 
more aggressive approach to leak issues. The Committee 
recommends that the U.S. Government consider the workability of 
aggressive criminal and civil enforcement, even civil 
compensatory remedies (e.g., liquidated damages).

Coordination of United States Government research on security 
        evaluations

    In October 2002, the National Academies of Science released 
a report entitled, ``The Polygraph and Lie Detection''--``a 
scientific review of the research on polygraph examinations 
that pertains to their validity and reliability, in particular 
for personnel security screening.'' In the report--the first 
comprehensive assessment of the polygraph since the 1983 study 
by the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment--the National 
Academies stated:

          [W]e recommend an expanded research effort directed 
        at methods for deterring and detecting major security 
        threats, including efforts to improve techniques for 
        security screening. * * * We cannot guarantee that 
        research related to techniques for detecting deception 
        will yield valuable practical payoff for national 
        security, even in the long term. However, given the 
        seriousness of the national need, an expanded research 
        effort appears worthwhile. * * * The research program 
        we envision would seek any edge that science can 
        provide for deterring and detecting security threats. 
        It would have two major objectives: (1) to provide 
        Federal agencies with methods of the highest possible 
        scientific validity for protecting national security by 
        deterring and detecting espionage, sabotage, terrorism, 
        and other major security threats; and (2) to make these 
        agencies fully aware of the strengths and limitations 
        of the techniques they use.

    In Section 355, the Committee authorizes $500,000 from the 
Intelligence Community Management Account for the National 
Science Foundation and the Office of Science and Technology to 
convene components of the U.S. Government to provide a forum to 
catalogue and coordinate Federally-funded research activities 
relating to the development of new techniques in the 
behavioral, psychological, or physiological assessment of 
individuals to be used in security evaluations. This effort is 
intended to serve as an important step in developing a more 
focused research effort leading to the development of 
alternatives to the polygraph as a security evaluation tool for 
the U.S. Government. By March 1, 2004, the National Science 
Foundation and the Office of Science and Technology are 
required to jointly submit to Congress a written report 
identifying the research most likely to advance the 
understanding of the use of such assessments of individuals in 
security evaluations; distinguish between short-term and long-
term areas of research in order to maximize the utility of 
short-term and long-term research on such assessments; identify 
the Federal departments and agencies best suited to support 
such research; and develop recommendations for coordinating 
future Federally-funded research for the development, 
improvement, or enhancement of security evaluations. The 
components of the Federal Government who will participate in 
this effort include DoD, DoE, the Department of State, the 
Department of Justice, the Department of Homeland Security, the 
Director of Central Intelligence, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, and the National Counterintelligence Executive.

Report on cleared insider threats to classified computer networks

    The Committee is concerned that the classified computer 
networks of the U.S. Government lack adequate protections from 
cleared insiders and from certain outside threats. Accordingly, 
section 331 requires the Director of Central Intelligence, in 
conjunction with the Secretary of Defense, to provide a one-
time report to Congress. The report should assess the national 
security risks posed by ``cleared insiders'' that are inherent 
in current computer security practices within the Intelligence 
Community and DoD with regard to vulnerabilities such as 
Information Warfare (IW), Information Operations (IO), Computer 
Network Exploitation (CNE), and Computer Network Attack (CNA) 
activity by foreign governments, international terrorist 
organizations, or organized crime groups. In particular, this 
report should describe the risks inherent in furnishing to 
users of local area networks (LANs) and wide-area networks 
(WANs) that include classified information such capabilities as 
e-mail, upload/download authorization, and removable storage 
media without comprehensive firewalls, accountability 
procedures, or other appropriate security controls. The 
Committee understands, for instance, that thousands of 
classified computer terminals within DoD may suffer from these 
vulnerabilities, which have been highlighted by recent 
exercises conducted within the U.S. Government in light of the 
Regan and Hanssen espionage cases. The Committee expects that 
the report should not only assess what vulnerabilities exist in 
this regard, but should also describe in detail what steps are 
being taken to eliminate these threats, including any budget 
requirements to address shortfalls.

Report on security background investigations and clearance procedures 
        of the United States Government

    Most publicly known instances of foreign espionage in this 
country have been committed by persons who legitimately 
obtained sensitive security clearances before deciding to 
betray their country. The Committee is concerned that current 
security investigations, however, focus more upon screening 
individuals prior to giving them clearances than upon 
ascertaining their trustworthiness on an ongoing basis. With 
this in mind, the Committee has requested a report to assess 
the relative risks of pre-clearance and post-clearance 
compromise. This report should state whether current approaches 
address adequately the risk of cleared employees compromising 
classified information after their period of access to such 
information has already begun. The report should also make 
recommendations about how background investigations might in 
the future be better targeted to historically verifiable 
counterintelligence vulnerabilities.

Report on United States dependence on computer hardware and software 
        manufactured overseas

    After 1973, when the risks inherent in America's reliance 
on foreign oil became clear, many positive steps were taken to 
ameliorate United States vulnerabilities. Those steps included, 
among other things, establishment of a strategic petroleum 
reserve, establishment of a Central Command, and research and 
development into alternative fuel supplies. In many respects, 
information technology has become as important to the 
functioning of the United States economy as oil, and the 
growing dependence of the United States on foreign information 
technology raises concerns similar to those raised with respect 
to foreign oil dependence. Unlike foreign oildependence, 
however, United States dependence on foreign information technology 
creates opportunities for espionage and clandestine information 
operations that are extremely difficult to detect. In that regard, the 
Committee notes that most of the leading suppliers of hardware and 
software to the United States are countries that the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation indicates are already actively engaged in economic 
espionage against this country.
    To accurately determine the dimensions of the problem 
relating to United States dependence on foreign hardware and 
software, the Committee directs the Director of Central 
Intelligence to prepare a thorough evaluation of the trends 
within this critical industry and the strategic implications of 
increasing United States reliance on foreign hardware and 
software. Recognizing that some of the greatest sources of 
expertise on this issue reside in the private sector, the 
Committee authorizes and supports such consultation with 
industry as may be required. Once the Committee has received 
this analysis, Congress will be in a better a position to 
develop appropriate policies to mitigate this new 
vulnerability.

                   SUMMARY OF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

One-time reporting requirements

    The Fiscal Year 2004 Intelligence Authorization Bill 
requires the following one-time reporting requirements, which 
are discussed throughout the report:
          (a) Report on cleared insider threat to classified 
        computer networks;
          (b) Report on security background investigations and 
        security clearance procedures of the United States 
        Government;
          (c) Report on detail of civilian intelligence 
        personnel among elements of the Intelligence Community 
        and the Department of Defense;
          (d) Report on modifications of policy and law on 
        classified information to facilitate to sharing of 
        information for national security purposes;
          (e) Report of Secretary of Defense and Director of 
        Central Intelligence on strategic planning;
          (f) Report on United States dependence of computer 
        hardware and software manufactured overseas;
          (g) Report on intelligence lessons learned from 
        military operations in Iraq;
          (h) Report on conventional weapons and ammunition 
        obtained by Iraq in violation of certain United Nations 
        Security Council resolutions;
          (i) Report on data-mining capabilities for the 
        Intelligence Community;
          (j) Report on the National Security Agency Senior 
        Acquisition Executive;
          (k) Quarterly report baselining all program, 
        projects, and activities ongoing within the 
        Consolidated Cryptologic Program;
          (l) Report on a review of the ``Public Private 
        Partnership'' and the ``Private Financing Initiative'' 
        concepts for application to Menwith Hill Station.

Reports repealed or cancelled

    The following is a list of reports that are repealed or 
cancelled, and are no longer required to be submitted to the 
Committee. Additional reports repealed in the Fiscal Year 2004 
Intelligence Authorization Bill are contained in the Classified 
Annex.
          (a) Annual Evaluation of Performance and 
        Responsiveness of Intelligence Community;
          (b) Periodic and Special Reports on Disclosure of 
        Intelligence Information to the United Nations;
          (c) Annual Report on Intelligence Community 
        Cooperation with Counterdrug Activities;
          (d) Annual Report on Russian Nuclear Facilities;
          (e) Annual Report on Covert Leases;
          (f) Annual Report on Protection of Covert Agents;
          (g) Annual Report on Certain Foreign Companies 
        Involved in Proliferation of Weapons of Mass 
        Destruction;
          (h) Annual Report on Intelligence Activities of 
        People's Republic of China;
          (i) Annual Report on Coordination of 
        Counterintelligence Matters with the Federal Bureau of 
        Investigation;
          (j) Reports on Decisions not to Prosecute Violations 
        of Classified Information Procedures Act;
          (k) Report on Postemployment Assistance for 
        Terminated Intelligence Employees;
          (l) Annual Report on Activities of Federal Bureau of 
        Investigation Personnel Outside the United States;
          (m) Annual Report on Exceptions to Consumer 
        Disclosure Requirements for National Security 
        Investigations;
          (n) Recurring report(s) on comprehensive annual 
        reviews of customer satisfaction;
          (o) Recurring report on the Intelligence Community's 
        information infrastructure.

                            COMMITTEE ACTION

    On May 1, 2003, the Select Committee on Intelligence 
approved the Bill and ordered that it be favorably reported.

                           ESTIMATE OF COSTS

    Pursuant to paragraph 11(a) of rule XXVI of the Standing 
Rules of the Senate, the estimated costs incurred in carrying 
out the provisions of this Bill for fiscal year 2003 are set 
forth in the Classified Annex to this Bill. Estimates of the 
costs incurred in carrying out this Bill in the five fiscal 
years thereafter are not available from the Executive Branch, 
and therefore the Committee deems it impractical, pursuant to 
paragraph 11(a)(3) of rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of the 
Senate, to include such estimates in this report. On [      ], 
2003, the Committee transmitted this Bill to the Congressional 
Budget Office and requested that it conduct an estimate of the 
costs incurred in carrying out the provisions of this Bill.

                    EVALUATION OF REGULATORY IMPACT

    In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee finds that no 
regulatory impact will be incurred by implementing the 
provisions of this legislation.

                        CHANGES IN EXISTING LAW

    In the opinion of the Committee it is necessary to dispense 
with the requirements of paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate in order to expedite the business 
of the Senate.