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108th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     108-441
======================================================================

                         CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

                         ON THE BUDGET--FISCAL

                               YEAR 2005

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

                        COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                              to accompany

                            H. Con. Res. 393

ESTABLISHING THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET FOR THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT 
FOR FISCAL YEAR 2005 AND SETTING FORTH APPROPRIATE BUDGETARY LEVELS FOR 
                FISCAL YEARS 2004 AND 2005 THROUGH 2009

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS



                                     
                                     
 March 19, 2004.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed


                        COMMITTEE ON THE BUDGET

                       JIM NUSSLE, Iowa, Chairman
CHRISTOPHER SHAYS, Connecticut       JOHN M. SPRATT, Jr., South 
  Speaker's Designee, Vice Chairman      Carolina,
GIL GUTKNECHT, Minnesota               Ranking Minority Member
MAC THORNBERRY, Texas                JAMES P. MORAN, Virginia
JIM RYUN, Kansas                     DARLENE HOOLEY, Oregon
PATRICK J. TOOMEY, Pennsylvania      TAMMY BALDWIN, Wisconsin
DOC HASTINGS, Washington             DENNIS MOORE, Kansas
ROB PORTMAN, Ohio                    JOHN LEWIS, Georgia
EDWARD L. SCHROCK, Virginia          RICHARD E. NEAL, Massachusetts
HENRY E. BROWN, Jr., South Carolina  ROSA L. DeLAURO, Connecticut
ANDER CRENSHAW, Florida              CHET EDWARDS, Texas
ADAM H. PUTNAM, Florida              ROBERT C. SCOTT, Virginia
ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi         HAROLD E. FORD, Jr., Tennessee
KENNY C. HULSHOF, Missouri           LOIS CAPPS, California
THOMAS G. TANCREDO, Colorado         MIKE THOMPSON, California
DAVID VITTER, Louisiana              BRIAN BAIRD, Washington
JO BONNER, Alabama                   JIM COOPER, Tennessee
TRENT FRANKS, Arizona                RAHM EMANUEL, Illinois
SCOTT GARRETT, New Jersey            ARTUR DAVIS, Alabama
J. GRESHAM BARRETT, South Carolina   DENISE L. MAJETTE, Georgia
THADDEUS G. McCOTTER, Michigan       RON KIND, Wisconsin
MARIO DIAZ-BALART, Florida
JEB HENSARLING, Texas
GINNY BROWN-WAITE, Florida

                           Professional Staff

                       Rich Meade, Chief of Staff
       Thomas S. Kahn, Minority Staff Director and Chief Counsel


                            C O N T E N T S

                                                                   PAGE
Strength, Growth, Opportunity: Introduction to the Budget 
  Resolution.....................................................     3
Growth: The Economy and Economic Assumptions.....................    17
    Economic Assumptions of the Budget Resolution (Table 1)......    23
    Comparison of Economic Assumptions (Table 2).................    23
Revenue..........................................................    25
Function-by-Function Presentation................................    27
    050 National Defense.........................................    28
    100 Homeland Security........................................    30
    150 International Affairs....................................    32
    250 Science, Space and Technology............................    33
    270 Energy...................................................    34
    300 Natural Resources and Environment........................    35
    350 Agriculture..............................................    37
    370 Commerce and Housing Credit..............................    38
    400 Transportation...........................................    40
    450 Community and Regional Development.......................    42
    500 Education, Training, Employment and Social Services......    43
    550 Health...................................................    44
    570 Medicare.................................................    46
    600 Income Security..........................................    48
    650 Social Security..........................................    50
    700 Veterans Benefits........................................    51
    750 Administration of Justice................................    52
    800 General Government.......................................    53
    900 Net Interest.............................................    54
    920 Allowances...............................................    55
    950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts........................    56
Summary Tables: Revenue and Spending:
    Comparison of Total Budget Revenues for President's Request 
      and Committee Recommendations (Table 3)....................    58
    Comparison of On-Budget Revenues for President's Request and 
      Committee Recommendation (Table 4).........................    59
    Comparison of Total Budget Revenues for CBO Baseline and 
      Committee Recommendation (Table 5).........................    60
    Comparison of Total Budget Revenues, as Percent of GDP, for 
      CBO Baseline and Committee Recommendation (Table 6)........    61
    CBO Baseline Revenues by Source, in Billions of Dollars, 
      Under Past and Current Law (Table 7).......................    61
    CBO Baseline Revenues By Source, Percent of GDP, Under Past 
      and Current Law (Table 8)..................................    62
    Tax Expenditure Estimates By Function (Table 9)..............    63
    Budget Resolution Total Spending and Revenue (Table 10)......    74
    Budget Resolution Discretionary Spending (Table 11)..........    76
    Budget Resolution Mandatory Spending (Table 12)..............    77
    Committee Recommendation Minus the President's Request: 
      President Total Spending and Revenues (Table 13)...........    79
    Committee Recommendation Compared to 2001: Total Spending and 
      Revenues ( Table 14).......................................    81
    Committee Recommendation Compared to 2001: Percentage Change 
      (Table 15).................................................    83
Reconciliation...................................................    87
    Reconciliation Levels (Table 16).............................    88
Section-by-Section Summary of the Budget Resolution..............    89
The Congressional Budget Process.................................    99
    Appropriations Committee.....................................    99
    Authorizing Committees.......................................   100
    Adjustments..................................................   100
    Enforcement..................................................   102
    Reconciliation...............................................   102
    Appropriations Committee Allocation (Table 17)...............   102
    Authorizing Committees Allocations (Table 18)................   103
Enforcing the Budget Resolution..................................   107
Votes of the Committee...........................................   109
Additional Report Language.......................................   141
Other Matters To Be Discussed Under The Rules of The House.......   149
    Committee on the Budget Oversight Findings and 
      Recommendations............................................   149
    New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax 
      Expenditures...............................................   149
    General Performance Goals and Objectives.....................   149
    Views of Committee Members...................................   149
    Minority Views...............................................   150
Appendix--The Concurrent Resolution on the Budget................   167

                            List of Acronyms

Office of Management and Budget..................................   OMB
Congressional Budget Office......................................   CBO
Gross Domestic Product...........................................   GDP
Budget Authority.................................................    BA

                              T A B L E S

                                                                   Page
Table 1: Economic Assumptions of the Budget Resolution...........    23
Table 2: Comparison of Economic Assumptions......................    23
Table 3: Comparison of Total Budget Revenues for President's 
  Request and Committee Recommendations..........................    58
Table 4: Comparison of On-Budget Revenues for President's Request 
  and Committee Recommendation...................................    59
Table 5: CBO Baseline Revenues by Source, in Billions of Dollars, 
  Under Past and Current Law.....................................    60
Table 6: CBO Baseline Revenues By Source, Percent of GDP, Under 
  Past and Current Law...........................................    61
Table 7: Comparison of Total Budget Revenues for CBO Baseline and 
  Committee Recommendation.......................................    61
Table 8: Comparison of Total Budget Revenues, as Percent of GDP, 
  for CBO Baseline and Committee Recommendation..................    62
Table 9: Tax Expenditure Estimates By Function...................    63
Table 10: Budget Resolution Total Spending and Revenue...........    74
Table 11: Budget Resolution Discretionary Spending...............    76
Table 12: Budget Resolution Mandatory Spending...................    77
Table 13: Committee Recommendation Minus the President's Request: 
  President Total Spending and Revenues..........................    79
Table 14: Committee Recommendation Compared to 200: Total 
  Spending and Revenues..........................................    81
Table 15: Committee Recommendation Compared to 200: Percentage 
  Change.........................................................    83
Table 16: Reconciliation Levels..................................    88
Table 17: Appropriations Committee Allocation....................   102
Table 18: Authorizing Committees Allocations.....................   103



                                                                       
108th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     108-441
======================================================================

 
         CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET--FISCAL YEAR 2005

                                _______
                                

 March 19, 2004.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

   Mr. Nussle, from the Committee on Budget, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                             MINORITY VIEWS

                    [To accompany H. Con. Res. 393]
                     Strength, Growth, Opportunity

                              ----------                              


                 INTRODUCTION TO THE BUDGET RESOLUTION

                                Summary

    This budget recognizes the fundamental obligations of the 
Federal Government to promote Strength for America, Growth for 
the Economy, and Opportunity for the Future by promoting 
freedom at home and around the world. It does so in a fiscally 
responsible way that cuts the deficit in half in the next 4 
years, with no tax increases.

                               BACKGROUND

    Even before the end of last year, it was obvious that the 
budget for fiscal year 2005 had to show fiscal responsibility, 
and had to get spending under control. As far back as the 
administration's Mid-Session Review in July, the President was 
proposing to cut the deficit in half within the next 5 years. 
Regaining control of the budget also was the mandate from the 
public and from Members of this House.

                    DEFICITS CONGRESS HAS ADDRESSED

    It was obvious, too, that the Nation had faced, and largely 
overcome, extraordinary circumstances in the past 3 years. 
These were evident in a variety of deficits:

- The Defense Deficit--Beginning in the early 1990's, military 
    spending began a steady decline, eventually reaching its 
    lowest percentage of Gross Domestic Product [GDP] since 
    before Pearl Harbor. Infrastructure began to deteriorate, 
    and so did the quality of life for service members.

- The Intelligence Deficit--The attacks of September 11, and 
    the inadequate intelligence regarding Iraq, North Korea, 
    and Iran made it abundantly clear that there was a deficit 
    of resources and focus in the Nation's intelligence 
    community--which had developed in the 1990's.

- The Homeland Security Deficit--September 11 proved, 
    painfully, that terrorists could exploit gaps in the 
    Nation's security. These gaps had to be closed.

- The Medicare Deficit--Medicare was on a short path to 
    bankruptcy until the President and Congress worked to 
    modernize the program that had been running under the same 
    system since its creation almost 40 years ago. The program 
    also has been brought into the 21st century, with a 
    prescription drug benefit for seniors.

- The Growth Deficit--Beginning in 2000, the economy began to 
    decline. The slowdown and recession of 2000-01 already had 
    taken a toll when the terrorists struck on September 11.
    
    
                           THE NEXT CHALLENGE

    These were large and important problems that could not be 
ignored. No one should underestimate the challenges of the past 
3 years--or the strength and resilience with which America has 
endured, and largely overcome, those challenges. But in 
addressing them, the Federal Government took on large costs--
and the result was a budget deficit (see figures below). 
Correcting that deficit--getting back on the path to balance--
is the next major challenge. It's one this budget tackles.
    At the same time, however, this is not simply a green-
eyeshade exercise; it's not just a matter of getting a batch of 
numbers to add up. The budget also has to support an agenda 
that reflects its principles for governing--which are to 
advance the Nation's Strength, Growth, and Opportunity.

                                Strength

    There is no greater priority in this budget than protecting 
America. In the face of unprecedented threats to the Nation's 
domestic and international security, the National Defense and 
Homeland Security budgets ensure that the following overarching 
goals are advanced:

- One: Win the Global War Against Terrorism.

- Two: Prepare for Future Challenges.

- Three: Protect America's Homeland.

                   WINNING THE WAR AGAINST TERRORISM

    Over the past 3 years, the budgets Congress has adopted 
began to address the defense deficit of the 1990's. Basic pay 
alone has increased 21 percent. Overall, the Department of 
Defense's annual budget has increased by more than $110 billion 
to prosecute the global war against terrorism and carry out 
military transformation.
    The national defense budget embraced here--fully 
accommodating the President's request--is part of a multiyear 
plan enabling the military to fight the war against terrorism 
now, and to transform to counter unconventional threats in the 
future. This budget will: 1) continue to advance America's 
efforts in the global War Against Terrorism; 2) provide for a 
7-percent increase for defense--which represents a 35-percent 
increase since 2001; make strides in transforming the 
Department to meet new threats; 4) continue to improve the 
quality of life for military personnel and their families.
    In addition, this budget reflects the expected cost of $50 
billion in its bottom line for ongoing operations in Iraq and 
Afghanistan for 2005. This is a mid-range estimate for 
anticipated annual costs. It is not an attempt to predetermine 
the scope of operations or which weapons and supplies DOD will 
need, but rather an effort to make the budget reflect a likely 
future outlay. During testimony to the Committee on 3 February 
2004, the Director of the administration's Office of Management 
and Budget said: ``If you want to assume that the level of our 
commitment in 2005 is going to be as robust as it has been in 
2004, then you will have to add into our deficit number for 
2005 something close to that $50 billion figure. My own 
expectation is that our needs there will be less, but we do not 
know.''

                        PROTECTING THE HOMELAND

    Since the attacks of September 11, Congress and the 
President have invested more than $50 billion, and created the 
Department of Homeland Security--reorganizing 22 agencies 
consisting of 180,000 employees, and adapting their missions. 
Threats such as bioterrorism have also been addressed 
vigorously.
    As it does with defense, this budget recognizes the 
continued importance of ensuring that America's homeland is 
secure. The budget provides the Department of Homeland Security 
and related agencies with added resources to protect the Nation 
from terrorist attacks, focusing on:

- Improving security at the Nation's borders.

- Ensuring First Responders are properly trained and equipped.

- Reducing the vulnerability of the Nation's infrastructure.

- Protecting against bioterrorism.

- Advancing research in science and technology aimed at 
    detecting and countering terrorist attacks.

- Improving intelligence analysis and coordination.

                                 Growth

    At this time a year ago, the Nation and its economy were 
still in the early stages of recovering from the slowdown and 
recession of 2000-01, and the terrorist attacks and their 
aftermath. The Nation faced uncertainties about war in Iraq; 
and the economy was still struggling to gain traction.
    Congress and the President worked to put in place solid 
policies to deal with these challenges; and because of those 
efforts, the Nation is in a much different--and certainly, much 
better--position today.

                         GROWTH IN THE ECONOMY

    Today's economy is showing robust growth, and strong growth 
is expected to continue. (A further discussion appears in the 
section of this report titled ``Growth.'') A principal goal of 
this budget is to double the economy in the next 15 years. One 
of the fundamental ways this budget encourages sustained growth 
is by supporting the policies that are currently working to 
boost the economy. In short, it ensures there will be no tax 
increases at this critical time in the Nation's economic 
recovery. It provides for:

- No reduction in the child tax credit, which otherwise will 
    decrease from $1,000 per child to $700 per child in 2005 if 
    not extended. In other words, the budget prevents a 
    potential tax increase of $600 on a family with two 
    children--from that provision alone--that would otherwise 
    occur.

- No increase in the marriage penalty. The budget prevents a 
    decline in the 15-percent bracket for a married couple, 
    which would increase their marriage penalty taxes.

- No increase in taxes resulting from lowering the upper 
    threshold for the 10-percent bracket (e.g., scheduled to 
    decline from $14,300 for 2004 for joint filers to $12,000 
    in 2005 if not extended).

                          CONTROLLING SPENDING

    In addition to keeping the economy going, Congress must 
address the other side of the equation: controlling Federal 
spending. All spending must get paid for, either through taxes 
or borrowing--and both are burdens on the economy. Controlling 
spending eases that burden; and for that reason alone, 
controlling spending is itself a policy for sustaining economic 
growth.

- Discretionary Spending. This budget holds the line on overall 
    discretionary spending other than that for national defense 
    and homeland security. This does not mean, however, that a 
    level-funding restriction is mechanically applied to every 
    program or activity.

     The budget is the broad blueprint of the Congress's 
    general priorities. It is not designed or intended to bind 
    the committees of Congress to any specific program choices. 
    Within this framework, some priority areas may be 
    increased, and lower priorities reduced. Those details will 
    be worked out in the next round, when the committees of 
    jurisdiction write their legislative provisions--as is 
    envisioned by the procedures of the Budget Act. The Budget 
    Committee's role is to set a broad, overall recommendation 
    that reflects the Nation's priorities, and set the stage 
    for the programmatic decisions that will be made by the 
    committees of jurisdiction.

- Mandatory Spending. The budget also continues the call for 
    program savings or elimination based on rooting out waste, 
    fraud, and abuse in mandatory--or entitlement--programs.

     Entitlement spending is not a new problem. In 1974, the 
    year the Budget Act was adopted, mandatory spending 
    accounted for about 41 percent of the budget, and 
    discretionary spending--which has to be approved each 
    year--was about 51 percent. By 1988, mandatory spending had 
    grown to 42 percent of the budget; discretionary was 44 
    percent (see figures below). Today, 30 years after adoption 
    of the Budget Act, more than half of the budget is 
    mandatory spending--thus, more than half of the Federal 
    Government's spending is on ``autopilot.''
    
    
     Mandatory programs in-and-of-themselves are not bad; many 
    of them provide critical services. But Congress must get 
    control of the growing wave of entitlement spending that 
    has developed over the years.

     Congress proved last year that there are huge amounts--
    indefensible amounts--of waste, fraud, and abuse in 
    mandatory programs. So this budget begins the process of 
    actually reducing or eliminating some of the most 
    outrageous examples of waste in these programs.

                              Opportunity

    Opportunity is the third tenet of this budget, because 
without the first two--strength, ensuring that America is free 
and stays free; and growth, to remain the world's most 
prosperous superpower nation, with an ever-expanding economy 
and job market--America's opportunities would quickly diminish.
    As this budget continues to strengthen the foundations that 
have provided a wealth of opportunity to Americans, it also 
maintains a commitment to educate Americans, help them through 
difficult periods, and provide for those who fought for this 
country.

                                MEDICARE

    In just a few months' time all Medicare beneficiaries will 
have access to a discount card that will result in 10-percent 
to 15-percent savings for the average beneficiary--and up to 
25-percent savings in some cases--on certain prescription drug 
costs. Low-income seniors also will receive a $600 subsidy in 
conjunction with their prescription drug discount card. This 
will be the first stage of the Medicare prescription drug 
coverage enacted by Congress and the President last year.


    In addition to the new prescription drug benefit, there are 
a host of other positive changes to Medicare worth noting: They 
include: 1) strengthening its finances and addressing waste, 
fraud, and abuse by opening the program to the benefits of 
competition; 2) reforming its regulatory structure to ease the 
burden on Medicare providers; 3) making it easier for generic 
drugs to enter the market; 4) finally, addressing the payment 
equity issue between rural and urban areas.
    As part of the improvements in both benefits and the way 
the Medicare Program does business, this Congress and the 
President have also acted to transform the way Americans can 
plan for and manage their health care needs--adopting Health 
Savings Accounts [HSAs]. HSAs allow Americans to provide for 
their own medical needs much as they save for their family's 
future through individual retirement accounts, 401(k)s, 
education savings accounts, and the like.
    These accounts will allow for two very important changes: 
1) they will restore to consumers the ability to plan for, and 
make their own choices about, their own medical coverage; 2) 
they will help to address the long-term demographic and 
financial problems facing the Medicare Program.

                                MEDICAID

    This budget continues the government's commitment to 
preserve and strengthen both Medicaid and the State Children's 
Health Insurance Program [SCHIP], which assist individuals and 
families who cannot afford health care coverage.
    Since 1995, Medicaid spending has grown 95.2 percent, an 
average increase of 7.7 percent a year. Federal Medicaid 
outlays increased from $108.0 billion in 1999 to $173.9 billion 
this year, an average of 10 percent a year. Federal SCHIP 
spending grew from $1.4 billion in 1999 to an estimated $4.8 
billion this year, an average annual increase of 27.9 percent.


    Last year, Congress increased funding for the SCHIP program 
by 9 percent, and added additional funds to allow for Medicaid/
SCHIP reform, extend the availability of expiring fiscal year 
2000 SCHIP funds, and give States the option to extend Medicaid 
coverage to children with special needs. Over the next 5 years, 
the Congressional Budget Office estimates that Federal outlays 
for Medicaid will exceed $1 trillion.

                             WELFARE REFORM

    This budget continues the Nation's commitment to assist 
lower-income Americans by funding such programs as the 
Temporary Assistance to Needy Families [TANF] block grant, 
child care funding, food stamps and child nutrition programs, 
and Head Start. It also accommodates H.R. 4, the Personal 
Responsibility, Work, and Family Promotion Act of 2003, which 
passed the House on 13 February 2003 and is awaiting action in 
the Senate.
    Since TANF was enacted in 1996, welfare rolls have declined 
by 56 percent--with the vast majority of those individuals 
replacing their government dependence with the self-reliance of 
productive jobs. In fact, more than 3 million single mothers 
who have left welfare have been lifted out of poverty, mostly 
because of increased earnings. In that same period, child 
poverty fell to its lowest level in more than 25 years. Black 
and Hispanic child poverty have fallen to their lowest levels 
in history. This budget accommodates reauthorizing the TANF 
program at the President's level--$16.9 billion annually over 5 
years.

                               EDUCATION

    This resolution continues the Republican commitment to 
education, increasing budget authority by $2.9 billion in 
fiscal year 2005. This is intended to accommodate increases in 
priority programs, such as special education State grants, 
Title I grants to local education agencies, and Pell Grants for 
low-income college students.
    Since 1996, under Republican control of Congress, the 
budget for the Department of Education has more than doubled 
(see Figure I-7). Education has received an annual average 
increase of 12 percent--sustained over 8 years. No other 
Cabinet-level agency has grown as fast as Education over this 
period. In the three large programs that now absorb about two-
thirds of the agency's budget (see Figures I-8 through I-10 
below): Title I funds to low-income schools have nearly doubled 
since 1996; Pell Grant funding has more than doubled in the 
same period; special education (funding for the Individuals 
with Disabilities Education Act [IDEA]) has more than 
quadrupled since 1996.
    In addition to increased funding, Congress also passed the 
No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which demands results from 
schools in exchange for Federal dollars. It works to forge a 
real link between education spending and classroom achievement, 
while focusing resources more sharply on underperforming 
schools.
    The accountability standards in this law represent the 
greatest step forward in a generation in terms of the Federal 
contribution to K-12 education--an even larger stride than the 
funding increases of recent years.


                                VETERANS

    Americans' gratitude toward the Nation's 25 million 
veterans--the men and women who have secured America's freedom 
through their sacrifices--is beyond question. Over the past 
several years, Congress has shown the level of gratitude 
befitting the service of these men and women, through hefty 
increases in funding and substantial increase in benefits and 
services.
    This budget provides for an additional $1.2 billion above 
the President's increase, which could be used for veterans 
medical care and medical and prosthetic research. Since 1995, 
monthly education benefit payment levels under the Montgomery 
GI Bill increased from $405 to $985. That percentage increase 
of 143 percent is far higher than the 35-percent increase 
during the preceding 10 years.
    Since Republicans took the majority in Congress in 1995, 
great strides have been made in improving benefits for the 
Nation's veterans:

- In 1996 and 1999, Congress expanded eligibility for veterans 
    medical care. It now includes Reserve and National Guard 
    personnel called to active duty who are returning from Iraq 
    and Afghanistan. The number of veterans using VA medical 
    care has increased from 2.5 million in 1995 to 4.7 million 
    today.

- Since 1995, total spending on veterans has increased from $38 
    billion to $60 billion. That is a 58-percent increase, 
    compared with a 36-percent increase during the previous 10 
    years (see Figure I-11 below).
    
    
- Payments per veteran rose from $1,368 in 1995 to $2,443 in 
    2004--a 79- percent increase, compared with a 39-percent 
    increase during the previous 10 years.

- In just a decade, VA medical care funding has been increased 
    by 75 percent--from $16.2 billion to $28.3 billion--with 
    especially large increases of 13 percent in both 2003 and 
    10.9 percent in 2004 (see chart below).

- For the 40 years prior to 1995, there was no progress on 
    ``concurrent receipt.'' Now, military retirees injured in 
    combat, while training for combat, or who are 50 percent or 
    more service-disabled can, for the first time in more than 
    a century, receive retirement benefits concurrently with 
    veterans disability compensation. This is the result of 
    actions by this Congress.

    With this budget, Congress continues its commitment to, and 
appreciation of, those who have served their country with 
pride, valor, and dignity.

                               Conclusion

    This budget reflects the priorities and values of America 
today.

- By preventing tax increases, it ensures that the economy will 
    keep moving forward, and will create more jobs. It protects 
    the tax relief for married couples, parents, and those at 
    the lower end of the income brackets.

- In the areas of defense and homeland security, it 
    appropriately adds funding to the levels from last year so 
    the Nation can defend itself and prosecute the global war 
    against terrorism. It also recognizes that the cost of the 
    conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan will have an effect on the 
    bottom line. So it adds $50 billion to its projections to 
    reflect a request expected later this year.

- It helps advance the opportunities this Nation provides by 
    supporting important programs in medical care, education, 
    and veterans' benefits, to name just a few.

    Finally, while recognizing that the past few years have 
dealt this country a hand of challenging circumstances, this 
budget addresses head-on the deficits that have resulted--just 
as Congress and the President addressed the economy and the war 
against terror.
    Through fiscal restraint and a commitment to addressing 
waste, fraud, and abuse, this budget will cut this deficit in 
half in less than 4 years.
    Budgets are supposed to reflect priorities, and this budget 
does just that. It is the right formula for Strength, Growth, 
and Opportunity in America.
                                Growth: 
                  The Economy and Economic Assumptions

                              ----------                              


                            WHERE WE WERE: 
                     PROBLEMS THE ECONOMY HAS FACED

    Over the past 4 years, the Nation has sustained a period 
unlike any other in its history--and one that, it is hoped, 
will never be repeated.

- Significant adverse events included the September 11 attacks 
    and the increased risk and uncertainty associated with 
    them; the military conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq; the 
    bursting of the stock market bubble of the late 1990's in 
    early 2000 (and a harsh reaction to the corporate 
    malfeasance and improper accounting practices that 
    contributed to the bubble); the sharp declines in 
    manufacturing and business investment that began in the 
    middle of 2000, and the associated loss of jobs.

- Reflecting this confluence of events, the U.S. economy slowed 
    dramatically beginning in the middle of 2000, and then 
    entered a recession that lasted for most of 2001.

- After the recession, the economy entered a period of uneven 
    recovery with continued sluggishness in manufacturing and 
    labor markets. At this time last year, the Nation faced a 
    backdrop of economic uncertainty--about the investment 
    outlook, the strength of the economic recovery, and the 
    international environment--the uncertainty about military 
    conflict in Iraq, in particular.

- Only during the past year has the economy shown signs of 
    strong growth with broad-based gains across the various 
    sectors of the economy. In particular, manufacturing and 
    labor markets--the hardest hit areas of the economy--are 
    finally showing signs of sustained improvement.

    Fiscal and monetary policies combined to play major roles 
in keeping the adverse effects of the 2000-01 slowdown and 
recession milder than otherwise would have been the case and to 
help boost the economic recovery from the recession.
    Fiscal policy actions have been particularly aggressive in 
working to boost the economy. Three major tax relief bills 
became law over 2001-03, helping to stimulate the economy.

- The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 
    (June 2001) provided for immediate and phased-in reductions 
    in income taxes and tax rates, as well as other tax relief 
    and incentives. Joint Committee on Taxation [JCT] estimates 
    show the tax relief totaling nearly $300 billion over 
    fiscal years 2001-04, and more than $100 billion per year 
    in subsequent years.

- The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act of 2002 (March 
    2002)--in addition to providing extended unemployment 
    benefits and special tax relief following September 11--
    provided tax relief intended for economic stimulus, 
    including business investment tax incentives from ``bonus 
    depreciation'' of equipment and software. JCT estimates 
    show the business investment tax incentives totaling more 
    than $100 billion over 2002-04.

- The Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003 
    [JGTRRA] (May 2003) accelerated the scheduled income tax 
    relief and tax rate reductions of the 2001 legislation, 
    increased the ``bonus depreciation'' business investment 
    tax incentives, and reduced dividend and capital gains tax 
    rates. JCT estimates show the tax relief totaling $185 
    billion over fiscal years 2003-04.

                 SUMMARY OF TAX RELIEF MEASURES, 2001-03
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                Legislation                      Tax Relief Effects
------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Economic Growth and Tax Relief          Tax relief of nearly $300
 Reconciliation Act of 2001                  billion in 2001-04, and
                                             approximately $100 billion
                                             a year in subsequent years
The Job Creation and Worker Assistance Act  More than $100 billion in
 of 2002                                     2002-04
The Jobs and Growth Tax Relief              Tax relief of $185 billion
 Reconciliation Act of 2003                  over 2003-04
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Altogether, the JCT estimates show that the combined tax 
relief over the 2001-04 period amounts to nearly $600 billion--
or about 6 percent of gross domestic product spread over the 4 
fiscal years, with a concentration in fiscal years 2003 and 
2004.
    Without the tax cuts, the recession would have been worse--
with a deeper decline in real GDP, even greater job losses, and 
a slower recovery from the recession.

- The actual decline in real GDP following the economic 
    slowdown and recession of 2000-01 was a relatively mild 
    -0.5 percent, compared to the average recession decline of 
    about -2\1/4\ percent. Without the tax cuts, estimates show 
    that the decline in real GDP would have been about twice as 
    deep (at about -1.0 percent). In addition, real GDP growth 
    following the recession would have been much slower than 
    actually occurred.

- The increase in the unemployment rate resulting from the 
    economic slowdown and recession of 2000-01 was 2.4 
    percentage points, somewhat less severe than the average 
    increase of 3.2 percentage points during post-World War II 
    recessions. Without the tax cuts, estimates show that the 
    increase in the unemployment rate would have been as high 
    as 4.0 percentage points--a much more severe result than on 
    average for recessions.

- The decline in payroll employment resulting from the economic 
    slowdown and recession of 2000-01 was 2.7 million jobs. 
    Without the tax cuts, estimates show the decline in payroll 
    jobs would have been much greater--around 4\1/2\ million.

    The tax relief is still working in the economy. A 
significant portion of the 2003 tax relief is occurring in the 
first half of this year (the first and second quarters of 2004) 
as taxpayers are and will be receiving significant income tax 
refunds.
    Independent private forecasters and government estimators 
also have acknowledged the beneficial economic effects of the 
tax relief of the past 3 years. For example:

- At the time of the passage of the 2001 tax relief 
    legislation, one respected private forecaster 
    (Macroeconomic Advisers of St. Louis) stated: ``* * * once 
    in a while we get lucky, and fiscal policy delivers a well-
    timed dose of stimulus. This year's tax cut is perhaps the 
    best such example in recent memory.''

- In early 2003, private forecasters generally agreed that 
    President Bush's proposed ``growth and jobs'' 2003 tax 
    relief plan (which was similar to what ended up being 
    enacted) would boost real GDP and jobs growth and lower 
    unemployment. The average of private forecasters' estimates 
    showed real GDP being boosted by 1\1/4\ percent over 2003-
    04 and the unemployment rate being reduced by \3/4\ 
    percentage point (from the effects of the 2003 tax relief 
    alone).

- Early last year, the CBO estimated that the President's 
    fiscal year 2004 budget proposals and tax relief would 
    boost real GDP by about 1 percent to 1\1/2\ percent by 
    2005, and boost employment by about 1 percent to 1\1/4\ 
    percent by 2005.

- Similarly, the JCT's estimate of the macroeconomic effects of 
    the JGTRRA tax relief legislation showed that the tax 
    relief would boost real GDP by 0.2 percent to 0.9 percent 
    on average over the 2003-08 period, with employment boosted 
    by 0.2 percent (about 230,000 new jobs) to 0.8 percent 
    (about 900,000 new jobs) on average over 2003-08.

- Federal Reserve Chairman Greenspan, in reference to the 2003 
    tax relief, stated: ``Fortuitously, this particular cut in 
    taxes is happening at the right time, although I doubt very 
    much one could have planned that in advance.''

    Although Macroeconomic Advisers used the word ``lucky,'' 
and Chairman Greenspan used the word ``fortuitously,'' the 
truth is that the tax cuts--and their intended beneficial 
economic effects--were very much so planned in advance.

- President Bush and congressional Republicans have been 
    ongoing advocates of tax relief for promoting enhanced 
    economic performance for many years. Tax relief proposals 
    have been included in all of the President's budget 
    submissions.

- In March 2003, the Committee on the Budget's report 
    accompanying the House budget resolution advocated 
    additional tax relief to help bolster the economy: ``Doing 
    nothing is unwise * * * * it isn't wise to sit back and 
    wait and hope for monetary policy to work and for the 
    economy to recover on its own * * * * The President and 
    Congress should act to adopt policies that will promote 
    growth and job creation.'' In April 2003, Congress passed a 
    budget resolution that included significant additional tax 
    relief over the next decade, but with the bulk of the tax 
    relief occurring over the 2003-04 period.

    Monetary policy also played an important role in bolstering 
the economy. From January 2001 through June 2003, the Federal 
Reserve reduced the Federal funds rate--the key monetary policy 
interest rate--from 6\1/2\ percent to 1 percent in 13 separate 
cuts. Lower interest rates have boosted interest-sensitive 
spending, including consumer durable goods, business equipment 
investment, and residential housing construction.

                             WHERE WE ARE: 
                     CURRENT STATUS OF THE ECONOMY

    On nearly every important score, data now show the U.S. 
economy has been growing strongly, with a broad-based expansion 
across the various sectors of the economy. Tax relief played a 
major role in helping to get the economy growing again.
    Even so, labor market data provide a confusing picture of 
the extent of improvements in the employment situation.

- The unemployment rate has fallen significantly since last 
    summer--falling to 5.6 percent in February from last June's 
    peak of 6.3 percent.

- In contrast, payroll jobs growth has shown modest gains over 
    the past 6 months--364,000 since September (or a monthly 
    average of about 60,000). Analysts have been expecting 
    stronger jobs growth, with monthly gains in jobs in the 
    150,000 to 200,000 range.

    Despite the recent labor market uncertainties, the Office 
of Management and Budget [OMB], the Congressional Budget Office 
[CBO], private forecasters and the Federal Reserve all expect 
that the economy will continue growing at a fairly strong pace 
during 2004 and through 2005.
    Labor markets also are expected to improve substantially, 
with further declines in the unemployment rate and significant 
payroll jobs growth. Private analysts are expecting jobs growth 
through the remainder of this year of around 1\1/2\ million to 
2 million jobs.

- In a February survey in The Wall Street Journal, 75 percent 
    of private forecasters said they expected jobs growth 
    through October 2004 of between 1 million and 2 million.

- A National Association of Business Economists February survey 
    of private forecasters showed an expected average gain of 
    about 1.8 million jobs by the end of the year. Those 
    numbers represent monthly jobs gains of about 150,000 per 
    month.

    In the mean time, the list of ``Good News'' about the 
economy is impressive, including:

- Real GDP growth was 4.1 percent at an annual rate in the 
    fourth quarter of 2003, following the 8.2-percent growth 
    rate of the third quarter--the highest pace in two decades. 
    Real GDP growth during the second half of 2003 was at a 
    6.1-percent annual rate--the highest two-quarter growth in 
    two decades as well.

- Manufacturing activity soared at the end of 2003 and into the 
    beginning of 2004--registering the highest pace of activity 
    in 20 years.

- Industrial production rose at a 6 percent annual rate during 
    the second half of 2003, its fastest 6-month rate of 
    increase in 3\1/2\ years. Growth continued at that strong 
    pace into 2004, with industrial production rising at a 0.8 
    percent rate in January and a 0.7 percent rate in February.

- Real fixed business investment rose at a 11-percent annual 
    rate over the second half of 2003, its fastest rate of 
    growth in 2\1/2\ years.

- Real business equipment investment rose at a 16-percent 
    annual rate over the second half of 2003, its fastest rate 
    of growth in over 6 years.

- U.S. real exports of goods and services rose at a 21 percent 
    annual rate in the fourth quarter, the fastest pace in 7 
    years.

- Housing starts have been running at their highest levels in 
    20 years.

- Stock markets have increased significantly: the Dow Jones 
    industrials average is about 30 percent higher than in 
    March 2003.

- Household wealth, reflecting the gains in stock markets and 
    rising housing values, rose to a record level at the end of 
    2003.

    The unemployment rate fell to 5.6 percent in February, down 
from 6.3 percent last June.

- Employment as measured in the ``household'' survey has 
    recovered to the level that preceded the recession (the 
    household survey includes the self-employed and is not 
    subject to the downward measurement bias for new business 
    employment as in the establishment survey). Payroll 
    employment in the ``establishment'' survey has increased by 
    364,000 jobs over the past 6 months.

- Hiring plans: The business outlook for hiring is the best it 
    has been in more than 3 years. The Manpower survey recently 
    showed that, on net, 22 percent of businesses are planning 
    an increase in hiring in the April-to-June period. That is 
    an equivalent level to what occurred during the second half 
    of the 1990's.

- Interest rates are low: mortgage rates have been running at 
    their lowest levels in more than 3 decades; the bank prime 
    is at its lowest level in 45 years.

- Inflation is low: consumer price inflation (the consumer 
    price index [CPI], and core CPI, excluding food and energy) 
    is at its lowest rate in nearly 4 decades.

                        WHERE THINGS ARE GOING:
                          ECONOMIC PROJECTIONS

    The economic projections from the administration, CBO, and 
private forecasters reveal the consensus outlook for continued 
strong growth in the economy, following on the heels of last 
year's economic rebound (see table 1).
    The various forecasts show projections for strong real GDP 
growth in 2004 in the range of 4.4 percent to 4.8 percent: 4.8 
percent for the CBO, 4.7 percent for the private Blue Chip 
consensus, and 4.4 percent for the Administration.
    Relatively strong growth is expected to continue beyond 
2004, with CBO projecting real GDP growth at 4.2 percent in 
2005, the administration at 3.6 percent and the Blue Chip at 
3.8 percent.
    Reflecting the stronger growth in the economy, the 
unemployment rate is projected to decline in 2004 and 2005, 
falling from the 6.0 percent average for 2003 to around 5.6 
percent to 5.8 percent in 2004 and to the 5.3 percent to 5.4 
percent range in 2005.
    Inflation and interest rates are projected to rise 
gradually over the next several years, yet still ultimately 
remain at relatively low historical levels for an expanding 
economy.
    The broad policies of the budget resolution--including 
spending restraint, no tax increases, and declining budget 
deficits--are expected to be beneficial for the performance of 
the economy.

- All government spending must be paid for--through taxes or 
    borrowing--and both are burdens on the economy. Raising 
    taxes--even if the intent is to close deficits--does not by 
    itself reduce the economic burden of government spending. 
    The true measure of the burden of government on the economy 
    is the overall level of spending.

- Spending restraint itself--like that in the budget 
    resolution--is an important form of pro-growth policy.

- Federal Reserve Chairman Greenspan also has warned about the 
    need to restrain government spending and keep the tax 
    burden low in order to promote economic growth: ``Tax rate 
    increases of sufficient dimension to deal with our looming 
    fiscal problems arguably pose significant risks to economic 
    growth and the revenue base. The exact magnitude of such 
    risks are very difficult to estimate, but they are of 
    enough concern, in my judgment, to warrant aiming to close 
    the fiscal gap primarily, if not wholly, from outlay 
    restraint.''

    CBO's annual economic assumptions were adopted for use in 
the budget resolution and are shown in table table 2.

    TABLE 1.--ECONOMICS PROJECTIONS: ADMINISTRATION, CBO, AND PRIVATE
                               FORECASTERS
                            [Calendar years]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                       Actual    Forecast     Projected
                                     -----------------------    annual
                                                               average
                                        2003    2004   2005 ------------
                                                              2005-2009
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Real GDP (percent change, year over
 year):
    Administration..................      3.1    4.4    3.6          3.3
    CBO.............................      3.1    4.8    4.2          3.1
     Blue Chip, March...............      3.1    4.7    3.8          3.3
GDP Price Index (percent change,
 year over year):
    Administration..................      1.6    1.2    1.3          1.7
    CBO.............................      1.6    1.1    1.1          1.6
     Blue Chip, March...............      1.6    1.4    1.6          1.9
Consumer Price Index (percent
 change, year over year):
    Administration..................      2.3    1.4    1.5          2.1
    CBO.............................      2.3    1.6    1.7          2.1
     Blue Chip, March...............      2.3    1.8    1.9          2.2
Unemployment rate (percent, annual
 average):
    Administration..................      6.0    5.6    5.4          5.2
    CBO.............................      6.0    5.8    5.3          5.2
     Blue Chip, March...............      6.0    5.6    5.3          5.2
3-Month Treasury Bill Rate (percent,
 annual average):
    Administration..................      1.0    1.3    2.4          3.7
    CBO.............................      1.0    1.3    3.0          4.2
     Blue Chip, March...............      1.0    1.2    2.4          3.5
10-Year Treasury Note Yield
 (percent, annual average):
    Administration..................      4.0    4.6    5.0          5.5
    CBO.............................      4.0    4.6    5.4          5.5
     Blue Chip, March...............      4.0    4.5    5.2          5.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------



         TABLE 2.--ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS OF THE BUDGET RESOLUTION
                       [Calendar years, 2004-2009]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                 2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   2009
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Real GDP (percent change, year    4.8    4.2    3.2    2.7    2.8    2.8
 over year)...................
GDP Price Index (percent          1.1    1.1    1.5    1.8    1.9    1.9
 change, year over year)......
Consumer Price Index (percent     1.6    1.7    2.0    2.2    2.2    2.2
 change, year over year)......
Unemployment Rate (percent,       5.8    5.3    5.0    5.1    5.2    5.2
 annual average)..............
3-month Treasury Bill Rate        1.3    3.0    4.0    4.6    4.6    4.6
 (percent, annual average)....
10-year Treasury Note Yield       4.6    5.4    5.5    5.5    5.5    5.5
 (percent, annual average)....
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                REVENUE

                                                     REVENUE
                            [On-budget totals, in billions of dollars by fiscal year]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            2004      2005      2006      2007      2008      2009     2005-2009
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
On-budget total.........................   1,273.0   1,457.2   1,619.8   1,721.6   1,818.6   1,922.1     8,539.3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                Summary

    The component of the budget resolution designated as 
revenue reflects all of the Federal Government's various tax 
receipts that are classified as ``on budget.'' This includes 
individual income taxes; corporate income taxes; excise taxes, 
such as the gasoline tax; and other taxes, such as estate and 
gift taxes. The component of social insurance taxes that is 
collected for the Social Security system the Old Age and 
Survivors and Disability Insurance [OASDI] payroll tax is ``off 
budget.'' The remaining social insurance taxes (the Hospital 
Insurance [HI] payroll tax portion of Medicare, the Federal 
Unemployment Tax Act [FUTA] payroll tax, railroad retirement 
and other retirement systems) are all on budget. Customs 
duties, tariffs, and other miscellaneous receipts also are 
included in the revenue function. Pursuant to the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 and the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, 
Social Security payroll taxes, which constitute slightly more 
than a quarter of all Federal receipts, are not included in the 
budget resolution.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The budget resolution calls for $1.457 trillion in on-
budget revenue for fiscal year 2005, and $8.539 trillion over 
2005-09. Total revenue in the budget resolution is $2.029 
trillion for fiscal year 2005 and $11.691 trillion over 2005-
09. The resolution assumes policies with a revenue impact of 
$19.919 billion for fiscal year 2005 and $145.799 billion over 
2005-09. These effects are principally the result of preventing 
automatic tax increases that would otherwise occur.
    Although the budget resolution does not explicitly define 
specific changes in tax policy, the revenue levels of the 
resolution are consistent with a general policy of not 
increasing taxes compared to policies currently in place. In 
particular, the resolution includes adjustments to revenue of 
sufficient size to accommodate continuation of specific 
provisions that are set to expire, including:

- No tax increase for those claiming the child tax credit. The 
    resolution provides for retaining the current credit level 
    of $1,000 per child. It assumes Congress will act to 
    prevent a reduction in the credit, to $700 per child, 
    scheduled to occur in 2005. In other words, the budget 
    resolution accommodates changes to prevent a potential tax 
    increase of $600 on a family with two children from that 
    provision alone that would otherwise occur.

- No increase in the marriage penalty. The budget resolution 
    accommodates changes to prevent a scheduled reduction in 
    the upper bound of the 15-percent bracket for a married 
    couple.

- No increase in taxes resulting from a reduction in the upper 
    threshold for the 10-percent income tax bracket (e.g., 
    scheduled to decline from $14,000 adjusted for inflation in 
    2004 for joint filers to $12,000 in 2005 if not extended).

    Additional tax relief from the 2001 and 2003 tax relief 
legislation that is accommodated in the budget resolution 
includes extending the small business expensing limits (the 
expensing of business equipment spending is scheduled to fall 
back to a limit of $25,000 in 2005, from the inflation-indexed 
level of $100,000 for 2003 and subsequent years).
    Extension of bonus depreciation for corporate investment 
spending is not accommodated, reflecting the original intent of 
it serving as a temporary, short-run stimulus at the time of 
its adoption in 2002 and its extension in 2003.
    The budget resolution sets the on-budget revenue level of 
the Federal Government for the current and following 5 years 
but it is the responsibility of the Committee on Ways and Means 
to make the specific adjustments in law to implement these 
levels.

                             RECONCILIATION

    Through the reconciliation instructions of the budget 
resolution, the Committee on Ways and Means is directed to 
report legislation to the House floor by 1 October 2004, making 
adjustments in current law to prevent tax increases of $13.182 
billion in fiscal year 2005 and $137.580 billion for fiscal 
years 2005-09. These reconciled tax adjustments provide the 
full amount necessary to prevent tax increases from the 
provisions of law enacted in 2001 and 2003. The President's 
budget proposals assumed these amounts as a baseline 
adjustment.

                         TAX REVENUE OVER TIME

    Total Federal tax revenues averaged about 18 percent of 
gross domestic product [GDP] over the past 50 years. Even 
though the intent is that there will be no statutory tax 
increases under this budget, total Federal taxes are projected 
to rise from 16.8 percent of GDP in 2005 to 18.0 percent of GDP 
in 2009 a return to the historical average. The increase in 
Federal taxes relative to GDP occurs because of the improving 
economy as well as the natural tendency for taxes to increase 
over time because of provisions in the tax code that are not 
indexed fully for inflation and real, inflation-adjusted, 
income growth. That intrinsic tendency for taxes to increase 
relative to the size of the economy highlights the need to 
regularly adjust tax policies to avoid an ever-increasing tax 
burden in our economy.
                    Function By Function Description

                              ----------                              



    The budget is the broad blueprint of the Congress's general 
priorities. It is not designed or intended to bind the 
committees of Congress to any specific program choices. Within 
this framework, some priority areas may be increased, and lower 
priorities reduced. Those details will be worked out in the 
next round, when the committees of jurisdiction write their 
legislative provisions as is envisioned by the procedures of 
the Budget Act. The Budget Committee's role is to set a broad, 
overall recommendation that reflects the Nation's priorities, 
and set the stage for the programmatic decisions that will be 
made by the committees of jurisdiction. The following 
presentation shows the resolution's recommended distribution of 
budget authority and outlays according to broad categories 
called ``budget functions.''

    The budget functions presented here are as follows:

    050 National Defense
    100 Homeland Security
    150 International Affairs
    250 Science, Space and Technology
    270 Energy
    300 Natural Resources and Environment
    350 Agriculture
    370 Commerce and Housing Credit
    400 Transportation
    450 Community and Regional Development
    500 Education, Training, Employment and Social Services
    550 Health
    570 Medicare
    600 Income Security
    650 Social Security
    700 Veterans Benefits
    750 Administration of Justice
    800 General Government
    900 Net Interest
    920 Allowances
    950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts
                     FUNCTION 050: NATIONAL DEFENSE

                              ----------                              


                            Function Summary

    Function 050 includes funds to develop, maintain, and equip 
the military forces of the United States. More than 95 percent 
of the funding in this function goes to Subfunction 051--
Department of Defense [DOD] military activities; the remaining 
funding in the function applies to atomic energy defense 
activities of the Department of Energy (Subfunction 053), and 
other defense-related activities (Subfunction 054). Please note 
that the resolution carries Function 053 and 054 Homeland 
Security spending in Function 100.
    Function 050 BA rose from $292.1 billion in 1999 to $463.6 
billion in 2004, a 9.7-percent average annual growth rate. 
During the same time period, outlays rose from $274.9 billion 
to $452.9 billion, a 10.5-percent average annual growth rate 
(these figures include the effects of supplemental spending). 
The largest component of this was the budget of the Department 
of Defense, whose budget authority grew from $278.4 billion in 
1999 to $443.8 billion in 2004, a 9.8-percent average annual 
increase.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $419.6 billion in budget authority 
and $447.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $2,320.6 billion in budget authority and $2,284.9 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $1.4 
billion in budget authority and $2.4 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $15.8 billion in budget authority 
and $16.9 billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $418.3 billion in budget authority and $444.7 
billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is 
$2,304.7 billion in budget authority and $2,267.9 billion in 
outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    Function 050 contains numerous small mandatory accounts 
such as stock funds, trust funds, and gift funds whose receipts 
vary from year to year. The resolution assumes 2005 mandatory 
spending that matches the President's request. For 2004, the 
resolution accommodates $13 million to retroactively compensate 
service members for purchase of domestic airline tickets used 
for travel from the Iraq theater of war to their final 
destination. The Supplemental Appropriations Act for Fiscal 
Year 2004 (Public Law 108-106) specified that funds be used to 
reimburse service members, but DOD did not authorize 
disbursement until 19 December 2003. Under current government 
compensation rules, no decision can be implemented 
retroactively; hence there is a need to allocate direct 
spending to fund a provision that would specifically reimburse 
service members not compensated under the supplemental 
appropriation.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    Figures show a recommended increase of 7 percent (excluding 
the 2004 supplemental), fully accommodating the President's 
request. Department of Defense discretionary funding, at $401.8 
billion, matches the President's request. The national defense 
budget presented here is part of a multiyear plan enabling the 
military to fight the war against terrorism now, and to 
transform to counter unconventional threats in the future. 
Elsewhere (in Function 920) the resolution includes $50 billion 
to anticipate additional needs in the Afghanistan and Iraq 
theaters. This is a mid-range estimate for anticipated annual 
costs. It is not an attempt to predetermine the scope of 
operations or which weapons and supplies DOD will need, but 
rather an effort to make the budget reflect a likely future 
outlay.
    A special procedure provided for in the budget resolution 
would exempt appropriations related to the global war on 
terrorism, and hence a supplemental appropriations toward this 
end will not trigger a point at order.
    A saving of $199 million from the request in Functions 053 
and 054 can be attributed to the effort to maintain level 
funding in non-security areas of the budget; it should be 
noted, however, that the 2005 resolution total for these 
functions is $543 million more than the previous year's 
appropriations. This modest adjustment does not affect 
Department of Defense funding or ongoing contingency 
operations.
                    FUNCTION 100: HOMELAND SECURITY


                            Function Summary

    This resolution includes a new budget function, Function 
100: Homeland Security. This addition is necessary because, 
since September 11, 2001, homeland security has become an 
important separate spending category.
    Function 100 comprises all Homeland Security funding in the 
Federal Government, excluding the portion provided by the 
Department of Defense. According to the Office of Management 
and Budget, Homeland Security is defined as ``a concerted 
national effort to prevent terrorist attacks within the United 
States, reduce America's vulnerability to terrorism, and 
minimize the damage and recover from attacks that do occur.'' 
About 58 percent of Homeland Security spending occurs in the 
Department of Homeland Security [DHS]. Other agencies with 
significant Homeland Security spending in the President's 
request include the Department of Defense (21 percent of 
requested Homeland Security funding, which the resolution 
carries in Function 050); the Department of Health and Human 
Services (9 percent); Department of Justice (5 percent); 
Department of Energy (3 percent); Department of Transportation 
(1 percent); and the Department of Agriculture (less than 1 
percent).
    Function 100 budget authority rose from $14.3 billion in 
2001 to $29.6 billion in 2004, a 27.4-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same period, outlays rose from $13.1 
billion to $24.8 billion, a 23.7-percent average annual growth 
rate. The largest component of this was the budget of the 
Department of Homeland Security, whose discretionary budget 
authority for Homeland Security spending grew from $10.0 
billion in 2001 to $23.5 billion in 2004, a 33.0-percent 
average annual increase.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $34.1 billion in budget authority 
and $30.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $179.8 billion in budget authority and $174.3 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $0.7 
billion in budget authority and $0.5 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $5.9 billion in budget authority 
and $5.8 billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $33.4 billion in budget authority and $29.5 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $173.9 
billion in BA and $168.5 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The resolution allows for the President's mandatory 
policies for Homeland Security. Most mandatory spending in this 
function consists of fee-funded activities. The collection of 
fees, mostly by the Transportation Security Administration 
[TSA], is the largest mandatory component. Mandatory spending 
finances some additional homeland security activities, 
generally border protection and immigration enforcement. Most 
of that spending is offset by immigration and customs user 
fees, which the budget records as offsetting receipts.
    The resolution assumes enactment of the House-passed Armed 
Forces Naturalization Act (H.R. 1954) which waives the 
application fees and shortens from 3 years to two the required 
length of service an individual must serve in the Armed Forces 
in order to become a naturalized U.S. citizen. On enactment, 
the measure would be retroactive to 11 September 2001. Because 
enactment would result in a reduction in immigration fees, it 
would increase mandatory spending by $1 million in 2003 and by 
$12 million in 2004.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution fully accommodates the President's request 
for homeland security, less a 0.5-percent efficiency savings. 
The resolution notes the Views and Estimates letter of the 
Select Committee on Homeland Security, which states: ``The 
Committee is concerned that the Department [of Homeland 
Security] has not provided Congress with a comprehensive threat 
and vulnerability analysis to support the budgetary decisions 
and priorities contained in the DHS budget proposal. Without 
such analysis and budgetary justification, it is difficult for 
the Committee to fully and fairly evaluate whether the funding 
amounts and priorities contained in the DHS budget proposal are 
indeed appropriate.''
    Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.
                  FUNCTION 150: INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS


                            Function Summary

    Function 150 includes international development and 
humanitarian assistance; international security assistance; the 
conduct of foreign affairs; foreign information and exchange 
activities; and international financial programs. The major 
agencies in this function include the Departments of State and 
Treasury, the United States Agency for International 
Development, and the Millennium Challenge Corporation.
    Function 150 budget authority rose from $37.9 billion in 
1999 to $43.6 billion in 2004, a 2.9 percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$15.2 billion to $29.3 billion, a 14.0 percent average annual 
growth rate. The largest component of this was the budget of 
the Department of State, whose budget authority grew from $8.8 
billion in 1999 to $10.6 billion in 2004, a 3.7 percent average 
annual increase.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $26.5 billion in budget authority 
and $32.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $138.5 billion in budget authority and $140.0 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is -$0.4 
billion in budget authority and -$3.0 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $2.8 billion in budget authority 
and -$13.0 billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $26.9 billion in budget authority and $35.8 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $135.8 
billion in budget authority and $153.0 billion in outlays.
    The negative budget authority and outlay levels in 
mandatory spending reflect receipts of the Foreign Military 
Sales Trust Fund, interest income earned on U.S. Government 
securities held by the Exchange Stabilization Fund, and the 
liquidation of economic assistance loans, foreign military 
financing loans, Export-Import Bank loans, loans to the United 
Kingdom, and loan guarantees to Israel.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    There are no specific mandatory assumptions in this 
function. In fiscal year 2005, the mandatory BA and outlay 
levels are negative, reflecting receipts of the Foreign 
Military Sales Trust Fund, and the liquidation of economic 
assistance loans, foreign military financing loans, Export-
Import Bank loans, loans to the United Kingdom, and loan 
guarantees to Israel.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.
          FUNCTION 250: GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE AND TECHNOLOGY


                            Function Summary

    Function 250 consists of General Science, Space and 
Technology programs. The largest component of this function--
about two-thirds of total spending is for the space flight, 
research, and supporting activities of the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration [NASA]. The function also contains 
general science funding, including the budgets for the National 
Science Foundation [NSF], and the fundamental science programs 
of the Department of Energy [DOE].
    Function 250 budget authority rose from $18.9 billion in 
1999 to $22.8 billion in 2004, a 3.9-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same period, outlays rose from $18.1 
billion to $21.9 billion, a 3.9-percent average annual growth 
rate.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $22.8 billion in budget authority 
and $22.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $115.2 billion in budget authority and $113.5 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $3 
million in budget authority and $111 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $154 million in budget authority 
and $321 million in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $22.8 billion in budget authority and $22.3 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $115.1 
billion in budget authority and $113.2 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    There are no specific mandatory assumptions in this 
function.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.
                          FUNCTION 270: ENERGY


                            Function Summary

    Function 270 includes civilian energy and environmental 
programs of the Department of Energy [DOE] (it does not include 
DOE's national security activities the National Nuclear 
Security Administration which are in Function 050, or its basic 
research and science activities, which are in Function 250). 
Function 270 also includes the Rural Utilities Service of the 
Department of Agriculture, the Tennessee Valley Authority 
[TVA], the U.S. Enrichment Corporation, the Federal Energy 
Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
    Function 270 budget authority rose from $979 million in 
1999 to $2.3 billion in 2004, an 18.9-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays dropped from 
$911 million to $59 million, a 42.2-percent average annual 
reduction rate. Receipts, repayments, and electricity sales 
(negative spending) result in negative budget authority and are 
the primary causes for the drop in outlays.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $2.9 billion in budget authority 
and $1.2 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $13.0 billion in budget authority and $5.2 billion 
in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is -$0.6 billion in 
budget authority and -$2.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2005. Over the 2005-09 period, mandatory spending is -$4.7 
billion in budget authority and -$12.7 billion in outlays due 
to increasing offsetting receipts from various loan repayments 
and liquidations, electricity sales, and fees. Discretionary 
spending is $3.5 billion in budget authority and $3.5 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $17.6 
billion in budget authority and $17.9 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    As noted, the negative figures in mandatory spending result 
from increasing offsetting receipts from various loan 
repayments and liquidations, electricity sales, and fees.
    The resolution accommodates the conference version of the 
H.R. 6, the Energy Policy Act of 2003, which passed the House 
on 18 November 2003, but has not been passed by the Senate. The 
accommodation is necessary to allow for a potential conference 
agreement. The assumption is reflected in the allocation to the 
Committee on Energy and Commerce. The authorizing committee is 
free to determine its own policies within the allocation 
limits.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.
            FUNCTION 300: NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT


                            Function Summary

    Function 300 consists of water resources, conservation, 
land management, pollution control and abatement, and 
recreational resources. Major departments and agencies in this 
function are the Department of Interior, including the National 
Park Service [NPS], the Bureau of Land Management [BLM], the 
Bureau of Reclamation, and the Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS]; 
conservation-oriented and land management agencies within the 
Department of Agriculture [USDA] including the Forest Service; 
the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] in 
the Department of Commerce; the Army Corps of Engineers; and 
the Environmental Protection Agency [EPA].
    Function 300 budget authority rose from $24.4 billion in 
1999 to $32.0 billion in 2004, a 5.6-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same period, outlays increased from 
$24.0 billion to $30.2 billion, a 4.7-percent average annual 
increase.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $31.2 billion in budget authority 
and $30.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $159.6 billion in budget authority and $159.9 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $2.7 
billion in budget authority and $1.8 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005. Over the 2005-09 period, mandatory spending 
increases by $15.7 billion in budget authority and $15.3 
billion in outlays. Discretionary spending is $28.5 billion in 
budget authority and $29.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2005; and over 5 years, it is $143.9 billion in budget 
authority and $144.6 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The assumptions accommodate legislation, H.R. 313, to 
assist the United Mine Workers of America Combined Benefit Fund 
in averting financial crisis by transferring to it any 
additional interest from the Abandoned Mine Land Reclamation 
Fund. The measure was reported by the Committee on Resources on 
1 October 2003. The resolution also accommodates legislation 
that passed the House last year and is awaiting Senate action 
to increase the waiver requirement for certain local matching 
requirements for grants provided to American Samoa, Guam, the 
Virgin Islands, or the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands. These assumptions are reflected in the allocation to 
the Committee on Natural Resources, which is free to determine 
its own policies within the allocation limits. The 
accommodations are necessary to allow for a potential 
conference agreement.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution can accommodate full funding for the Healthy 
Forests Initiative legislation (H.R. 1904) signed into law last 
year. The Healthy Forests Initiative is a critical tool for 
reducing the threat of severe wildfire and insect infestation 
in heavily forested communities.
    The resolution also can accommodate full funding for 
numerous other Federal agencies and programs, including the 
Army Corps of Engineers, the Superfund program, and reducing 
the Operations and Maintenance backlog within the National Park 
Service.
    Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.
                       FUNCTION 350: AGRICULTURE


                            Function Summary

    Function 350 includes funds for direct assistance and loans 
to food and fiber producers, export assistance, market 
information, inspection services, and agricultural research. 
Farm policy is driven by the Farm Security and Rural Investment 
Act of 2002, which provides producers with continued planting 
flexibility while protecting them against unique uncertainties 
such as poor weather conditions and unfavorable market 
conditions.
    Function 350 budget authority fell from $23.9 billion in 
1999 to $19.9 billion in 2004, a 3.6-percent average reduction 
rate. During the same time period, outlays dropped from $22.9 
billion to $18.4 billion, a 4.3-percent average annual 
reduction rate. The primary reason for this reduction is more 
favorable overall commodity prices. Commodity prices often 
fluctuate from year to year. This has a significant impact on 
mandatory programs, which account for the vast majority of 
spending within Function 350.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $21.1 billion in budget authority 
and $20.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $117.7 billion in budget authority and $112.9 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $16.3 
billion in budget authority and $15.4 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005. Over the 2005-09 period, mandatory spending 
increases by $93.4 billion in budget authority and $88.4 
billion in outlays. Discretionary spending is $4.8 billion in 
budget authority and $5.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2005; and over 5 years, it is $24.3 billion in budget authority 
and $24.6 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The resolution assumes no new mandatory spending proposals.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution can accommodate full funding for enhanced 
efforts to protect our food supply from Bovine Spongiform 
Encephalopathy [BSE], or Mad Cow Disease, as well as other 
important food safety and agricultural research programs within 
Function 350. Outyear levels are not binding and will be 
revisited in subsequent years.
               FUNCTION 370: COMMERCE AND HOUSING CREDIT


                            Function Summary

    Function 370 includes four components: mortgage credit 
(usually negative budget authority because receipts tend to 
exceed the losses from defaulted mortgages); the Postal Service 
(mostly off budget); deposit insurance (negligible spending due 
to reserve supporting fees, etc.); and other advancement of 
commerce (the majority of the discretionary and mandatory 
spending in this function).
    The mortgage credit component of this function includes 
housing assistance through the Federal Housing Administration 
[FHA], the Federal National Mortgage Association [Fannie Mae], 
the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation [Freddie Mac], the 
Government National Mortgage Association [Ginnie Mae], and 
rural housing programs of the Department of Agriculture. The 
function also includes net postal service spending and spending 
for deposit insurance activities of banks, thrifts, and credit 
unions. Finally, most, but not all, of the Commerce Department 
is provided for in this function including the International 
Trade Administration, Bureau of Economic Analysis, Patent and 
Trademark Office [PTO], National Institute of Standards and 
Technology, National Telecommunications and Information 
Administration, and the Bureau of the Census; as well as 
independent agencies such as the Securities and Exchange 
Commission [SEC], the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, the 
Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Communications Commission 
[FCC], and the majority of the Small Business Administration 
[SBA].
    More than two-thirds of the spending in function 370 is out 
of the FCC's Universal Service Fund. This fund collects 
receipts derived by certain telecommunications operators from 
charges on their consumers and customers to promote service to 
low-income users and high-cost areas, as well as new services.
    Function 370 budget authority rose from $9.3 billion in 
1999 to $17.2 billion in 2004, a 13.1-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same period, outlays rose from $1.6 
billion to $12.8 billion, a 51.6-percent average annual growth 
rate. (For growth comparison purposes, totals include homeland 
security funding now found in Function 100.)

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    For on-budget amounts, the resolution calls for $10.8 
billion in budget authority and $5.8 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005. The function totals are $50.0 billion in 
budget authority and $23.3 billion in outlays over 5 years. 
Mandatory spending is $9.7 billion in budget authority and $4.7 
billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005, and totals $44.4 
billion in budget authority and $17.7 billion in outlays over 5 
years. Discretionary spending is $1.1 billion in budget 
authority and $1.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and 
over 5 years, it is $5.6 billion in budget authority and $5.6 
billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The resolution accommodates the following measures: H.R. 
758, the Business Checking Freedom Act, which passed the House 
on 1 April 2003; H.R. 522, the Federal Deposit Insurance Reform 
Act of 2003, which passed the House on 2 April 2003; and H.R. 
1375, the Financial Services Regulatory Relief Act of 2003, 
which passed the House on 17 March 2004. The accommodations are 
is necessary to allow for potential conference agreement. All 
three bills are awaiting action in the Senate. The assumptions 
are reflected in the allocation to the Committee on Financial 
Services.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The Committee on Appropriations will determine how funds 
will be apportioned among the various discretionary programs. 
Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.
                      FUNCTION 400: TRANSPORTATION


                            Function Summary

    Function 400 includes the Federal Highway Administration; 
the Federal Transit Administration; the National Rail Passenger 
Corporation [Amtrak]; highway, motor carrier and rail safety 
programs; the Federal Aviation Administration; the aeronautical 
activities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
[NASA]; the Coast Guard; and the Maritime Administration.
    Function 400 budget authority rose from $51.6 billion in 
1999 to $69.2 billion in 2004, a 6.0 percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$42.5 billion to $65.7 billion, a 9.1-percent average annual 
growth rate. The largest component of this was the Federal-Aid 
Highways program, whose budget authority grew from $29.3 
billion in 1999 to $33.4 billion in 2004, a 2.7 percent average 
annual increase. (For growth comparison purposes, totals 
include homeland security funding.)

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $65.0 billion in budget authority 
and $62.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $339.4 billion in budget authority and $328.3 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $47.2 
billion in budget authority and $2.0 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $249.6 billion in budget authority 
and $8.8 billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $17.8 billion in budget authority and $60.1 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $89.8 
billion in budget authority and $319.5 billion in outlays. 
Homeland security components formerly found in Function 400 
including the Transportation Security Administration, the 
United States Coast Guard, and the Federal Air Marshals are now 
recorded in Function 100: Homeland Security, and are consistent 
with the President's request.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The resolution creates a reserve fund that allows the 
chairman of the House Budget Committee to adjust the allocation 
of budget authority to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure for any measure that reauthorizes surface 
transportation programs and provides new budget authority for 
highway and transit spending. The adjustment may only be made 
if it is offset by changes in law, either included in the same 
measure or by previously enacted legislation. The language in 
the resolution regarding this contingency measure is identical 
to that included in the budget resolution for fiscal year 2004.
    The resolution assumes a stream of mandatory budget 
authority for a reauthorization of surface transportation 
programs. It also creates a reserve fund to provide additional 
budget authority for such a bill to the extent that it is 
offset in the same or other legislation.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels result from applying a simple computation of 
modest growth, consistent with the President's budget. Outyear 
levels are not binding and will be revisited in subsequent 
years.
            FUNCTION 450: COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT


                            Function Summary

    Function 450 includes programs that provide Federal funding 
for economic and community development in both urban and rural 
areas, including: Community Development Block Grants [CDBGs]; 
the non-power activities of the Tennessee Valley Authority; the 
non-roads activities of the Appalachian Regional Commission; 
the Economic Development Administration [EDA]; and partial 
funding for the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
    Function 450 budget authority rose from $11.3 billion in 
1999 to $16.7 billion in 2004, an 8.1-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$11.9 billion to $16.7 billion, a 7-percent average annual 
growth rate.
    A factor in this growth was the presence of Federal 
Emergency Management Agency [FEMA] funding for first responders 
and one-time New York City recovery funds in the wake of the 
events of 9-11. FEMA funding will appear in the Homeland 
Security Function for fiscal year 2005.(For growth comparison 
purposes, totals include homeland security funding now found in 
Function 100.)

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $11.9 billion in budget authority 
and $14.2 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $58.7 billion in budget authority and $61.2 billion 
in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $402 million in 
budget authority and -$183 million in outlays in fiscal year 
2005, and totals $780 million in budget authority and -$924 
million in outlays over 5 years. The negative figures appears 
because of receipts to revolving loan funds. Discretionary 
spending is $11.5 billion in budget authority and $14.4 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $57.9 
billion in budget authority and $62.2 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The resolution assumes no new mandatory spending proposals.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution does not assume specific levels for 
individual discretionary programs within Function 450. Instead, 
$11.5 billion in budget authority and $14.4 billion in outlays 
in fiscal year 2005 is assumed for overall discretionary 
spending within the function. The Committee on Appropriations 
will determine how these funds will be apportioned among the 
various discretionary Community and Regional Development 
programs. Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited 
in subsequent years.
   FUNCTION 500: EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND SOCIAL SERVICES


                            Function Summary

    Function 500 primarily covers Federal spending within the 
Departments of Education, Labor, and Health and Human Services 
for programs that directly provide--or assist states and 
localities in providing--services to young people and adults. 
Its activities provide developmental services to low-income 
children, help fund programs for disadvantaged and other 
elementary and secondary school students, make grants and loans 
to post secondary students, and fund job-training and 
employment services for people of all ages.
    Function 500 budget authority rose from $56.6 billion in 
1999 to $89.5 billion in 2004, a 10-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same period, outlays rose from $50.6 
billion to $86.5 billion, a 11-percent average annual growth 
rate.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $92.5 billion in budget authority 
and $90.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $470.5 billion in budget authority and $465.4 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $11.8 
billion in budget authority and $10 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $63 billion in budget authority 
and $55.5 billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $80.7 billion in budget authority and $80.5 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005, and totals $407.4 billion in 
budget authority and $409.9 billion in outlays over 5 years.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The assumptions accommodate H.R. 438, the Teacher 
Recruitment and Retention Act of 2003, which passed the House 
on 9 July 2003 and is awaiting action in the Senate. The 
assumption is reflected in the allocation to the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce, which is free to determine its own 
policies within the allocation limits.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution gives Function 500 priority status within 
the overall framework of level funding for fiscal year 2005 in 
non-defense, non-homeland-security spending. The resolution 
calls for an increase from level funding of $2.8 billion in 
budget authority and $3.55 billion in outlays. This increase is 
intended to accommodate increases in the funding levels for 
priority programs, such as special education state grants, 
Title I grants to local education agencies, and Pell Grants for 
low-income college students. Outyear levels are not binding and 
will be revisited in subsequent years.
                          FUNCTION 550: HEALTH


                            Function Summary

    Function 550 consists of health care services, including 
Medicaid, the Nation's major program covering medical and long-
term care costs for low-income persons; the State Children's 
Health Insurance Program [SCHIP], health research and training, 
including the National Institutes of health [NIH] and substance 
abuse prevention and treatment; and consumer and occupational 
health and safety, including the Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration. Medicaid represents about 72 percent of the 
spending in this function.
    Function 550 budget authority rose from $142.2 billion in 
1999 to $241.8 billion in 2004, an 11.2-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$141.1 billion to $239.6 billion, an 11.2-percent average 
annual growth rate. The largest component of this was the 
budget of the Medicaid, whose Federal payments grew from $108.0 
billion in 1999 to $173.9 billion in 2004, a 10.0-percent 
average annual increase.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $245.1 billion in budget authority 
and $244.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $1,352.9 billion in budget authority and $1,350.3 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $198.8 
billion in budget authority and $198.9 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $1,118.9 billion in budget 
authority and $1,119.9 billion in outlays over 5 years. 
Discretionary spending is $46.3 billion in budget authority and 
$46.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, 
it is $233.9 billion in budget authority and $230.4 billion in 
outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The assumptions accommodate H.R. 4, the Personal 
Responsibility, work, and Family Promotion Act of 2003, which 
passed the House on 13 February 2003, and is awaiting action in 
the Senate. This accommodation is necessary to allow for a 
potential conference agreement. The assumption is reflected in 
the allocation to the Committee on Energy and Commerce.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The Committee on Appropriations will determine how funds 
will be apportioned among the various discretionary programs. 
Specific programs will be increased or decreased when the 
Appropriations subcommittees write their respective bills. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.

                             RESERVE FUNDS

    The resolution provides a reserve fund to reflect the 
savings from legislation that has passed the House of 
Representatives and is pending in the Senate ``that provides 
for the safe importation of FDA-approved prescription drugs or 
places limits on medical malpractice litigation.'' This reserve 
fund affects Function 550 as well as Function 570.
    The adjustment will be made by the chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget to the allocations and aggregates to 
reflect any resulting savings from any such measure. The effect 
of any adjustment would be to lock in the savings for deficit 
reduction. The Chairman of the Budget Committee will consult 
with the committees of jurisdiction before making any 
adjustments pursuant to this section.
    The resolution also provides a deficit neutral reserve fund 
for the period of fiscal years 2005-09 for legislation that 
addresses access to health care services and health insurance 
for the uninsured. The reserve funded is needed to allow an 
initiative for the uninsured to come to the floor as long as it 
is deficit neutral in the first year and over the 5-year 
period.
    The resolution also provides a reserve fund for the Family 
Opportunity Act. If legislation is reported by the Energy and 
Commerce Committee that provides Medicaid coverage for children 
with special needs (the Family Opportunity Act), the Chairman 
of the Budget Committee may adjust the levels in the 
allocations and aggregates to the extent such legislation is 
deficit neutral in fiscal year 2005, and the period of fiscal 
years 2005 through 2009. The reserve fund would allow these 
initiatives to come to the floor with offsets, as long as that 
initiative is deficit neutral in the first year and over the 5-
year period.
                         FUNCTION 570: MEDICARE


                            Function Summary

    Function 570 reflects the Medicare Part A Hospital 
Insurance [HI] Program, Part B Supplementary Medical Insurance 
[SMI] Program, and premiums paid by qualified aged and disabled 
beneficiaries. In addition, with the enactment of H.R. 1 last 
year, the Medicare Advantage Program replaced Medicare+Choice 
under Part C and a new Voluntary Prescription Drug Benefit 
Program was established under Part D of Medicare. Prior to 
implementation of the new drug benefit in 2006, certain low-
income seniors will be eligible for transitional low-income 
drug assistance of up to $600 in conjunction with their 
prescription drug discount card.
    Function 570 budget authority rose from $190.6 billion in 
1999 to $269.6 billion in 2004, a 7.2-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$190.4 billion to $268.8 billion, a 7.1-percent average annual 
growth rate. This function consists entirely of the Medicare 
program.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $288.2 billion in budget authority 
and $289.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $1,776.0 billion in budget authority and $1,776.4 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $284.0 
billion in budget authority and $285.1 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $1,755.1 billion in budget 
authority and $1,755.8 billion in outlays over 5 years. 
Discretionary spending is $4.1 billion in budget authority and 
$4.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, 
it is $20.9 billion in budget authority and $20.7 billion in 
outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The resolution assumes growth in mandatory spending to 
accommodate projected caseloads, inflation, and other normal 
factors. It also provides for the continuation of the 
modernization of Medicare with prescription drug coverage that 
was enacted by the President and Congress last year. The 
assumptions appear in the allocations of the respective 
committees of jurisdiction, which limit the amount that 
programs can be increased. The authorizing committees are free 
to determine their own policies, so long as they stay within 
the allocation limits.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution gives Function 570 priority status within 
the overall framework of level funding for fiscal year 2005 in 
non-defense, non-homeland-security spending. Consequently, the 
resolution called for an increase from level funding of $0.302 
billion in budget authority and $0.199 billion in outlays. This 
amount accommodates the President's request for Function 570 
discretionary--including the President's $100-million request 
for additional funds for prescription drug administrative 
costs--without including any of the President's offsets. 
Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited in 
subsequent years.

                              RESERVE FUND

    The resolution provides a reserve fund to reflect the 
savings from legislation that has passed the House of 
Representatives and is pending in the Senate ``that provides 
for the safe importation of FDA-approved prescription drugs or 
places limits on medical malpractice litigation.'' This reserve 
fund affects Function 550 as well as Function 570.
    The adjustment will be made by the chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget to the allocations and aggregates to 
reflect any resulting savings from any such measure. The effect 
of any adjustment would be to lock in the savings for deficit 
reduction. The Chairman of the Budget Committee will consult 
with the committees of jurisdiction before making any 
adjustments pursuant to this section.
                     FUNCTION 600: INCOME SECURITY


                            Function Summary

    Function 600 includes most of the Federal Government's 
income support programs. These include: general retirement and 
disability insurance (excluding Social Security)--mainly 
through the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation [PBGC]--and 
benefits to railroad retirees. Other components are Federal 
employee retirement and disability benefits (including military 
retirees); unemployment compensation; low-income housing 
assistance, including section 8 housing; food and nutrition 
assistance, including food stamps and school lunch subsidies; 
and other income security programs.
    This last category includes: Temporary Assistance to Needy 
Families [TANF], the Government's principal welfare program; 
Supplemental Security Income [SSI]; spending for the refundable 
portion of the Earned Income Credit [EIC]; and the Low Income 
Home Energy Assistance Program [LIHEAP]. Agencies involved in 
these programs include the Departments of Agriculture, Health 
and Human Services, Housing and Urban Development, the Social 
Security Administration (for SSI), and the Office of Personnel 
Management (for Federal retirement benefits).
    Function 600 budget authority rose from $242.3 billion in 
1999 to $329.2 billion in 2004, a 6.3-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same period, outlays rose from $242.4 
billion to $336.0 billion, a 6.7-percent average annual growth 
rate.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $337.3 billion in budget authority 
and $341.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $1,727.5 billion in budget authority and $1,742.3 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $291.5 
billion in budget authority and $290.7 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $1,496.1 billion in budget 
authority and $1,492.0 billion in outlays over 5 years. 
Discretionary spending is $45.8 billion in budget authority and 
$51.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, 
it is $231.4 billion in budget authority and $250.3 billion in 
outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The assumptions accommodate H.R. 4, The Personal 
Responsibility, Work, and Family Promotion Act of 2003, which 
passed the House on 13 February 2003; H.R. 7, The Charitable 
Giving Act of 2003, which passed the House on 17 September 
2003; and H.R. 1000, The Pension Security Act of 2003, which 
passed the House on 14 May 2003. All three measures are 
awaiting action in the Senate. These accommodations are needed 
to allow for a potential conference agreement.
    The assumptions also accommodate H.R. 3108, The Pension 
Funding Equity Act of 2003, which passed the House on 8 October 
2003, and is currently being conferenced with the Senate.
    The assumptions are reflected in the allocation to the 
Committee on Education and the Workforce, which limits the 
amount that programs can be increased.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The Committee on Appropriations will determine how these 
funds will be apportioned among the various discretionary 
income security programs. Outyear levels are not binding and 
will be revisited in subsequent years.
                     FUNCTION 650: SOCIAL SECURITY


                            Function Summary

    Function 650 consists of the Social Security program, or 
Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance [OASDI], the 
Government's largest entitlement program. Social Security 
consists of two parts, each tied to a trust fund. The Old-Age 
and Survivors Insurance [OASI] program provides monthly 
benefits to eligible retired workers and their families and 
survivors. The Disability Insurance [DI] program provides 
monthly benefits to eligible disabled workers and their 
families.
    Under provisions of the Budget Enforcement Act, Social 
Security trust funds are off budget. The presentations below, 
therefore, refer to only the portion of Function 650 that is on 
budget.
    On budget Function 650 budget authority rose from $10.8 
billion in 1999 to $13.4 billion in 2004, a 4-percent average 
annual growth rate. During the same time period, outlays also 
rose from $10.8 billion to $13.4 billion, a 4-percent average 
annual growth rate.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $15.1 billion in budget authority 
and $15.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $91.7 billion in budget authority and $91.7 billion 
in outlays over 5 years. All of this spending is mandatory; all 
discretionary spending in Function 650 is off budget.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    There are no specific mandatory assumptions in this 
function.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The Committee on Appropriations will determine how 
discretionary funds in this function are apportioned. Outyear 
levels are not binding and will be revisited in subsequent 
years.
              FUNCTION 700: VETERANS BENEFITS AND SERVICES


                            Function Summary

    Function 700 includes funding for the Department of 
Veterans Affairs [VA], which provides benefits to veterans who 
meet various eligibility rules. Benefits range from income 
security for veterans, principally disability compensation and 
pensions; veterans education, training, and rehabilitation 
services; hospital and medical care for veterans; and other 
veterans' benefits and services, such as home loan guarantees. 
There are about 25 million veterans.
    Function 700 budget authority rose from $44.2 billion in 
1999 to $61.5 billion in 2004, a 6.8-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$43.2 billion to $60.1 billion, a 6.8-percent average annual 
growth rate. The two largest components of this were veterans 
medical care, whose budget authority grew from $17.8 billion in 
1999 to $28.0 billion in 2004, a 9.4-percent average annual 
increase and disability compensation, whose budget authority 
grew from $18.7 billion in 1999 to $30.7 billion in 2004, a 
10.4-percent average annual increase

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $70.5 billion in budget authority 
and $68.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $346.0 billion in budget authority and $341.7 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $39.8 
billion in budget authority and $39.5 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005, and totals $190.9 billion in budget authority 
and $190.4 billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary 
spending is $30.7 billion in budget authority and $29.1 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $155.1 
billion in budget authority and $151.4 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    There are no specific mandatory assumptions in this 
function.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    During markup, the Budget Committee adopted an amendment 
offered by Representative Brown-Waite adding $200 million to 
the Chairman's Mark in veterans benefits and services. As a 
result, the reported resolution includes an increase in total 
veterans budget authority of $1.2 billion in fiscal year 2005 
over the President's request with none of the fees in the 
President's budget. Outyear levels are not binding and will be 
revisited in subsequent years.
                FUNCTION 750: ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE


                            Function Summary

    Function 750 supports the majority of Federal justice and 
law enforcement programs and activities. This includes funding 
for the Department of Justice, as well as the financial law 
enforcement activities of the Department of the Treasury, 
Federal courts and prisons, and criminal justice assistance to 
State and local governments.
    Function 750 budget authority rose from $27.6 billion in 
1999 to $41.2 billion in 2004, an 8.4-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$26.1 billion to $39.6 billion, a 8.7-percent average annual 
growth rate. The largest component of this growth was for 
Federal law enforcement activities, with budget authority 
growing from $11.4 billion in 1999 to $19 billion in 2004, a 
10.8-percent average annual increase. The budget for the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation alone grew from $2.7 billion in 
1999 to $4 billion in 2004, an 8.7-percent average annual 
increase. (For growth comparison purposes, totals include 
homeland security funding.)

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $30.1 billion in budget authority 
and $30 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $140.4 billion in budget authority and $141 billion 
in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $5 billion in 
budget authority and $4.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2005, and totals $13.2 billion in budget authority and $13.1 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary spending is 
$25.2 billion in budget authority and $25.7 billion in outlays 
in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $127.2 billion in 
budget authority and $127.9 billion in outlays. Homeland 
security components formerly found in Function 750 are now 
recorded in Function 100: Homeland Security.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The assumptions accommodate H.R. 975, the Bankruptcy Abuse 
Prevention and Consumer Protection Act or 2003, which passed 
the House on 19 March 2003 and is awaiting action in the 
Senate. The accommodation is to allow for a potential 
conference agreement. The assumption is reflected in the 
allocation to the Committee on the Judiciary, which is free to 
determine its own policies within the allocation limits.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The Committee on Appropriations will determine how these 
funds will be apportioned among the various discretionary 
programs. Outyear levels are not binding and will be revisited 
in subsequent years.
                    FUNCTION 800: GENERAL GOVERNMENT


                            Function Summary

    Function 800 consists of the activities of the Legislative 
Branch; the Executive Office of the President; general tax 
collection and fiscal operations of the Department of Treasury 
(including the Internal Revenue Service); the Office of 
Personnel Management, and the property and personnel costs of 
the General Services Administration; general purpose fiscal 
assistance to States, localities, the District of Columbia, and 
U.S. territories; and other general Government activities.
    Function 800 budget authority rose from $17.0 billion in 
1999 to $23.9 billion in 2004, a 7-percent average annual 
growth rate. During the same time period, outlays rose from 
$15.6 billion to $24.6 billion, a 9.5-percent average annual 
growth rate.(For growth comparison purposes, totals include 
homeland security funding.)

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $17.2 billion in budget authority 
and $17.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function 
totals are $86.8 billion in budget authority and $86.9 billion 
in outlays over 5 years. Mandatory spending is $1.8 billion in 
budget authority and $1.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2005, and totals $8.9 billion in budget authority and $8.9 
billion in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary spending is 
$15.4 billion in budget authority and $16.2 billion in outlays 
in fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $77.9 billion in 
budget authority and $77.9 billion in outlays. Homeland 
security components formerly found in Function 800 including 
the Federal Protective Service are now recorded in Function 
100: Homeland Security, and are consistent with the President's 
request.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    Mandatory totals allow for inclusion of H.R. 2751, GAO 
Human Capital Reform Act of 2033, as passed by the House last 
year. The accommodation is to allow for a potential conference 
agreement. The resolution assumes growth in mandatory spending 
to accommodate projected inflation, and other normal factors. 
The assumptions appear in the allocations of the respective 
committees of jurisdiction, which are free to determine their 
own policies within the allocation limits.

                         DISCRETIONARY SPENDING

    The resolution can accommodate funding for the Payment in 
Lieu of Taxes [PILT] program at the fully authorized level. 
Specific programmatic decisions will be made by the Committee 
on Appropriations. Outyear levels are not binding and will be 
revisited in subsequent years.
                       FUNCTION 900: NET INTEREST


                            Function Summary

    Function 900 includes net interest, which is the interest 
paid for the Federal Government's borrowing less the interest 
received by the Federal Government from trust fund investments 
and loans to the public. It is a mandatory payment, with no 
discretionary components.
    Function 900 budget authority declined from $229.7 billion 
in 1999 to $154.9 billion in 2004, an average reduction of 7.6-
percent a year. During the same time period, outlays declined 
from $229.8 billion to $154.9 billion, a 7.6-percent average 
annual reduction. The largest component of this decline was the 
interest received by off-budget trust funds.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $180.5 billion in budget authority 
and outlays in fiscal year 2005. The function totals are 
$1,234.6 billion in budget authority and outlays over 5 years. 
On-budget spending is $270.7 billion in budget authority and 
outlays in fiscal year 2005, and totals $1,780.1 billion in 
budget authority and outlays over 5 years. Off-budget spending 
is $90.2 billion in budget authority and outlays in fiscal year 
2005; and over 5 years, it is $545.5 billion in budget 
authority and outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    There are no specific mandatory assumptions in this 
function.
                        FUNCTION 920: ALLOWANCES


                            Function Summary

    Function 920, Allowances, is used for planning purposes to 
address the budgetary effects of proposals or assumptions that 
cross various other budget functions. Once such changes are 
enacted, the budgetary effects are distributed to the 
appropriate budget functions in past years.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for $50.0 billion in discretionary 
budget authority and $24.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2005. This provides for an expected supplemental spending bill 
to address operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. The function 
totals are $50.0 billion in budget authority and $49.8 billion 
in outlays over 5 years. Discretionary spending is $50.0 
billion in budget authority and $24.9 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005; and over 5 years, it is $50.0 billion in 
budget authority and $49.8 billion in outlays.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    There is no mandatory spending in this function.
            FUNCTION 950: UNDISTRIBUTED OFFSETTING RECEIPTS


                            Function Summary

    Function 950 consists of receipts to the Treasury. Receipts 
recorded in this function are either intrabudgetary (a payment 
from one Federal agency to another, such as agency payments to 
the retirement trust funds) or proprietary (a payment from the 
public for some kind of business transaction with the 
Government). The main types of receipts recorded in this 
function are: the payments Federal employees and agencies make 
to employee retirement trust funds; payments made by companies 
for the right to explore and produce oil and gas on the Outer 
Continental Shelf, and payments by those who bid for the right 
to buy or use public property or resources, such as the 
electromagnetic spectrum. These receipts are treated as 
negative spending.
    On-budget receipts (or decline in spending) in budget 
authority and outlays have increased over the past 5 years from 
$33.1 billion in 1999 to $47.2 billion in 2004 for Function 
950, an average annual increase of 7.4 percent. The off-budget 
receipts have increased from $7.39 billion in 1999 to $11.26 
billion in 2004, an average annual increase of 8.8 percent.

                Summary of Committee-Reported Resolution

    The resolution calls for -$63.7 billion in budget authority 
and -$63.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005. (The minus 
signs indicate receipts into the Treasury.) The function totals 
are -$360.4 billion in budget authority and -$361.4 billion in 
outlays over 5 years.

                           MANDATORY SPENDING

    The assumptions accommodate H.R. 1320, which passed the 
House on 11 June 2003, and is awaiting action in the Senate. 
Although H.R. 1320 has budgetary effect in Function 950 
(Undistributed Offsetting Receipts) because it is a receipt 
against spending, it is within the scope of the Federal 
Communications Commission. The accommodation is to allow for a 
potential conference agreement.
                  Summary Tables: Spending and Revenue

                              ----------                              

Comparison of Total Budget Revenues for President's Request and 
        Committee Recommendation (Table 3)

Comparison of On-Budget Revenues for President's Request and 
        Committee Recommendation (Table 4)

Comparison of Total Budget Revenues for CBO Baseline and 
        Committee Recommendation (Table 5)

Comparison of Total Budget Revenues, as Percent of GDP, for CBO 
        Baseline and Committee Recommendation (Table 6)

CBO Baseline Revenues by Source, in Billions of Dollars(Table 
        7)

CBO Baseline Revenues By Source, as Percent of GDP (Table 8)

Tax Expenditure Estimates By Budget Function (Table 9)

Budget Resolution Total Spending and Revenue (Table 10)

Budget Resolution Discretionary Spending (Table 11)

Budget Resolution Mandatory Spending (Table 12)

Committee Recommendation Minus the President's Request: 
        President's Total Spending and Revenues (Table 13)

Committee Recommendation Compared to 2004: Total Spending and 
        Revenues (Table 14)

Committee Recommendation Compared to 2004: Percentage Change 
        (Table 15)
                          Revenue Comparisons

                              ----------                              



   TABLE 3.--COMPARISON OF TOTAL REVENUES FOR PRESIDENT'S REQUEST AND
                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION
                        [In billions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fiscal year
    1992 Actual..............................................    1,091.3
    1993 Actual..............................................    1,154.4
    1994 Actual..............................................    1,258.6
    1995 Actual..............................................    1,351.8
    1996 Actual..............................................    1,453.1
    1997 Actual..............................................    1,579.3
    1998 Actual..............................................    1,721.8
    1999 Actual..............................................    1,827.5
    2000 Actual..............................................    2,025.2
    2001 Actual..............................................    1,991.2
    2002 Actual..............................................    1,853.2
    2003 Actual..............................................    1,782.3
Fiscal Year 2004:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,816.4
    Committee Level..........................................    1,817.5
Fiscal Year 2005:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    2,026.7
    Committee Level..........................................    2,029.6
Fiscal Year 2006:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    2,211.1
    Committee Level..........................................    2,220.9
Fiscal Year 2007:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    2,351.0
    Committee Level..........................................    2,351.1
Fiscal Year 2008:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    2,469.7
    Committee Level..........................................    2,477.4
Fiscal Year 2009:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    2,595.0
    Committee Level..........................................    2,611.9
------------------------------------------------------------------------


 TABLE 4.--COMPARISON OF ON-BUDGET REVENUES FOR PRESIDENT'S REQUEST AND
                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION
                        [In billions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fiscal year:
    1992 Actual..............................................      788.9
    1993 Actual..............................................      842.5
    1994 Actual..............................................      923.6
    1995 Actual..............................................    1,000.8
    1996 Actual..............................................    1,085.6
    1997 Actual..............................................    1,187.3
    1998 Actual..............................................    1,306.0
    1999 Actual..............................................    1,383.0
    2000 Actual..............................................    1,544.6
    2001 Actual..............................................    1,483.7
    2002 Actual..............................................    1,337.9
    2003 Actual..............................................    1,258.5
Fiscal Year 2004:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,271.8
    Committee Level..........................................    1,273.0
Fiscal Year 2005:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,454.3
    Committee Level..........................................    1,457.2
Fiscal Year 2006:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,610.1
    Committee Level..........................................    1,619.8
Fiscal Year 2007:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,721.5
    Committee Level..........................................    1,721.6
Fiscal Year 2008:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,810.8
    Committee Level..........................................    1,818.6
Fiscal Year 2009:
    President's Request (February 2004)......................    1,905.3
    Committee Level..........................................    1,922.1
------------------------------------------------------------------------


   TABLE 5.--COMPARISON OF TOTAL BUDGET REVENUES FOR CBO BASELINE AND
                        COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION
                        [In billions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fiscal year:
    1992 Actual..............................................    1,091.3
    1993 Actual..............................................    1,154.4
    1994 Actual..............................................    1,258.6
    1995 Actual..............................................    1,351.8
    1996 Actual..............................................    1,453.1
    1997 Actual..............................................    1,579.3
    1998 Actual..............................................    1,721.8
    1999 Actual..............................................    1,827.5
    2000 Actual..............................................    2,025.2
    2001 Actual..............................................    1,991.2
    2002 Actual..............................................    1,853.2
    2003 Actual..............................................    1,782.3
Fiscal Year 2004:
    CBO Baseline.............................................    1,817.4
    Committee Level..........................................    1,817.5
Fiscal Year 2005:
    CBO Baseline.............................................    2,049.6
    Committee Level..........................................    2,029.6
Fiscal Year 2006:
    CBO Baseline.............................................    2,255.2
    Committee Level..........................................    2,220.9
Fiscal Year 2007:
    CBO Baseline.............................................    2,384.4
    Committee Level..........................................    2,351.1
Fiscal Year 2008:
    CBO Baseline.............................................    2,504.7
    Committee Level..........................................    2,477.4
Fiscal Year 2009:
    CBO Baseline.............................................    2,642.8
    Committee Level..........................................    2,611.9
------------------------------------------------------------------------


  TABLE 6.--COMPARISON OF TOTAL BUDGET REVENUES, AS PERCENT OF GDP, FOR
                CBO BASELINE AND COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATION
                   [Percent of gross domestic product]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fiscal year:
    1992 Actual..............................................       17.5
    1993 Actual..............................................       17.5
    1994 Actual..............................................       18.1
    1995 Actual..............................................       18.5
    1996 Actual..............................................       18.9
    1997 Actual..............................................       19.3
    1998 Actual..............................................       20.0
    1999 Actual..............................................       20.0
    2000 Actual..............................................       20.9
    2001 Actual..............................................       19.8
    2002 Actual..............................................       17.9
    2003 Actual..............................................       16.5
Fiscal Year 2004:
    CBO Baseline.............................................       15.8
    Committee Level..........................................       15.8
Fiscal Year 2005:
    CBO Baseline.............................................       17.0
    Committee Level..........................................       16.8
Fiscal Year 2006:
    CBO Baseline.............................................       17.8
    Committee Level..........................................       17.5
Fiscal Year 2007:
    CBO Baseline.............................................       18.0
    Committee Level..........................................       17.8
Fiscal Year 2008:
    CBO Baseline.............................................       18.1
    Committee Level..........................................       17.9
Fiscal Year 2009:
    CBO Baseline.............................................       18.2
    Committee Level..........................................       18.0
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                        TABLE 7.--CBO BASELINE REVENUES BY SOURCE, IN BILLIONS OF DOLLARS
                              [Includes on- and off-budget revenues, fiscal years]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Projected
                                           1950    1960    1970    1980     1990      2000   -------------------
                                                                                                2004      2005
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individual Income Taxes.................    15.8    40.7    90.4   244.1     466.9   1,004.5     761.6     884.7
Corporate Income Tax....................    10.4    21.5    32.8    64.6      93.5     207.3     161.4     223.3
Social Insurance Tax and Contributions..     4.3    14.7    44.4   157.8     380.0     652.9     746.7     789.5
Excise Taxes............................     7.6    11.7    15.7    24.3      35.3      68.9      70.0      73.3
Estate and Gift Taxes...................     0.7     1.6     3.6     6.4      11.5      29.0      24.5      23.0
Customs Duties..........................     0.4     1.1     2.4     7.2      16.7      19.9      21.0      21.3
Miscellaneous Receipts..................     0.2     1.2     3.4    12.7      28.0      42.8      32.1      34.6
                                         -----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Total...............................    39.4    92.5   192.8   517.1   1,032.0   2,025.2   1,817.4   2,049.6
On-budget Revenues......................    37.3    81.9   159.3   403.9     750.3   1,544.6   1,272.8   1,477.1
Off-budget Revenues.....................     2.1    10.6    33.5   113.2     281.7     480.6     544.6     572.4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                          TABLE 8.--CBO BASELINE REVENUES BY SOURCE, AS PERCENT OF GDP
                              [Includes on- and off-budget revenues, fiscal years]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                    Projected
                                                  1950   1960   1970    1980    1990     2000  -----------------
                                                                                                  2004     2005
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Individual Income Taxes........................    5.8    7.8     8.9     9.0     8.1     10.3      6.6      7.3
Corporate Income Tax...........................    3.8    4.1     3.2     2.4     1.6      2.1      1.4      1.8
Social Insurance Tax and Contributions.........    1.6    2.8     4.4     5.8     6.6      6.7      6.5      6.5
Excise Taxes...................................    2.8    2.3     1.6     0.9     0.6      0.7      0.6      0.6
Estate and Gift Taxes..........................    0.3    0.3     0.4     0.2     0.2      0.3      0.2      0.2
Customs Duties.................................    0.1    0.2     0.2     0.3     0.3      0.2      0.2      0.2
Miscellaneous Receipts.........................    0.1    0.2     0.3     0.5     0.5      0.4      0.3      0.3
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
    Total......................................   14.4   17.8    19.0    19.0    18.0     20.9     15.8     17.0
On-budget Revenues.............................   13.7   15.8    15.7    14.8    13.1     15.9     11.1     12.2
Off-budget Revenues............................    0.8    2.1     3.3     4.2     4.9      5.0      4.7      4.7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                     Table 9.--Tax Expenditure Estimates By Budget Function, Fiscal Years 2004-2008
                                                                  [Billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     Corporations                                 Individuals
                      Function                      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   Total
                                                       2004     2005     2006     2007     2008     2004     2005     2006     2007     2008    2004-08
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Defense
  Exclusion of benefits and allowances to Armed      .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      2.7      2.8      2.8      2.9      2.9       14.2
   Forces personnel................................
  Exclusion of military disability benefits........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.6
  Deduction for overnight-travel expenses of         .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.4
   National Guard and Reserve Members..............
International Affairs
  Exclusion of income earned abroad by U.S.          .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.4      3.6      3.8      4.0      4.2       19.0
   citizens........................................
  Exclusion of certain allowances for Federal        .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.4      0.5      0.5      0.6      0.6        2.6
   employees abroad................................
  Exclusion of extraterritorial income.............      5.2      5.5      5.9      6.1      6.3  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......       29.0
  Deferral of active income of controlled foreign        4.6      4.8      5.0      5.2      5.4  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......       25.0
   corporations....................................
  Inventory property sales source rule exception...      5.4      5.7      6.0      6.3      6.6  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......       30.0
  Deferral of certain active financing income......      1.9      2.1      2.3      1.7  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        8.0
General Science, Space, and Technology
  Tax credit for qualified research expenditures...      3.9      2.4      1.2      0.7      0.3    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        8.6
  Expensing of research and experimental                 3.5      4.9      6.0      6.5      6.9      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1       28.5
   expenditures....................................
Energy
  Expensing of exploration and development costs:
    Oil and gas....................................      0.5      0.3      0.4      0.5      0.5    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        2.0
    Other fuels....................................    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
  Excess of percentage over cost depletion:
    Oil and gas....................................      0.4      0.4      0.5      0.5      0.5    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        2.4
    Other fuels....................................    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
  Tax credit for enhanced oil recovery costs.......      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        1.5
  Tax credit for production of non-conventional          0.5      0.5      0.5      0.6      0.2      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        2.8
   fuels...........................................
  Tax credit for alcohol fuel blenders \2\.........    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      (\1\)
  Exclusion on interest on State and local             (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.9
   government industrial development bonds for
   energy production facilities....................
  Exclusion of energy conservation subsidies         .......  .......  .......  .......  .......    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
   provided by public utilities....................
  Tax credit for investments in solar and              (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
   geothermal energy facilities....................
  Tax credit for electricity production from wind,       0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        1.1
   biomass, and poultry waste......................
Natural Resources and Environment
  Expensing of exploration and development costs,      (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.3
   nonfuel minerals................................
  Excess of percentage over cost depletion, nonfuel      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.8
   minerals........................................
  Expensing of multiperiod timber-growing costs....      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        1.0
  Exclusion of interest on State and local               0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5        3.4
   government sewage, water, and hazardous waste
   facilities bonds................................
  Special rules for mining reclamation reserves....    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
  Special tax rate for nuclear decommissioning           0.3      0.3      0.4      0.4      0.4  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        1.8
   reserve fund....................................
  Exclusion of contributions in aid of construction    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        0.1
   for water and sewer utilities...................
Agriculture
  Expensing of soil and water conservation             (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
   expenditures....................................
  Expensing of fertilizer and soil conditioner         (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.3
   costs...........................................
  Expensing of the costs of raising dairy and          (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.1    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
   breeding cattle.................................
  Exclusion of cost-sharing payments...............    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
  Exclusion of cancellation of indebtedness income   .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.4
   of farmers......................................
  Cash accounting for agriculture..................    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3        1.9
  Income averaging for farmers.....................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
  Five-year carryback period for net operating         (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
   losses attributable to farming..................
Commerce and Housing
  Financial institutions:
    Exemption of credit union income...............      1.2      1.3      1.3      1.4      1.5  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        6.7
  Insurance companies:
    Exclusion of investment income on life               1.4      1.4      1.5      1.5      1.5     24.7     25.4     26.0     26.7     27.3      137.5
     insurance and annuity contracts...............
    Small life insurance company taxable income          0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        0.3
     adjustment....................................
    Special treatment of life insurance company          1.7      1.8      1.9      2.0      2.0  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        9.4
     reserves......................................
    Deduction of unpaid property loss reserves for       1.5      1.5      1.6      1.6      1.6  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        7.8
     property and casualty insurance companies.....
    Special deduction for Blue Cross and Blue            0.5      0.5      0.6      0.6      0.6  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        2.8
     Shield companies..............................
  Housing:
    Deduction for mortgage interest on owner-        .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     61.4     69.9     75.6     80.2     85.5      372.7
     occupied residences...........................
    Deduction for property taxes on owner-occupied   .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     18.7     16.7     15.0     14.2     13.3       77.8
     residences....................................
    Exclusion of capital gains on sales of           .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     17.9     18.0     18.3     18.5     18.7       91.4
     principal residences..........................
    Exclusion of interest on State and local             0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.8      0.9      0.9      0.9      0.9        6.0
     government bonds for owner-occupied housing...
    Exclusion of interest on State and local             0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2        1.3
     government bonds for rental housing...........
    Depreciation of rental housing in excess of          0.3      0.4      0.4      0.5      0.5      3.0      3.3      3.7      4.3      4.9       21.3
     alternative depreciation system...............
    Tax credit for low-income housing..............      3.0      3.2      3.3      3.5      3.7      1.3      1.4      1.4      1.5      1.6       23.8
    Tax credit for rehabilitation of historic            0.4      0.4      0.4      0.4      0.4      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        2.5
     structures....................................
  Other business and commerce:
    Reduced rates of tax on dividends and long-term  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     66.1     76.8     81.7     86.5     95.2      406.3
     capital gains.................................
    Exclusion of capital gains at death............  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     35.9     37.7     40.0     42.8     46.2      202.6
    Carryover basis of capital gains on gifts......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      4.3      4.6      4.9      5.2      5.5       24.5
    Deferral of gain on non-dealer installment           0.6      0.6      0.6      0.7      0.7      0.4      0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5        5.6
     sales.........................................
    Deferral of gain on like-kind exchanges........      1.2      1.2      1.3      1.3      1.4      0.4      0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5        9.2
    Deferral of gain on involuntary conversions      .......  .......  .......  .......  .......    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
     resulting from Presidentially-declared
     disasters.....................................
    Depreciation of buildings other than rental          1.8      1.4      0.9      1.2      1.6      1.9      1.3      0.1      0.2      0.3       10.7
     housing in excess of alternative depreciation
     system........................................
    Depreciation of equipment in excess of the          52.9     23.0      2.4      6.1     12.4     16.1      5.8     -1.6     -0.6      1.4      117.9
     alternative depreciation system...............
    Expensing of depreciable business property.....  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        0.0
    Amortization of business startup costs.........    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.6      0.6      0.6      0.6      0.7        3.1
    Reduced rates on first $10,000,000 of corporate      3.3      4.1      5.1      5.6      5.8  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......       23.9
     taxable income................................
    Permanent exemption from imputed interest rules    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3        1.6
    Expensing of magazine circulation expenditures.    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
    Special rules for magazine, paperback book, and    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
     record returns................................
    Completed contract rules.......................      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        1.2
    Cash accounting, other than agriculture........    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.7      0.7      0.8      0.8      0.8        3.8
    Exclusion of interest on State and local             0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3        2.2
     government small-issue industrial development
     bonds.........................................
    Exception from net operating loss limitations        0.7      0.6      0.6      0.6      0.6  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        3.1
     for corporations in bankruptcy proceedings....
    Tax credit for employer-paid FICA taxes on tips      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.3      0.3      0.4      0.4      0.4        2.7
Transportation
  Deduction for clean fuel vehicles and refueling      (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\3\)    (\3\)      0.2      0.2      0.1      0.1  .......        0.5
   property........................................
  Deferral of tax on capital construction funds of       0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        0.4
   shipping companies..............................
  Exclusion of employer-paid transportation          .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.8      3.8      3.8      3.9      3.9       19.2
   benefits........................................
Community and Regional Development
  New York City Liberty Zone tax incentives........      0.1      0.3      0.4      0.1     -0.1      0.2      0.3      0.3      0.2      0.2        2.4
  Empowerment zone tax incentives..................      0.3      0.3      0.4      0.4      0.4      0.3      0.4      0.4      0.4      0.5        3.7
  Renewal community tax incentives.................      0.1      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.4      0.4      0.5        2.9
  New markets tax credit...........................      0.1      0.2      0.2      0.3      0.4      0.2      0.2      0.3      0.4      0.5        2.8
  District of Columbia tax incentives..............    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.3
  Wage credit for Indian reservation employment....    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
  Accelerated depreciation for Indian reservation        0.1    (\1\)     -0.1     -0.1     -0.1      0.1    (\1\)     -0.1     -0.1     -0.1       -0.3
   investments.....................................
  Expensing of environmental remediation costs         (\1\)    (\3\)    (\3\)    (\3\)    (\3\)    (\1\)    (\3\)    (\3\)    (\3\)    (\3\)       -0.1
   (``Brownfields'')...............................
  Tax credit for rehabilitation of structures,           0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.4
   other than historic structures..................
  Exclusion of interest on State and local               0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.3      0.6      0.6      0.6      0.6      0.6        4.4
   government bonds for private airports, docks,
   and mass-commuting facilities...................
Education, Training, Employment, and Social
 Services
  Education and training:
    Tax credits for tuition for post-secondary       .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      4.3      4.3      4.4      4.4      4.4       21.8
     education.....................................
    Deduction for interest on student loans........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.7      0.8      0.8      0.9      0.9        3.9
    Deduction for higher education expenses........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      2.7      2.9      0.7  .......  .......        6.3
    Exclusion of earnings of Coverdell education     .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.3      0.3      0.4      0.4      0.5        2.0
     savings accounts..............................
    Exclusion of interest on educational savings     .......  .......  .......  .......  .......    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
     bonds.........................................
    Exclusion of earnings of qualified tuition       .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.5      0.6      0.7      0.8      0.9        3.4
     programs......................................
    Exclusion of scholarship and fellowship income.  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      1.5      1.5      1.6      1.6      1.7        7.9
    Exclusion of employer-provided education         .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.8      0.8      0.9      0.9      0.9        4.3
     assistance benefits...........................
    Parental personal exemption for students age 19  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      1.5      1.1      0.7      0.6      0.5        4.4
     to 23.........................................
    Exclusion of interest on State and local             0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3        2.0
     government student loan bonds.................
    Exclusion of interest on State and local             0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.8      0.8      0.8      0.8      0.8        5.6
     government bonds for private nonprofit and
     qualified public educational facilities.......
    Tax credit for holders of qualified zone             0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        0.4
     academy bonds.................................
    Deduction for charitable contributions to            1.1      1.1      1.1      1.2      1.2      5.2      5.3      5.5      5.6      5.8       33.1
     educational institutions......................
    Above the line deduction for teacher classroom   .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1  .......  .......  .......  .......        0.1
     expenses......................................
  Employment:
    Exclusion of employee meals and lodging (other   .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.9      0.9      0.9      0.9      0.9        4.7
     than military)................................
    Exclusion of benefits provided under cafeteria   .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     16.9     18.4     19.5     20.7     22.2       97.6
     plans \4\.....................................
    Exclusion of housing allowances for ministers..  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.4      0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5        2.4
    Exclusion of miscellaneous fringe benefits.....  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      5.8      5.9      6.0      6.2      6.4       30.3
    Exclusion of employee awards...................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.1      0.2      0.2      0.2        0.8
    Exclusion of income earned by voluntary          .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.2      3.4      3.5      3.7      3.9       17.7
     employees' beneficiary associations...........
    Special tax provisions for employee stock            0.8      0.9      0.9      0.9      0.9      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3      0.3        5.9
     ownership plans (ESOPs).......................
    Work opportunity tax credit....................      0.2      0.1    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.4
    Welfare-to-work tax credit.....................      0.1    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
    Deferral of taxation on spread on acquisition    .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.4      0.4      0.4      0.4      0.4        2.0
     of stock under incentive stock option plans
     and employee stock purchase plans \5\.........
  Social services:
    Tax credit for children under age 17 \6\.......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     44.1     35.7     31.7     31.1     30.4      173.0
    Tax credit for child and dependent care          .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.1      2.6      2.2      2.1      1.9       11.9
     expenses......................................
    Exclusion of employer-provided child care \7\..  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.8      0.9      0.9      1.0      1.0        4.7
    Tax credit for employer-provided dependent care      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.2      0.2    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.8
    Exclusion of certain foster care payments......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.6      0.7      0.7      0.8      0.8        3.6
    Adoption credit and employee adoption benefits   .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2        1.0
     exclusion.....................................
    Deduction for charitable contributions, other        1.8      1.9      1.9      2.0      2.1     27.9     28.8     29.6     30.5     31.4      158.0
     than for education and health.................
    Tax credit for disabled access expenditures....    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.4
Health
  Exclusion of employer contributions for health     .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     96.0    109.4    121.5    132.2    143.6      602.7
   care, health insurance premiums, and long-term
   care insurance premiums \8\.....................
  Exclusion of medical care and CHAMPUS/TRICARE      .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      1.7      1.8      1.8      1.8      1.9        9.0
   medical insurance for military dependents,
   retirees, and retiree dependents................
  Deduction for health insurance premiums and long-  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.3      3.6      4.0      4.3      4.6       19.8
   term care insurance premiums by the self-
   employed........................................
  Deduction for medical expenses and long-term care  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      5.9      6.9      7.7      8.8      9.9       39.2
   expenses........................................
  Exclusion of workers' compensation benefits        .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.7      3.9      4.0      4.2      4.4       20.3
   (medical benefits)..............................
  Health savings accounts..........................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.3      0.4      0.5      0.5      0.6        2.4
  Exclusion of interest on State and local               0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5      0.5      1.2      1.2      1.2      1.3      1.3        8.6
   government bonds for private nonprofit hospital
   facilities......................................
  Deduction for charitable contributions to health       0.9      1.0      1.0      1.0      1.1      3.5      3.7      3.8      3.9      4.0       23.9
   organizations...................................
  Tax credit for orphan drug research..............      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.3  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        1.1
  Tax credit for purchase of health insurance by       (\1\)      0.1      0.2      0.2      0.2    (\1\)      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        1.1
   certain displaced persons.......................
Medicare
  Exclusion of untaxed Medicare benefits:
    Hospital insurance (Part A)....................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     16.8     19.3     21.4     23.1     25.1      105.7
    Supplementary medical insurance (Part B).......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     11.0     12.6     14.1     15.6     17.3       70.6
    Prescription drug insurance (Part D)...........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      1.9      3.6      4.3        9.8
  Exclusion of certain subsidies to employers who    .......  .......      1.1      1.6      1.9  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        4.7
   maintain prescription drug plans for Medicare...
Income Security
  Exclusion of workers' compensation benefits        .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      4.8      4.9      5.0      5.3      5.6       25.6
   (disability and survivors payments).............
  Exclusion of damages on account of personal        .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      1.4      1.4      1.4      1.5      1.5        7.2
   physical injuries or physical sickness..........
  Exclusion of special benefits for disabled coal    .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1    (\1\)        0.3
   miners..........................................
  Exclusion of cash public assistance benefits.....  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.2      3.3      3.5      3.6      3.6       17.2
  Net exclusion of pension contributions and
   earnings:
    Employer plans.................................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     94.6     99.3    104.2    109.4    114.8      522.1
    Individual retirement plans....................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     13.0     15.5     17.2     18.7     20.5       84.9
    Keogh plans....................................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      6.2      6.5      6.8      7.2      7.6       34.3
  Tax credit for certain individuals for elective    .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      2.5      2.3      2.1      0.6  .......        7.6
   deferrals and IRA contributions.................
  Tax credit for new retirement plan expenses of       (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
   small businesses................................
  Exclusion of other employee benefits:
    Premiums on group term life insurance..........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      2.4      2.5      2.6      2.7      2.8       13.0
    Premiums on accident and disability insurance..  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      2.4      2.5      2.7      2.8      2.9       13.3
  Additional standard deduction for the blind and    .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      2.0      2.1      2.3      2.2      2.2       10.8
   the elderly.....................................
  Tax credit for the elderly and disabled..........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.1
  Deduction for casualty and theft losses..........  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2        1.0
  Earned income credit (EIC) \6\...................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     34.1     35.4     36.1     36.6     37.4      179.7
Social Security and Railroad Retirement
  Exclusion of untaxed social security and railroad  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     20.0     20.8     21.5     22.3     22.9      107.5
   retirement benefits.............................
Veterans' Benefits and Services
  Exclusion of veterans' disability compensation...  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      3.1      3.3      3.4      3.5      3.4       16.6
  Exclusion of veterans' pensions..................  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1      0.1        0.6
  Exclusion of veterans' readjustment benefits.....  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2      0.2        1.1
  Exclusion of interest on State and local             (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)    (\1\)        0.2
   government bonds for veteran's housing..........
General Purpose Fiscal Assistance
  Exclusion of interest on public purpose State and      7.1      7.2      7.3      7.5      7.6     18.2     18.4     18.8     19.2     19.6      130.9
   local government debt...........................
  Deduction of nonbusiness State and local           .......  .......  .......  .......  .......     44.3     40.9     37.9     36.7     35.4      195.2
   government income and personal property taxes...
  Tax credit for Puerto Rico and possession income,      1.4      1.2      0.3  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......        2.9
   and Puerto Rico economic activity...............
Interest
  Deferral of interest on savings bonds............  .......  .......  .......  .......  .......      1.7      1.7      1.7      1.7      1.7       9.0
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Positive tax expenditure of less than $50 million.
\2\ In addition, the exemption  from excise  tax for alcohol fuels results in a reduction in excise  tax receipts, net  of income  tax effect, of $1.1
  billion in each of the fiscal years 2004 through 2006, and $1.2 billion per year in fiscal years 2007 and 2008.
\3\ Negative tax expenditure of less than $50 million.
\4\ Estimate includes amounts of employer-provided health insurance purchased through cafeteria plans and employer-provided child care purchased through
  dependent care flexible spending accounts. These amounts are also included in other line items in this table.
\5\ Tax expenditure estimate does not include offsetting denial of corporate deduction for qualified stock option compensation.
\6\ Tax expenditure estimate includes refundable amounts, amounts used to offset income taxes, and amounts used to offset other taxes. The amount of
  refundable child tax credit and earned income tax credit used to offset taxes other than income tax or paid out as refunds is: $44.3 billion in 2004,
  $44.8 billion in 2005, $42.6 billion in 2006, $42.7 billion in 2007, and $42.9 billion in 2008.
\7\ Estimate includes employer-provided child care purchased through dependent care flexible spending accounts.
\8\ Estimate includes employer-provided health insurance purchased through cafeteria plans.

Note.--Details may not add to totals due to rounding.
Source: Joint Committee on Taxation.


                                        TABLE 10.--FISCAL YEAR 2005 BUDGET RESOLUTION TOTAL SPENDING AND REVENUES
                                                                [In billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Fiscal year                                2004        2005        2006        2007        2008        2009       2005-2009
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                         Summary
Total Spending:
    BA............................................................   2,338.156   2,410.838   2,481.700   2,617.210   2,749.696   2,886.638    13,146.082
    OT............................................................   2,295.011   2,406.471   2,492.176   2,590.871   2,712.342   2,845.861    13,047.721
    On-Budget:
        BA........................................................   1,952.700   2,010.338   2,071.186   2,193.395   2,311.770   2,431.782    11,018.471
        OT........................................................   1,911.235   2,007.926   2,083.910   2,169.446   2,277.071   2,393.946    10,932.299
    Off-Budget:
        BA........................................................     385.456     400.500     410.514     423.815     437.926     454.856     2,127.611
        OT........................................................     383.776     398.545     408.266     421.425     435.271     451.915     2,115.422
Revenues:
    Total.........................................................   1,817.538   2,029.644   2,220.897   2,351.051   2,477.420   2,611.883    11,690.895
    On-budget.....................................................   1,272.966   1,457.215   1,619.835   1,721.568   1,818.559   1,922.133     8,539.310
    Off-budget....................................................     544.572     572.429     601.062     629.483     658.861     689.750     3,151.585
Deficit (-):
    Total.........................................................    -477.473    -376.827    -271.279    -239.820    -234.922    -233.978    -1,356.826
    On-budget.....................................................    -638.269    -550.711    -464.075    -447.878    -458.512    -471.813    -2,392.989
    Off-budget....................................................     160.796     173.884     192.796     208.058     223.590     237.835     1,036.163
Debt Held by the Public (end of year).............................       4,385       4,775       5,060       5,312       5,560       5,807            na
Debt Subject to Limit (end of year)...............................       7,436       8,087       8,675       9,244       9,823      10,419            na
                                                                       By Function
National Defense (050):
    BA............................................................     461.544     419.634     442.400     464.000     486.149     508.369     2,320.552
    OT............................................................     451.125     447.114     439.098     445.927     465.542     487.186     2,284.867
Homeland Security (100):
    BA............................................................      29.559      34.102      33.548      35.160      36.520      40.420       179.750
    OT............................................................      24.834      29.997      33.298      35.635      36.979      38.401       174.310
International Affairs (150):
    BA............................................................      43.604      26.529      27.776      27.927      28.077      28.228       138.537
    OT............................................................      29.281      32.848      30.017      26.714      25.323      25.099       140.001
General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
    BA............................................................      22.822      22.813      22.927      23.042      23.157      23.274       115.213
    OT............................................................      21.897      22.453      22.683      22.743      22.763      22.863       113.505
Energy (270):
    BA............................................................       2.323       2.863       2.604       2.583       2.629       2.285        12.964
    OT............................................................       0.059       1.201       1.397       1.040       0.662       0.891         5.191
Natural Resources and Environment (300):
    BA............................................................      32.021      31.212      31.568      31.897      32.101      32.777       159.555
    OT............................................................      30.210      30.868      31.911      32.153      32.128      32.804       159.864
Agriculture (350):
    BA............................................................      19.908      21.087      23.374      24.278      24.042      24.903       117.684
    OT............................................................      18.434      20.501      22.310      23.199      22.957      23.956       112.923
Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
    BA............................................................      14.577       8.692       7.442       6.827       6.405       6.080        35.446
    OT............................................................      10.248       3.682       4.042       1.869      -0.110      -0.760         8.723
    On-budget:
        BA........................................................      17.077      10.792      10.242       9.727       9.705       9.580        50.046
        OT........................................................      12.748       5.782       6.842       4.769       3.190       2.740        23.323
    Off-budget:
        BA........................................................      -2.500      -2.100      -2.800      -2.900      -3.300      -3.500       -14.600
        OT........................................................      -2.500      -2.100      -2.800      -2.900      -3.300      -3.500       -14.600
Transportation (400):
    BA............................................................      62.937      65.021      66.075      68.263      69.578      70.445       339.382
    OT............................................................      59.280      61.988      64.204      66.131      67.545      68.452       328.320
Community and Regional Development (450):
    BA............................................................      13.758      11.867      11.655      11.715      11.692      11.752        58.681
    OT............................................................      15.443      14.233      12.484      11.616      11.392      11.510        61.235
Education, Training, Employment and Social Services (500):
    BA............................................................      89.463      92.523      93.596      94.243      94.738      95.366       470.466
    OT............................................................      86.405      90.492      92.878      93.365      93.975      94.685       465.395
Health (550):
    BA............................................................     236.822     245.095     252.639     266.117     284.970     304.034     1,352.855
    OT............................................................     235.551     244.936     252.495     265.196     284.222     303.460     1,350.309
Medicare (570):
    BA............................................................     269.567     288.166     322.974     362.759     387.838     414.278     1,776.015
    OT............................................................     268.759     289.126     322.549     363.016     387.858     413.853     1,776.402
Income Security (600):
    BA............................................................     329.744     337.318     335.387     340.140     352.809     361.830     1,727.484
    OT............................................................     336.074     341.716     339.098     342.945     355.046     363.465     1,742.270
Social Security (650):
    BA............................................................     498.229     519.219     540.180     565.506     593.680     625.464     2,844.049
    OT............................................................     496.549     517.264     537.932     563.116     591.025     622.523     2,831.860
    On-budget:
        BA........................................................      13.396      15.094      16.589      18.049      19.988      21.989        91.709
        OT........................................................      13.396      15.094      16.589      18.049      19.988      21.989        91.709
    Off-budget:
        BA........................................................     484.833     504.125     523.591     547.457     573.692     603.475     2,752.340
        OT........................................................     483.153     502.170     521.343     545.067     571.037     600.534     2,740.151
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
    BA............................................................      61.179      70.536      68.501      66.621      69.842      70.506       346.006
    OT............................................................      59.858      68.563      67.597      66.007      69.459      70.106       341.732
Administration of Justice (750):
    BA............................................................      29.932      30.139      27.430      27.480      27.616      27.755       140.420
    OT............................................................      30.103      30.025      28.036      27.744      27.540      27.621       140.966
General Government (800):
    BA............................................................      23.806      17.198      17.419      17.573      17.230      17.383        86.803
    OT............................................................      24.540      17.916      17.392      17.401      17.075      17.044        86.828
Net Interest (900):
    BA............................................................     154.858     180.541     220.722     256.528     279.848     296.984     1,234.623
    OT............................................................     154.858     180.541     220.722     256.528     279.848     296.984     1,234.623
    On-budget:
        BA........................................................     240.471     270.698     318.909     364.463     398.574     427.464     1,780.108
        OT........................................................     240.471     270.698     318.909     364.463     398.574     427.464     1,780.108
    Off-budget:
        BA........................................................     -85.613     -90.157     -98.187    -107.935    -118.726    -130.480      -545.485
        OT........................................................     -85.613     -90.157     -98.187    -107.935    -118.726    -130.480      -545.485
Allowances (920):
    BA............................................................        ----      50.000        ----        ----        ----        ----        50.000
    OT............................................................        ----      24.850      18.600       5.100       1.000       0.250        49.800
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
    BA............................................................     -58.497     -63.717     -66.517     -75.449     -79.225     -75.495      -360.403
    OT............................................................     -58.497     -63.843     -66.567     -76.574     -79.887     -74.532      -361.403
    On-budget:
        BA........................................................     -47.233     -52.349     -54.427     -62.642     -65.485     -60.856      -295.759
        OT........................................................     -47.233     -52.475     -54.477     -63.767     -66.147     -59.893      -296.759
    Off-budget:
        BA........................................................     -11.264     -11.368     -12.090     -12.807     -13.740     -14.639       -64.644
        OT........................................................     -11.264     -11.368     -12.090     -12.807     -13.740     -14.639       -64.644
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                          TABLE 11.--FISCAL YEAR 2005 BUDGET RESOLUTION DISCRETIONARY SPENDING
                                                                [In billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Fiscal year                                 2004        2005        2006        2007        2008        2009      2005-2009
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                         Summary
Total Spending:
    BA.............................................................     875.487     871.264     843.020     867.691     892.746     920.612    4,395.333
    OT.............................................................     895.047     927.262     912.721     906.430     923.705     947.555    4,617.673
Defense:
    BA.............................................................     457.025     418.261     439.204     460.450     482.329     504.466    2,304.710
    OT.............................................................     450.010     444.736     435.794     442.319     461.835     483.256    2,267.940
Homeland Security:
    BA.............................................................      29.234      33.368      32.333      33.901      35.211      39.063      173.876
    OT.............................................................      24.581      29.463      32.183      34.425      35.487      36.953      168.511
Other Functions of Government:
    BA.............................................................     389.228     419.635     371.483     373.340     375.206     377.083    1,916.747
    OT.............................................................     420.456     453.063     444.744     429.686     426.383     427.346    2,181.222
                                                                       By Function
National Defense (050):
    BA.............................................................     457.025     418.261     439.204     460.450     482.329     504.466    2,304.710
    OT.............................................................     450.010     444.736     435.794     442.319     461.835     483.256    2,267.940
Homeland Security (100):
    BA.............................................................      29.234      33.368      32.333      33.901      35.211      39.063      173.876
    OT.............................................................      24.581      29.463      32.183      34.425      35.487      36.953      168.511
International Affairs (150):
    BA.............................................................      48.600      26.886      27.020      27.156      27.291      27.428      135.781
    OT.............................................................      34.086      35.844      32.460      29.284      27.808      27.569      152.965
General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
    BA.............................................................      22.783      22.783      22.897      23.011      23.126      23.242      115.059
    OT.............................................................      21.808      22.342      22.575      22.703      22.732      22.832      113.184
Energy (270):
    BA.............................................................       3.567       3.489       3.506       3.524       3.542       3.559       17.620
    OT.............................................................       3.331       3.541       3.639       3.571       3.570       3.550       17.871
Natural Resources and Environment (300):
    BA.............................................................      29.957      28.489      28.631      28.775      28.918      29.063      143.876
    OT.............................................................      29.372      29.077      28.904      28.863      28.849      28.895      144.588
Agriculture (350):
    BA.............................................................       5.415       4.804       4.828       4.852       4.876       4.901       24.261
    OT.............................................................       5.254       5.114       4.898       4.861       4.830       4.848       24.551
Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
    Total
        BA.........................................................      -0.869       1.117       1.123       1.128       1.134       1.140        5.642
        OT.........................................................      -0.768       1.031       1.142       1.313       1.096       1.052        5.634
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................      -0.869       1.117       1.123       1.128       1.134       1.140        5.642
        OT.........................................................      -0.768       1.031       1.142       1.313       1.096       1.052        5.634
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
        OT.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
Transportation (400):
    BA.............................................................      17.944      17.775      17.864      17.953      18.043      18.133       89.768
    OT.............................................................      57.836      60.013      62.280      64.357      65.915      66.965      319.530
Community and Regional Development (450):
    BA.............................................................      12.648      11.465      11.522      11.580      11.638      11.696       57.901
    OT.............................................................      14.953      14.416      12.688      11.806      11.551      11.698       62.159
Education, Training, Employment and Social Services (500):
    BA.............................................................      77.872      80.679      81.082      81.488      81.895      82.305      407.449
    OT.............................................................      76.905      80.451      81.820      82.107      82.535      82.965      409.878
Health (550):
    BA.............................................................      46.780      46.317      46.549      46.781      47.015      47.250      233.912
    OT.............................................................      45.101      46.052      45.772      45.938      46.198      46.419      230.379
Medicare (570):
    BA.............................................................       3.836       4.138       4.159       4.179       4.200       4.221       20.897
    OT.............................................................       3.814       4.013       4.109       4.147       4.179       4.203       20.651
Income Security (600):
    BA.............................................................      44.591      45.826      46.055      46.285      46.517      46.749      231.432
    OT.............................................................      53.005      51.006      50.291      49.729      49.775      49.491      250.292
Social Security (650):
    Total
        BA.........................................................       4.134       4.541       4.564       4.587       4.609       4.633       22.934
        OT.........................................................       4.154       4.366       4.486       4.547       4.584       4.612       22.595
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
        OT.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................       4.134       4.541       4.564       4.587       4.609       4.633       22.934
        OT.........................................................       4.154       4.366       4.486       4.547       4.584       4.612       22.595
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
    BA.............................................................      28.981      30.711      30.865      31.019      31.174      31.330      155.099
    OT.............................................................      27.794      29.070      30.016      30.459      30.851      30.971      151.367
Administration of Justice (750):
    BA.............................................................      25.513      25.185      25.311      25.437      25.565      25.692      127.190
    OT.............................................................      25.729      25.699      25.533      25.474      25.549      25.612      127.867
General Government (800):
    BA.............................................................      17.476      15.430      15.507      15.585      15.663      15.741       77.926
    OT.............................................................      18.082      16.178      15.531      15.427      15.361      15.414       77.911
Allowances (920):
    BA.............................................................        ----      50.000        ----        ----        ----        ----       50.000
    OT.............................................................        ----      24.850      18.600       5.100       1.000       0.250       49.800
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                            TABLE 12.--FISCAL YEAR 2005 BUDGET RESOLUTION MANDATORY SPENDING
                                                                [In billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Fiscal year                                 2004        2005        2006        2007        2008        2009      2005-2009
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                         Summary
Total Spending:
    BA.............................................................   1,462.669   1,539.574   1,638.680   1,749.519   1,856.950   1,966.026    8.750.749
    OT.............................................................   1,399.964   1,479.209   1,579.455   1,684.441   1,788.637   1,898.306    8.430.048
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................   1,081.347   1,143.615   1,232.730   1,330.291   1,423.633   1,515.803    6,646.072
        OT.........................................................   1,020.342   1,085.030   1,175.675   1,267.563   1,357.950   1,451.003    6,337.221
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................     381.322     395.959     405.950     419.228     433.317     450.223    2,104.677
        OT.........................................................     379.622     394.179     403.780     416.878     430.687     447.303    2,092.827
                                                                       By Function
National Defense (050):
    BA.............................................................       4.519       1.373       3.196       3.550       3.820       3.903       15.842
    OT.............................................................       1.115       2.378       3.304       3.608       3.707       3.930       16.927
Homeland Security (100):
    BA.............................................................       0.325       0.734       1.215       1.259       1.309       1.357        5.874
    OT.............................................................       0.253       0.534       1.115       1.210       1.492       1.448        5.799
International Affairs (150):
    BA.............................................................      -4.996      -0.357       0.756       0.771       0.786       0.800        2.756
    OT.............................................................      -4.805      -2.996      -2.443      -2.570      -2.485      -2.470      -12.964
General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
    BA.............................................................       0.039       0.030       0.030       0.031       0.031       0.032        0.154
    OT.............................................................       0.089       0.111       0.108       0.040       0.031       0.031        0.321
Energy (270):
    BA.............................................................      -1.244      -0.626      -0.902      -0.941      -0.913      -1.274       -4.656
    OT.............................................................      -3.272      -2.340      -2.242      -2.531      -2.908      -2.659      -12.680
Natural Resources and Environment (300):
    BA.............................................................       2.064       2.723       2.937       3.122       3.183       3.714       15.679
    OT.............................................................       0.838       1.791       3.007       3.290       3.279       3.909       15.276
Agriculture (350):
    BA.............................................................      14.493      16.283      18.546      19.426      19.166      20.002       93.423
    OT.............................................................      13.180      15.387      17.412      18.338      18.127      19.108       88.372
Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
    Total
        BA.........................................................      15.446       7.575       6.319       5.699       5.271       4.940       29.804
        OT.........................................................      11.016       2.651       2.900       0.556      -1.206      -1.812        3.089
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................      17.946       9.675       9.119       8.599       8.571       8.440       44.404
        OT.........................................................      13.516       4.751       5.700       3.456       2.094       1.688       17.689
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................      -2.500      -2.100      -2.800      -2.900      -3.300      -3.500      -14.600
        OT.........................................................      -2.500      -2.100      -2.800      -2.900      -3.300      -3.500      -14.600
Transportation (400):
    BA.............................................................      44.993      47.246      48.211      50.310      51.353      52.312      249.614
    OT.............................................................       1.444       1.975       1.924       1.774       1.630       1.487        8.790
Community and Regional Development (450):
    BA.............................................................       1.110       0.402       0.133       0.135       0.054       0.056        0.780
    OT.............................................................       0.490      -0.183      -0.204      -0.190      -0.159      -0.188       -0.924
Education, Training, Employment and Social Services (500):
    BA.............................................................      11.591      11.844      12.514      12.755      12.843      13.061       63.017
    OT.............................................................       9.500      10.041      11.058      11.258      11.440      11.720       55.517
Health (550):
    BA.............................................................     190.042     198.778     206.090     219.336     237.955     256.784    1,118.943
    OT.............................................................     190.450     198.884     206.723     219.258     238.024     257.041    1,119.930
Medicare (570):
    BA.............................................................     265.731     284.028     318.815     358.580     383.638     410.057    1,755.118
    OT.............................................................     264.945     285.113     318.440     358.869     383.679     409.650    1,755.751
Income Security (600):
    BA.............................................................     285.153     291.492     289.332     293.855     306.292     315.081    1,496.052
    OT.............................................................     283.069     290.710     288.807     293.216     305.271     313.974    1,491.978
Social Security (650):
    Total
        BA.........................................................     494.095     514.678     535.616     560.919     589.071     620.831    2,821.115
        OT.........................................................     492.395     512.898     533.446     558.569     586.441     617.911    2,809.265
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................      13.396      15.094      16.589      18.049      19.988      21.989       91.709
        OT.........................................................      13.396      15.094      16.589      18.049      19.988      21.989       91.709
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................     480.699     499.584     519.027     542.870     569.083     598.842    2,729.406
        OT.........................................................     478.999     497.804     516.857     540.520     566.453     595.922    2,717.556
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
    BA.............................................................      32.198      39.825      37.636      35.602      38.668      39.176      190.907
    OT.............................................................      32.064      39.493      37.581      35.548      38.608      39.135      190.365
Administration of Justice (750):
    BA.............................................................       4.419       4.954       2.119       2.043       2.051       2.063       13.230
    OT.............................................................       4.374       4.326       2.503       2.270       1.991       2.009       13.099
General Government (800):
    BA.............................................................       6.330       1.768       1.912       1.988       1.567       1.642        8.877
    OT.............................................................       6.458       1.738       1.861       1.974       1.714       1.630        8.917
Net Interest (900):
    Total
        BA.........................................................     154.858     180.541     220.722     256.528     279.848     296.984    1,234.623
        OT.........................................................     154.858     180.541     220.722     256.528     279.848     296.984    1,234.623
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................     240.471     270.698     318.909     364.463     398.574     427.464    1,780.108
        OT.........................................................     240.471     270.698     318.909     364.463     398.574     427.464    1,780.108
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................     -85.613     -90.157     -98.187    -107.935    -118.726    -130.480     -545.485
        OT.........................................................     -85.613     -90.157     -98.187    -107.935    -118.726    -130.480     -545.485
Allowances (920):
    BA.............................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
    OT.............................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
    Total
        BA.........................................................     -58.497     -63.717     -66.517     -75.449     -79.225     -75.495     -360.403
        OT.........................................................     -58.497     -63.843     -66.567     -76.574     -79.887     -74.532     -361.403
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................     -47.233     -52.349     -54.427     -62.642     -65.485     -60.856     -295.759
        OT.........................................................     -47.233     -52.475     -54.477     -63.767     -66.147     -59.893     -296.759
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................     -11.264     -11.368     -12.090     -12.807     -13.740     -14.639      -64.644
        OT.........................................................     -11.264     -11.368     -12.090     -12.807     -13.740     -14.639      -64.644
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                       TABLE 13.--FISCAL YEAR 2005 BUDGET RESOLUTION MINUS THE PRESIDENT'S BUDGET
                                                                [In billions of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Fiscal year                                 2004        2005        2006        2007        2008        2009      2005-2009
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                         Summary
Total Spending:
    BA.............................................................       0.423      49.454      -9.749      -6.113      -8.243      -5.014       20.335
    OT.............................................................       0.163      22.074       9.791      -1.930      -9.556      -7.062       13.317
    On-Budget:
        BA.........................................................       0.423      49.432      -9.315      -6.438      -8.710      -5.511       18.858
        OT.........................................................       0.163      22.210       9.697      -2.210     -10.001      -7.540       12.156
    Off-Budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----       0.022       0.166       0.325       0.467       0.497        1.477
        OT.........................................................        ----      -0.136       0.094       0.280       0.445       0.478        1.161
Revenues:
    Total..........................................................       1.183       2.951       9.771       0.063       7.719      16.860       37.364
    On-Budget......................................................       1.183       2.951       9.771       0.063       7.719      16.860       37.364
    Off-Budget.....................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
Surplus/Deficit (-):
    Total..........................................................       1.020     -19.123      -0.020       1.993      17.275      23.922       24.047
    On-Budget......................................................       1.020     -19.259      -0.074       2.273      17.720      24.400       25.208
    Off-Budget.....................................................        ----       0.136      -0.094      -0.280      -0.445      -0.478       -1.161
                                                                       By Function
National Defense (050):
    BA.............................................................       0.013      -0.177      -0.849      -0.173       0.755       0.658        0.214
    OT.............................................................       0.013      -0.131      -0.677      -0.387       0.374       0.622       -0.199
Homeland Security (100):
    BA.............................................................        ----       0.629       1.402       1.485       1.571       1.665        6.752
    OT.............................................................        ----       0.695       1.426       1.497       1.579       1.671        6.868
International Affairs (150):
    BA.............................................................        ----      -4.654      -6.919      -7.409      -7.613      -7.514      -34.109
    OT.............................................................        ----      -1.024      -2.861      -4.821      -6.130      -6.785      -21.621
General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
    BA.............................................................        ----      -1.043      -1.433      -2.153      -2.278      -2.190       -9.097
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.740      -1.349      -1.900      -2.121      -2.185       -8.295
Energy (270):
    BA.............................................................        ----      -0.380      -0.439      -0.395      -0.247      -0.262       -1.723
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.218      -0.590      -0.437      -0.297      -0.261       -1.803
Natural Resources and Environment (300):
    BA.............................................................        ----       0.431       1.021       1.114       1.071       1.190        4.827
    OT.............................................................        ----       0.091       0.261       0.571       0.792       1.013        2.728
Agriculture (350):
    BA.............................................................        ----      -0.259      -0.136      -0.125      -0.206      -0.294       -1.020
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.223       0.031      -0.041      -0.192      -0.320       -0.745
Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
    BA.............................................................        ----       2.380       1.295       0.177      -0.092      -0.790        2.970
    OT.............................................................        ----       2.270       3.486       0.972      -0.834      -1.229        4.665
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----       2.380       1.295       0.177      -0.092      -0.790        2.970
        OT.........................................................        ----       2.270       3.486       0.972      -0.834      -1.229        4.665
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
        OT.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
Transportation (400):
    BA.............................................................       0.269       1.875       2.767       4.955       5.998       6.805       22.400
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.092       0.323       1.638       3.034       4.257        9.160
Community and Regional Development (450):
    BA.............................................................        ----       0.589       0.730       0.774       0.766       0.804        3.663
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.115       0.171       0.596       0.721       0.784        2.157
Education, Training, Employment and Social Services (500):
    BA.............................................................       0.205       0.524       2.743       2.947       2.812       3.021       12.047
    OT.............................................................       0.215       1.492       2.515       3.589       3.822       3.980       15.398
Health (550):
    BA.............................................................       0.016      -0.569      -5.754      -7.063      -7.143      -7.143      -27.672
    OT.............................................................       0.016      -0.502      -6.458      -7.160      -7.059      -7.135      -28.314
Medicare (570):
    BA.............................................................        ----       0.247      -0.380      -0.316      -0.334      -0.333       -1.116
    OT.............................................................        ----       0.103      -0.265      -0.333      -0.352      -0.350       -1.197
Income Security (600):
    BA.............................................................       0.007      -0.037      -6.182      -5.668      -5.840      -6.032      -23.759
    OT.............................................................       0.006      -3.003      -6.497      -6.124      -6.072      -6.330      -28.026
Social Security (650):
    BA.............................................................        ----       0.020       0.158       0.310       0.449       0.481        1.418
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.138       0.086       0.265       0.427       0.462        1.102
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
        OT.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----       0.020       0.158       0.310       0.449       0.481        1.418
        OT.........................................................        ----      -0.138       0.086       0.265       0.427       0.462        1.102
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
    BA.............................................................        ----       1.243       2.329       2.599       2.751       3.025       11.947
    OT.............................................................        ----       0.465       1.888       2.363       2.613       2.902       10.231
Administration of Justice (750):
    BA.............................................................        ----      -0.230      -0.494      -0.439      -0.491      -0.088       -1.742
    OT.............................................................        ----      -1.299      -0.761      -0.602      -0.690      -0.392       -3.744
General Government (800):
    BA.............................................................      -0.078      -1.716      -1.141      -2.668      -1.070      -1.415       -8.010
    OT.............................................................      -0.078      -0.862      -1.021      -2.651      -1.094      -1.439       -7.067
Net Interest (900):
    BA.............................................................      -0.009       0.457       0.758       0.960       0.565      -0.610        2.130
    OT.............................................................      -0.009       0.457       0.758       0.960       0.565      -0.610        2.130
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................      -0.009       0.455       0.750       0.945       0.547      -0.626        2.071
        OT.........................................................      -0.009       0.455       0.750       0.945       0.547      -0.626        2.071
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----       0.002       0.008       0.015       0.018       0.016        0.059
        OT.........................................................        ----       0.002       0.008       0.015       0.018       0.016        0.059
Allowances (920):
    BA.............................................................        ----      50.147       0.302       0.287       0.301       0.316       51.353
    OT.............................................................        ----      24.997      18.902       5.387       1.301       0.566       51.153
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
    BA.............................................................        ----      -0.023       0.473       4.688       0.032       3.692        8.862
    OT.............................................................        ----      -0.149       0.423       4.688       0.057       3.717        8.736
    On-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----      -0.023       0.473       4.688       0.032       3.692        8.862
        OT.........................................................        ----      -0.149       0.423       4.688       0.057       3.717        8.736
    Off-budget:
        BA.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
        OT.........................................................        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----        ----         ----
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


           TABLE 14.--FISCAL YEAR 2005 BUDGET RESOLUTION COMPARED TO 2004: TOTAL SPENDING AND REVENUES
                                            [In billions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
               Fiscal year                   2005        2006        2007        2008        2009      2005-2009
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Summary
Total Spending:
    BA..................................      72.682     143.544     279.054     411.540     548.482   1,455.302
    OT..................................     111.460     197.165     295.860     417.331     550.850   1,572.666
    On-Budget
        BA..............................      57,638     118.486     240.695     359.070     479.082   1,254.971
        OT..............................      96.691     172.675     258.211     365.836     482.711   1,376.124
    Off-Budget
        BA..............................      15.044      25.058      38.359      52.470      69.400     200.331
        OT..............................      14.769      24.490      37.649      51.495      68.139     196.542
Revenues:
    Total...............................     212.106     403.359     533.513     659.882     794.345   2,603.205
    On-Budget...........................     184.249     346.869     448.602     545.593     649.167   2,174.480
    Off-Budget..........................      27.857      56.490      84.911     114.289     145.178     428.725
Surplus/Deficit (-):
    Total...............................     100.646     206.194     237.653     242.551     243.495   1,030.539
    On-Budget...........................      87,558     174.194     190.391     179.757     166.456     798.356
    Off-Budget..........................      13.088      32.000      47.262      62.794      77.039     232.183
                                                   By Function
National Defense (050):
    BA..................................     -41.910     -19.144       2.456      24.605      46.825      12.832
    OT..................................      -4.011     -12.027      -5.198      14.417      36.061      29.242
Homeland Security (100):
    BA..................................       4.543       3.989       5.601       6.961      10.861      31.955
    OT..................................       5.163       8.464      10.801      12.145      13.567      50.140
International Affairs (150):
    BA..................................     -17.075     -15.828     -15.677     -15.527     -15.376     -79.483
    OT..................................       3.567       0.736      -2.567      -3.958      -4.182      -6.404
General Science, Space, and Technology
 (250):
    BA..................................      -0.009       0.105       0.220       0.335       0.452       1.103
    OT..................................       0.556       0.786       0.846       0.866       0.966       4.020
Energy (270):
    BA..................................       0.540       0.281       0.260       0.306      -0.038       1.349
    OT..................................       1.142       1.338       0.981       0.603       0.832       4.896
Natural Resources and Environment (300):
    BA..................................      -0.809      -0.453      -0.124       0.080       0.756      -0.550
    OT..................................       0.658       1.701       1.943       1.918       2.594       8.814
Agriculture (350):
    BA..................................       1.179       3.466       4.370       4.134       4.995      18.144
    OT..................................       2.067       3.876       4.765       4.523       5.522      20.753
Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
    BA..................................      -5.885      -7.135      -7.750      -8.172      -8.497     -37.439
    OT..................................      -6.566      -6.206      -8.379     -10.358     -11.008     -42.517
    On-budget:
        BA..............................      -6.285      -6.835      -7.350      -7.372      -7.497     -35.339
        OT..............................      -6.966      -5.906      -7.979      -9.558     -10.008     -40.417
    Off-budget:
        BA..............................       0.400      -0.300      -0.400      -0.800      -1.000      -2.100
        OT..............................       0.400      -0.300      -0.400      -0.800      -1.000      -2.100
Transportation (400):
    BA..................................       2.084       3.138       5.326       6.641       7.508      24.697
    OT..................................       2.708       4.924       6.851       8.265       9.172      31.920
Community and Regional Development
 (450):
    BA..................................      -1.891      -2.103      -2.043      -2.066      -2.006     -10.109
    OT..................................      -1.210      -2.959      -3.827      -4.051      -3.933     -15.980
Education, Training, Employment and
 Social Services (500):
    BA..................................       3.060       4.133       4.780       5.275       5.903      23.151
    OT..................................       4.087       6.473       6.960       7.570       8.280      33.370
Health (550):
    BA..................................       8.273      15.817      29.295      48.148      67.212     168.745
    OT..................................       9.385      16.944      29.645      48.671      67.909     172.554
Medicare (570):
    BA..................................      18.599      53.407      93.192     118.271     144.711     428.180
    OT..................................      20.367      53.790      94.257     119.099     145.094     432.607
Income Security (600):
    BA..................................       7.574       5.643      10.396      23.065      32.086      78.764
    OT..................................       5.642       3.024       6.871      18.972      27.391      61.900
Social Security (650):
    BA..................................      20.990      41.951      67.277      95.451     127.235     352.904
    OT..................................      20.715      41.383      66.567      94.476     125.974     349.115
    On-budget:
        BA..............................       1.698       3.193       4.653       6.592       8.593      24.729
        OT..............................       1.698       3.193       4.653       6.592       8.593      24.729
    Off-budget:
        BA..............................      19.292      38.758      62.624      88.859     118.642     328.175
        OT..............................      19.017      38.190      61.914      87.884     117.381     324.386
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
    BA..................................       9.357       7.322       5.442       8.663       9.327      40.111
    OT..................................       8.705       7.739       6.149       9.601      10.248      42.442
Administration of Justice (750):
    BA..................................       0.207      -2.502      -2.452      -2.316      -2.177      -9.240
    OT..................................      -0.078      -2.067      -2.359      -2.563      -2.482      -9.549
General Government (800):
    BA..................................      -6.608      -6.387      -6.233      -6.576      -6.423     -32.227
    OT..................................      -6.624      -7.148      -7.139      -7.465      -7.496     -35.872
Net Interest (900):
    BA..................................      25.683      65.864     101.670     124.990     142.126     460.333
    OT..................................      25.683      65.864     101.670     124.990     142.126     460.333
    On-budget:
        BA..............................      30.227      78.438     123.992     158.103     186.993     577.753
        OT..............................      30.227      78.438     123.992     158.103     186.993     577.753
    Off-budget:
        BA..............................      -4.544     -12.574     -22.322     -33.113     -44.867    -117.420
        OT..............................      -4.544     -12.574     -22.322     -33.113     -44.867    -117.420
Allowances (920):
    BA..................................      50.000        ----        ----        ----        ----      50.000
    OT..................................      24.850      18.600       5.100       1.000       0.250      49.800
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
    BA..................................      -5.220      -8.020     -16.952     -20.728     -16.998     -67.918
    OT..................................      -5.346      -8.070     -18.077     -21.390     -16.035     -68.918
    On-budget:
        BA..............................      -5.116      -7.194     -15.409     -18.252     -13.623     -59.594
        OT..............................      -5.242      -7.244     -16.534     -18.914     -12.660     -60.594
    Off-budget:
        BA..............................      -0.104      -0.826      -1.543      -2.476      -3.375      -8.324
        OT..............................      -0.104      -0.826      -1.543      -2.476      -3.375      -8.324
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


           TABLE 15.--FISCAL YEAR 2005 BUDGET RESOLUTION COMPARED TO 2004: TOTAL SPENDING AND REVENUES
                                               [Percentage change]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           Fiscal year                               2005     2006     2007     2009      2009
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     Summary
Total Spending:
    BA...........................................................      3.1      6.1     11.9      17.6      23.5
    OT...........................................................      4.9      8.6     12.9      18.2      24.0
    On-Budget
        BA.......................................................      3.0      6.1     12.3      18.4      24.5
        OT.......................................................      5.1      9.0     13.5      19.1      25.3
    Off-Budget
        BA.......................................................      3.9      6.5     10.0      13.6      18.0
        OT.......................................................      3.8      6.4      9.8      13.4      17.8
Revenues
    Total........................................................     11.7     22.2     29.4      36.3      43.7
    On-Budget....................................................     14.5     27.2     35.2      42.9      51.0
    Off-Budget...................................................      5.1     10.4     15.6      21.0      26.7
Surplus/Deficit (-):
    Total........................................................    -21.1    -43.2    -49.8     -50.8     -51.0
    On-Budget....................................................    -13.7    -27.3    -29.8     -28.2     -26.1
    Off-Budget...................................................      8.1     19.9     29.4      39.1      47.9
                                                   By Function
National Defense (050):
    BA...........................................................     -9.1     -4.1      0.5       5.3      10.1
    OT...........................................................     -0.9     -2.7     -1.2       3.2       8.0
Homeland Security (100):
    BA...........................................................     15.4     13.5     18.9      23.5      36.7
    OT...........................................................     20.8     34.1     43.5      48.9      54.6
International Affairs (150):
    BA...........................................................    -39.2    -36.3    -36.0     -35.6     -35.3
    OT...........................................................     12.2      2.5     -8.8     -13.5     -14.3
General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
    BA...........................................................     ----      0.5      1.0       1.5       2.0
    OT...........................................................      2.5      3.6      3.9       4.0       4.4
Energy (270):
    BA...........................................................     23.2     12.1     11.2      13.2      -1.6
    OT...........................................................   1935.6   2267.8   1662.7    1022.0    1410.2
Natural Resources and Environment (300):
    BA...........................................................     -2.5     -1.4     -0.4       0.2       2.4
    OT...........................................................      2.2      5.6      6.4       6.3       8.6
Agriculture (350):
    BA...........................................................      5.9     17.4     22.0      20.8      25.1
    OT...........................................................     11.2     21.0     25.8      24.5      30.0
Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
    BA...........................................................    -40.4    -48.9    -53.2     -56.1     -58.3
    OT...........................................................    -64.1    -60.6    -81.8    -101.1    -107.4
    On-budget:
        BA.......................................................    -36.8    -40.0    -43.0     -43.2     -43.9
        OT.......................................................    -54.6    -46.3    -62.6     -75.0     -78.5
    Off-budget:
        BA.......................................................    -16.0     12.0     16.0      32.0      40.0
        OT.......................................................    -16.0     12.0     16.0      32.0      40.0
Transportation (400):
    BA...........................................................      3.3      5.0      8.5      10.6      11.9
    OT...........................................................      4.6      8.3     11.6      13.9      15.5
Community and Regional Development (450):
    BA...........................................................    -13.7    -15.3    -14.8     -15.0     -14.6
    OT...........................................................     -7.8    -19.2    -24.8     -26.2     -25.5
Education, Training, Employment and Social Services (500):
    BA...........................................................      3.4      4.6      5.3       5.9       6.6
    OT...........................................................      4.7      7.5      8.1       8.8       9.6
Health (550):
    BA...........................................................      3.5      6.7     12.4      20.3      28.4
    OT...........................................................      4.0      7.2     12.6      20.7      28.8
Medicare (570):
    BA...........................................................      6.9     19.8     34.6      43.9      53.7
    OT...........................................................      7.6     20.0     35.1      44.3      54.0
Income Security (600):
    BA...........................................................      2.3      1.7      3.2       7.0       9.7
    OT...........................................................      1.7      0.9      2.0       5.6       8.2
Social Security (650):
    BA...........................................................      4.2      8.4     13.5      19.2      25.5
    OT...........................................................      4.2      8.3     13.4      19.0      25.4
    On-budget:
        BA.......................................................     12.7     23.8     34.7      49.2      64.1
        OT.......................................................     12.7     23.8     34.7      49.2      64.1
    Off-budget:
        BA.......................................................      4.0      8.0     12.9      18.3      24.5
        OT.......................................................      3.9      7.9     12.8      18.2      24.3
Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
    BA...........................................................     15.3     12.0      8.9      14.2      15.2
    OT...........................................................     14.5     12.9     10.3      16.0      17.1
Administration of Justice (750):
    BA...........................................................      0.7     -8.4     -8.2      -7.7      -7.3
    OT...........................................................     -0.3     -6.9     -7.8      -8.5      -8.2
General Government (800):
    BA...........................................................    -27.8    -26.8    -26.2     -27.6     -27.0
    OT...........................................................    -27.0    -29.1    -29.1     -30.4     -30.5
Net Interest (900):
    BA...........................................................     16.6     42.5     65.7      80.7      91.8
    OT...........................................................     16.6     42.5     65.7      80.7      91.8
    On-budget:
        BA.......................................................     12.6     32.6     51.6      65.7      77.8
        OT.......................................................     12.6     32.6     51.6      65.7      77.8
    Off-budget:
        BA.......................................................      5.3     14.7     26.1      38.7      52.4
        OT.......................................................      5.3     14.7     26.1      38.7      52.4
Allowances (920):
    BA...........................................................       na       na       na        na        na
    OT...........................................................       na       na       na        na        na
Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
    BA...........................................................      8.9     13.7     29.0      35.4      29.1
    OT...........................................................      9.1     13.8     30.9      36.6      27.4
    On-budget:
        BA.......................................................     10.8     15.2     32.6      38.6      28.8
        OT.......................................................     11.1     15.3     35.0      40.0      26.8
    Off-budget:
        BA.......................................................      0.9      7.3     13.7      22.0      30.0
        OT.......................................................      0.9      7.3     13.7      22.0      30.0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             Reconciliation

                              ----------                              


    As permitted in Section 310 of the Congressional Budget Act 
(2 U.S.C. 641), the budget resolution provides for two 
reconciliation bills. The first instructs five authorizing 
committees to reconcile and report changes in law necessary to 
achieve the direct spending and revenue levels provided for in 
the budget resolution to eliminate waste, fraud and abuse in 
specific programs in their jurisdictions. They must submit 
their legislative text to the Budget Committee by July 15, 
2004. The second is an instruction to Ways and Means Committee 
only, to reduce the level of revenue collected by the Federal 
Government by a specified amount (see Table 16 below for 
Reconciliation levels). The committee must submit its 
legislative text to the full House by October 1, 2004.
    Any committee receiving a reconciliation directive must 
increase or decrease spending by the specified amount, or in 
the case of revenue, increase or decrease revenue by the 
specified amount (this last instruction is almost exclusively a 
directive to the Ways and Means Committee). The committees may 
achieve the amounts specified in any manner they wish. When a 
directive is received, the committees hold a markup as they 
would on any other bill, but it is reported to the Budget 
Committee instead of the House. The Budget Committee then binds 
all the submissions together and votes the combined measure out 
of committee as a single bill the Budget Committee may not make 
any changes in the submitted text, except the ministerial task 
of binding it together. The committees being given directives 
are given a deadline for reporting their legislative text to 
the Budget Committee. If only one committee is reconciled to 
make changes, as in this case with the second reconciliation 
bill, only a directive to the Ways and Means Committee is 
included, it will report that measure directly to the House, 
not the Budget Committee.
    A reconciliation bill is protected in the Senate: it has an 
automatic time limit on debate and cannot be filibustered hence 
passage only requires 51 votes. A provision that doesn't 
increase or decrease spending (or revenue) is considered 
extraneous and hence violates the Byrd Rule, and may be removed 
from the bill, unless 60 Senators vote to waive the point of 
order. Reconciliation does not apply to discretionary spending, 
which is controlled by the Appropriations Committee.
    For the first reconciliation bill, the committees which 
must submit legislative language to the Budget Committee are as 
follows: Committee on Agriculture, Committee on Education and 
the Workforce, Committee on Energy and Commerce, Committee on 
Government Reform, and the Committee on Ways and Means. The 
committees may make whatever changes in the law they deem 
appropriate as long as they achieve the specified amount of 
savings for fiscal year 2005 and for the period of fiscal years 
2005 through 2009. For instance, in discussions between the 
Committee on Government Reform and the Budget Committee, the 
former has expressed an interest in possibly reporting 
legislation that might increase resources to authorize 
information sharing to allow Federal benefit program limited 
access to Federal and state administrative date a to verify 
eligibility. Similarly the Education Committee has indicated 
that it will focus on legislation that provides fairness in 
Federal workers' compensation.
    The second reconciliation bill is designed to allow one or 
more bills related to taxation to be moved under reconciliation 
procedures. The reconciliation instruction directs the 
Committee on Ways and Means to report a measure that will 
reduce taxes by $13.182 billion for fiscal year 2005 and by 
$137.850 billion from 2005 through 2009. No specific tax bill 
or bills are assumed, though the amounts included in the 
instruction would allow for a bill that extends certain tax 
provisions, such as the tax relief provided for in 2001 (in the 
Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act), and the 
accelerations of the phase in of certain tax credits, such as 
the 10-percent tax bracket, the child care tax credit and the 
marriage-penalty tax relief (from the Jobs and Growth Tax 
Relief Reconciliation Act).
    Because tax measures often include tax credits, the 
directive to Ways and Means includes the authorization for the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to adjust the reconciliation 
instruction, the relevant allocations and aggregates, in order 
to allow for an increase in outlays that is caused by these 
credits. The authority, though, may be made for a 
reconciliation bill that costs more in total outlays and 
revenue reduction than the underlying reconciliation 
instruction.
    The following table indicates the amounts required from 
each reconciled committee:

Fiscal Year 2005 Budget Resolution Reconciliation Instructions by House 
                         Authorizing Committee

  TABLE 16.--SUBMISSIONS PROVIDING FOR THE ELIMINATION OF WASTE, FRAUD,
           AND ABUSE IN MANDATORY PROGRAMS (Due July 15, 2004)
           [By fiscal year in millions of dollars of outlays]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      2005    2005-2009
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agriculture.......................................     -110         -371
Education and Workforce...........................       -5          -43
Energy and Commerce...............................     -410       -2,185
Government Reform.................................     -170       -2,365
Ways and Means (deficit reduction; revenues and       1,126        8,269
 outlays).........................................
------------------------------------------------------------------------



   SUBMISSION PROVIDING FOR THE EXTENSION OF EXPIRING TAX RELIEF (DUE
                            OCTOBER 1, 2004)
                 [By fiscal year in millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      2005    2005-2009
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ways and Means (revenue reduction)................   13,182      137,580
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     Section By Section Description

                              ----------                              


    The budget resolution establishes an overall budgetary 
framework, which includes aggregate levels of total new budget 
authority and outlays, total Federal revenues and the amount by 
which revenues should be changed, the surplus or deficit, new 
budget authority and outlays for each major functional 
category, the debt held by the public, the debt subject to the 
statutory limit, and directives to authorizing committees to 
submit legislation achieving specified changes in revenue and 
mandatory spending levels.

  SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2005

    Subsection (a), in accordance with section 301(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, revises the appropriate 
budgetary levels for the current year, fiscal year 2004, and 
establishes the levels for fiscal year 2005, and each of the 4 
years following the budget year, fiscal years 2006 through 
2009.
    For fiscal year 2005, it establishes a binding ceiling on 
spending and a floor on revenue. The accompanying report 
provides a lump sum allocation of discretionary spending 
authority that, in turn, is distributed to thirteen 
suballocations for spending on the various programs, projects 
and activities that need to be funded on an annual basis 
through appropriations measures. Allocations are also provided 
to the authorizing committees for fiscal year 2005.
    The budget resolution also updates the fiscal year 2004 
spending levels to take into account any variations in spending 
or revenue laws after the fiscal year 2004 budget resolution 
was passed. The report also includes revised allocations to the 
relevant committees for legislation that would be effective in 
the current fiscal year.
    The 5-year period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009 is 
important because bills that increase direct spending are 
subject to 5-year allocations for the period of fiscal years 
2005 through 2009. This is also the case with revenues.
    Subsection (b) sets out the table of contents of the 
resolution.

                Title I--Recommended Levels and Amounts

              SECTION 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

    Consistent with section 301 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974, this section establishes the recommended levels for 
revenue, reduction in revenue, total new budget authority, 
total budget outlays, surpluses or deficits, debt held by the 
public, and the debt subject to the statutory limit. The 
recommended level of revenue operates as a floor against which 
all revenue bills are measured pursuant to section 311 of the 
Budget Act. Similarly, the recommended levels of new budget 
authority and budget outlays serve as a ceiling on the 
consideration of subsequent spending. The surplus or deficit 
levels reflect only on-budget outlays and revenue and hence do 
not reflect most outlays and receipts related to the Social 
Security program and certain Postal Service operations. The 
debt subject to statutory limit aggregates refers to the 
portion of gross Federal debt issued by the Treasury to the 
public or another government fund or account, whereas the debt 
held by the public is the amount of debt issued and held by 
entities or individuals other than the U.S. Government.

                SECTION 102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES

    As further required by section 301(a) of the Budget Act, 
section 102 establishes the appropriate budgetary levels for 
the functional categories for the current fiscal year, 2004, 
the budget year, fiscal year 2005, and fiscal years 2005 
through 2009. The amount of spending included in any function 
level for fiscal year 2005 is further described in the 
``Function By Function Description'' in this report.
    The functions are as follows:

    050 National Defense
    100 Homeland Security
    150 International Affairs
    250 Science, Space and Technology
    270 Energy
    300 Natural Resources and Environment
    350 Agriculture
    370 Commerce and Housing Credit
    400 Transportation
    450 Community and Regional Development
    500 Education, Training, Employment and Social Services
    550 Health
    570 Medicare
    600 Income Security
    650 Social Security
    700 Veterans Benefits
    750 Administration of Justice
    800 General Government
    900 Net Interest
    920 Allowances
    950 Undistributed Offsetting Receipts

                        Title II--Reconciliation

                  SECTION 201. GENERAL RECONCILIATION

    As permitted in Section 310 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974, the budget resolution includes reconciliation 
instructions to specified committees of the House of 
Representatives. These instructions require the committees to 
report legislative text to amend laws in their jurisdiction. 
These recommendations are submitted to the Budget Committee, 
which then binds them together and votes whether to report 
them, without substantive change, to the full House. Where only 
one committee is given a reconciliation instruction to be 
included in a single bill, that legislation may be reported 
directly to the full House.
    Section 201(a) directs five committees to report changes in 
programs within their jurisdiction to the Budget Committee by 
July 15, 2004. The committees that must submit legislative 
language to the Budget Committee are as follows: Committee on 
Agriculture, Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
Committee on Energy and Commerce, Committee on Government 
Reform, and the Committee on Ways and Means. Though each 
committee determines the policy and program changes, savings 
must be in the mandatory spending category. For instance, a 
reduction in an authorization level for spending subject to 
annual appropriations, is categorized as discretionary spending 
and would not be estimated as producing mandatory savings as 
the reconciliation process requires. (Please see Table 16 in 
the Reconciliation section of this report for the specific 
amounts in savings that must be reported to the Budget 
Committee by each reconciled committee.)
    The committees may make whatever changes in the law they 
deem appropriate as long as they achieve the specified amount 
of savings for fiscal year 2005 and for the period of fiscal 
years 2005 through 2009. For instance, in discussions between 
the Committee on Government Reform and the Budget Committee, 
the former has expressed an interest in possibly reporting 
legislation that might increase resources to authorize 
information-sharing to allow Federal benefit programs limited 
access to Federal and state administrative data to verify 
eligibility. Similarly the Education Committee has indicated 
that it will focus on legislation that provides fairness in 
Federal workers' compensation.
    Section 201(b) directs that, by October 1, 2004, the Ways 
and Means Committee must report directly to the floor of the 
House a bill that may allow for making permanent expiring tax 
relief. Such legislation must reduce revenues by no more than 
$13.182 billion in fiscal year 2005 and by more than $137.580 
billion over the 2005-09 period. This decrease may be in 
whatever priorities the Ways and Means Committee determines, 
though it is in sufficient magnitude to allow a reconciliation 
bill that extends the provisions of the Economic Growth and Tax 
Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001, which reduced marginal 
income tax rates, phased in an elimination of the marriage tax 
penalty, and phased in an increase in the child tax credit. In 
addition, certain provisions in the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief 
Reconciliation Act of 2003 could also be extended, such as the 
accelerated phase-in of the child tax credit, the 10-percent 
tax bracket, and marriage penalty relief. It does not include 
other revenue changes that are reflected in the revenue 
aggregates which would have to be considered outside of 
reconciliation.
    The section also provides authority for the Budget 
Committee Chairman to adjust the reconciliation instructions 
should the bill reported include a mix of outlays and revenue, 
as long as there is no net increase in the deficit in the first 
year and over the 5-year period, relative to the underlying 
reconciliation instruction. Though the reconciliation 
instruction only requires revenue to be reduced, legislation 
moving under this process could increase outlays because some 
of the provisions may effect refundable tax credits and 
payments. These payments to low-income individuals and families 
are categorized as direct spending and hence will cause an 
increase in outlays. To keep the spending and revenue levels 
accurate, this section gives authority to the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee to make adjustments to the reconciliation 
instructions, the allocations, and the aggregates to reflect 
whatever mix of outlay increases and revenue reductions the 
reconciliation bill makes.

          SECTION 202. SUBMISSION OF REPORT ON DEFENSE SAVINGS

    This section requires the House Armed Services Committee to 
submit to the Budget Committee a set of findings that identify 
two billion dollars in savings from activities that are 
determined to be of low priority or wasteful or unnecessary to 
national defense. These savings then can be used to accommodate 
other priorities such as force protection, munitions and 
surveillance capabilities. The report must be submitted by May 
15, 2004. Its submission would not be considered under 
reconciliation procedures and it is assumed the savings would 
be discretionary. The Budget Committee Chairman is then 
required to submit the report for inclusion in the 
Congressional Record by no later than May 21, 2004.

           Title III Reserve Funds and Contingency Procedure

    Pursuant to section 301(b)(4) of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, the resolution provides the Chairman of the House 
Budget Committee with the authority to increase the budget 
aggregates, and in some cases the allocations, for specified 
legislation whose costs are not assumed in the allocation and/
or aggregates. This section of the Budget Act permits the 
budget resolution to include ``such other matters, and require 
such other procedures, relating to the budget, as may be 
appropriate to carry out the purposes of this Act.'' Without 
these adjustments, such legislation reported by the committees 
of jurisdiction would exceed the applicable committee's 
allocations. This would violate section 302(f) of the Budget 
Act and subject the measure to a point of order and preclude 
the House from considering it. Each of the reserve funds 
established under this title apply to reported bills, 
amendments, and conference reports.

 Subtitle A--Reserve Funds for Legislation Assumed in Budget Aggregates

SECTION 301. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE 
                               UNINSURED

    This section allows adjustments to be made in the 
allocations and aggregates for certain deficit neutral 
legislation. If legislation is reported by a committee that 
provides health insurance for the uninsured, the Chairman of 
the Budget Committee may adjust the levels in the allocations 
and aggregates to the extent such legislation is deficit 
neutral in fiscal year 2005, and the period of fiscal years 
2005 through 2009. Typically, committees are given an 
allocation of budget authority and may not spend above that 
level in the first year and the 5-year period covered by the 
budget resolution. This allocation may include increases to 
enable initiatives to move through the process without being 
subject to Budget Act points of order. This section would 
enable these initiatives to come to the floor as long as that 
initiative is deficit neutral in the first year and over the 5 
year period.

 SECTION 302. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE FAMILY OPPORTUNITY 
                                  ACT

    This section allows adjustments to be made in the 
allocations and aggregates for certain deficit neutral 
legislation. If legislation is reported by the Energy and 
Commerce Committee that provides Medicaid coverage for children 
with special needs (the Family Opportunity Act), the Chairman 
of the Budget Committee may adjust the levels in the 
allocations and aggregates to the extent such legislation is 
deficit neutral in fiscal year 2005, and the period of fiscal 
years 2005 through 2009. This section would allow these 
initiatives to come to the floor with offsets, as long as that 
initiative is deficit neutral in the first year and over the 5 
year period.

   SECTION 303. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR MILITARY SURVIVORS' 
                              BENEFIT PLAN

    Section 303 establishes a deficit-neutral reserve fund 
should legislation be reported, an amendment offered, or 
conference report submitted which increases military survivor 
benefits. The purpose of this section is to encourage an 
examination of existing mandatory spending accounts so that 
appropriate reductions may be used to offset a potential 
survivor benefit expansion. The committee believes that policy 
reform with respect to military survivor benefits is achievable 
in a manner that alleviates inequities in existing policy while 
remaining within a responsible budget framework.

           SECTION 304. RESERVE FUND FOR PENDING LEGISLATION

    This section allows an adjustment to be made for any bill, 
including a bill that provides for the safe importation of FDA-
approved prescription drugs or places limits on medical 
malpractice litigation, that has been adopted by the House in 
the first session of the 108th Congress and is acted on by the 
Senate, enacted by the Congress, and presented to the 
President. The adjustment, made by the chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget to the allocations and aggregates to 
reflect any resulting savings from any such measure. The effect 
of any adjustment would be to lock in the savings for deficit 
reduction. The Chairman of the Budget Committee will consult 
with the committees of jurisdiction before making any 
adjustments pursuant to this section.

                   Subtitle B--Contingency Procedure

     SECTION 311. CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION

    This section provides for an increase above the levels 
provided for in the budget resolution should the Transportation 
Committee and the Appropriations Committee report certain kinds 
of legislation or spending measures, and which includes offsets 
for the additional spending. The language in the resolution 
regarding this contingency measure is identical to that 
included in the budget resolution for fiscal year 2004. A 
comprehensive transportation measure is expected to be enacted 
some time before the end of fiscal year 2004 and the Budget 
Committee expects to work closely with the Transportation 
Committee as that measure proceeds through the legislative 
process.
    Subsection (a) creates a reserve fund that allows the 
chairman of the House Budget Committee to adjust the allocation 
of budget authority to the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure for any measure that reauthorizes surface 
transportation programs and provides new budget authority for 
highway and transit spending.
    Subsection (b) creates a reserve fund that allows the 
chairman of the House Budget Committee to adjust the allocation 
of outlays to the Committee on Appropriations for any measure 
that sets total obligation limitations higher than the amount 
assumed in the resolution.

                      Title IV--Budget Enforcement

          SECTION 401. RESTRICTIONS ON ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS

    Section 401 imposes a limitation on advance appropriations 
similar to a provision included in the last several budget 
resolutions. It effectively limits which programs may receive 
an advance appropriation and an overall amount of advanced 
appropriations.
    The section includes a general restriction that limits the 
programs that may receive an advance appropriation and the 
total level of such appropriations. Advance appropriations may 
be provided for the accounts in appropriation bills identified 
under the section ``Accounts Identified Advanced 
Appropriations'' in the Joint Statement of Managers on the 
Conference Report on the Budget Resolution. The list is 
expected to be the same as that which appears in this report in 
the section ``Additional Report Language'' and with the same 
heading. Total advance appropriations for these accounts may 
not exceed $23.568 billion in budget authority. The amount is 
essentially the same as provided in previous budget 
resolutions, but it was adjusted to reflect advance 
appropriations provided for any year.
    The section defines an ``advance appropriation'' as any new 
discretionary budget authority making general appropriations or 
continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2005 that first 
becomes available for any fiscal year after 2005.
    The limitation may be enforced by any member making a point 
of order at the appropriate time against any advance 
appropriations not falling within an exception or exceeding the 
overall limit. The effect of a point of order under this 
section, if sustained by the Chair, is to cause the 
appropriation(s) to be stricken from the bill or joint 
resolution. The bill itself, however, would continue to be 
considered in the House.

                   SECTION 402. EMERGENCY LEGISLATION

    Section 402 provides Congress with the authority to 
designate spending provisions as ``emergencies.'' It adopts 
criteria for evaluating emergency spending. It also exempts 
supplemental appropriations for the Department of Defense for 
contingency operations related to the global war on terrorism 
as exempt from budget controls.
    Section 402(a) provides a special exemption from budget 
controls for a supplemental spending measure for the Department 
of Defense for ``contingency operations related to the global 
war on terrorism.'' Though $50 billion has been budgeted for 
fiscal year 2005 in the budget resolution for this purpose, the 
exact final amount has yet to be determined. The final level of 
the supplemental will depend on the President's request and the 
response of the appropriations committees of the House and the 
Senate.
    Subsection (b) exempts spending designated as an emergency 
under this section from the budget resolution and as such 
emergency designated spending would not trigger a point of 
order. This is largely the same procedure as was included in 
the budget resolution from fiscal year 2004, H. Con. Res 95. 
Instead of adjusting the allocations and budget aggregates by 
the amount designated as an emergency, as was the case prior to 
the expiration of the emergency designation at the end of 
fiscal year 2002, subsection (b) provides that the spending (or 
receipts) resulting from such a provision will not be counted 
for purposes of determining whether a measure complies with the 
budget resolution. This is consistent with the congressional 
scoring conventions prior to the Balanced Budget Act of 1997. 
Assuming a measure that includes this emergency designation is 
otherwise in compliance with the budget resolution, it would 
not be subject to a point of order under sections 302(f), 
303(a), 311(a) or 401 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    Committees reporting a measure that designates spending as 
an emergency should include in the accompanying report, or the 
conference committee in the joint statement of managers, a 
statement justifying the emergency designation on the basis of 
the following criteria:
    ``An emergency requirement if the underlying situation 
poses a threat to life, property, or national security and is
    (i) sudden, quickly coming into being, and not building up 
over time;
    (ii) an urgent, pressing, and compelling need requiring 
immediate action;
    (iii) subject to subparagraph (B), unforeseen, 
unpredictable, and unanticipated; and
    (iv) not permanent, temporary in nature.''
    This definition was adapted from criteria developed by 
previous administrations as part of an OMB Circular (A-11) on 
the preparation and submission of budget estimates.
    The subsection continues the practice of allowing the 
provisions designated as emergencies to be exempt from the 
budget controls and points of orders of the Congressional 
Budget Act.

 SECTION 403. COMPLIANCE WITH SECTION 13301 THE BUDGET ENFORCEMENT ACT 
                                OF 1990

    This section provides authority to include the 
administrative expenses related to Social Security in the 
allocation to the Appropriations Committee. This language is 
necessary to ensure that the Appropriations Committee retains 
control of administrative expenses through the Congressional 
budget process.
    In the 106th Congress, the joint Leadership of the House 
and Senate Budget Committees decided to discontinue including 
administrative expenses in the budget resolution. This change 
was intended to make the budget resolution consistent with the 
Congressional Budget Office's baseline which does not include 
administrative expenses for Social Security.
    At the same time, the House Budget Committee believed that 
these expenses should continue to be reflected in the 302(a) 
allocations to the Appropriations Committee. Absent a waiver of 
section 302(a) of the Budget Act, the inclusion of these 
expenses in the allocation is construed as violating 302(a) of 
the Budget Act which states that the allocations must reflect 
the discretionary amounts in the budget resolution (and 
arguably, section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act, which 
states that Social Security benefits and revenues are off-
budget).

  SECTION 404. APPLICATION AND EFFECTS OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                               AGGREGATES

    This section sets forth the procedures for making 
adjustments for the reserve funds included in this resolution. 
Subsection (a)(1) and (2) provide that the adjustments may only 
be made during the interval that the legislation is under 
consideration and do not take effect until the legislation is 
actually enacted. This is approximately consistent with the 
procedures for making adjustments for various initiatives under 
section 314 of the Congressional Budget Act.
    Subsection (a)(3) provides that in order to make the 
adjustments provided for in the reserve funds, the Chairman of 
the House Budget Committee is directed to insert these 
adjustments in the Congressional Record.
    Subsection (b) clarifies that any adjustments made under 
any of the reserve funds in the resolution have the same effect 
as if they were part of the original levels set forth in 
section 101. Therefore the adjusted levels are used to enforce 
points of order against legislation inconsistent with the 
allocations and aggregates included in the concurrent 
resolution on the budget.
    Subsection (c) clarifies that the House Budget Committee 
determines the levels and estimates used to enforce points of 
order, as is the case for enforcing budget-related points of 
order. This section of the Budget Act provides the Chairman of 
the Budget Committee with the authority to advise the Chairman 
of the Committee of the whole House on the appropriate levels 
and estimates related to legislation being considered on the 
floor.

                      Title V--Sense of the House

       SECTION 501. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON SPENDING ACCOUNTABILITY

    Section 501 includes a Sense of the House on Spending 
Accountability. The language indicates that it is the sense of 
the House that authorizing committees should actively engage in 
oversight utilizing a specified lists of metrics, that all 
Federal programs should be periodically reauthorized and 
funding for unauthorized programs should be level-funded in 
fiscal year 2005 unless there is a compelling justification, 
that committees should submit written justifications for 
earmarks, that the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution should be 
vigorously enforced, that legislation should be enacted 
establishing statutory limits on appropriations and a PAY-AS-
YOU-GO rule for new and expanded entitlement programs, and that 
Congress should make every effort to offset nonwar-related 
supplemental appropriations.

         SECTION 502. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON ENTITLEMENT REFORM

    Section 502 includes a sense of the House on Entitlement 
Reform.
                    The Congressional Budget Process

                              ----------                              


    The spending and revenue levels established in the budget 
resolution are executed through two parallel, but separate, 
mechanisms: allocations to the appropriations and authorizing 
committees, and reconciliation directives to the authorizing 
committees. The budget resolution may include instructions 
directing the authorizing committees to report legislation 
complying with entitlement, revenue, deficit or debt reduction 
targets. The report accompanying the budget resolution 
distributes or ``allocates'' amounts set forth in the budget 
aggregates for programs, projects and activities to the 
Appropriations Committee for annual appropriations and the 
authorizing committees if they have permanent or multiyear 
spending authority. For fiscal year 2005 the budget resolution 
reported from the Budget Committee includes certain 
reconciliation instructions.
    As required under Section 302(a) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the discretionary spending levels 
established in the budget resolution are allocated to the 
Appropriations Committee and the mandatory spending levels are 
allocated to each of the authorizing committees with mandatory 
spending authority. These levels are enforced through points of 
order as discussed in the section ``Enforcing the Budget 
Resolution.'' Amounts provided under ``current law'' encompass 
programs that affect direct spending entitlement and other 
programs that have spending authority or offsetting receipts. 
Amounts subject to discretionary action refer to programs that 
require subsequent legislation to provide the necessary 
spending authority. Amounts provided under ``reauthorizations'' 
reflect amounts assumed to reauthorize expiring mandatory 
programs.
    The report accompanying the budget resolution provides 
allocations of budget authority and outlays for each of the 
authorizing committees for the current year (fiscal year 2004), 
the budget year (fiscal year 2005), and the 5-year period 
(fiscal years 2005 through 2009). Section 302 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (as modified by the Balanced 
Budget Act of 1997) requires that allocations of budget 
authority be provided in the budget resolution for the first 
fiscal year and at least the 4 ensuing fiscal years (except for 
the Committee on Appropriations which only receives an 
allocation for the budget year).

                        Appropriations Committee

    The report accompanying the budget resolution allocates a 
lump sum of discretionary budget authority assumed in the 
resolution and corresponding outlays to the Committee on 
Appropriations.

                     TERM OF THE 302(A) ALLOCATION

    The allocation to the Appropriations Committee is for the 
fiscal year commencing on 1 October 2004. Unlike the 
authorizing committees, the Appropriations Committee does not 
receive a 5-year allocation of budget authority and outlays.

                           302(B) ALLOCATION

    Upon receiving its 302(a) allocation, the Appropriations 
Committee is required to divide the allocation among its 13 
subcommittees. The amount each subcommittee receives 
constitutes its allocation pursuant to section 302(b) of the 
Congressional Budget Act.

                         Authorizing Committees

    The authorizing committees are allocated a lump sum of new 
budget authority along with the corresponding outlays. The 
committees may be allocated additional budget authority 
categorized as subject to discretionary action. This occurs 
when the budget resolution assumes a new or expanded mandatory 
program or a reduction in an existing program. Such spending 
authority must be provided through subsequent legislation and 
is not controlled through the annual appropriations process.

                     TERM OF THE 302(A) ALLOCATION

    Since the spending authority for the authorizing committees 
is multi-year or permanent, the allocations are for the 
forthcoming budget year commencing on October 1 and a 5-year 
total for fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
    Unlike the Appropriations Committee, the authorizing 
committees are provided a single allocation of new budget 
authority (divided between current law and discretionary 
action) that is not provided through annual appropriations. 
They are not required to file 302(b) allocations. Bills first 
effective in fiscal year 2004 will be measured against the 
revised level for that year included in the fiscal year 2005 
budget resolution, and also the 5-year period of fiscal year 
2004 through 2008.

                              Adjustments

    In addition to the adjustments made under the Congressional 
Budget Act, the budget resolution also provides the Chairman of 
the House Budget Committee with the authority to make certain 
adjustments in the aggregates and allocations, in certain 
circumstances. Several deficit-neutral adjustments are 
permitted for three reserve funds:

- In section 301, adjustments in the allocations and aggregates 
    may be made for legislation reported by any committee that 
    provides health insurance for the uninsured. These 
    adjustments may only be made by the Chairman of the Budget 
    Committee to the extent that such legislation is deficit 
    neutral in fiscal year 2005, and the period of fiscal years 
    2005 through 2009.

- In section 302, adjustments in the allocations and aggregates 
    may be made for legislation is reported by Energy and 
    Commerce Committee that provides Medicaid coverage for 
    children with special needs (the Family Opportunity Act). 
    These adjustments may only be made by the Chairman of the 
    Budget Committee to the extent that such legislation is 
    deficit neutral in fiscal year 2005, and the period of 
    fiscal years 2005 through 2009.

- In section 303, adjustments in the allocations and aggregates 
    may be made for legislation reported by the House Armed 
    Services Committee that provides widows benefits. These 
    adjustments may only be made by the Chairman of the Budget 
    Committee to the extent that such legislation is deficit 
    neutral in fiscal year 2005, and the period of fiscal years 
    2005 through 2009.

    Two other adjustments are permitted: For a certain 
legislation having already passed the House during the first 
session of the 108th Congress, and for a contingency procedure 
related to transportation spending.

- In section 304 This section allows an adjustment to be made 
    for any bill, including a bill that provides for the safe 
    importation of FDA-approved prescription drugs or places 
    limits on medical malpractice litigation, that has passed 
    the House in the first session of the 108th Congress and is 
    acted on by the Senate, enacted by the Congress, and 
    presented to the President.

- In section 311, the Chairman of the House Budget Committee is 
    given the authority to make adjustments in the allocation 
    of budget authority to the Committee on Transportation and 
    Infrastructure for a measure increasing highway spending, 
    but only if they are either offset by changes in law either 
    in that measure, or in previously enacted legislation. The 
    changes in law must dedicate the additional resources to 
    the Highway Trust Fund. Under the terms of this reserve 
    fund, the Chairman may also adjust the allocation of 
    outlays to the Appropriations Committee in order to provide 
    for the higher outlays flowing from the mandatory budget 
    authority in the Transportation Committee's measure, and 
    subject to the obligation limits included in the 
    Transportation Appropriation measure. Most discretionary 
    spending is implemented by appropriating budget authority, 
    but in the Highway Category, budget authority is provided 
    on the mandatory side. The outlays resulting therefrom are 
    discretionary and may be restricted through the use of 
    obligation limits included in appropriation acts. Again, 
    these increased outlays must be offset by the changes in 
    law included either in the Transportation's Committee's 
    measure, or previously enacted legislation.

    The statutory authority for the Chairmen of the Budget 
Committees to make adjustments for emergencies and a variety of 
other purposes has expired. Before this authority expired, 
emergencies could be designated in legislation, and the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee adjust the reporting 
committee's allocation for that amount, so the additional 
spending could be considered without being subject to spending 
points of order. Because this authority is no longer in force, 
this budget resolution provides for a revised method of 
treating emergency spending. Under its terms, rather than 
adjusting the allocations and aggregates, spending provisions 
may be designated as emergencies in law pursuant to section 402 
of this resolution and are hence exempt from points of order 
under the Congressional Budget Act.

                              Enforcement

    In order to enforce these allocations, Members may raise a 
point of order against spending legislation that exceeds a 
committee's allocation (see the section titled ``Enforcing the 
Budget Resolution'' in this report). The authorizing committees 
are given 5-year allocations, and hence the enforcement period 
for spending under section 302(f) of the Congressional Budget 
Act will be for the 5 years commencing from the year in which 
the committee's legislation is first effective.

                             Reconciliation

    Section 310 of the Congressional Budget Act (2 U.S.C. 641) 
permits the budget resolution to provide for a reconciliation 
process. Under reconciliation, one or more committees are 
directed to make changes in the laws in their jurisdiction to 
achieve a specified increase or decrease in either budget 
authority or revenues. A reconciliation bill is protected in 
the Senate: It has an automatic time limit on debate and cannot 
be filibustered hence passage only requires 51 votes. A 
provision that doesn't increase or decrease spending (or 
revenue) is considered extraneous and hence violates the Byrd 
Rule, and may be removed from the bill, unless sixty Senators 
vote to waive the point of order. Reconciliation does not apply 
to discretionary spending, which is controlled by the 
Appropriations Committee. (For a full description of the 
reconciliation instructions included in the budget resolution, 
see the section titled ``Reconciliation'' included in this 
report.)

   TABLE 17.--ALLOCATION OF SPENDING AUTHORITY TO HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS
                                COMMITTEE
                 [By fiscal year in millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                       2004       2005
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary Action:
    General Purpose\1\
        BA........................................    874,602    818,736
        OT........................................    894,848    901,816
    Bioshield\1\
        BA........................................        885      2,528
        OT........................................        199        596
    Total Discretionary Action
        BA........................................    875,487    821,264
        OT........................................    895,047    902,412
    Current Law Mandatory
        BA........................................    430,527    459,142
        OT........................................    416,858    444,662
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: \1\ Shown for display purposes only.


                        TABLE 18.--ALLOCATIONS OF SPENDING AUTHORITY TO HOUSE COMMITTEES
                                      COMMITTEES OTHER THAN APPROPRIATIONS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                         Total
                                            2004      2005      2006      2007      2008      2009   -----------
                                                                                                       2005-2009
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Agriculture Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................    15,283    18,081    19,893    20,930    20,606     6,460      85,970
        OT..............................    14,562    17,244    20,075    21,129    20,749     6,505      85,702
    Reconciliation:
        BA..............................      ----      -170       -80       -85       -20       -20        -375
        OT..............................      ----      -110       -86       -91       -51       -33        -371
    Reauthorizations
        BA..............................      ----      ----      ----      ----    27,750    44,155      71,905
        OT..............................      ----      ----      ----      ----    26,381    44,113      70,494
      Total
        BA..............................    15,283    17,911    19,813    20,845    48,336    50,595     157,500
        OT..............................    14,562    17,134    19,989    21,038    47,079    50,585     155,825
Armed Services Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................    81,728    85,817    90,718    94,292    97,956   101,543     470,326
        OT..............................    78,181    86,742    90,749    94,296    97,738   101,437     470,962
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................        13      ----      ----      ----      ----      ----        ----
        OT..............................        13      ----      ----      ----      ----      ----        ----
      Total
        BA..............................    81,741    85,817    90,718    94,292    97,956   101,543     470,326
        OT..............................    78,194    86,742    90,749    94,296    97,738   101,437     470,962
Committee on Education and the
 Workforce:
    Current Law
        BA..............................     6,840     7,097     7,743     7,930     7,960     8,122      38,852
        OT..............................     5,463     6,105     6,979     7,106     7,146     7,293      34,629
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................        95       -27       215       231       100        96         615
        OT..............................        85       -27       215       231       100        96         615
    Reconciliation
        BA..............................      ----        -5       -12       -11        -8        -7         -43
        OT..............................      ----        -5       -12       -11        -8        -7         -43
    Reauthorizations
        BA..............................       388       399       410     3,151     3,222     3,297      10,479
        OT..............................       385       397       408     1,512     2,639     3,245       8,201
      Total
        BA..............................     7,323     7,464     8,356    11,301    11,274    11,508      49,903
        OT..............................     5,933     6,470     7,590     8,838     9,877    10,627      43,402
Energy and Commerce Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................   144,407   154,932   203,595   241,870   255,189   274,085   1,129,671
        OT..............................   143,650   155,872   203,729   241,311   258,401   275,087   1,134,400
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................      ----       891     6,168       -43      -282       781       7,515
        OT..............................      ----       744     6,055    -1,197      -955     1,801       6,448
    Reconciliation
        BA..............................      ----      -410      -425      -440      -450      -460      -2,185
        OT..............................      ----      -410      -425      -440      -450      -460      -2,185
    Reauthorizations
        BA..............................      ----      ----      ----      ----     5,040     5,040      10,080
        OT..............................      ----      ----      ----      ----     1,312     3,502       4,814
      Total
        BA..............................   144,407   155,413   209,338   241,387   259,497   279,446   1,145,081
        OT..............................   143,650   156,206   209,359   239,674   258,308   279,930   1,143,477
Financial Services Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................     8,513     3,855     4,176     3,573     3,357     3,036      17,997
        OT..............................     4,979      -361       287      -627    -1,873    -2,357      -4,931
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................      ----         1         1         7         7         1          17
        OT..............................      ----     1,301     1,301       607       207         1       3,417
      Total
        BA..............................     8,513     3,856     4,177     3,580     3,364     3,037      18,014
        OT..............................     4,979       940     1,588       -20    -1,666    -2,356      -1,514
Government Reform Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................    71,404    69,443    72,286    74,694    77,604    80,597     374,624
        OT..............................    69,744    67,754    70,548    72,948    75,828    78,790     365,868
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................      ----         1         3         5         5         5          19
        OT..............................      ----         1         3         5         5         5          19
    Reconciliation
        BA..............................      ----      -170      -470      -545      -580      -600      -2,365
        OT..............................      ----      -170      -470      -545      -580      -600      -2,365
      Total
        BA..............................    71,404    69,274    71,819    74,154    77,029    80,002     372,278
        OT..............................    69,744    67,585    70,081    72,408    75,253    78,195     363,522
Committee on House Administration:
    Current Law
        BA..............................        74        77        73        73        76        75         374
        OT..............................       197        35        16        48       212        48         359
International Relations Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................     9,728    11,425    12,425    12,713    12,961    13,209      62,733
        OT..............................    12,812    11,712    11,676    11,946    12,178    12,413      59,925
Resources Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................     4,285     4,788     4,160     4,215     3,898     3,461      20,522
        OT..............................     3,391     3,792     3,912     4,017     3,543     3,530      18,794
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................      ----        77        76        60        47        42         302
        OT..............................      ----        77        76        60        47        42         302
      Total
        BA..............................     4,285     4,865     4,236     4,275     3,945     3,503      20,824
        OT..............................     3,391     3,869     3,988     4,077     3,590     3,572      19,096
Judiciary Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................     8,726     9,357     6,297     6,244     6,316     6,396      34,610
        OT..............................     8,784     8,790     6,699     6,507     6,289     6,357      34,642
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................      ----        15         5         5         5         5          35
        OT..............................      ----        15         5         5         5         5          35
      Total
        BA..............................     8,726     9,372     6,302     6,249     6,321     6,401      34,645
        OT..............................     8,784     8,805     6,704     6,512     6,294     6,362      34,677
Transportation and Infrastructure
 Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................    31,022    16,755    16,885    17,149    13,495    13,711      77,995
        OT..............................    11,632    13,788    13,626    13,660    13,803    13,843      68,720
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................      ----     1,737     2,713     4,787     6,023     6,810      22,070
        OT..............................      ----         4         2         2         2         2          12
    Reauthorizations
        BA..............................    23,923    41,010    41,010    41,010    44,710    44,710     212,450
        OT..............................       101       330       504       572       603       621       2,630
      Total
        BA..............................    54,945    59,502    60,608    62,946    64,228    65,231     312,515
        OT..............................    11,733    14,122    14,132    14,234    14,408    14,466      71,362
Science Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................        40        31        31        32        32        33         159
        OT..............................        90       112       109        41        32        32         326
Small Business Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................     3,237      ----      ----      ----      ----      ----        ----
        OT..............................     3,237      ----      ----      ----      ----      ----        ----
Veterans' Affairs Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................    -1,044     1,247     1,256     1,256     1,246     1,220       6,225
        OT..............................    -1,036     1,266     1,292     1,315     1,320     1,307       6,500
    Reauthorizations
        BA..............................      ----       467       960     1,385     2,065     2,653       7,530
        OT..............................      ----       466       940     1,361     2,017     2,604       7,388
      Total
        BA..............................    -1,044     1,714     2,216     2,641     3,311     3,873      13,755
        OT..............................    -1,036     1,732     2,232     2,676     3,337     3,911      13,888
Ways and Means Committee:
    Current Law
        BA..............................   614,124   642,390   700,046   769,742   829,446   884,866   3,826,490
        OT..............................   616,801   643,889   701,438   770,731   830,725   885,732   3,832,515
    Discretionary Action
        BA..............................       608       991       549       472       433       202       2,647
        OT..............................       115       889       567       694       577       182       2,909
    Reconciliation
        BA..............................      ----      -626      -636      -646      -671      -690      -3,269
        OT..............................      ----      -626      -636      -646      -671      -690      -3,269
    Reauthorizations
        BA..............................     7,737    19,606    19,606    19,911    20,764    20,779     100,666
        OT..............................     6,944    18,606    20,266    20,164    20,326    20,707     100,069
      Total
        BA..............................   622,469   662,361   719,565   789,479   849,972   905,157   3,926,534
        OT..............................   623,860   662,758   721,635   790,943   850,957   905,931   3,932,224
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Enforcing the Budget Resolution

                              ----------                              


    The budget resolution is more than a planning document. The 
allocations of spending authority and the aggregate levels of 
both spending authority and revenues are binding on the 
Congress when it considers subsequent spending and tax 
legislation. Legislation breaching the levels set forth in the 
budget resolution is subject to points of order on the House 
floor.
    Any Member of the House may raise a point of order against 
any tax or spending legislation that creates new entitlement 
authority during certain points in a calendar year, or breeches 
the allocations and aggregate spending levels established in 
the budget resolution. If the point of order is sustained, the 
House is precluded from further consideration of the measure.
    Though these points of order are important for budgetary 
discipline, in the House they may be waived by the resolution 
which structures rules for debate on legislation and 
appropriations measures that come before it for consideration. 
The House Budget Committee believes it is important to augment 
these congressional enforcement tools with statutory controls. 
Such controls were in place as part of the Budget Enforcement 
Act of 1997 [BEA], which expired at the end of 2002. The 
committee, at the same time it ordered this budget resolution 
reported, also considered and passed the ``Spending Control Act 
of 2004'' which re-establishes and revises the statutory 
controls over the budget from the BEA.
    The major Budget Act requirements are as follows:
Section 302(f)
    Section 302 of the Congressional Budget Act prohibits the 
consideration of legislation that exceeds a committee's 
allocation of new budget authority. Section 302(f) applies to 
the budget year and the 5-year total for authorizing 
committees. For appropriations bills, however, it applies only 
to the budget year. The budget year is the first fiscal year to 
which a concurrent resolution on the budget applies. An 
exception is provided for legislation that is offset by tax 
increases above and beyond those required by the budget 
resolution.
Section 303(a)
    This section prohibits the consideration of spending and 
tax legislation before the House has passed a budget 
resolution. Section 303(a) does not apply to budget authority 
and revenue provisions first effective in a year following the 
first fiscal year to which a budget resolution applies, or to 
appropriation bills after May 15.
Sections 308(b)(2), 311(c) and 312
    Under sections 308(b)(2), 311(c) and 312 of the Budget Act, 
the Budget Committee advises the presiding officer on the 
application of points of order against specific legislation 
pending before the House. House Budget Committee rules also 
authorize the chairman to poll the committee on recommendations 
to the Rules Committee to enforce the Budget Act by not waiving 
points of order against specific legislation.
Section 311(a)(1)
    Section 311(a)(1) prohibits the consideration of 
legislation that exceeds the ceiling on budget authority and 
outlays or reduces revenue below the revenue floor. Section 
311(a)(1) applies to the budget year and 10-year total for 
bills increasing revenue, but only to the budget year for 
appropriations bills. Section 311 does not apply to spending 
bills that do not breach a committee's 302(a) allocations.
Section 401(a)
    This section of the Congressional Budget Act prohibits the 
consideration of legislation providing borrowing authority, new 
credit authority, or contract authority not subject to 
discretionary appropriations.
Section 401(b)(1)
    This section prohibits the consideration of legislation 
creating new entitlement authority in the year preceding the 
budget year. It does not apply to trust funds primarily 
financed by earmarked taxes.
                         Votes of the Committee

                              ----------                              


    Clause 3(b) of House Rule XIII requires each committee 
report to accompany any bill or resolution of a public 
character, ordered to include the total number of votes cast 
for and against on each roll call vote, on a motion to report 
and any amendments offered to the measure or matter, together 
with the names of those voting for and against. Listed below 
are the roll call votes taken in the House Budget Committee on 
the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2005.
    On March 11, 2004 the Committee met in open session, a 
quorum being present. After recessing subject to the call of 
the chair, the Committee reconvened on March 17, 2004.
    The committee adopted and ordered reported the Concurrent 
Resolution on the Budget for fiscal year 2005. The following 
votes were taken in Committee:
    Mr. Shays asked unanimous consent that the Chairman be 
authorized, consistent with clause 4 of House Rule XVI, to 
declare a recess at any time during the Committee meeting.
    There was no objection to the unanimous consent request.
    Chairman Nussle asked unanimous consent to dispense with 
the first reading of the budget aggregates, function levels, 
and other appropriate matter; that the aggregates, function 
totals, and other appropriate matter be open for amendment; and 
that amendments be considered as read.
    There was no objection to the unanimous consent requests.
    The following votes were taken by the committee:
    1. Ms. Brown-Waite offered an amendment to increase 
function 700 by the following amounts: For fiscal year 2004: $0 
in budget authority; and $0 in outlays; for fiscal year 2005: 
$200 million in budget authority; and $100 million in outlays; 
for fiscal year 2006: $201 million in budget authority; and 
$168 million in outlays; for fiscal year 2007: $202 million in 
budget authority; and $190 million in outlays; for fiscal year 
2008: $203 million in budget authority; and $198 million in 
outlays; for fiscal year 2009: $204 million in budget 
authority; and $201 million in outlays.
    The amendment also decreased funding in function 800 by the 
following amounts: For fiscal year 2004: $0 in budget 
authority; and $0 in outlays; for fiscal year 2005: $200 
million in budget authority; and $100 million in outlays; for 
fiscal year 2006: $201 million in budget authority; and $168 
million in outlays; for fiscal year 2007: $202 million in 
budget authority; and $190 million in outlays; for fiscal year 
2008: $203 million in budget authority; and $198 million in 
outlays; for fiscal year 2009: $204 million in budget 
authority; and $201 million in outlays.
    The amendment by Ms. Brown-Waite was agreed to by voice 
vote.
    2. Representatives Davis, Moran, Moore, Ford, Thompson, 
Baird, Majette, Cooper, and Kind offered an amendment to 
include a point of order against any bill that increased the 
on-budget deficit in any year. The point of order would require 
two-thirds of the House to vote to waive it.
    The amendment was not agreed to on a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 23 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 2, DAVIS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    3. Representatives Edwards, Hooley, Baldwin, DeLauro, 
Baird, Cooper, and Scott offered an amendment to increase 
function 050 (National Defense) by the following amounts: 
$2.541 billion in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $1.352 
billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; $643 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2006; $321 million in outlays in fiscal year 
2007; $114 million in outlays in fiscal year 2008; $27 million 
in outlays in fiscal year 2009. The amendment also increased 
funding in function 500 (Education and Training) by the 
following amounts: $14 million in budget authority in fiscal 
year 2005; $12 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005, $1 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; and $1 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2007.
    The amendment provided that the deficit be reduced in the 
budget resolution by an amount equal to the foregoing outlay 
changes. It also provided that aggregate levels of revenues be 
adjusted by amounts equal to twice the foregoing outlay 
changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 23 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 3, EDWARDS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    4. Representatives Emanuel, Baldwin, DeLauro, Scott, Capps 
and Majette offered an amendment on prescription drugs to 
decrease funding in function 920 (Allowances) the following 
amounts: $100 million in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; 
by $100 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005; $100 million in 
budget authority in fiscal year 2006; by $100 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2006; by $300 million in budget 
authority in fiscal year 2007; by $300 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2007; by $300 million in budget authority in fiscal 
year 2008; by $300 million in outlays in fiscal year 2008; by 
$300 million in budget authority in fiscal year 2009; and by 
$300 million in outlays in fiscal year 2009. It increases 
revenues by $100 million each year in 2007, 2008 and 2009.
    The amendment provided that the deficit be reduced in the 
budget resolution by an amount equal to the foregoing revenue 
and outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 16 
ayes and 23 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 4, EMANUEL

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON        ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    5. Representatives Hooley, Moran, Baldwin, Moore, Ford, 
Scott, Capps, Thompson, Emanuel, Davis, Majette, and Kind 
offered an amendment to increase function 500 (Education and 
Training) by $6.152 billion in budget authority in fiscal year 
2005; by $582 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005; by $4.186 
billion in outlays in fiscal year 2006; by $1.209 billion in 
outlays in fiscal year 2007; and by $174 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2008.
    The amendment provided that aggregate levels of revenues be 
adjusted by amounts equal to the foregoing outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to agreed to by a roll call 
vote of 16 ayes and 22 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 5, HOOLEY

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS           ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    6. Representatives Majette, Hooley, Baldwin, DeLauro, 
Scott, Capps, Davis, and Kind offered an amendment to increase 
funding for function 370 (Commerce and Housing Credit) by the 
following amounts: $203 million in budget authority in fiscal 
year 2005; $88 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005; $82 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; $18 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2007; $8 million in outlays in fiscal year 2008; 
and $1 million in outlays in fiscal year 2009. The amendment 
also would increase funding for function 500 (Education, 
Training, Employment and Social Services) by the following 
amounts: $150 million in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; 
$19 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005; $100 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2006; $26 million in outlays in fiscal 
year 2007; and $3 million in outlays in fiscal year 2008; and 
$2 million in outlays in fiscal year 2009. The amendment also 
would to increase funding for function 600 (Income Security) by 
the following amounts: $6.494 billion in budget authority in 
fiscal year 2005 and $6.494 billion in outlays fiscal year 
2005. The amendment would increase revenue by the following 
amounts: $206 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005, $287 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; $264 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2007; $192 million in outlays in fiscal year 
2008; and $142 million in outlays in fiscal year 2009.
    The amendment provided that aggregate levels of revenues be 
adjusted by amounts equal to the foregoing net budgetary cost.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 21 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 6, MAJETTE

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........  ..........  ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    7. Representatives Thompson, Spratt, Davis, Cooper and Kind 
offered an amendment to extend PAYGO rules.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 21 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 7, THOMPSON

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    8. Representatives Edwards, Hooley, Baldwin, Moore, Capps, 
Thompson, Baird, Davis, Majette, and Kind offered an amendment 
to increase funding for function 700 (Veterans Benefits and 
Services) by the following amounts: $1.466 billion in budget 
authority in fiscal year 2005; $1.319 billion in outlays fiscal 
year 2005; $132 million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; $6 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2007, and $1 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2008.
    The amendment provided that the deficit be reduced in the 
budget resolution by an amount equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes. It also provided that aggregate levels of 
revenues be adjusted by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 16 
ayes and 21 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 8, EDWARDS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    9. Representatives Moran, Hooley, Baldwin, Scott, Capps, 
Emanuel, Majette and Kind offered an amendment to increase 
function 920 (Allowances) by the following amounts: $155 
million in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $84 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2005; $48 million in outlays in fiscal 
year 2006; $15 million in outlays in fiscal year 2007; $5 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2008.
    The amendment also increased funding in function 400 
(Transportation) by the following amounts: $619 million in 
budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $290 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2005; $175 million in outlays in fiscal year 
2006 and $150 million in outlays in fiscal year 2007. It 
increased funding in function 450 (Community and Regional 
Development) by the following amounts: $500 million in budget 
authority in fiscal year 2005; $75 million in outlays in fiscal 
year 2005; $200 million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; $200 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2007 and $25 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2008. It increased funding in function 
750 (Administration of Justice) by the following amounts: $240 
million in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $168 million 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005 and $72 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2006. It increased funding in function 050 
(National Defense) by the following amounts: $100 million in 
budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $1 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2005; $15 million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; 
$30 million in outlays in fiscal year 2007; $35 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2008 and $18 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2009. It increased funding in function 150 
(International Affairs) by the following amounts: $12 million 
in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $7 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2005; $3 million in outlays in fiscal year 2006; 
$1 million in outlays in fiscal year 2007 and $1 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2008.
    The amendment provided that the deficit be reduced in the 
budget resolution by an amount equal to the foregoing outlay 
changes. It also provided that aggregate levels of revenues be 
adjusted by amounts equal to twice the foregoing outlay 
changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote 15 ayes 
and 20 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 9, MORAN

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........  ..........  ............  Ms. MAJETTE         ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    10. Representatives Baldwin, DeLauro, Hooley, Lewis, 
Edwards, Capps, Cooper, Emanuel, Davis and Majette offered an 
amendment to increase funding for function 600 (Income 
Security) by the following amounts: $1.262 billion in budget 
authority in fiscal year 2005; $947 million in outlays fiscal 
year 2005; $265 million in fiscal year 2006 and $50 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2007. It provided for a reserve fund for 
the uninsured. It also provided that aggregate levels of 
revenues be adjusted by amounts equal to the foregoing outlay 
changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 16 
ayes and 23 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 10, BALDWIN

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN           ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    11. Representatives Scott, Moran, Hooley, Moore, Baird, 
Emanuel, Davis and Majette offered an amendment to increase 
funding for function 750 (Administration of Justice) by the 
following amounts: $1.3 billion in budget authority in fiscal 
year 2005; $475 million in outlays fiscal year 2005; $350 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2006, $275 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2007, $175 million in outlays in fiscal year 
2008 and $25 million in outlays in fiscal year 2009. The 
amendment provided that the deficit be reduced in the budget 
resolution by an amount equal to the foregoing outlay changes. 
It also provided that aggregate levels of revenues be adjusted 
by amounts equal to twice the foregoing outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 24 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 11, SCOTT

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    12. Representatives Kind, Capps, Moran, Hooley, Baldwin, 
Davis and Majette offered an amendment to increase funding for 
function 300 (Natural Resources and Environment) by the 
following amounts: $2.232 billion in budget authority in fiscal 
year 2005; $1.629 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2005; $354 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2006, $90 million in outlays 
in fiscal year 2007 and $159 million in 2008. It provided for a 
conservation spending category. The amendment provided that the 
deficit be reduced in the budget resolution by an amount equal 
to the foregoing outlay changes. It also provided that 
aggregate levels of revenues be adjusted by amounts equal to 
twice the foregoing outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 24 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 12, KIND

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    13. Representatives Baird, Moran, DeLauro, Thompson, Davis 
and Majette offered an amendment to increase funding for 
function 400 (Transportation) by the following amounts: $5.856 
billion in budget authority in fiscal year 2005; $1.415 billion 
in outlays in fiscal year 2005; $2.293 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2006, $1.037 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2007, $476 million in outlays in fiscal year 2008 and $345 
million in outlays in fiscal year 2009. It provided for a 
conservation spending category. It also provided that aggregate 
levels of revenues be adjusted by amounts equal to the 
foregoing outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 19 
ayes and 22 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 13, BAIRD

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    14. Representatives Capps, Cooper, Davis and DeLauro 
offered an amendment to strike the reconciliation instructions 
to the Committee on Energy and Commerce. The amendment provided 
that the deficit be reduced in the budget resolution by an 
amount equal to the foregoing outlay changes. It also provided 
that aggregate levels of revenues be adjusted by amounts equal 
to twice the foregoing outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 19 
ayes and 22 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 14, CAPPS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    15. Representatives Cooper, Moran, Emanuel and DeLauro 
offered an amendment to increase funding for function 800 
(General Government) by the following amounts: $3 million in 
budget authority in fiscal year 2004; $2 million in outlays in 
fiscal year 2004 and $1 million in outlays in fiscal year 2005. 
The amendment provided that the deficit be reduced in the 
budget resolution by an amount equal to the foregoing outlay 
changes. It also provided that aggregate levels of revenues be 
adjusted by amounts equal to twice the foregoing outlay 
changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 19 
ayes and 24 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 15, COOPER

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    16. Representatives Edwards, Hooley, Emanuel, Capps, 
Baldwin, Majette, Scott and Moran offered an amendment to 
replace section 303 and increase funding for function 050 
(National Defense) by the following amounts: -$1.0 million in 
budget authority and -$1.0 million in outlays in fiscal year 
2005; $90 million in budget authority and $90 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2006; $52 million in budget authority 
and $52 million in outlays in fiscal year 2007; $71 million in 
budget authority and $71 million in outlays in fiscal year 2008 
and $286 million in budget authority and $286 million in 
outlays in fiscal year 2009. The amendment provided that the 
deficit be reduced in the budget resolution by an amount equal 
to the foregoing outlay changes. It also provided that 
aggregate levels of revenues be adjusted by amounts equal to 
twice the foregoing outlay changes.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 19 
ayes and 23 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 16, EDWARDS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    17. Mr. Davis offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 450 by $50 million in 2005 
to fund empowerment zones; to increase budget authority and 
outlays for function 450 by $40 million in 2005 to fund the 
Brownfield Redevelopment Program; to increase budget authority 
and outlays for function 600 by $40 million in 2005 to fund the 
Rural Housing and Economic Development Program; to increase 
budget authority and outlays for function 600 by $500 million 
in 2005 to fund the Community Development Block Grant Program; 
and to increase budget authority and outlays for function 550 
by $150 million in 2005 to fund Rural Health Activities.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 20 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 17, DAVIS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    18. Ms. DeLauro offered an amendment to include a Sense of 
the House that Federal work should not be taken offshore, and 
that State governments should not be eligible to receive 
Federal funds unless they certify each year that such funds 
will not be spent offshore.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 16 
ayes and 20 noes.

                         VOTE NO. 18, DE LAURO

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN           ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    19. Ms. Hooley offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 300 to reflect increased 
funding for the Army Corps of Engineers. Budget authority: 
$1.335 billion in 2005; outlays: $1.001 billion in 2005; and 
$334 million in 2006.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 20 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 19, HOOLEY

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    20. Ms. Majette offered an amendment to include a Sense of 
Congress that the budget resolution assumes that the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention's building and facilities 
master plan should be adequately funded so that it may be 
brought to completion.
    The amendment was not agreed to by voice vote.
    21. Mr. Kind offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 500 to reflect increased 
funding for programs under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and 
Technical Education Act. Budget authority: $272 million in 
2005; outlays: $8.2 million in 2005; $195.8 million in 2006; 
$54.4 million in 2007; and $13.6 million in 2008.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 21 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 21, KIND

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    22. Mr. Moore offered an amendment to waive the Gephardt 
Rule for the second session of the 108th Congress.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 16 
ayes and 21 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 22, MOORE

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........  ..........  ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD           ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    23. Mr. Moran offered an amendment to include a Sense of 
Congress that the rate of increase in compensation for Federal 
civilian employees should be the same as that for military 
employees in fiscal year 2005.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 15 
ayes and 21 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 23, MORAN

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON        ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD           ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    24. Ms. Hooley offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 300 to reflect increased 
funding for the Healthy Forests Act. Budget authority: $494 
million in 2005; outlays: $345.8 million in 2005; $98.8 million 
in 2006; $49.4 million in 2007.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by voice vote.
    25. Ms. Baldwin offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 550 to reflect increased 
funding for the National Institutes of Health. Budget 
authority: $360 million in 2005; outlays: $97 million in 2005; 
$187 million in 2006; $40 million in 2007; $18 million in 2008.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 23 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 25, BALDWIN

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    26. Mr. Lewis offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 600 to reflect increased 
funding for HOPE VI. Budget authority: $574 million in 2005; 
outlays: $11 million in 2006; $75 million in 2007; $115 million 
in 2008; $115 million in 2009.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 17 
ayes and 23 noes.

                           VOTE NO. 26, LEWIS

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD            ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    27. Ms. DeLauro offered an amendment to change the 
reconciliation instructions in the chairman's mark to reflect 
the following: The Ways and Means Committee would be directed 
to increase outlays by $1.7 billion and reduce revenues by 
$2.377 billion to increase the refundable portion of the child 
tax credit.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 18 
ayes and 23 noes.

                         VOTE NO. 27, DE LAURO

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........  .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    28. Mr. Thompson offered an amendment to create a point of 
order against any measure containing new budget authority which 
reduces revenue and which first takes effect beyond the fifth 
fiscal year of the current budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by voice vote.
    29. Mr. Emanuel offered two amendments en bloc. One 
increased revenue by $875 million in 2005 and reduced revenue 
by $875 million in 2006. These changes reflect a 1-year 
extension of the higher education tuition deduction through 
2006, offset (over 5 years) by a 2-year reduction in the 
deductibility of SUVs purchased for business use.
    The other amendment included a Sense of the House that 
Congress should enact legislation establishing a trigger 
mechanism for the negotiation of prescription drug prices by 
HHS.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 19 
ayes and 24 noes.

                          VOTE NO. 29, EMANUEL

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........       X      ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    30. Mr. Davis offered an amendment to increase budget 
authority and outlays for function 350 by $18.8 million in 2005 
to reflect increased funding for certain colleges, including 
Tuskegee University.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    Mr. Davis withdrew the amendment.
    31. Mr. Kind offered an amendment to reduce budget 
authority and outlays for function 350 to reflect payment 
limits under the Farm Security and Rural Investment Act of 
2002. Budget authority and outlays: -$101 million; 2006: -$285 
million; 2007: -$305 million; 2008: -$260 million; 2009: -$286 
million.
    The amendment also would have increased budget authority 
and outlays for function 300 to reflect increased funding for 
various conservation programs. Budget authority and outlays: 
2005: $32 million; 2006: $92 million; 2007: $100 million; 2008: 
$84 million; 2009: $92 million. It would have increased budget 
authority and outlays for function 450 to reflect increased 
funding for value-added development programs. Budget authority 
and outlays: 2005: $1.4 million; 2006: $4.1 million; 2007: $4.5 
million; 2008: $3.8 million; 2009: $4.2 million. It would have 
increased budget authority and outlays for function 600 to 
reflect increased funding for child nutrition programs. Budget 
authority and outlays: 2005: $16 million; 2006: $46 million; 
2007: $50 million; 2008: $42 million; 2009: $46 million.
    It also provided that the deficit would be reduced by an 
amount equal to the outlay changes in the appropriate function 
for the prior changes, and that the aggregate levels of revenue 
should be increased by amounts equal to twice the foregoing 
outlay changes, reflecting a reduction in the tax relief 
assumed in the budget resolution.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a voice vote.
    32. Ms. DeLauro offered two amendments en bloc. One 
amendment would have included a Sense of the House that 
Congress provide States with sufficient funds to meet Federal 
standards under the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act.
    The other amendment would have reduced budget authority and 
outlays for function 920 to reflect reductions in funds 
available to HHS for public education on the Medicare 
Prescription Drug and Modernization Act of 2003. It would have 
reduced budget authority by $80 million in 2004, and outlays by 
$24 million in 2004, $56 million in 2005, and $66 million in 
2006.
    The amendment was not agreed to by a roll call vote of 19 
ayes and 23 noes.

                         VOTE NO. 32, DE LAURO

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,         ..........       X      ............  Mr. SPRATT,              X      .........  ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS           ..........       X      ............  Mr. MORAN                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT       ..........       X      ............  Ms. HOOLEY               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. THORNBERRY      ..........       X      ............  Ms. BALDWIN              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. RYUN            ..........       X      ............  Mr. MOORE                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TOOMEY          ..........  ..........  ............  Mr. LEWIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HASTINGS        ..........       X      ............  Mr. NEAL                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PORTMAN         ..........       X      ............  Ms. DeLAURO              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SCHROCK         ..........       X      ............  Mr. EDWARDS              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BROWN           ..........       X      ............  Mr. SCOTT                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. CRENSHAW        ..........       X      ............  Mr. FORD                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. PUTNAM          ..........       X      ............  Mrs. CAPPS               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. WICKER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. THOMPSON             X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HULSHOF         ..........       X      ............  Mr. BAIRD                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. TANCREDO        ..........       X      ............  Mr. COOPER               X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. VITTER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. EMANUEL              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BONNER          ..........       X      ............  Mr. DAVIS                X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. FRANKS          ..........       X      ............  Ms. MAJETTE              X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GARRETT         ..........       X      ............  Mr. KIND                 X      .........  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. BARRETT         ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. McCOTTER        ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. DIAZ-BALART     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. HENSARLING      ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Ms. BROWN-WAITE     ..........       X
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    33. Mr. Nussle offered an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute to reduce revenue and increase budget authority and 
obligation limits in function 400 to reflect technical changes 
in the contingency procedure for surface transportation.
    The amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    34. Mr. Shays made a motion that the Committee adopt the 
aggregates, function totals, and other appropriate matter, with 
any amendments.
    The motion offered by Mr. Shays was agreed to by voice 
vote.
    Chairman Nussle called up the Concurrent Resolution on the 
Budget for Fiscal year 2005 incorporating the aggregates, 
function totals, and other appropriate matter as previously 
agreed.
    35. Mr. Shays made a motion that the Committee report the 
Concurrent Resolution with a favorable recommendation and that 
the Concurrent Resolution do pass. The motion offered by Mr. 
Shays was agreed to by a roll call vote of 24 ayes and 19 noes.

               VOTE NO. 35, FOR FAVORABLE RECOMMENDATION

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Representative        Aye         No         Present      Representative        Aye         No       Present
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. NUSSLE,              X      ..........  ............  Mr. SPRATT,         ..........      X      ...........
 Chairman                                                  Ranking
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. SHAYS                X      ..........  ............  Mr. MORAN           ..........      X      ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mr. GUTKNECHT            X      ..........  ............  Ms. HOOLEY          ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. THORNBERRY           X      ..........  ............  Ms. BALDWIN         ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. RYUN                 X      ..........  ............  Mr. MOORE           ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. TOOMEY               X      ..........  ............  Mr. LEWIS           ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. HASTINGS             X      ..........  ............  Mr. NEAL            ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. PORTMAN              X      ..........  ............  Ms. DeLAURO         ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. SCHROCK              X      ..........  ............  Mr. EDWARDS         ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. BROWN                X      ..........  ............  Mr. SCOTT           ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. CRENSHAW             X      ..........  ............  Mr. FORD            ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. PUTNAM               X      ..........  ............  Mrs. CAPPS          ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. WICKER               X      ..........  ............  Mr. THOMPSON        ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. HULSHOF              X      ..........  ............  Mr. BAIRD           ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. TANCREDO             X      ..........  ............  Mr. COOPER          ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. VITTER               X      ..........  ............  Mr. EMANUEL         ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. BONNER               X      ..........  ............  Mr. DAVIS           ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. FRANKS               X      ..........  ............  Ms. MAJETTE         ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. GARRETT              X      ..........  ............  Mr. KIND            ..........      X      ...........
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Mr. BARRETT              X
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Mr. McCOTTER             X
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Mr. DIAZ-BALART          X
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Mr. HENSARLING           X
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Ms. BROWN-WAITE          X
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    Mr. Shays asked for unanimous consent that the Chairman be 
authorized to make a motion to go to conference pursuant to 
clause 1 of House Rule XXII, the staff be authorized to make 
any necessary technical and conforming corrections in the 
resolution, and any committee amendments, and calculate any 
remaining elements required in the resolution, prior to filing 
the resolution.
    There was no objection to the unanimous consent requests.
                       Additional Report Language

                              ----------                              


                          Land Grant Colleges

    During committee consideration of the budget resolution, 
Mr. Davis raised the issue of Land Grant Colleges. To be clear 
on this matter, the committee recognizes the outstanding 
achievements of 1890 Colleges of Agriculture. The committee 
understands that Section 7203 of the Farm Security and Rural 
Investment Act of 2002 recommended specific percentage levels 
of appropriated funds for the 1890 schools for Research Formula 
and Extension Formula grant programs. The committee recommends 
that the intent of Section 7203 be fully considered and that 
the 1890 Colleges be treated fairly during consideration of 
funding levels in the coming fiscal year.

                           Statute of Liberty

    The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 had a 
devastating effect on the travel and tourism industry. Many of 
our national treasures, including the White House and the U.S. 
Capitol Building, were closed to the public for many months. 
Security plans had to be devised and implemented, and the 
American people understood that safety had priority over access 
during that time.
    In the two and one-half years since the attacks, the U.S. 
Capitol has resumed tours, including the specialized tour of 
the Capitol Dome. The White House, which on its faces the 
gravest security threat, is once again available to tourists.
    Unfortunately, the Statue of Liberty has remained closed to 
the public since it was shut down indefinitely on September 11, 
2001. Currently, renovations are underway to upgrade safety and 
security measures. However, there is no scheduled date to 
reopen the Statue.
    This Committee encourages the National Park Service to 
continue to diligently work toward re-establishing the Statue 
of Liberty as a safe and secure site. We believe it would 
gratify all Americans if the Statue of Liberty could debut her 
renovations on July 4, 2004. No other day could be more 
appropriate for unveiling one of the most universal symbols of 
political freedom and democracy.

                       The Inland Waterway System

    It is the view of the Budget Committee that the inland 
waterway system is vital to the nation's economy, and that the 
nation must invest in navigation infrastructure so that 
agriculture and other industries can compete in the 
international marketplace.

                     National Animal Disease Center

    The Committee is concerned about the threat to food safety 
and the possibility of bio-terrorism in relation to the 
nation's food supply.
    The Department of Agriculture National Animal Disease 
Center plays a critical role in responding to, and addressing, 
numerous animal diseases such as Mad Cow disease. The 
importance of the Center has become more pronounced in the 
context of potential terrorist acts against food production 
assets, as well as random disease outbreaks. The Committee 
notes that the Administration budget request for fiscal year 
2005 includes the final funding amount necessary to finish the 
overall Animal Disease Center modernization project. 
Accordingly, the Committee believes that the request should be 
fully funded so that the modernization project can be finished 
in a timely manner.

                       Skilled Nursing Facilities

    It is the view of the Committee that any changes in 
Medicare reimbursements for skilled nursing facilities or in 
the Federal matching assistance provided to state Medicaid 
programs for nursing facility care be carefully considered and 
monitored to ensure that the financial stability of this vital 
health care sector and access to quality care is not 
jeopardized.

                                SmartBUY

    In 2003, OMB estimated that enterprise software licensing, 
utilizing the purchasing power of the Federal Government though 
the Federal initiative known as the ``SmartBUY'' program, could 
save taxpayers more than $100 million dollars annually.
    The combination of $100 million in annual savings achieved 
through SmartBUY, while concurrently achieving billions of 
dollars of long-term savings derived through IT consolidation, 
deserves priority attention and an efficient process that takes 
advantage of savings opportunities. There appear to be even 
more immediate opportunities with enterprise licensing in the 
human resources and statistical data areas, where shorter-term 
tangible savings seem most achievable. These particular 
SmartBUY savings, combined with savings derived from the bulk 
purchase of computer security software and standard desktop 
utilities, would provide an excellent jump-start to reaching 
the $100 million annual savings goal.
    This Committee recommends a thorough examination of the 
advantages and obstacles to the implementation of SmartBUY in 
an effort to fight duplicative government procedures that lead 
to unnecessary spending and waste.

                      Coastal Erosion In Louisiana

    The committee is concerned about coastal erosion in areas 
such as Louisiana. Sensitive wetland habitats are disappearing 
at an alarming rate, and 90 percent of all coastal marsh loss 
in the 48 contiguous states occurs in Louisiana. In the 1900s, 
1.2 million acres vanished, and another 330,000 to 430,000 
acres will disappear by 2050 unless substantial action is 
taken. Loss of these wetlands further exposes productive 
domestic energy resources, critical transportation routes, low-
lying areas, and many of the nation's busiest seaports to 
increased vulnerability to hurricanes, flooding, and erosion 
damage.
    The budget resolution can accommodate increased levels of 
Federal funding in cooperation with the state of Louisiana and 
local authorities to protect and restore Louisiana's coastal 
wetlands, often called ``America's Wetlands.''

                 Regulatory Review of Federal Agencies

    The Committee believes that Congress should establish a 
mechanism for reviewing Federal agencies and their regulations 
with the express purpose of making recommendations to Congress 
when agencies prove to be inefficient, duplicative, outdated, 
irrelevant, or fail to accomplish their intended purpose. It is 
an economic reality that unnecessary and ineffective 
regulations discourage investment and run counter to a holistic 
vision of growth. They increase prices for consumers and 
suppress job creation. Making agencies more accountable to 
Congress and the American people will lead to more efficient 
practices and less waste.

                  General Fund Diesel Fuel Excise Tax

    The unfair and discriminatory 4.3 cents per gallon general 
fund excise tax imposed on rail and inland waterway carriers 
should be repealed. This tax unfairly targets railroad and 
barges for discriminatory tax treatment and is inconsistent 
with sound transportation policy. The resolution also opposes 
the creation or diversion of revenue from the tax to new or 
existing Federal trust funds. The Committee on the Budget will 
work with the committees of jurisdiction on this matter as it 
proceeds through the legislative process.

                  Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit

    Renewable fuels reduce America's dependence on foreign oil. 
Existing ethanol tax incentives have successfully expanded the 
demand and use of renewable fuels. However, the replacement of 
the current excise tax exemption for gasoline/ethanol blends 
(gasohol) with a Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit [VEETC] 
will improve the Federal ethanol tax incentive by simplifying 
reporting requirements for taxpayers, reducing fuel fraud and 
accurately reflecting highway use of vehicles burning gasohol 
blends. The Committee on the Budget will work with the 
committees of jurisdiction on this matter as it proceeds 
through the legislative process.

                               Telehealth

    Telehealth is a dynamic tool that is improving access to 
the health care services throughout the country. Advancement in 
telecommunications now allows patients and health care 
providers in medically underserved areas to access the 
resources available in a multitude of hospitals and academic 
institutions within their state and nationwide. Additionally, 
providing telehealth services to patients in their homes is an 
effective tool to manage chronic diseases and to strengthen 
communities and their economic base by keeping services local.
    It is the view of the Committee that telemedicine is vital 
to the practice of delivering efficient and effective health 
care services in areas that are underserved. Easy access, via 
telehealth, to healthcare services not normally available in 
underserved communities, can shorten the time to diagnosis and 
treatment, improving patient outcomes and reducing health care 
costs.
    Accordingly, the Committee supports proposals that would 
create regional telehealth resource centers which provide 
assistance with respect to technical, legal and regulatory 
service delivery or other related barriers to the deployment of 
telehealth technologies; that fund telehealth network grant 
programs that will provide necessary healthcare services to 
underserved areas; that provide grants to State professional 
licensing boards to carry out programs to reduce statutory and 
regulatory barriers to telemedicine; and that provide grants 
for mental health services provided via telehealth programs. 
Likewise, the committee recognizes the importance of studying 
rate and cost structure, diagnostic effectiveness and payment 
methodology as means to determining the effectiveness of 
telemedicine in rural areas.

                          School Lunch Program

    Studies show that children who have access to meals at 
school have a higher retention rate and are enabled to learn 
and to succeed in school. Unfortunately, reduced price meals 
are oftentimes unaffordable for many low-income, working 
parents; particularly at the end of the month.
    It is the view of the Committee that consideration be given 
to making modifications to the Richard B. Russell National 
School Lunch Act to raise the free income guideline threshold. 
This change will take an important step toward harmonizing the 
Federal guidelines for school meals with other Federal 
assistance programs. Furthermore, the Committee supports 
working toward proposals to eradicate hunger and malnourishment 
among children.

                            Nuclear Cleanup

    The Budget Committee believes consideration should be given 
to the President's $7.4 billion request for the Department of 
Energy's [DOE] Environmental Management Program for Fiscal Year 
2005. This funding level would continue the commitment to 
accelerating the completion of cleanup by decades and saving 
billions of dollars in spending.

                     Science Research and Education

    The budget resolution recognizes the importance of the 
research and education initiatives of the Department of 
Energy's Office of Science and the National Science Foundation 
to the nation's economic future and our position as the world's 
leader in technology innovation.
    Investment in the physical sciences, life sciences, 
engineering, mathematics and computing is critical to our 
national security, energy security, as well as development of 
the next generation of America's scientists and engineers.
    Just as Congress has recognized the importance of increased 
support and funding for health sciences research, it is 
important to invest in the basic science research conducted by 
the DOE Office of Science's national labs and the NSF.

                        Fitzsimons Army Hospital

    The Budget Committee recognizes the importance of new 
construction projects within the Department of Veterans Affairs 
and the benefits these projects can bring to the improved 
health care of our nation's veterans. The University of 
Colorado School of Medicine plans a major relocation of all its 
facilities to the site of the closed Fitzsimons Army Hospital. 
The Department of Veterans Affairs recently endorsed the 
concept of recommending replacement and co-location of the 
Denver VA Medical Center, a 50-year old structure, to the 
Fitzsimons site. This project should be given consideration 
within the context of either the Department of Veterans Affairs 
Medical Programs funding allocations for construction projects, 
or the Department of Defense budget.

                           Homeland Security

    The Committee is concerned about the growing number of 
local governments that have adopted policies restricting both 
the flow of information regarding persons in custody from local 
police departments to Federal Homeland Security authorities, 
and from Federal Homeland Security authorities to local police 
departments. Such policies violate Federal law (8 U.S.C. 
1373(a)), and undermine anti-terrorism efforts. The Committee 
believes that the Department of Justice should vigorously 
enforce the provisions of 8 U.S.C. 1373(a), and that Congress 
should consider sanctioning those local governments who refuse 
to comply.

                      Formerly Used Defense Sites

    The Committee recognizes the continuing challenges 
presented to state and local governments by the finding of 
unexploded and hazardous munitions on sites previously used for 
training by the Department of Defense. The U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers is conducting reclamation and mitigation activities 
at the former Lowry Bombing and Gunnery Range in Arapahoe 
County, Colorado. The site has been identified as the third 
ranking priority for cleanup nationally, and the top priority 
in the State of Colorado. Given the proximity of the site to 
Cherry Creek High School, Aurora Reservoir, and encroaching 
suburbs, the Committee believes that cleanup efforts can be 
accelerated.

                           Joint Task Force 6

    The Committee is pleased with the work of Joint Task Force 
6 in combating narco-trafficking and drug smuggling. In recent 
years, both these activities and the cartels that carry them 
out have expanded their operations to include, or become 
intertwined with criminal syndicates engaged in human-
trafficking. The Committee believes that as Joint Task Force 6 
is reorganized and integrated into the Joint Interagency Task 
Force at NORTHCOM, its mission should be expanded to combat 
human-trafficking, and that adequate funding should be provided 
within the context of the Department of Homeland Security, 
Department of Defense, and Department of Justice budgets to 
carry out such efforts.

                       Artificial Neural Networks

    The Committee is aware of research into Artificial Neural 
Networks [ANN] which are capable of recognizing complex 
patterns in data and information. The Committee believes such 
networks are excellent tools for clinical decision making in 
prostate cancer, testicular cancer, cardiovascular problems, 
and other medical situations. Research to date has been 
encouraging, but expansion of the research efforts to include a 
more diverse population base would aid the ANN in determining 
optimal treatment. Therefore, the Committee asks that the ANN 
receive full consideration in the funding of cooperative 
studies research and medical research under the Department of 
Veterans Affairs Medical and Prosthetic Research budget in 
order to continue research in the diagnosis and prognosis of 
prostate cancer.

                       Postal Reform Legislation

    The Budget Committee supports enactment of postal reform 
legislation in the 108th Congress, accommodated within the 
budget process. The Committee recognizes that successful postal 
reform will not be possible without abolishing the escrow 
provision of the Postal Service Civil Service Retirement System 
Funding Reform Act of 2003. The Committee expresses concern 
that without reform the United States Postal Service [USPS] 
faces severe financial straits, although short-term financial 
prospects may have improved because retirement obligations are 
less burdensome than presumed. With unfunded retiree health 
benefits and an outdated business model, the USPS would be 
bankrupt but not for the fact that it is a government entity, 
with Treasury borrowing rights. This outdated business model 
needs to be reformed.
    The Postal Service has stated that failure by Congress to 
remove the CSRS escrow account would cause an additional 5.4 
percent rate increase in 2006 and even larger increases in 
later years. The Committee supports the efforts to limit the 
need to increase postal rates but remains concerned about the 
budgetary impact of the escrow. The Committee fully understands 
that the failure of Congress to allow for consideration of 
postal reform legislation that includes the removal of the CSRS 
escrow account would directly impact the Postal Service's 
revenue and rate planning and will trigger a postal rate 
increase for all users in 2006, over and on top of any rate 
increases needed to fund postal operations. The Committee 
supports the efforts of the Committee on Government Reform to 
improve the financial transparency of the Postal Service as an 
essential component of comprehensive postal reform legislation.
    The Committee will continue to work with the Government 
Reform Committee to accommodate reasonable postal reform 
legislation within the budget process.

                        Payment in Lieu of Taxes

    The Committee is encouraged by the gradual reduction in 
Federal land acquisition appropriations over the last few 
years, but further reductions should be made. The Federal 
Government already holds title to large amounts of Federal 
land, and continues to acquire more despite the well documented 
fact that Federal land management agencies are unable to 
adequately manage even the lands that they currently 
administer.

    Health Plan and Employer Reimbursement Under Medicare and ERISA

    Public and private health plans and employers pay the 
medical expenses of insured individuals when they are injured 
by a third party, but in these circumstances public and private 
health plans and employers are allowed under Federal law to be 
repaid if the individual later recovers damages from the third 
party causing the injury. The right of recovery is an important 
means to restore Federal revenue, to contain private health 
plan and employer costs and to reduce health care premiums for 
individuals. The Committee understands the recovery rights of 
Federal health programs (Medicare, FEHPB and M+C) and private 
health plans have been eroded by recent court decisions. The 
result is higher Federal and private health plan costs. Last 
year, Congress acted to shore up the Medicare program's 
recovery right. The Committee encourages the committees of 
jurisdiction to adopt legislation that will strengthen the 
right of recovery for Federal programs and private health plans 
and employers.

 Returning Stability to Payments under Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

    (a) FINDINGS--The Committee finds that:
    (1) The fees Medicare pays physicians and other health 
professionals were reduced by 5.4 percent across-the-board in 
2002;
    (2) action by Congress in early 2003 narrowly averted a 4.4 
percent across-the-board reduction in such fees that year;
    (3) in the fall of 2003, Congressional action was once 
again needed to prevent an across-the-board reduction of 4.5 
percent in such fees for 2004, as well as an anticipated 
further reduction in 2005;
    (4) there are major flaws in the formula Medicare uses to 
reimburse physicians which result in steep cuts that adversely 
impact Medicare beneficiaries' access to care; and,
    (5) CMS should consider using its authority to exclude 
Medicare-covered drugs and biologics from the physician formula 
and accurately reflect in the formula the direct and indirect 
cost of increases due to coverage decisions, administrative 
actions, and rules and regulations.
    (b) SENSE OF THE COMMITTEE--It is the sense of the 
Committee that, while recent actions by Congress have helped 
address the immediate reductions in reimbursement, further 
action by Congress will be needed to put in place a new formula 
or mechanism for updating Medicare physician fees in 2006 and 
thereafter, in order to ensure:
    (1) the long-term stability of the Medicare payment system 
for physicians and other health care professionals, such that 
payment rates keep pace with practice cost increases; and
    (2) future access to physicians' services for Medicare 
beneficiaries.

             Accounts Identified For Advance Appropriations

                        INTERIOR APPROPRIATIONS

    Elk Hills (89 5428 02 271)

       LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS

    Corporation for Public Broadcasting (20 0151 01 503)
    Employment and Training administration (16 0174 01 504)
    Education for the Disadvantaged (91 0900 01 501)
    School Improvement (91 1000 01 501)
    Children and Family Services [Head Start] (75 1536 01 506)
    Special Education (91 0300 01 501)
    Vocational and Adult Education (91 0400 01 501)

                     TRANSPORTATION APPROPRIATIONS

    Transportation (highways; transit; Farley Building)

              TREASURY, GENERAL GOVERNMENT APPROPRIATIONS

    Payment to Postal Service (18 1001 01 372)

         VETERANS, HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT APPROPRIATIONS

    Section 8 Renewals (86 0319 01 604)
       Other Matters to be Discussed Under the Rules of the House

                              ----------                              


     Committee on the Budget Oversight Findings and recommendations

    Clause 3(c)(1) of Rule XIII requires each committee report 
to contain oversight findings and recommendations pursuant to 
clause 2(b)(1) of rule X. The Budget Committee has no findings 
to report at the present time.

   New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives provides that Committee reports shall contain 
the statement required by Section 308(a)(1) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974. This report does not contain 
such a statement because as a concurrent resolution setting 
forth a blueprint for the Congressional budget, the budget 
resolution does not provide new budget authority or new 
entitlement authority or change revenues.

                General Performance Goals and Objectives

    Clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII requires each committee report 
to contain a statement of general performance goals and 
objectives, including outcome-related goals and objectives, for 
which the measure authorizes funding. The Budget Committee has 
no such goals and objectives to report at this time.

                       Views of Committee Members

    Clause 2(l) of rule XI requires each committee to afford a 
2-day opportunity for members of the committee to file 
additional, minority, or dissenting views and to include the 
views in its report. The following views were submitted:


                                   John M. Spratt, Jr.
                                   Jim Moran.
                                   Tammy Baldwin.
                                   John Lewis.
                                   Richard E. Neal.
                                   Rosa L. DeLauro.
                                   Chet Edwards.
                                   Bobby Scott.
                                   Darlene Hooley.
                                   Harold Ford.
                                   Lois Capps.
                                   Brian Baird.
                                   Jim Cooper.
                                   Rahm Emanuel.
                                   Artur Davis.
                                   Denise Majette.
                                   Ron Kind.
                            A P P E N D I X

                              ----------                              


                            H. CON. RES. 393

    A Concurrent Resolution Establishing the congressional 
budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2005 
and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 
2004 and 2006 through 2009.
  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate 
concurring), 

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2005.

  (a) Declaration.--The Congress declares that the concurrent 
resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2005 is hereby 
established and that the appropriate budgetary levels for 
fiscal years 2004 and 2006 through 2009 are set forth.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2005.

                 TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Major functional categories.

             TITLE II--RECONCILIATION AND REPORT SUBMISSIONS

Sec. 201. Reconciliation in the House of Representatives.
Sec. 202. Submission of report on savings to be used for members of the 
          Armed Forces in Iraq and Afghanistan.

           TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS AND CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE

 Subtitle A--Reserve Funds for Legislation Assumed in Budget Aggregates

Sec. 301. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for health insurance for the 
          uninsured.
Sec. 302. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the Family Opportunity Act.
Sec. 303. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for Military Survivors' Benefit 
          Plan.
Sec. 304. Reserve fund for pending legislation.

                    Subtitle B--Contingency Procedure

Sec. 311. Contingency procedure for surface transportation.

                      TITLE IV--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

Sec. 401. Restrictions on advance appropriations.
Sec. 402. Emergency legislation.
Sec. 403. Compliance with section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 
          1990.
Sec. 404. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.

                       TITLE V--SENSE OF THE HOUSE

Sec. 501. Sense of the House on spending accountability.
Sec. 502. Sense of the House on entitlement reform.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

  The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
fiscal years 2004 through 2009:
          (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution:
                  (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
                          Fiscal year 2004: $1,272,966,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2005: $1,457,215,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2006: $1,619,835,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2007: $1,721,568,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2008: $1,818,559,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2009: $1,922,133,000,000.
                  (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels 
                of Federal revenues should be reduced are as 
                follows:
                          Fiscal year 2004: -$179,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2005: $19,919,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2006: $34,346,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2007: $33,376,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2008: $27,231,000,000.
                          Fiscal year 2009: $30,927,000,000.
          (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total new budget authority are as follows:
                  Fiscal year 2004: $1,952,700,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005: $2,010,338,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006: $2,071,186,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007: $2,193,395,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008: $2,311,770,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009: $2,431,782,000,000.
          (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement 
        of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total 
        budget outlays are as follows:
                  Fiscal year 2004: $1,911,235,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005: $2,007,926,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006: $2,083,910,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007: $2,169,446,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008: $2,277,071,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009: $2,393,946,000,000.
          (4) Deficits (on-budget).--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the amounts of the 
        deficits (on-budget) are as follows:
                  Fiscal year 2004: $638,269,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005: $550,711,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006: $464,075,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007: $447,878,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008: $458,512,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009: $471,813,000,000.
          (5) Debt subject to limit.--Pursuant to section 
        301(a)(5) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
        appropriate levels of the public debt are as follows:
                  Fiscal year 2004: $7,436,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005: $8,087,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006: $8,675,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007: $9,244,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008: $9,823,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009: $10,419,000,000,000.
          (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels 
        of debt held by the public are as follows:
                  Fiscal year 2004: $4,385,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005: $4,775,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006: $5,060,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007: $5,312,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008: $5,560,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009: $5,807,000,000,000.

SEC. 102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

  The Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
2004 through 2009 for each major functional category are:
          (1) National Defense (050):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $461,544,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $451,125,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $419,634,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $447,114,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $442,400,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $439,098,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $464,000,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $445,927,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $486,149,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $465,542,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $508,369,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $487,186,000,000.
          (2) Homeland Security (100):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $29,559,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $24,834,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $34,102,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $29,997,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $33,548,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $33,298,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $35,160,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $35,635,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $36,520,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $36,979,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $40,420,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $38,401,000,000.
          (3) International Affairs (150):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $43,604,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $29,281,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,529,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $32,848,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,776,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,017,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,927,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $26,714,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $28,077,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $25,323,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $28,228,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $25,099,000,000.
          (4) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,822,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,897,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,813,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,453,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,927,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,683,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,042,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,743,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,157,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,763,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,274,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,863,000,000.
          (5) Energy (270):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $2,323,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $59,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $2,863,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,201,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $2,604,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,397,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $2,583,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,040,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $2,629,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $662,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $2,285,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $891,000,000.
          (6) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $32,021,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,210,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $31,212,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,868,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $31,568,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $31,911,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $31,897,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $32,153,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $32,101,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $32,128,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $32,777,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $32,804,000,000.
          (7) Agriculture (350):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $19,908,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $18,434,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,087,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $20,501,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,374,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,310,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,278,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $23,199,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,042,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $22,957,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,903,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $23,956,000,000.
          (8) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,077,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $12,748,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,792,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $5,782,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,242,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $6,842,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $9,727,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $4,769,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $9,705,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $3,190,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $9,580,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $2,740,000,000.
          (9) Transportation (400):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $62,937,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $59,280,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $65,021,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $61,988,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $66,075,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $64,204,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $68,263,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $66,131,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $69,578,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $67,545,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,445,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $68,452,000,000.
          (10) Community and Regional Development (450):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,758,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $15,443,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,867,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $14,233,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,655,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $12,484,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,715,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $11,616,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,692,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $11,392,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,752,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $11,510,000,000.
          (11) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $89,463,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $86,405,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $92,523,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $90,492,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $93,596,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $92,878,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $94,243,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $93,365,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $94,738,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $93,975,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $95,366,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $94,685,000,000.
          (12) Health (550):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $236,822,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $235,551,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $245,095,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $244,936,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $252,639,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $252,495,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $266,117,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $265,196,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $284,970,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $284,222,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $304,034,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $303,460,000,000.
          (13) Medicare (570):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $269,567,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $268,759,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $288,166,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $289,126,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $322,974,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $322,549,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $362,759,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $363,016,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $387,838,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $387,858,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $414,278,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $413,853,000,000.
          (14) Income Security (600):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $329,744,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $336,074,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $337,318,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $341,716,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $335,387,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $339,098,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $340,140,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $342,945,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $352,809,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $355,046,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $361,830,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $363,465,000,000.
          (15) Social Security (650):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,396,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $13,396,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $15,094,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $15,094,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,589,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $16,589,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $18,049,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $18,049,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $19,988,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $19,988,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,989,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $21,989,000,000.
          (16) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $61,179,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $59,858,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,536,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $68,563,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $68,501,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $67,597,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $66,621,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $66,007,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $69,842,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $69,459,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,506,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $70,106,000,000.
          (17) Administration of Justice (750):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $29,932,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,103,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $30,139,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $30,025,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,430,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $28,036,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,480,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $27,744,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,616,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $27,540,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $27,755,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $27,621,000,000.
          (18) General Government (800):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,806,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $24,540,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,198,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $17,916,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,419,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $17,392,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,573,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $17,401,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,230,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $17,075,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,383,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $17,044,000,000.
          (19) Net Interest (900):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $240,471,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $240,471,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $270,698,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $270,698,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $318,909,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $318,909,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $364,463,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $364,463,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $398,574,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $398,574,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $427,464,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $427,464,000,000.
          (20) Allowances (920):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $0.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,000,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, $24,850,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $18,600,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $5,100,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $1,000,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, $0.
                          (B) Outlays, $250,000,000.
          (21) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                  Fiscal year 2004:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$47,233,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$47,233,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2005:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$52,349,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$52,475,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2006:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$54,427,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$54,477,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2007:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$62,642,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$63,767,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2008:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$65,485,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$66,147,000,000.
                  Fiscal year 2009:
                          (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$60,856,000,000.
                          (B) Outlays, -$59,893,000,000.

            TITLE II--RECONCILIATION AND REPORT SUBMISSIONS

SEC. 201. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

  (a) Submissions Providing for the Elimination of Waste, 
Fraud, and Abuse.--(1) Not later than July 15, 2004, the House 
committees named in paragraph (2) shall submit their 
recommendations to the House Committee on the Budget. After 
receiving those recommendations, the House Committee on the 
Budget shall report to the House a reconciliation bill carrying 
out all such recommendations without any substantive revision.
  (2) Instructions.--
          (A) Committee on agriculture.--The House Committee on 
        Agriculture shall report changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the level of direct 
        spending for that committee by $110,000,000 in outlays 
        for fiscal year 2005 and $371,000,000 in outlays for 
        the period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
          (B) Committee on education and the workforce: 
        instruction to provide fairness in federal workers 
        compensation.--The House Committee on Education and the 
        Workforce shall report changes in laws within its 
        jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the level of direct 
        spending for that committee by $5,000,000 in outlays 
        for fiscal year 2005 and $43,000,000 in outlays for the 
        period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
          (C) Committee on energy and commerce.--The House 
        Committee on Energy and Commerce shall report changes 
        in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce 
        the level of direct spending for that committee by 
        $410,000,000 in outlays for fiscal year 2005 and 
        $2,185,000,000 in outlays for the period of fiscal 
        years 2005 through 2009.
          (D) Committee on government reform: instruction to 
        increase resources to authorize information sharing to 
        allow federal benefit programs limited access to 
        federal and state administrative data to verify 
        eligibility.--The House Committee on Government Reform 
        shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
        sufficient to reduce the level of direct spending for 
        that committee by $170,000,000 in outlays for fiscal 
        year 2005 and $2,365,000,000 in outlays for the period 
        of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
          (E) Committee on ways and means.--The House Committee 
        on Ways and Means shall report changes in laws within 
        its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by 
        $1,126,000,000 for fiscal year 2005 and $8,269,000,000 
        for the period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
  (b) Submission Providing for the Extension of Expiring Tax 
Relief.--(1) The House Committee on Ways and Means shall report 
a reconciliation bill not later than October 1, 2004, that 
consists of changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient 
to reduce revenues by not more than $13,182,000,000 for fiscal 
year 2005 and by not more than $137,580,000,000 for the period 
of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
  (2) If a reconciliation bill, as reported pursuant to 
paragraph (1), does not increase the deficit for fiscal year 
2005 or for the period of fiscal years 2005 though 2009 above 
the levels permitted in such paragraph, the chairman of the 
House Committee on the Budget may revise the reconciliation 
instructions under this section to permit the Committee on Ways 
and Means to increase the level of direct spending outlays, 
make conforming adjustments to the revenue instruction to 
decrease the reduction in revenues, and make conforming changes 
in allocations to the Committee on Ways and Means and in budget 
aggregates.

SEC. 202. SUBMISSION OF REPORT ON DEFENSE SAVINGS.

  In the House, not later than May 15, 2004, the Committee on 
Armed Services shall submit to the Committee on the Budget its 
findings that identify $2,000,000,000 in savings from (1) 
activities that are determined to be of a low priority to the 
successful execution of current military operations; or (2) 
activities that are determined to be wasteful or unnecessary to 
national defense. Funds identified should be reallocated to 
programs and activities that directly contribute to enhancing 
the combat capabilities of the U.S. military forces with an 
emphasis on force protection, munitions and surveillance 
capabilities. For purposes of this subsection, the report by 
the Committee on Armed Services shall be inserted in the 
Congressional Record by the chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget not later than May 21, 2004.

           TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS AND CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE

 Subtitle A--Reserve Funds for Legislation Assumed in Budget Aggregates

SEC. 301. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE 
                    UNINSURED.

  In the House, if legislation is reported, or if an amendment 
thereto is offered or a conference report thereon is submitted, 
that provides health insurance for the uninsured, the chairman 
of the Committee on the Budget may make the appropriate 
adjustments in allocations and aggregates to the extent such 
measure is deficit neutral in fiscal year 2005 and for the 
period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.

SEC. 302. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR THE FAMILY OPPORTUNITY ACT.

  In the House, if the Committee on Energy and Commerce reports 
legislation, or if an amendment thereto is offered or a 
conference report thereon is submitted, that provides medicaid 
coverage for children with special needs (the Family 
Opportunity Act), the chairman of the Committee on the Budget 
may make the appropriate adjustments in allocations and 
aggregates to the extent such measure is deficit neutral in 
fiscal year 2005 and for the period of fiscal years 2005 
through 2009.

SEC. 303. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND FOR MILITARY SURVIVORS' BENEFIT 
                    PLAN.

  In the House, if the Committee on Armed Services reports 
legislation, or if an amendment thereto is offered or a 
conference report thereon is submitted, that increases 
survivors' benefits under the Military Survivors' Benefit Plan, 
the chairman of the Committee on the Budget may make the 
appropriate adjustments in allocations and aggregates to the 
extent such measure is deficit neutral resulting from a change 
other than to discretionary appropriations in fiscal year 2005 
and for the period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.

SEC. 304. RESERVE FUND FOR PENDING LEGISLATION.

  In the House, for any bill, including a bill that provides 
for the safe importation of FDA-approved prescription drugs or 
places limits on medical malpractice litigation, that has 
passed the House in the first session of the 108th Congress 
and, after the date of adoption of this concurrent resolution, 
is acted on by the Senate, enacted by the Congress, and 
presented to the President, the chairman of the Committee on 
the Budget may make the appropriate adjustments in the 
allocations and aggregates to reflect any resulting savings 
from any such measure.

                   Subtitle B--Contingency Procedure

SEC. 311. CONTINGENCY PROCEDURE FOR SURFACE TRANSPORTATION.

  (a) In General.--If the Committee on Transportation and 
Infrastructure of the House reports legislation, or if an 
amendment thereto is offered or a conference report thereon is 
submitted, that provides new budget authority for the budget 
accounts or portions thereof in the highway and transit 
categories as defined in sections 250(c)(4)(B) and (C) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 in 
excess of the following amounts:
          (1) for fiscal year 2004: $41,569,000,000,
          (2) for fiscal year 2005: $42,657,000,000,
          (3) for fiscal year 2006: $43,635,000,000,
          (4) for fiscal year 2007: $45,709,000,000,
          (5) for fiscal year 2008: $46,945,000,000, or
          (6) for fiscal year 2009: $47,732,000,000,
the chairman of the Committee on the Budget may adjust the 
appropriate budget aggregates and increase the allocation of 
new budget authority to such committee for fiscal year 2004, 
for fiscal year 2005, and for the period of fiscal years 2005 
through 2009 to the extent such excess is offset by a reduction 
in mandatory outlays from the Highway Trust Fund or an increase 
in receipts appropriated to such fund for the applicable fiscal 
year caused by such legislation or any previously enacted 
legislation.
  (b) Adjustment for Outlays.--For fiscal year 2004 or 2005, in 
the House, if a bill or joint resolution is reported, or if an 
amendment thereto is offered or a conference report thereon is 
submitted, that changes obligation limitations such that the 
total limitations are in excess of $40,116,000,000 for fiscal 
year 2004 or $41,204,000,000 for fiscal year 2005 for programs, 
projects, and activities within the highway and transit 
categories as defined in sections 250(c)(4)(B) and (C) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, and 
if legislation has been enacted that satisfies the conditions 
set forth in subsection (a) for such fiscal year, the chairman 
of the Committee on the Budget may increase the allocation of 
outlays and appropriate aggregates for such fiscal year for the 
committee reporting such measure by the amount of outlays that 
corresponds to such excess obligation limitations, but not to 
exceed the amount of such excess that was offset pursuant to 
subsection (a).

                      TITLE IV--BUDGET ENFORCEMENT

SEC. 401. RESTRICTIONS ON ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--(1) In the House, except as provided in 
subsection (b), an advance appropriation may not be reported in 
a bill or joint resolution making a general appropriation or 
continuing appropriation, and may not be in order as an 
amendment thereto.
  (2) Managers on the part of the House may not agree to a 
Senate amendment that would violate paragraph (1) unless 
specific authority to agree to the amendment first is given by 
the House by a separate vote with respect thereto.
  (b) Limitation.--In the House, an advance appropriation may 
be provided for fiscal year 2006 or 2007 for programs, 
projects, activities or accounts identified in the joint 
explanatory statement of managers accompanying this resolution 
under the heading ``Accounts Identified for Advance 
Appropriations'' in an aggregate amount not to exceed 
$23,568,000,000 in new budget authority.
  (c) Definition.--In this subsection, the term ``advance 
appropriation'' means any discretionary new budget authority in 
a bill or joint resolution making general appropriations or 
continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2005 that first 
becomes available for any fiscal year after 2005.

SEC. 402. EMERGENCY LEGISLATION.

  (a) Exemption of Overseas Contingency Operations.--In the 
House, if a bill or joint resolution is reported, or an 
amendment is offered thereto or a conference report is filed 
thereon, that makes supplemental appropriations for fiscal year 
2005 for contingency operations related to the global war on 
terrorism, then the new budget authority, new entitlement 
authority, outlays, and receipts resulting therefrom shall not 
count for purposes of sections 302, 303, and 401 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 for the provisions of such 
measure that are designated pursuant to this subsection as 
making appropriations for such contingency operations.
  (b) Exemption of Emergency Provisions.--In the House, if a 
bill or joint resolution is reported, or an amendment is 
offered thereto or a conference report is filed thereon, that 
designates a provision as an emergency requirement pursuant to 
this section, then the new budget authority, new entitlement 
authority, outlays, and receipts resulting therefrom shall not 
count for purposes of sections 302, 303, 311, and 401 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  (c) Designations.--
          (1) Guidance.--In the House, if a provision of 
        legislation is designated as an emergency requirement 
        under subsection (b), the committee report and any 
        statement of managers accompanying that legislation 
        shall include an explanation of the manner in which the 
        provision meets the criteria in paragraph (2). If such 
        legislation is to be considered by the House without 
        being reported, then the committee shall cause the 
        explanation to be published in the Congressional Record 
        in advance of floor consideration.
          (2) Criteria.--
                  (A) In general.--Any such provision is an 
                emergency requirement if the underlying 
                situation poses a threat to life, property, or 
                national security and is--
                          (i) sudden, quickly coming into 
                        being, and not building up over time;
                          (ii) an urgent, pressing, and 
                        compelling need requiring immediate 
                        action;
                          (iii) subject to subparagraph (B), 
                        unforeseen, unpredictable, and 
                        unanticipated; and
                          (iv) not permanent, temporary in 
                        nature.
                  (B) Unforeseen.--An emergency that is part of 
                an aggregate level of anticipated emergencies, 
                particularly when normally estimated in 
                advance, is not unforeseen.

SEC. 403. COMPLIANCE WITH SECTION 13301 OF THE BUDGET ENFORCEMENT ACT 
                    OF 1990.

  (a) In General.--In the House, notwithstanding section 
302(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and section 
13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, the joint 
explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on any 
concurrent resolution on the budget shall include in its 
allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 to the Committee on Appropriations amounts for the 
discretionary administrative expenses of the Social Security 
Administration.
  (b) Special Rule.--In the House, for purposes of applying 
section 302(f) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, 
estimates of the level of total new budget authority and total 
outlays provided by a measure shall include any discretionary 
amounts provided for the Social Security Administration.

SEC. 404. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

  (a) Application.--Any adjustments of allocations and 
aggregates made pursuant to this resolution shall--
          (1) apply while that measure is under consideration;
          (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
          (3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon 
        as practicable.
  (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 as allocations and aggregates contained in 
this resolution.
  (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
resolution--
          (1) the levels of new budget authority, outlays, 
        direct spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, 
        deficits, and surpluses for a fiscal year or period of 
        fiscal years shall be determined on the basis of 
        estimates made by the appropriate Committee on the 
        Budget; and
          (2) such chairman may make any other necessary 
        adjustments to such levels to carry out this 
        resolution.

                      TITLE V--SENSE OF THE HOUSE

SEC. 501. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON SPENDING ACCOUNTABILITY.

  It is the sense of the House that--
          (1) authorizing committees should actively engage in 
        oversight utilizing--
                  (A) the plans and goals submitted by 
                executive agencies pursuant to the Government 
                Performance and Results Act of 1993; and
                  (B) the performance evaluations submitted by 
                such agencies (that are based upon the Program 
                Assessment Rating Tool which is designed to 
                improve agency performance);
        in order to enact legislation to eliminate waste, 
        fraud, and abuse to ensure the efficient use of 
        taxpayer dollars;
          (2) all Federal programs should be periodically 
        reauthorized and funding for unauthorized programs 
        should be level-funded in fiscal year 2005 unless there 
        is a compelling justification;
          (3) committees should submit written justifications 
        for earmarks and should consider not funding those most 
        egregiously inconsistent with national policy;
          (4) the fiscal year 2005 budget resolution should be 
        vigorously enforced and legislation should be enacted 
        establishing statutory limits on appropriations and a 
        PAY-AS-YOU-GO rule for new and expanded entitlement 
        programs; and
          (5) Congress should make every effort to offset 
        nonwar-related supplemental appropriations.

SEC. 502. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON ENTITLEMENT REFORM.

  (a) Findings.--The House finds that welfare was successfully 
reformed through the application of work requirements, 
education and training opportunity, and time limits on 
eligibility.
  (b) Sense of the House.--It is the sense of the House that 
authorizing committees should--
          (1) systematically review all means-tested 
        entitlement programs and track beneficiary 
        participation across programs and time;
          (2) enact legislation to develop common eligibility 
        requirements for means-tested entitlement programs;
          (3) enact legislation to accurately rename means-
        tested entitlement programs;
          (4) enact legislation to coordinate program benefits 
        in order to limit to a reasonable period of time the 
        Government dependency of means-tested entitlement 
        program participants;
          (5) evaluate the costs of, and justifications for, 
        nonmeans-tested, nonretirement-related entitlement 
        programs; and
          (6) identify and utilize resources that have 
        conducted cost-benefit analyses of participants in 
        multiple means- and nonmeans-tested entitlement 
        programs to understand their cumulative costs and 
        collective benefits.