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                                                       Calendar No. 250
108th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE                          
 1st Session                                                    108-126
_______________________________________________________________________

 
     UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2003

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

           COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION

                                   on

                                S. 1152




                August 26, 2003.--Ordered to be printed

      Filed under authority of the order of the Senate of July 29 
                    (legislative day, July 21), 2003
                                 ______

                     U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
                            WASHINGTON : 2003




       SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION
                      one hundred eighth congress
                             first session

                     JOHN McCAIN, Arizona, Chairman
TED STEVENS, Alaska                  ERNEST F. HOLLINGS, South Carolina
CONRAD BURNS, Montana                DANIEL K. INOUYE, Hawaii
TRENT LOTT, Mississippi              JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER IV, West 
KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON, Texas              Virginia
OLYMPIA J. SNOWE, Maine              JOHN F. KERRY, Massachusetts
SAM BROWNBACK, Kansas                JOHN B. BREAUX, Louisiana
GORDON SMITH, Oregon                 BYRON L. DORGAN, North Dakota
PETER G. FITZGERALD, Illinois        RON WYDEN, Oregon
JOHN ENSIGN, Nevada                  BARBARA BOXER, California
GEORGE ALLEN, Virginia               BILL NELSON, Florida
JOHN E. SUNUNU, New Hampshire        MARIA CANTWELL, Washington
                                     FRANK LAUTENBERG, New Jersey
           Jeanne Bumpus, Staff Director and General Counsel
                   Ann Begeman, Deputy Staff Director
                  Robert W. Chamberlin, Chief Counsel
      Kevin D. Kayes, Democratic Staff Director and Chief Counsel
                Gregg Elias, Democratic General Counsel



                                                       Calendar No. 250
108th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                    108-126
======================================================================


     UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2003

                                _______
                                

                August 26, 2003.--Ordered to be printed

     Filed, under authority of the order of the Senate of July 29 
                    (legislative day, July 21), 2003

                                _______
                                

       Mr. McCain, from the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
                Transportation, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1152]

    The Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, to 
which was referred the bill (S. 1152) ``a bill to reauthorize 
the United States Fire Administration, and for other 
purposes'', having considered the same, reports favorably 
thereon with an amendment (in the nature of a substitute) and 
recommends that the bill as amended do pass.

                          Purpose of the Bill

  The purpose of this legislation, as reported, is to 
reauthorize the United States Fire Administration (USFA) for 
fiscal year (FY) 2004 through FY 2008, and re-establish the 
position of Administrator of the USFA. The legislation also 
would establish and authorize funding for programs under the 
USFA to support the development of voluntary consensus 
standards for new firefighting technology, improve coordination 
between Federal, State, and local fire officials, and authorize 
the National Fire Academy to train firefighters to respond to 
acts of terrorism.

                          Background and Needs

  Nearly 75 percent of the more than one million firefighters 
in the United States are volunteers. Volunteer fire departments 
protect most of the rural areas and smaller communities in the 
United States, as well as many of the suburban areas 
surrounding large cities. Career firefighters, including 
municipal firefighters, cover mostly metropolitan cities and 
most cities with populations greater than 50,000. The career 
fire service is estimated to include about 3,000 fire 
departments and approximately 275,000 full-time paid 
firefighters. The largest career fire department has more than 
14,000 full-time employees, although most have fewer than 50 
employees. Some jurisdictions include fire departments that use 
both career and volunteer firefighters. The firefighting 
profession is one of the most hazardous professions in the 
country. In 2002, 102 firefighters died in the line of duty. As 
was demonstrated during the terrorist attacks of September 11, 
2001, local firefighters are often the first responders to an 
incident of domestic terrorism.
  The USFA. The USFA is a directorate within the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The Homeland Security Act 
of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) incorporated FEMA, including the USFA, 
into the Emergency Preparedness and Response Directorate of the 
U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS). The USFA's mission 
is to provide leadership, coordination, and support for the 
nation's fire prevention and control, fire training and 
education, and emergency medical services activities. The 
USFA's ultimate objective is to significantly reduce the 
nation's loss of life from fire, while also achieving a 
reduction in property loss and non-fatal injury due to fire.
  The USFA contains the following programs:

          Data Collection. USFA's National Fire Data Center 
        (NFDC) administers a national system for collecting, 
        analyzing, and disseminating data and information on 
        fire and other emergency incidents to State and local 
        governments and the fire community.
          Public Education and Awareness. Through partnerships 
        and special initiatives, the USFA involves the fire 
        services, the media, other Federal agencies, and safety 
        interest groups in the development of fire safety 
        awareness and education programs.
          Training. The USFA's National Fire Academy (NFA) 
        offers educational opportunities for the advanced 
        professional development of the mid-level and senior 
        fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) officers and 
        allied professionals involved in fire prevention and 
        life safety activities. The Academy develops and 
        delivers educational and training programs with a 
        national focus that supplement and support State and 
        local fire service training.
          Technology. Through research, testing, and 
        evaluation, the USFA works with public and private 
        entities to promote and improve fire and life safety. 
        Research and special studies are conducted on fire 
        detection, suppression, and notification systems and 
        are published and made available to the public free of 
        charge through the USFA Publications Center.
          Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program. This 
        program was established by Title XVII of the National 
        Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (the 
        title is commonly referred to as the Firefighter 
        Investment and Response Enhancement (FIRE) Act). This 
        program provides competitive grants to local fire 
        departments for training, wellness/fitness programs, 
        vehicles, firefighting equipment, personal protective 
        equipment, and fire prevention. The National Defense 
        Authorization Act for FY 2002 (P.L. 107-107) authorized 
        $900 million per year through FY 2004 for the 
        Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program. In the 108th 
        Congress, the FY 2003 Omnibus Appropriations 
        legislation (P.L. 108-7) provided $750 million for this 
        program.

Issues Concerning the Fire Services

  USFA's Transfer to the Department of Homeland Security. 
Issues have been raised about how the USFA's transfer to DHS 
will affect its mission. Language in the Homeland Security Act 
which terminated positions that received compensation at the 
rates prescribed at level II, III, IV, or V of the Executive 
Schedule eliminated the position of the U.S. Fire 
Administrator, which is currently compensated at level IV.
  Equipment Standardization. Today's firefighters use a variety 
of technologies, including thermal imaging equipment used for 
locating firefighters and victims, and state-of-the-art 
protective suits to fight fires, clean up chemical or hazardous 
waste spills, and contend with potential terrorist devices. The 
Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program provides funding for 
career and volunteer fire companies to buy necessary equipment 
and to be prepared for fires and other emergencies.
  It is important to point out that there are no uniform 
technical standards for new equipment for combating fires and 
other threats. Without such standards, local fire companies may 
purchase equipment that does not satisfy their needs, or even 
purchase faulty equipment. For example, Montgomery County, 
Maryland, spent $40,000 on ``Level B'' protective suits that 
they cannot use, because these suits have ``booties'' that are 
not compatible with the firefighters' boots. Also, the fire 
chief of Arlington County, Virginia, Edward P. Plaugher, has 
raised concerns about the lack of equipment standards, as well 
as the lack of guidelines for training the workers charged with 
responding to a future terrorist attack. In a September 10, 
2002, story in The Washington Post, Chief Plaugher stated, 
``Without clear goals, we risk undermining ourselves while 
wasting precious resources.'' In addition, a 1998 Blue Ribbon 
Panel review recommended greater coordination between the USFA 
and other agencies, such as the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, in order to advance the state of the art 
technology for fire safety.
  Coordination. Coordination issues also challenge the fire 
services. Many issues regarding coordination surfaced on 
September 11, 2001. On July 23, 2002, Titan Systems Corporation 
issued an after-action report, on behalf of the fire department 
of Arlington County, Virginia, which highlighted problems 
between the coordination of Washington, D.C., and Arlington 
County fire departments. The report also cited the confusion 
caused by a large influx of self-dispatched volunteers, and 
increased risk faced by the ``bonafide responders.'' These 
conclusions are consistent with an article by the most recent 
U.S. Fire Administrator, R. David Paulison, in the June 1993 
issue of Fire Chief magazine, where he described being 
overwhelmed by the number of uncoordinated volunteer efforts 
that poured into Florida after Hurricane Andrew. Additionally, 
many fire officials and the General Accounting Office have 
highlighted the duplicative nature of many Federal programs and 
the need for better coordination between Federal, State, and 
local officials.
  Training. The events of September 11 also demonstrated a need 
for improved training, especially in the fields of building 
collapse rescue and tactics to respond to terrorist-caused 
catastrophes. In his testimony before the Science, Technology, 
and Space Subcommittee in October 2001, Kenneth Burris, then-
Chief Operating Officer of the USFA, testified on the need for 
greater training in leadership and strategic skills, including 
incident management systems and integrated response. Further, 
the growing trend of wildfires invading urban areas highlights 
the need for urban firefighters to be prepared to deal with 
these threats.

                         Summary of Provisions

  S. 1152, as reported, would re-establish the position of 
Administrator of the USFA. In addition, the legislation also 
would authorize appropriations for the USFA for Fiscal Year 
(FY) 2004 through FY 2008. The legislation also would authorize 
a $3,000,000 grant program for fire fighting equipment to fight 
fires using foam in remote areas without access to water.
  S. 1152, as reported, would authorize the United States Fire 
Administrator to conduct a program of development, testing, and 
evaluation of methods to contain insect infested forest fires, 
and measuring, tracking, and limiting dispersal of resultant 
fine particle smoke. In addition, the Administrator would be 
directed to consult with the National Institute of Standards 
and Technology, the Inter-Agency Board for Equipment 
Standardization and Inter-Operability, the National Institute 
for Occupational Safety and Health, the Directorate of Science 
and Technology of the Department of Homeland Security, national 
voluntary consensus standards development organizations, 
interested Federal, State, and local agencies, and other 
interested parties, to develop measurement techniques and 
testing methodologies, and support the development of voluntary 
consensus standards through national standards development 
organizations for evaluating the performance and compatibility 
of new firefighting technology.
  The legislation also would authorize the Administrator, in 
consultation with the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for 
Emergency Preparedness and Response, to provide technical 
assistance and training to State and local fire service 
officials to establish nationwide and State mutual aid systems 
for dealing with national emergencies that include threat 
assessment, and means of collecting asset and resource 
information for deployment. The Administrator, in consultation 
with the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Emergency 
Preparedness and Response, also would develop model mutual aid 
plans for both intrastate and interstate assistance. The United 
States Fire Administrator would be directed to report to the 
Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and 
the House of Representatives Committee on Science within 90 
days after the date of enactment of this Act on the need for a 
strategy concerning deployment of volunteers and emergency 
response personnel, including a national credentialing system 
in the event of a national emergency. Within 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary of Homeland 
Security for Emergency Preparedness and Response would be 
required to revise the Federal Response Plan to incorporate 
plans for responding to terrorist attacks, particularly in 
urban areas, including fire detection and suppression, and 
related emergency services. The Under Secretary would report to 
the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation 
and the House of Representatives Committee on Science on these 
revisions.
  The legislation also would authorize the Superintendent of 
the National Fire Academy to train firefighters for responding 
to acts of terrorism. The Superintendent would be authorized to 
consult with other Federal, State, and local agency officials 
in developing curricula for classes at the Academy. The United 
States Fire Administrator would coordinate the training program 
with the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services, and other Federal agencies to prevent and eliminate 
duplicative training programs.

                          Legislative History

  On February 5, 2003, Senator McCain introduced S. 321, the 
Firefighting Research and Coordination Act. This legislation 
was co-sponsored by Senators Hollings, Biden, Brownback, 
Cantwell, Carper, DeWine, Graham of South Carolina, and Snowe.
  On April 30, 2003, the full Committee conducted a hearing on 
the ``Needs of the Fire Service''. The hearing witnesses 
included: Congressman Dave Camp; Congressman Curt Weldon; the 
Honorable Arden L. Bement, Jr., Director, National Institute of 
Standards and Technology; the Honorable R. David Paulison, 
Director, Preparedness Division, Emergency Preparedness and 
Response Directorate, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; 
Chief Randy R. Bruegman, President, International Association 
of Fire Chiefs; Mr. Kevin O'Connor, Assistant to the General 
President for Government and Public Relations, International 
Association of Fire Fighters (AFL-CIO-CLC); the Honorable James 
M. Shannon, President and Chief Executive Officer, National 
Fire Protection Association; and Chief Philip C. Stittleburg, 
Chairman, National Volunteer Fire Council.
  On May 23, 2003, Senator McCain introduced S. 1152, the 
United States Fire Administration Reauthorization Act of 2003. 
The bill was co-sponsored by Senators Hollings and Breaux.
  On June 19, 2003, the Committee met in open executive session 
and, by a voice vote, ordered S. 1152 to be reported with a 
substitute amendment offered by Senators McCain, Hollings, 
Rockefeller, Cantwell, Lautenberg and Kerry. The substitute 
amendment included two major changes--(1) it would authorize 
appropriations for USFA for FY 2004 through FY 2008; and (2) it 
added the provisions of S. 321, the Firefighting Research and 
Coordination Act. An amendment by Senator Stevens was accepted 
by voice vote that would authorize research into methods of 
containing insect infested forest fires and methods of 
limiting, measuring, and tracking smoke resulting from such 
fires. In addition, the Stevens amendment would establish a 
$3,000,000 grant program for fire fighting equipment necessary 
to fight fires using foam in remote areas without access to 
water.

                            Estimated Costs

  In accordance with paragraph 11(a) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate and section 403 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee provides the 
following cost estimate, prepared by the Congressional Budget 
Office:

               CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE COST ESTIMATE

S. 1152--A bill to reauthorize the United States Fire Administration, 
        and for other purposes

    Summary: S. 1152 would reauthorize the activities of the 
United States Fire Administration for five years and would 
authorize the appropriation of $335 million over the 2004-2008 
period. In addition, the bill would authorize the agency to 
undertake new research and development and training activities.
    Assuming appropriation of the amounts authorized in S. 
1152, CBO estimates that implementing the bill would cost $262 
million over the 2004-2008 period and an additional $73 million 
after that period. Enacting S. 1152 would not affect direct 
spending or revenues.
    S. 1152 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of S. 1152 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 450 
(community and regional development).
    For this estimate, CBO assumes that the amounts authorized 
by the bill will be appropriated for each fiscal year. Outlay 
estimates are based on historical spending patterns for this 
program.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
                                                                   2003    2004    2005    2006    2007    2008
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

U.S. Fire Administration spending under current law:
    Budget authority \1\........................................      93       0       0       0       0       0
    Estimated outlays...........................................      54      31      19      12       5       0
Proposed changes:
    Authorization level.........................................       0      63      65      67      69      71
    Estimated outlays...........................................       0      28      45      56      64      69
U.S. Fire Administration spending under S. 1152:
    Authorization level \1\.....................................              63      65      67      69      71
    Estimated outlays...........................................              59      64      68      69      69
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 2003 level is the amount appropriated for that year.

    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 1152 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose on costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Julie Middleton. 
Impact on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Greg Waring. 
Impact on the Private Sector: Cecil McPherson.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      Regulatory Impact Statement

  In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides the 
following evaluation of the regulatory impact of the 
legislation, as reported:

                       NUMBER OF PERSONS COVERED

  Section 202(5) of this legislation would direct the 
Administrator of the USFA (the Administrator) to support the 
development of new voluntary consensus standards for new 
firefighting technologies through national voluntary consensus 
standards organizations. Recipients of grants through the 
Assistance to Firefighters program, as defined by section 33 of 
the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 
2229), would be required by regulation to purchase equipment 
for which applicable voluntary consensus standards have been 
established.

                            ECONOMIC IMPACT

  This legislation would not have an adverse economic impact on 
the nation. The bill would promote the development of more 
effective equipment and the establishment of better 
coordination and training for response to fires, terrorist 
attacks, and other national emergencies.

                                PRIVACY

  S. 1152 would not have a negative impact on the personal 
privacy of individuals.

                               PAPERWORK

  The legislation would not increase paperwork requirements for 
private individuals or businesses. The bill would require two 
reports from the Federal government. The first report would be 
from the Administrator to the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science, and Transportation and the House of Representatives 
Committee on Science, within 90 days after the enactment of 
this legislation, on the need for a strategy concerning the 
deployment of volunteers and emergency response personnel, 
including a national credentialing system, in the event of a 
national emergency. The second report would be from the Under 
Secretary of Emergency Preparedness and Response at the 
Department of Homeland Security to the Senate Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation and the House of 
Representatives Committee on Science, within 180 days after the 
date of enactment, on revisions that the Under Secretary has 
made to the Federal Response Plan for responding to terrorist 
attacks, particularly in urban areas, including fire detection 
and suppression, and related emergency services. The 
legislation also would establish a $3,000,000 grant program for 
fire fighting equipment necessary to fight fires using foam in 
remote areas without access to water. Applicants to this grant 
program would have to file documents to apply for this program.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis


       TITLE I--UNITED STATES FIRE ADMINISTRATION REAUTHORIZATION

Sec. 101. Short Title

  The section would provide that the legislation may be cited 
as the ``United States Fire Administration Reauthorization Act 
of 2003''.

Sec. 102. Re-Establishment of Position of United States Fire 
        Administrator

  Section 102 would clarify that Section 1513 of the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296) does not apply to the 
position or office of the Administrator of the USFA. The 
Administrator would continue to be appointed by the President, 
with the advice and consent of the Senate, and would be 
compensated as provided for by section 5(b) of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 2204(b)).

Sec. 103. Authorization of Appropriations

  Section 103 would authorize appropriations of $63,200,000 for 
FY 2004, of which $2,200,000 would be used for activities to 
support the development of voluntary consensus standards for 
new firefighting technologies; $65,096,000 for FY 2005, of 
which $2,266,000 would be used for activities to support the 
development of voluntary consensus standards for new 
firefighting technologies; $67,049,000 for FY 2006, of which 
$2,334,000 would be used for activities to support the 
development of voluntary consensus standards for new 
firefighting technologies; $69,060,000 for FY 2007, of which 
$2,404,000 would be used for activities to support the 
development of voluntary consensus standards for new 
firefighting technologies; and $71,132,000 for FY 2008, of 
which $2,476,000 would be used for activities to support the 
development of voluntary consensus standards for new 
firefighting technologies.
  This section also would authorize $3,000,000 annually for FY 
2004 through FY 2006 for grants for firefighting equipment 
necessary to fight fires using foam in remote areas without 
access to water. The Committee expects that such grants would 
be awarded on a merit-reviewed, competitive basis.

            TITLE II--FIREFIGHTING RESEARCH AND COORDINATION

Sec. 201. Short Title

  The section would cite the title as the ``Firefighting 
Research and Coordination Act''.

Sec. 202. New Firefighting Technology

  Section 202 would amend Section 8(a) of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 2207) to 
authorize the Administrator to conduct a program of 
development, testing, and evaluation of methods of containing 
insect infested forest fires and limiting dispersal of 
resultant fine particle smoke, and methods for measuring and 
tracking the dispersal of fine particle smoke resulting from 
fires of insect infested fuel.
  In addition, this section would establish a new section 8(e) 
of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 
U.S.C. 2207). This new subsection would direct the 
Administrator, in consultation with the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, the Inter-Agency Board for Equipment 
Standardization and Inter-Operability, the National Institute 
for Occupational Safety and Health, the Directorate of Science 
and Technology of the Department of Homeland Security, national 
voluntary consensus standards development organizations, and 
other interested parties, to develop new, and utilize existing, 
measurement techniques and testing methodologies for evaluating 
the performance of new firefighting technologies, including--
          (1) personal protection equipment;
          (2) devices for advance warning of extreme hazard;
          (3) equipment for enhanced vision;
          (4) devices to locate victims, firefighters, and 
        other rescue personnel in above-ground and below-ground 
        structures;
          (5) equipment and methods to provide information for 
        incident command, including the monitoring and 
        reporting of individual personnel welfare;
          (6) equipment and methods for training, especially 
        for virtual reality training; and
          (7) robotics and other remote-controlled devices.
  Under the new section 8(e), the Administrator also would be 
required to evaluate the compatibility of new equipment and 
technology with existing firefighter technology, and support 
the development of new voluntary consensus standards for new 
firefighting technologies through national voluntary consensus 
standards organizations.
  For equipment for which applicable voluntary consensus 
standards have been established, the Administrator would be 
directed to require, by regulation, that equipment purchased 
through the Assistance to Firefighters Grant Program 
established by section 33 of the Federal Fire Prevention and 
Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 2229) meet or exceed applicable 
voluntary consensus standards. For the purposes of this 
subsection, the Administrator would have the discretion to 
determine the applicability of voluntary consensus standards to 
an application under this program. The Committee recognizes 
that the establishment of voluntary consensus standards can be 
a time-consuming process and that developments in new 
firefighting technology may supersede such standards. In order 
to enable fire departments to have access to state-of-the-art 
equipment, the Committee recommends that the Administrator 
exercise some flexibility in the rare case when a newly 
developed firefighting technology may make an existing 
voluntary consensus standard irrelevant.
  In addition, the Committee believes that it would be 
beneficial for the Administrator to collaborate with the 
Department of Defense to use that department's expertise in the 
fields of firefighting and fire prevention in meeting the 
requirements of this section.

Sec. 203. Coordination of Response to National Emergency

  Subsection (a) would create a new section 10(b) of the 
Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 
2209). This new subsection (b) would require the Administrator, 
after consultation with the Under Secretary for Emergency 
Preparedness and Response at the Department of Homeland 
Security, to provide technical assistance and training to State 
and local fire service officials to establish nationwide and 
State mutual aid systems for dealing with national emergencies. 
These mutual aid systems would include threat assessment and 
equipment deployment strategies and include means of collecting 
asset and resource information to provide accurate and timely 
data for regional deployment. These mutual aid systems also 
would have to be consistent with the Federal Response Plan. The 
Administrator, in consultation with the Under Secretary for 
Emergency Preparedness and Response at the Department of 
Homeland Security, would be required to develop and make 
available to State and local fire service officials model 
mutual aid plans for both intrastate and interstate assistance.
  Subsection (b) would require the Administrator to report to 
the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation 
and the House of Representatives Committee on Science, within 
90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, on the need 
for a strategy concerning the deployment of volunteers and 
emergency response personnel (as defined in section 6 of the 
Firefighters' Safety Study Act (15 U.S.C. 2223e)), including a 
national credentialing system, in the event of a national 
emergency. The Committee recommends that the Administrator 
consider existing programs that accredit and certify 
professional fire service qualifications and programs in other 
Federal agencies that credential volunteer firefighters as he 
examines a national credentialing system.
  Subsection (c) would require the Under Secretary for 
Emergency Preparedness and Response at the Department of 
Homeland Security to revise the Federal Response Plan, within 
180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, to 
incorporate plans for responding to terrorist attacks, 
particularly in urban areas, including fire detection and 
suppression and related emergency services. The Under Secretary 
also would be required to transmit a report to the Senate 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and the 
House of Representatives Committee on Science on these 
revisions.

Sec. 204. Training

  Subsection (a) would amend section 8(d)(1) of the Federal 
Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 2206(d)(1) 
to authorize the Superintendent of the National Fire Academy to 
conduct training in the following areas--
          (1) strategies for building collapse rescue;
          (2) the use of technology in response to fires, 
        including terrorist incidents and other national 
        emergencies;
          (3) response, tactics, and strategies for dealing 
        with terrorist-caused national catastrophes;
          (4) use of and familiarity with the Federal Response 
        Plan;
          (5) leadership and strategic skills, including 
        integrated management systems operations and integrated 
        response;
          (6) applying new technology and developing strategies 
        and tactics for fighting forest fires;
          (7) integrating terrorism response agencies into the 
        national terrorism incident response system; and
          (8) response tactics and strategies for fighting 
        fires at United States ports, including fires on the 
        water and aboard vessels.
  Subsection (b) would authorize the Superintendent of the 
National Fire Academy to consult with other Federal, State, and 
localgovernment officials in developing curricula for classes 
at the Academy.
  Subsection (c) would require the Administrator to coordinate 
the training provided under section 8(d)(1) of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 U.S.C. 2206(d)(1)) with 
the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services, and the heads of other Federal agencies, to ensure 
that such training does not duplicate existing courses 
available to fire service personnel and to establish a 
mechanism for eliminating duplicative training programs.

                        Changes in Existing Law

  
  In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the Standing 
Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by the bill, 
as reported, are shown as follows (existing law proposed to be 
omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new material is printed 
in italic, existing law in which no change is proposed is shown 
in roman):
  

            Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974

SEC. 7. NATIONAL ACADEMY FOR FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL.

                            [15 U.S.C. 2206]

  (a) Establishment.--The Director shall establish, at the 
earliest practicable date, a National Academy for Fire 
Prevention and Control. The purpose of the Academy shall be to 
advance the professional development of fire service personnel 
and of other persons engaged in fire prevention and control 
activities.
  (b) Superintendent.--The Academy shall be headed by a 
Superintendent, who shall be appointed by the Director. In 
exercising the powers and authority contained in this section 
the Superintendent shall be subject to the direction of the 
Administrator.
  (c) Powers of Superintendent.--The Superintendent is 
authorized to--
          (1) develop and revise curricula, standards for 
        admission and performance, and criteria for the 
        awarding of degrees and certifications;
          (2) appoint such teaching staff and other personnel 
        as he determines to be necessary or appropriate;
          (3) conduct courses and programs of training and 
        education, as defined in subsection (d) of this 
        section;
          (4) appoint faculty members and consultants without 
        regard to the provisions of title 5, United States 
        Code, governing appointments in the competitive 
        service, and, with respect to temporary and 
        intermittent services, to make appointments to the same 
        extent as is authorized by section 3109 of title 5, 
        United States Code;
          (5) establish fees and other charges for attendance 
        at, and subscription to, courses and programs offered 
        by the Academy. Such fees may be modified or waived as 
        determined by the Superintendent;
          (6) conduct short courses, seminars, workshops, 
        conferences, and similar education and training 
        activities in all parts and localities of the United 
        States;
          (7) enter into such contracts and take such other 
        actions as may be necessary in carrying out the 
        purposes of the Academy; and
          (8) consult with officials of the fire services and 
        other interested persons in the exercise of the 
        foregoing powers.
  (d) Program of the Academy.--The Superintendent is authorized 
to--
          (1) train fire service personnel in such skills and 
        knowledge as may be useful to advance their ability to 
        prevent and control fires, including, but not limited 
        to--
                  (A) techniques of fire prevention, fire 
                inspection, firefighting, and fire and arson 
                investigation;
                  (B) tactics and command of firefighting for 
                present and future fire chiefs and commanders;
                  (C) administration and management of fire 
                services;
                  (D) tactical training in the specialized 
                field of aircraft fire control and crash 
                rescue;
                  (E) tactical training in the specialized 
                field of fire control and rescue aboard 
                waterborne vessels; [and]
                  (F) strategies for building collapse rescue;
                  (G) the use of technology in response to 
                fires, including terrorist incidents and other 
                national emergencies;
                  (H) response, tactics, and strategies for 
                dealing with terrorist-caused national 
                catastrophes;
                  (I) use of and familiarity with the Federal 
                Response Plan;
                  (J) leadership and strategic skills, 
                including integrated management systems 
                operations and integrated response;
                  (K) applying new technology and developing 
                strategies and tactics for fighting forest 
                fires;
                  (L) integrating terrorism response agencies 
                into the national terrorism incident response 
                system;
                  (M) response tactics and strategies for 
                fighting fires at United States ports, 
                including fires on the water and aboard 
                vessels; and
                  [(F)] (N) the training of present and future 
                instructors in the aforementioned subjects;
          (2) develop model curricula, training programs, and 
        other educational materials suitable for use at other 
        educational institutions, and to make such materials 
        available without charge;
          (3) develop and administer a program of 
        correspondence courses to advance the knowledge and 
        skills of fire service personnel;
          (4) develop and distribute to appropriate officials 
        model questions suitable for use in conducting entrance 
        and promotional examinations for fire service 
        personnel; and
          (5) encourage the inclusion of fire prevention and 
        detection technology and practices in the education and 
        professional practice of architects, builders, city 
        planners, and others engaged in design and planning 
        affected by fire safety problems.
  (e) Technical Assistance.--The Administrator is authorized, 
to the extent that he determines it necessary to meet the needs 
of the Nation, to encourage new programs and to strengthen 
existing programs of education and training by local fire 
services, units, and departments, State and local governments, 
and private institutions, by providing technical assistance and 
advice to--
          (1) vocational training programs in techniques of 
        fire prevention, fire inspection, firefighting, and 
        fire and arson investigation;
          (2) fire training courses and programs at junior 
        colleges; and
          (3) four-year degree programs in fire engineering at 
        colleges and universities.
  (f) Assistance to State and Local Fire Service Training 
Programs.--The Administrator is authorized to provide 
assistance to State and local fire service training programs 
through grants, contracts, or otherwise. Such assistance shall 
not exceed 4 per centum of the amount authorized to be 
appropriated in each fiscal year pursuant to section 17 of this 
Act.
  (g) Site Selection.--The Academy shall be located on such 
site as the Director selects, subject to the following 
provisions:
          (1) The Director is authorized to appoint a Site 
        Selection Board consisting of the Academy 
        Superintendent and two other members to survey the most 
        suitable sites for the location of the Academy and to 
        make recommendations to the Director.
          (2) The Site Selection Board in making its 
        recommendations and the Director in making his final 
        selection, shall give consideration to the training and 
        facility needs of the Academy, environmental effects, 
        and the possibility of using a surplus Government 
        facility, and such other factors as are deemed 
        important and relevant. The Director shall make a final 
        site selection not later than 2 years after the date of 
        enactment of this Act.
  (h) Construction Costs.--Of the sums authorized to be 
appropriated for the purpose of implementing the programs of 
the Administration, not more than $9,000,000 shall be available 
for the construction of facilities of the Academy on the site 
selected under subsection (g) of this section. Such sums for 
such construction shall remain available until expended.
  (i) Educational and Professional Assistance.--The 
Administrator is authorized to--
          (1) provide stipends to students attending Academy 
        courses and programs, in amounts up to 75 per centum of 
        the expense of attendance, as established by the 
        Superintendent;
          (2) provide stipends to students attending courses 
        and non-degree training programs approved by the 
        Superintendent at universities, colleges, and junior 
        colleges, in amounts up to 50 per centum of the cost of 
        tuition;
          (3) make or enter into contracts to make payments to 
        institutions of higher education for loans, not to 
        exceed $2,500 per academic year for any individual who 
        is enrolled on a full-time basis in an undergraduate or 
        graduate program of fire research or engineering which 
        is certified by the Superintendent. Loans under this 
        paragraph shall be made on such terms and subject to 
        such conditions as the Superintendent and each 
        institution involved may jointly determine; and
          (4) establish and maintain a placement and promotion 
        opportunities center in cooperation with the fire 
        services, for firefighters who wish to learn and take 
        advantage of different or better career opportunities. 
        Such center shall not limit such assistance to students 
        and graduates of the Academy, but shall undertake to 
        assist all fire service personnel.
  (j) Board of Visitors.--Upon establishment of the Academy, 
the Director shall establish a procedure for the selection of 
professionals in the field of fire safety, fire prevention, 
fire control, research and development in fire protection, 
treatment and rehabilitation of fire victims, or local 
government services management to serve as members of a Board 
of Visitors for the Academy. Pursuant to such procedure, the 
Director shall select eight such persons to serve as members of 
such Board of Visitors to serve such terms as the Director may 
prescribe. The function of such Board shall be to review 
annually the program of the Academy and to make comments and 
recommendations to the Director regarding the operation of the 
Academy and any improvements therein which such Board deems 
appropriate. Each member of such Board shall be reimbursed for 
any expenses actually incurred by him in the performance of his 
duties as a member of such Board.
  (k) Accreditation.--The Superintendent is authorized to 
establish a Committee on Fire Training and Education which 
shall inquire into and make recommendations regarding the 
desirability of establishing a mechanism for accreditation of 
fire training and education programs and courses, and the role 
which the Academy should play if such a mechanism is 
recommended. The Committee shall consist of the Superintendent 
as Chairman and eighteen other members appointed by the 
Administrator from among individuals and organizations 
possessing special knowledge and experience in the field of 
fire training and education or related fields. The Committee 
shall submit to the Administrator within two years after its 
appointment a full and complete report of its findings and 
recommendations. Upon the submission of such report, the 
Committee shall cease to exist. Each appointed member of the 
Committee shall be reimbursed for expenses actually incurred in 
the performance of his duties as a member.
  (l) Admission.--The Superintendent is authorized to admit to 
the courses and programs of the Academy individuals who are 
members of the firefighting, rescue, and civil defense forces 
of the Nation and such other individuals, including candidates 
for membership in these forces, as he determines can benefit 
from attendance. Students shall be admitted from any State, 
with due regard to adequate representation in the student body 
of all geographic regions of the Nation. In selecting students, 
the Superintendent may seek nominations and advice from the 
fire services and other organizations which wish to send 
students to the Academy.

SEC. 8. FIRE TECHNOLOGY.

                            [15 U.S.C. 2207]

  (a) Development.--The Administrator shall conduct a 
continuing program of development, testing, and evaluation of 
equipment for use by the Nation's fire, rescue, and civil 
defense services, with the aim of making available improved 
suppression, protective, auxiliary, and warning devices 
incorporating the latest technology.Attention shall be given to 
the standardization, compatibility, and interchangeability of such 
equipment. Such development, testing, and evaluation activities shall 
include, but need not be limited to--
          (1) safer, less cumbersome articles of protective 
        clothing, including helmets, boots, and coats;
          (2) breathing apparatus with the necessary duration 
        of service, reliability, low weight, and ease of 
        operation for practical use;
          (3) safe and reliable auxiliary equipment for use in 
        fire prevention, detection, and control, such as fire 
        location detectors, visual and audio communications 
        equipment, and mobile equipment;
          (4) special clothing and equipment needed for forest 
        fires, brush fires, oil and gasoline fires, aircraft 
        fires and crash rescue, fires occurring aboard 
        waterborne vessels, and in other special firefighting 
        situations;
          (5) fire detectors and related equipment for 
        residential use with high sensitivity and reliability, 
        and which are sufficiently inexpensive to purchase, 
        install, and maintain to insure wide acceptance and 
        use;
          (6) in-place fire prevention systems of low cost and 
        of increased reliability and effectiveness;
          (7) methods of testing fire alarms and fire 
        protection devices and systems on a non-interference 
        basis;
          (8) the development of purchase specifications, 
        standards, and acceptance and validation test 
        procedures for all such equipment and devices; [and]
          (9) operation tests, demonstration projects, and fire 
        investigations in support of the activities set forth 
        in this [section.] section;
          (10) methods of containing insect infested forest 
        fires and limiting disbursal of resultant fine particle 
        smoke; and
          (11) methods of measuring and tracking the disbursal 
        of fine particle smoke resulting from fires of insect 
        infested fuel.
  (b) Limitation on Manufacture and Sale of Equipment.--The 
Administration shall not engage in the manufacture or sale of 
any equipment or device developed pursuant to this section, 
except to the extent that it deems it necessary to adequately 
develop, test, or evaluate such equipment or device.
  (c) Management Studies.--
          (1) The Administrator is authorized to conduct, 
        directly or through contracts or grants, studies of the 
        operations and management aspects of fire services, 
        utilizing quantitative techniques, such as operations 
        research, management economics, cost effectiveness 
        studies, and such other techniques and methods as may 
        be applicable and useful. Such studies shall include, 
        but need not be limited to, the allocation of 
        resources, the optimum location of fire stations, the 
        optimum geographical area for an integrated fire 
        service, the manner of responding to alarms, the 
        operation of citywide and regional fire dispatch 
        centers, firefighting under conditions of civil 
        disturbance, and the effectiveness, frequency, and 
        methods of building inspections.
          (2) The Administrator is authorized to conduct, 
        directly or through contracts or grants, research 
        concerning and productivity and efficiency of fire 
        service personnel, the job categories and skills 
        required by fire services under varying conditions, the 
        reduction of injuries to fire service personnel, the 
        most effective fire prevention programs and activities, 
        and techniques for accurately measuring and analyzing 
        the foregoing.
          (3) The Administrator is authorized to conduct, 
        directly or through contracts, grants, or other forms 
        of assistance, development, testing, and demonstration 
        projects to the extent deemed necessary to introduce 
        and to encourage the acceptance of new technology, 
        standards, operating methods, command techniques, and 
        management systems for utilization by the fire 
        services.
          (4) The Administrator is authorized to assist the 
        Nation's fire services, directly or through contracts, 
        grants, or other forms of assistance, to measure and 
        evaluate, on a cost-benefit basis, the effectiveness of 
        the programs and activities of each fire service and 
        the predictable consequences on the applicable local 
        fire services of coordination or combination, in whole 
        or in part, in a regional, metropolitan, or statewide 
        fire service.
  (d) Rural Assistance.--The Administrator is authorized to 
assist the Nation's fire services, directly or through 
contracts, grants, or other forms of assistance, to sponsor and 
encourage research into approaches, techniques, systems, and 
equipment to improve fire prevention and control in the rural 
and remote areas of the Nation.
  (e) Development of New Technology.--
          (1) In general.--In addition to, or as part of, the 
        program conducted under subsection (a), the 
        Administrator, in consultation with the National 
        Institute of Standards and Technology, the Inter-Agency 
        Board for Equipment Standardization and Inter-
        Operability, the National Institute for Occupational 
        Safety and Health, the Directorate of Science and 
        Technology of the Department of Homeland Security, 
        national voluntary consensus standards development 
        organizations, interested Federal, State, and local 
        agencies, and other interested parties, shall--
                  (A) develop new, and utilize existing, 
                measurement techniques and testing 
                methodologies for evaluating new firefighting 
                technologies, including--
                          (i) personal protection equipment;
                          (ii) devices for advance warning of 
                        extreme hazard;
                          (iii) equipment for enhanced vision;
                          (iv) devices to locate victims, 
                        firefighters, and other rescue 
                        personnel in above-ground and below-
                        ground structures;
                          (v) equipment and methods to provide 
                        information for incident command, 
                        including the monitoring and reporting 
                        of individual personnel welfare;
                          (vi) equipment and methods for 
                        training, especially for virtual 
                        reality training; and
                          (vii) robotics and other remote-
                        controlled devices;
                  (B) evaluate the compatibility of new 
                equipment and technology with existing 
                firefighting technology; and
                  (C) support the development of new voluntary 
                consensus standards through national voluntary 
                consensus standards organizations for new 
                firefighting technologies based on techniques 
                and methodologies described in subparagraph 
                (A).
          (2) New equipment must meet standards.--For equipment 
        for which applicable voluntary consensus standards have 
        been established, the Administrator shall, by 
        regulation, require that equipment or systems purchased 
        through the assistance program established by section 
        33 meet or exceed applicable voluntary consensus 
        standards.
  [(e)] (f) Coordination.--In establishing and conducting 
programs under this section, the Administrator shall take full 
advantage of applicable technological developments made by 
other departments and agencies of the Federal Government, by 
State and local governments, and by business, industry, and 
nonprofit associations.

                          *  *  *  *  *  *  *

SEC. 10. MASTER PLANS.

                            [15 U.S.C. 2209]

  (a) Encouragement by Administrator.--The establishment of 
master plans for fire prevention and control are the 
responsibility of the States and the political subdivisions 
thereof. The Administrator is authorized to encourage and 
assist such States and political subdivisions in such planning 
activities, consistent with his powers and duties under this 
Act.
  (b) Mutual Aid Systems.--
          (1) In general.--The Administrator, after 
        consultation with the Under Secretary for Emergency 
        Preparedness and Response, shall provide technical 
        assistance and training to State and local fire service 
        officials to establish nationwide and State mutual aid 
        systems for dealing with national emergencies that--
                  (A) include threat assessment and equipment 
                deployment strategies;
                  (B) include means of collecting asset and 
                resource information to provide accurate and 
                timely data for regional deployment; and
                  (C) are consistent with the Federal Response 
                Plan.
          (2) Model mutual aid plans.--The Administrator, in 
        consultation with the Under Secretary for Emergency 
        Preparedness and Response, shall develop and make 
        available to State and local fire service officials 
        model mutual aid plans for both intrastate and 
        interstate assistance.
  [(b)] (c) ``Master Plan'' Defined.--For the purposes of this 
section, a ``master plan'' is one which will result in the 
planning and implementation in the area involved of a general 
program of action for fire prevention and control. Such master 
plan is reasonably expected to include (1) a survey of the 
resources and personnel of existing fire services and an 
analysis of the effectiveness of the fire and building codes in 
such area; (2) an analysis of short and long term fire 
prevention and control needs in such area; (3) a plan to meet 
the fire prevention and control needs in such area; and (4) an 
estimate of cost and realistic plans for financing the 
implementation of the plan and operation on a continuing basis 
and a summary of problems that are anticipated in implementing 
such master plan.

                          *  *  *  *  *  *  *

SEC. 17. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

                            [15 U.S.C. 2216]

  (a) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out the 
foregoing provisions of this Act, except as otherwise 
specifically provided, with respect to the payment of claims, 
under section 11 of this Act, an amount not to exceed 
$25,210,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980, 
which amount includes--
          (1) $4,781,000 for programs which are recommended in 
        the report submitted to the Congress by the 
        Administrator pursuant to section 24(b)(1) ;
          (2) $9,430,000 for the National Academy for Fire 
        Prevention and Control;
          (3) $307,000 for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits;
          (4) $500,000 for additional rural firefighting 
        technical assistance and information activities;
          (5) $500,000 for the study required by section 26 of 
        this Act; and
          (6) $110,000 for the study required by section 27 of 
        this Act.
  (b) There are authorized to be appropriated for the 
additional administrative expenses of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, which are related to this Act and which 
result from Reorganization Plan Numbered 3 of 1978 (submitted 
June 19, 1978) and related Executive orders, an amount not to 
exceed $600,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980.
  (c) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
Act, except as otherwise specifically provided with respect to 
the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, an amount 
not to exceed $23,814,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1981, which amount includes--
          (1) not less than $1,100,000 for the first year of a 
        three-year concentrated demonstration program of fire 
        prevention and control in two States with high fire 
        death rates;
          (2) not less than $2,575,000 for rural fire 
        prevention and control; and
          (3) not less than $4,255,000 for research and 
        development for the activities under section 18 of this 
        Act at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau 
        of Standards, of which not less than $250,000 shall be 
        available for adjustments required by law in salaries, 
        pay, retirement, and employee benefits. The funds 
        authorized in paragraph (3) shall be in addition to 
        funds authorized in any other law for research and 
        development at the Fire Research Center.
  (d) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect to 
the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated--
          (1) $20,815,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1982, and $23,312,800 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1983, which amount shall include--
                  (A) such sums as may be necessary for the 
                support of research and development at the Fire 
                Research Center of the National Bureau of 
                Standards under section 18 of this Act, which 
                sums shall be in addition to those funds 
                authorized to be appropriated under the 
                National Bureau of Standards Authorization Act 
                for fiscal years 1981 and 1982; and
                  (B) $654,000 for the fiscal year ending 
                September 30, 1982, and $732,480 for the fiscal 
                year ending September 30, 1983, for executive 
                direction by the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency of program activities for which 
                appropriations are authorized by this 
                subsection; and
          (2) such further sums as may be necessary in each of 
        the fiscal years ending September 30, 1982, and 
        September 30, 1983, for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits 
        incurred in the conduct of activities for which funds 
        are authorized by paragraph (1) of this subsection. The 
        funds authorized under section 18 shall be in addition 
        to funds authorized in any other law for research and 
        development at the Fire Research Center of the National 
        Bureau of Standards.
  (e) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect to 
the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated--
          (1) $15,720,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1984, and $20,983,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1985; and
          (2) such further sums as may be necessary in each of 
        the fiscal years ending September 30, 1984, and 
        September 30, 1985, for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits 
        incurred in the conduct of activities for which funds 
        are authorized by paragraph (1) of this subsection. The 
        funds authorized under this subsection shall be in 
        addition to funds authorized in any other law for 
        research and development at the Fire Research Center of 
        the National Bureau of Standards.
  (f) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect to 
the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated $22,037,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1986 and $18,300,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1987.
  (g)(1) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, there 
are authorized to be appropriated to carry out the purposes of 
this Act--
          [(A) $17,039,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1989;
          [(B) $17,737,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1990;
          [(C) $18,464,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1991;
          [(D) $25,550,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1992;
          [(E) $26,521,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1993;
          [(F) $27,529,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1994;
          [(G) $29,664,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1998;
          [(H) $30,554,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1999;
          [(I) $44,753,000 for fiscal year 2001, of which 
        $3,000,000 is for research activities, and $250,000 may 
        be used for contracts or grants to non-Federal entities 
        for data analysis, including general fire profiles and 
        special fire analyses and report projects, and of which 
        $6,000,000 is for anti-terrorism training, including 
        associated curriculum development, for fire and 
        emergency services personnel;
          [(J) $47,800,000 for fiscal year 2002, of which 
        $3,250,000 is for research activities, and $250,000 may 
        be used for contracts or grants to non-Federal entities 
        for data analysis, including general fire profiles and 
        special fire analyses and report projects, and of which 
        $7,000,000 is for anti-terrorism training, including 
        associated curriculum development, for fire and 
        emergency services personnel; and
          [(K) $50,000,000 for fiscal year 2003, of which 
        $3,500,000 is for research activities, and $250,000 may 
        be used for contracts or grants to non-Federal entities 
        for data analysis, including general fire profiles and 
        special fire analyses and report projects, and of which 
        $8,000,000 is for anti-terrorism training, including 
        associated curriculum development, for fire and 
        emergency services personnel.]
          (A) $63,200,000 for fiscal year 2004, of which 
        $2,200,000 shall be used to carry out section 8(e);
          (B) $65,096,000 for fiscal year 2005, of which 
        $2,266,000 shall be used to carry out section 8(e);
          (C) $67,049,000 for fiscal year 2006, of which 
        $2,334,000 shall be used to carry out section 8(e);
          (D) $69,060,000 for fiscal year 2007, of which 
        $2,404,000 shall be used to carry out section 8(e); and
          (E) $71,132,000 for fiscal year 2008, of which 
        $2,476,000 shall be used to carry out section 8(e).
  (2) Of the amounts referred to in paragraph (1), not more 
than $4,150,000 is authorized to be appropriated for each 
fiscal year for National Emergency Training Center site 
administration.
  (3) Of the funds authorized by paragraph (1) for fiscal years 
2004 through 2006, $3,000,000 annually shall be made available 
for grants for fire fighting equipment necessary to fight fires 
using foam in remote areas without access to water.
  (h) In addition to any other amounts that are authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this Act, there are authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this Act--
          (1) $500,000 for fiscal year 1995 for basic research 
        on the development of an advanced course on arson 
        prevention;
          (2) $2,000,000 for fiscal year 1996 for the expansion 
        of arson investigator training programs at the Academy 
        under section 24 and at the Federal Law Enforcement 
        Training Center, or through regional delivery sites;
          (3) $4,000,000 for each of fiscal years 1995 and 1996 
        for carrying out section 25, except for salaries and 
        expenses for carrying out section 25; and
          (4) $250,000 for each of the fiscal years 1995 and 
        1996 for salaries and expenses for carrying out section 
        25.