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                                                       Calendar No. 147
107th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     107-58

======================================================================



 
      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                        APPROPRIATION BILL, 2002
                                _______
                                

               September 4, 2001.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Leahy, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 2506]

    The Committee on Appropriations to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 2506), making appropriations for Foreign operations 
and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2002, and for other purposes, reports the same to the Senate 
with an amendment and recommends that the bill as amended do 
pass.



Amounts in new budget authority

Fiscal year 2001 appropriations \1\..................... $14,941,168,000
Fiscal year 2002 budget estimate........................  15,227,631,000
House allowance.........................................  15,212,173,000
Amount of bill as reported to Senate....................  15,568,880,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to:
    2001 appropriations.................................    +627,712,000
    Budget estimate.....................................    +341,249,000
    House allowance.....................................    +356,707,000

\1\ Does not reflect the 0.22 percent rescission.


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of total budget authority in the bill....................     4
Introduction.....................................................     4
Title I--Export assistance:
    Export-Import Bank of the United States......................     5
    Overseas Private Investment Corporation......................     5
    Trade and Development Agency.................................     6
Title II--Bilateral economic assistance:
    Bilateral assistance.........................................     7
    Child Survival and Health Programs Fund......................     7
    Development assistance.......................................    13
    International disaster assistance............................    34
    Transition initiatives.......................................    35
    Development credit authority.................................    35
    Operating expenses...........................................    36
    Payment to the Foreign Service retirement and disability fund    36
    Operating expenses of the United States Agency for 
      International Development..................................    36
    Operating expenses of the Office of Inspector General........    37
    Other bilateral economic assistance..........................    37
        Economic Support Fund....................................    37
        Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States......    39
        Assistance for the Independent States of the former 
          Soviet Union...........................................    41
    Independent Agencies.........................................    45
        Peace Corps..............................................    45
        African Development Foundation...........................    46
        Inter-American Foundation................................    46
    Department of State:
        International narcotics control and law enforcement......    46
        Andean Counterdrug Initiative............................    47
        Migration and refugee assistance.........................    51
        Emergency refugee and migration assistance fund..........    52
        Nonproliferation, antiterrorism, demining, and related 
          programs...............................................    53
    Department of Treasury:
        International affairs technical assistance...............    55
        Global fund to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis    55
        Debt restructuring.......................................    55
Title III--Military assistance:
    International military education and training................    56
    Foreign military financing...................................    57
    Peacekeeping operations......................................    58
Title IV--Multilateral economic assistance:
    International Financial Institutions Summary.................    59
    International Bank for Reconstruction and Development........    60
    Global Environment Facility..................................    60
    Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency.....................    61
    Inter-American Development Bank..............................    61
    Asian Development Fund.......................................    61
    African Development Bank.....................................    61
    Africa Development Fund......................................    61
    European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.............    61
    International Fund for Agriculture Development...............    61
    International Organizations and Programs.....................    62
Title V--General provisions......................................    64
Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI of the standing rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    67
Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI of the standing rules 
  of the Senate..................................................    67
Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the standing rules of 
  the 
  Senate.........................................................    68
Budget impact statement..........................................    72


                                 SUMMARY TABLE: AMOUNTS IN NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                   Committee
                                                                                                recommendation
                                                                                Committee        compared with
                          Item                             Budget estimate   recommendation     budget estimate
                                                                                                increase (+) or
                                                                                                 decrease (-)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Export assistance.......................................      $485,955,000      $604,955,000       +$119,000,000
Economic assistance--bilateral..........................     9,456,880,000     9,679,529,000        +222,649,000
Military assistance.....................................     3,889,000,000     3,889,000,000  ..................
Economic assistance.....................................     1,395,796,000     1,395,396,000          -4,600,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              INTRODUCTION

    In fiscal year 2001, the Committee appropriated 
$14,941,168,000 for foreign operations and related programs.\1\ 
This year, the Committee has provided $15,568,880,000, of which 
$15,524,000,000 is for discretionary spending and $44,880,000 
is for mandatory spending.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\ Does not reflect the 0.22 percent rescission.

                                TITLE I

                           EXPORT ASSISTANCE

                Export-Import Bank of the United States

                         SUBSIDY APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $865,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     633,323,000
House allowance.........................................     738,323,000
Committee recommendation................................     753,323,000

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $62,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      65,000,000
House allowance.........................................      60,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      64,000,000

    The Committee provides $753,323,000 for a subsidy 
appropriation for the Export-Import Bank. This is $120,000,000 
above the request and $111,677,000 below the fiscal year 2001 
level.
    The Administration's budget request is $231,677,000 below 
the fiscal year 2001 level. Of this reduction, approximately 
$112,000,000 is due to changes in risk factors as estimated by 
the Office of Management and Budget and required by the Federal 
Credit Reform Act. This leaves approximately $120,000,000 in 
cuts that are in addition to those that result from the 
reassessment of risk. The Committee restores this $120,000,000 
with the understanding that a total subsidy appropriation of 
$753,323,000 will support a projected level of Export-Import 
Bank authorizations of $12,400,000,000 in fiscal year 2002. 
This is approximately $1,000,000,000 higher than the projected 
authorizations that would be supported by the request, and 
approximately $2,000,000,000 higher than the estimated fiscal 
year 2001 level.
    The Committee provides $64,000,000 for administrative 
expenses, which is $1,000,000 below the request and $2,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2001 level.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation


                         SUBSIDY APPROPRIATION

                              DIRECT LOANS

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $24,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................................
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

                        ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $38,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      38,608,000
House allowance.........................................      38,608,000
Committee recommendation................................      38,608,000

    The Committee has not provided a subsidy appropriation for 
the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) for direct 
and guaranteed loan credit programs, and includes $38,608,000 
for administrative expenses. This level is equal to the 
Administration's budget request.
    OPIC subsidy appropriations are available for two years, 
and OPIC has $24,000,000 in carryover funds available for use 
in fiscal year 2002. Therefore, the Committee recommendation 
should not result in a reduction from last year's program 
level. The Committee recognizes that appropriations will be 
required next year.
    The Committee strongly endorses the House report language 
encouraging OPIC to provide increased support within the energy 
sector for investments using American cleaner and renewable 
energy technology.

                      Trade and Development Agency

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $50,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      50,024,000
House allowance.........................................      50,024,000
Committee recommendation................................      50,024,000

    The Committee provides $50,024,000 for the Trade and 
Development Agency. This amount is $24,000 above the fiscal 
year 2001 level and equal to the request.

                                TITLE II

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

           UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                     bilateral economic assistance

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,229,989,000
    Supplemental funding................................      90,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,179,380,000
House allowance.........................................   3,356,380,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,631,380,000

    The amounts listed in the above table for fiscal year 2001 
appropriations, the fiscal year 2002 budget estimate, and the 
Committee recommendation include funds appropriated or 
requested under child survival and health programs, development 
assistance, USAID operating expenses, Inspector General 
operating expenses, mandatory retirement expenses, 
international disaster assistance, transition initiatives and 
credit programs.
    Restoring a long-standing practice, the Committee has 
provided funding for the African Development Foundation and 
Inter-American Foundation under ``Independent Agencies'' rather 
than the ``Development Assistance'' account.

                CHILD SURVIVAL AND HEALTH PROGRAMS FUND

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $963,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     991,000,000
House allowance.........................................   1,425,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,455,500,000

    The Committee provides $1,455,500,000 for the renamed 
``Child Survival and Health Programs Fund''. These funds are 
available for programs and activities to reduce child mortality 
and morbidity, combat infectious diseases, and address a wide 
range of other public health problems around the world. The 
Committee reiterates its strong support for a comprehensive 
approach to global health, with an emphasis on building local 
capacity in developing countries to conduct effective 
surveillance and deliver basic health services.
    The Committee notes that in fiscal year 2001, $103,000,000 
for children's basic education was included in the Child 
Survival and Disease Programs Fund. It is now funded at a level 
of $135,000,000 in the Development Assistance account. In 
fiscal year 2001, $425,000,000 for reproductive health was 
included in the Development Assistance, Economic Support Fund 
(ESF), Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States 
(SEED), and Independent States of the former Soviet Union (FSU) 
accounts. It is now funded at a level of $450,000,000 in the 
Child Survival and Health Programs Fund, and the ESF, SEED and 
FSU accounts.

                                HIV/AIDS

    It is now widely recognized that the HIV/AIDS pandemic 
poses the greatest public health threat in over half a 
millennium. For reasons expressed in prior reports, the 
Committee is of the view that the response of the international 
community to this crisis has been woefully inadequate. For 
fiscal year 2002, the Committee has provided $415,000,000 in 
the Child Survival and Health Programs Fund for programs to 
combat HIV/AIDS. Of this amount, $375,000,000 is for USAID 
programs. The remaining $40,000,000 is for a United States 
contribution to a Global Fund to combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and 
tuberculosis, to be added to $10,000,000 in carryover fiscal 
year 2001 Child Survival and Disease Program funds, for a total 
contribution to the Global Fund in fiscal year 2002 of 
$50,000,000.
    In addition to the appropriation for HIV/AIDS in the Child 
Survival and Health Programs Fund, the Committee expects 
$25,000,000 to be provided for HIV/AIDS programs from the ESF, 
SEED, and FSU accounts in fiscal year 2002. The Committee 
expects that these funds will be obligated and disbursed far 
more rapidly than in the past. The total amount provided in the 
bill in fiscal year 2002 for HIV/AIDS is $450,000,000.
    The Committee also notes the recent action by Congress to 
provide $100,000,000 in fiscal year 2001 supplemental funds for 
an initial U.S. contribution to the Global Fund.

Foreign Operations Appropriations for HIV/AIDS--107th Congress

        Legislation                                               Amount

Fiscal Year 2001 Supplemental Appropriation: Global Fund    $100,000,000
Fiscal Year 2002 Committee Recommendation:
    USAID...............................................     375,000,000
    State Department (ESF, SEED, FSU)...................      25,000,000
    Global Fund.........................................      50,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     550,000,000

    The Committee believes that the first priority for these 
funds should be to support HIV/AIDS prevention programs, in 
order to reduce the number of new infections and save lives. 
However, the Committee also believes that funds should be 
increasingly used to support HIV/AIDS treatment programs, 
including programs to facilitate access by infected persons to 
anti-retroviral drugs. The Committee is aware of the concern 
that some HIV/AIDS affected countries, especially those in sub-
Saharan Africa, lack the capacity to effectively use additional 
funds for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS. The 
Committee believes that where local capacity is lacking, USAID 
should provide resources to build that capacity so HIV/AIDS 
programs can reach people in need.
    The Committee believes strongly that the urgency and 
magnitude of the HIV/AIDS crisis requires that USAID pursue all 
available options and authorities to ensure the most cost-
effective utilization of available resources to produce the 
greatest possible impact in stemming the pandemic.
    Microbicides.--The Committee welcomes progress by USAID and 
other Federal agencies to coordinate efforts to develop topical 
microbicides to prevent the spread of HIV. However, the 
Committee remains concerned that this work has not received the 
support it deserves. Microbicide products, while not yet 
available, are being tested in several countries and have the 
potential to be particularly important for women, whose risk of 
HIV/STD infection is high and whose control over existing 
prevention options is low. USAID has a demonstrated advantage 
in enhancing the feasibility of successful clinical trials 
through site infrastructure development and product 
introduction in countries with limited resources. For fiscal 
year 2002, USAID should provide at least $15,000,000 for 
microbicides research and development, and the Committee 
expects these funds to be managed by the Director of the 
USAID's HIV/AIDS Division.
    Media Training.--The Committee believes that more education 
about the causes, effects, and treatment of HIV/AIDS is needed 
in many areas, especially sub-Saharan Africa. One promising way 
to increase knowledge about the disease is through accurate and 
unbiased media reporting, which is lacking in many parts of 
Africa. The Committee recommends that USAID make available at 
least $2,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 for an independent media 
training program in sub-Saharan Africa. The program should be 
conducted by an organization with a demonstrated record of 
training journalists, assisting in the development of 
independent radio/television stations, and producing public 
service announcements on HIV/AIDS and related issues.
    Nurse Training.--The Committee believes that far more 
emphasis should be given to training nurses to cope with the 
HIV/AIDS crisis in sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the acute 
shortage of African doctors, nurses are often the first and 
only contact that people have with the health care system. The 
Committee urges USAID to fund an appropriate American school of 
nursing to establish an AIDS care and counseling program for 
African nurses, who can then train other nurses and community 
health workers in prevention, surveillance, testing, home care, 
and case management services.
    Nyumbani.--For many years, the Committee has been impressed 
by the work of the Nyumbani orphanage in Nairobi, which cares 
for HIV-positive infants. The Committee believes the Nyumbani 
orphanage merits continued support from USAID, and recommends 
$150,000 in fiscal year 2002. In addition, the Committee is 
aware of a new Nyumbani initiative called ``Village in Hope,'' 
to provide housing and care to two other HIV-affected groups--
the elderly, who through the ravages of AIDS no longer have 
children to support them, and AIDS-orphaned youth. Each group, 
living together, would share support and security. The 
Committee believes this proposal also deserves USAID's serious 
consideration for funding in fiscal year 2002.
    Father John Anthony Kaiser.--The Committee encourages USAID 
to provide funding for activities in rural Kenya that continue 
the work of the late Father John Anthony Kaiser, including 
support for rural schools, orphanages and health clinics, and 
the care and treatment of HIV-infected children and children 
orphaned by AIDS.
    Protection of Women and Girls.--The Committee recognizes 
that the vulnerability of women and girls to HIV/AIDS infection 
is increased, in part, due to a lack of economic opportunities, 
culturally defined gender roles, and widespread violence 
against women. As a result, women have accounted for more than 
half of the AIDS-related deaths since the beginning of the 
pandemic. The Committee urges USAID's Women in Development 
office to ensure that HIV/AIDS programs take into account the 
specific impact of the disease on women and girls.
    UNAIDS.--The Committee expects USAID to increase support 
for the work of UNAIDS, which plays a key coordination role in 
the global effort to design national AIDS plans, expand access 
to HIV drugs, set standards for vaccine trials, and collect 
data that is critical in combating the HIV/AIDS pandemic.
    Teacher Training.--The Committee recognizes that prevention 
programs in schools and teacher training initiatives on HIV/
AIDS issues can play an important role in reducing the spread 
of the virus. The Committee expects that these types of 
programs will be part of bilateral and multilateral prevention 
efforts.

                       OTHER INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    The Committee has provided $175,000,000 for programs to 
combat other infectious diseases, to strengthen disease 
surveillance, and to reduce anti-microbial resistance in 
developing countries. This is the fifth year of a congressional 
initiative begun in fiscal year 1998, which has resulted in 
additional appropriations of over $250,000,000 for these 
activities.
    Tuberculosis.--The Committee recommends at least 
$70,000,000 to combat tuberculosis (TB), including $55,000,000 
from the Child Survival and Health Programs Fund and at least 
$15,000,000 from the ESF, SEED, and FSU accounts. The Committee 
expects funds for TB from the ESF, SEED, and FSU accounts will 
be obligated and disbursed rapidly. The Committee recommends 
that USAID provide $2,000,000 to the Gorgas Memorial Institute 
Initiative for Tuberculosis Control. The Committee also notes 
that bilateral programs designed with the World Health 
Organization and American Lung Association have been effective 
in dealing with TB in developing nations and encourages USAID 
to continue to support these efforts.
    Malaria.--The Committee recommends at least $55,000,000 in 
Development Assistance funds for programs to combat malaria, a 
debilitating disease that afflicts an estimated 500 million 
people each year, of whom 1 million die, mostly Africans.

                UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)

    The Committee supports efforts to reach the child survival 
goals set by the World Summit for Children. In order to 
implement these goals, the Committee recommends that 
$120,000,000 of the funds provided under the Child Survival and 
Health Programs Fund be provided as a contribution to UNICEF. 
This does not preclude USAID from providing additional funding 
for specific UNICEF projects as may be appropriate.

                             IMMUNIZATIONS

    The Committee is aware that at least 3 million children die 
each year because they do not receive life-saving 
immunizations. Last year, Congress recommended that up to 
$50,000,000 be provided as an initial U.S. contribution to the 
Global Fund for Children's Vaccines in support of the Global 
Alliance for Children's Vaccines (GAVI). The Global Fund, now 
named The Vaccine Fund, provides resources to support the 
international, public and private partnership recommendations 
of GAVI. Since its inception a year ago, more than $600,000,000 
for 36 countries has been committed for immunization programs 
over the next 3 years, potentially saving as many as 1.5 
million lives a year. The Committee strongly supports continued 
funding for this program and recommends up to $50,500,000 for 
The Vaccine Fund in fiscal year 2002.

                            SAFE INJECTIONS

    The Committee notes that many of the 12 billion injections 
that are given each year in the world are unsafe. Of particular 
concern is the reuse of injection equipment without 
sterilization, a common practice in developing countries. The 
Committee recommends not less than $1,000,000 to develop and 
implement effective strategies to improve injection safety, 
including developing and promoting technologies that improve 
the safety of injections provided for preventive and curative 
services; developing environmentally sound, reasonable priced 
methods for improving the safety of the disposal of used 
injection supplies; and launching an intensive 5-year 
communication initiative, in conjunction with WHO, UNICEF and 
the GAVI Advocacy Task Force, to promote the safe and 
appropriate use of injections.
    The Committee emphasizes that it is important that 
injection safety is not perceived as an entirely separate 
initiative, but as one important element of an overall 
integrated effort to improve the quality of health service 
delivery. The Committee requests that USAID's efforts to 
improve injection safety be discussed in USAID's annual Child 
Survival Report to Congress.

                      IODINE DEFICIENCY DISORDERS

    The Committee is aware that iodine deficiency disorder 
(IDD) is the leading preventable cause of mental retardation in 
children. Problems associated with IDD are particularly of 
concern in Africa, Asia, and in the former Soviet republics. 
Private funding raised by Kiwanis International and implemented 
by UNICEF is already preventing the mental retardation of more 
than 10 million children a year. In order to help meet the IDD 
goals, the Committee recommends that USAID provide a total of 
at least $2,250,000 from the Child Survival and Health Programs 
Fund, and $2,500,000 from the FSU and SEED accounts through the 
Kiwanis/UNICEF IDD partnership program.

                   VITAMIN A AND OTHER MICRONUTRIENTS

    The Committee supports increased funding for the vitamin A 
deficiency program, as more than 250 million children are 
vitamin A deficient, increasing their risk of severe illness, 
blindness, and death. Vitamin A is a low cost solution to 
easily preventable diseases. Like last year, the Committee 
recommends at least $30,000,000 for the overall USAID 
micronutrient program, allowing for an increase in funding for 
programs related to vitamin A deficiency.

                           POLIO ERADICATION

    The Committee again recommends $30,000,000 for the 
multilateral effort to eradicate polio, an extraordinary 
public-private effort which is expected to take another 3 to 4 
years.

                             BLIND CHILDREN

    According to the World Health Organization, there are 1.5 
million blind children around the world and another 7 million 
children who suffer from impaired vision. The Committee 
recognizes the work being done by Helen Keller Worldwide, the 
International Eye Foundation, and other organizations to assist 
these children, who can be helped with simple and inexpensive 
methods of prevention and treatment. The Committee is concerned 
with the slow pace of obligation and disbursement of funds 
appropriated for blind children in the past, and expects USAID 
to provide $1,300,000 for such programs in fiscal year 2002.

       PROGRAMS TO ASSIST THE VISUALLY IMPAIRED IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

    The Committee is concerned with the large number of blind 
and visually and hearing impaired children and adults in 
Southeast Asia. The Committee is aware that organizations such 
as Helen Keller Worldwide have initiated cost-effective 
programs to address these needs in Vietnam and Cambodia. The 
Committee urges USAID to expand funding for similar programs in 
the region.

                  ORPHANS AND DISPLACED CHILDREN FUND

    The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the Displaced 
Children and Orphans Fund. The Committee has again provided 
authority to use up to $25,000 in program funds for displaced 
and orphaned children and victims of war, to enable the USAID 
office responsible for the design and management of these 
programs to monitor and oversee their implementation. USAID is 
also encouraged to use other operating expense funds, as 
necessary, to further the effectiveness of the oversight of 
these programs.

                  FAMILY PLANNING/REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH

    The Committee has provided $450,000,000 for family 
planning/reproductive health programs within the Child Survival 
and Health Programs Fund. The Committee notes that this is 
$25,000,000 above the Administration's request and equal to the 
amount provided in fiscal year 1995. The Committee believes 
that it is important for the United States to provide more 
support for family planning services in developing countries, 
where 95 percent of new births will occur. This support should 
include expanding access to and the use of quality family 
planning information and services, to enable individuals and 
couples to avoid unintended pregnancies and other risks to 
reproductive health, including those associated with pregnancy, 
sexually transmitted infections and HIV/AIDS. Of this amount, 
$395,000,000 is to come from the Child Survival and Health 
Programs Fund, and $55,000,000 from the ESF, SEED, and FSU 
accounts. In the past, funds designated for family planning/
reproductive health from the ESF, SEED, and FSU accounts have 
been obligated and disbursed on an exceedingly slow timetable. 
The Committee expects that the rate of expenditures will 
improve dramatically, and that funds will be disbursed rapidly 
this year.
    The Committee recognizes that unchecked population growth 
is a major cause of environmental degradation, and urges USAID 
to develop performance goals and indicators which promote 
cross-sectoral collaboration on community-based population-
health-environment programs.
    The Committee supports organizations such as the Population 
Media Center, which promotes the use of mass media to educate 
people in developing countries about the personal benefits of 
family planning, encourage the use of effective measures to 
prevent transmission of HIV, and adopt other health measures.

                            MATERNAL HEALTH

    The Committee is aware that pregnancy-related deaths exceed 
600,000 annually, most of which are preventable. Like last 
year, the Committee recommends $50,000,000 for maternal health 
activities, and that additional funding be made available 
specifically to reduce pregnancy-related deaths. The Committee 
is aware of the efforts of the Haitian Health Foundation (HHF) 
to provide health care, including the treatment of women with 
high risk pregnancies, to over 200,000 people in Haiti. The 
Committee recommends that USAID support its work.

                           MEDICAL EQUIPMENT

    The Committee supports efforts by organizations, including 
International Medical Equipment Collaborative, to deliver 
donated medical equipment and supplies to under-served clinics 
in developing countries. The Committee urges USAID to give 
serious consideration to proposals for funding from these 
organizations.
    The Committee recognizes the work of Mobility International 
USA to develop a disability inclusive policy in Vietnam, and 
recommends that USAID consider supporting such an initiative 
with up to $300,000.
    The Committee supports the work of the International 
Foundation for the Reduction of Infectious Diseases to provide 
hospitals in developing countries with technologies to protect 
hospital workers against a dangerous viruses.

                         DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,305,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   1,325,000,000
House allowance.........................................   1,098,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,235,000,000

    The Development Assistance account consists of a wide 
variety of poverty-reduction and long-term development 
activities including free market development, agriculture and 
rural development, urban programs, environment and energy, 
basic education, micro-credit, and democracy and the rule of 
law.

                      GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT ALLIANCE

    The Committee is aware of the preliminary outlines of 
USAID's ``Global Development Alliance'' (GDA) proposal, which 
builds on recent USAID experience of partnering with private 
organizations (including private companies, foundations, and 
private and voluntary organizations) to accomplish development 
objectives.
    The Committee generally supports the concept of linking 
Federal and private resources to achieve development goals. 
USAID's financial and human resources, particularly the 
expertise of its field missions, have the potential, when 
coupled with resources from non-Federal sources, to greatly 
increase the amount of assistance the United States can provide 
to advance development goals. The Committee believes that USAID 
needs to do more in investigating the management and policy 
implications of this approach before it is accepted as a model 
for USAID. The Committee encourages USAID to consult with the 
Committee on its plans for this initiative before procedures 
and policy are finalized. Until sufficient details about the 
scope and functions of the GDA proposal are provided to the 
Committee for its review and further consultations occur, no 
program funds are to be reserved or used from the fiscal year 
2002 or prior year Acts to fund GDA activities.

                          WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 
for USAID's Office of Women in Development (WID). In addition 
to providing adequate funding, the Committee requests the USAID 
Administrator to seriously consider strengthening the WID 
Office. The Office plays a key role in integrating gender 
perspectives into USAID's programs and policies, and providing 
technical support, research and implementation of initiatives 
focused on women's economic status and legal rights, and girls' 
education. Possible actions include appointing a person at the 
Deputy Assistant Administrator level to head the office; 
creating a WID Working Group, with membership at the Deputy 
Assistant Administrator level to monitor and assist with the 
implementation of the Gender Plan of Action; and increasing the 
WID office budget to enhance its effectiveness.
    The Committee strongly supports the work of Women's 
Campaign International (WCI), which works to enhance the status 
of women through media, leadership, business, organizational, 
and public-service training in developing countries. The 
Committee recommends at least $600,000 for WCI in fiscal year 
2002.
    The Committee is aware of Vital Voices Global Partnership's 
efforts to support women leaders who are working to increase 
economic opportunities for women and strengthen civil society 
in emerging democracies, and recommends $100,000 to support the 
Partnership's work.

                       CHILDREN'S BASIC EDUCATION

    Educating children in developing countries is fundamental 
to long term development. The Committee believes that USAID 
should significantly broaden its support for these activities, 
and recommends $135,000,000 for children's basic education in 
fiscal year 2002. The Committee expects USAID to emphasize 
programs that expand access and quality of education for girls, 
enhance community and parental participation in schools, 
improve teacher training, and build local management capacity. 
USAID should ensure that it has sufficient education 
specialists to manage this increased emphasis on basic 
education.

                 AMERICAN SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS ABROAD

    The Committee recognizes the important contributions made 
to U.S. foreign policy by institutions funded by the American 
Schools and Hospitals Abroad (ASHA) program, and has provided 
not less than $19,000,000 to support these institutions in 
fiscal year 2002, which is $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2001 level. The Committee also expects USAID to allocate 
sufficient sums to administer the ASHA program from funds 
provided for Operating Expenses, so it will not be necessary to 
expend any program funds for administrative purposes.
    The Committee understands that ASHA funds are available for 
a variety of purposes, such as construction and equipment, 
libraries, computer technology, curriculum and staff support, 
and related expenses. However, the Committee does not intend 
this assistance to be presumed to offer permanent budget 
support to ASHA recipients. The Committee encourages ASHA to 
give priority to organizations which demonstrate a commitment 
to private fundraising to match government support.
    By increasing ASHA funding to $19,000,000, the Committee 
intends to ensure that support is provided to institutions that 
are particularly effective demonstration centers of American 
educational and medical practices. The Committee continues to 
be impressed with the contributions to U.S. interests made by 
several institutions and believes that they warrant further 
support, including Lebanese American University, International 
College; The Johns Hopkins University's Centers in Nanjing, 
China and Bologna, Italy; the Center for American Studies at 
Fudan University, Shanghai; the Hadassah Medical Organization; 
the American University of Beirut; and the Feinberg Graduate 
School of the Weizmann Institute of Science. The Committee is 
also aware of the American University in Kyrgyzstan, which 
opened in 1993. The university serves as a model Western-style 
liberal arts university in the region.

                           VICTIMS OF TORTURE

    The Committee is informed that USAID has provided 
$1,500,000 to foreign treatment centers for victims of torture 
during fiscal years 2000-2002. The Committee recommends that 
USAID provide up to $5,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 for these 
centers consistent with the goals of the Torture Victims Relief 
Reauthorization Act of 1999.
    The Committee has reviewed USAID's ``Report to Congress on 
Victims of Torture and USAID Assistance for fiscal year 2000,'' 
and is concerned that USAID appears to include within its 
definition of ``torture'' such activities as assisting 
``victims displaced by violence'' and ``families adversely 
affected during armed conflict,'' and the ``reintegration of 
war-affected youth.'' While these may or may not involve 
torture victims, the Committee emphasizes that funds 
appropriated for victims of torture are intended for the unique 
category of persons who have been subjected to torture, or to 
support programs specifically to prevent torture.

                     PATRICK LEAHY WAR VICTIMS FUND

    The Committee strongly supports the Leahy War Victims Fund, 
which, since 1989, has provided essential orthopedic and 
related medical, surgical, and rehabilitation assistance for 
civilians who are disabled as a direct or indirect result of 
civil strife or armed conflict. In addition to enabling 
amputees and other people with disabilities to regain mobility, 
the Committee supports USAID's efforts to increase their 
accessibility to mainstream educational, recreational and 
economic opportunities. The Committee expects USAID to provide 
$12,000,000 for this program in fiscal year 2002. The Committee 
encourages the Fund to increase its support for initiatives in 
conflict-affected countries that will lead to appropriate 
disability laws and policies, and improvements in and the 
expansion of appropriate services and programs that are needed 
by people with conflict-related, physical disabilities.
    The Committee expresses its appreciation to the USAID 
employees who manage this program, and who have earned the 
respect of disability experts around the world.

               U.S. TELECOMMUNICATIONS TRAINING INSTITUTE

    The Committee has provided not less than $500,000 for the 
U.S. Telecommunications Training Institute (USTTI). USTTI is a 
nonprofit joint venture between the public and private sectors 
dedicated to providing tuition free communications and 
broadcast training to professionals from around the world.

          COOPERATIVE ASSOCIATION FOR STATES FOR SCHOLARSHIPS

    The Committee supports the work of the Cooperative 
Association for States for Scholarships and expects USAID to 
continue funding this program.

                    PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS

    The Committee has again included language to ensure that 
the level of funding to private and voluntary organizations 
(PVOs) is maintained at a high level. This is consistent with 
current law and USAID's commitment to enhance support for PVOs, 
as they are increasingly called upon to implement U.S. foreign 
assistance programs. In addition, the Committee urges the 
Office of Private Voluntary Cooperation to maintain funding at 
$6,000,000 for cooperative development organizations in fiscal 
year 2002 in order to enhance their technical capacities and 
build business alliances for overseas activities with U.S. 
cooperatives.

                         MICRO-CREDIT PROGRAMS

    The Committee strongly supports micro-credit programs for 
very poor people and funding for other micro-credit activities 
in accordance with Public Law 106-309. The Committee supports 
at least the funding level in that Act.

                            NAVSARJAN TRUST

    The Committee is aware of the important role the Navsarjan 
Trust is playing to build civil society in India by promoting 
the rights of the Dalit community. Navsarjan has 
representatives in more than 2,000 villages. The Committee 
requests USAID to seriously consider providing funding to the 
Navsarjan Trust.

                 INTERNATIONAL EXECUTIVE SERVICE CORPS

    The Committee supports the excellent work of International 
Executive Service Corps (IESC) volunteers who, over the past 
four decades, have assisted in business development, economic 
growth, and technology transfer in some 120 countries. The 
Committee is concerned that USAID has underutilized the IESC as 
a development partner in recent years, and calls on USAID to 
renew its commitment to the IESC to enable expansion of its 
projects in Latin America, the Caribbean, Asia and sub-Saharan 
Africa. The Committee recommends that USAID provide $5,000,000 
to support additional work by the IESC.

                    AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

    The Committee welcomes the USAID Administrator's strong 
support for agriculture development, and expects USAID to 
provide at least $310,000,000 for these activities in fiscal 
year 2002.
    Agriculture remains the only means of survival for the 
majority of people in developing countries, and support for 
agriculture will help slow the migration of people to cities, 
many of which are already overcrowded and incapable of 
providing even basic services. The Committee believes that, in 
addition to continuing programs to improve farming techniques 
and increase crop yields, more emphasis should be given to 
strengthening the business skills of small farmers, building 
links between private farmers and agriculture processors, and 
creating markets for agriculture products. These activities 
should be a priority in countries with a tradition of 
centralized control over agricultural production, as well as in 
countries where geography and a lack of infrastructure impede 
access to markets. Like last year, the Committee has provided 
that not less than $30,000,000 should be made available for 
plant biotechnology programs. In addition, USAID should 
consider allocating a substantial portion of these funds 
through the Global Bureau. The Committee notes that the 
American University of Beirut has designed a plant 
biotechnology program to enhance agricultural, industrial, and 
research opportunities in the Middle East. The Committee 
requests USAID to consider funding this program.
    The Committee urges USAID to seriously consider a proposal 
by Sustainable Harvest International to provide $100,000 for 
long-term training and support for subsistence farmers in 
Central America.

                    COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

    The Committee is disappointed by the decline in funding for 
the U.S./Israel Cooperative Development Program (CDR) and 
Cooperative Development Research Program (CDR). The Committee 
supports funding for CDP/CDR, which has particularly benefitted 
developing countries and the emerging democracies of Eastern 
Europe and the former Soviet Union.

                            FARMER-TO-FARMER

    The Committee continues to support the Farmer-to-Farmer 
(FTF) program in the former Soviet Union and elsewhere, and 
again recommends that USAID support these exchanges directly, 
in addition to the funding FTF receives from the Department of 
Agriculture. The Committee notes that this program is a cost-
effective form of technical assistance because the American 
participants volunteer their time.

                            CREDIT PROGRAMS

    The Committee is aware of the efforts of the World Council 
of Credit Unions to further develop credit union systems in 
South Africa and Mexico in order to promote free-market 
principles and increase the ability of poor people to access 
credit and other banking services. The Committee recommends up 
to $2,000,000 for this initiative.

                    MAINTENANCE OF PROTEA GERMPLASM

    The Committee recognizes the need to safeguard the protea 
germplasm maintained in South Africa, as protea production and 
marketing is an important economic component of the tropical 
ornamental plant industries of South Africa and the United 
States. The Committee requests USAID to provide sufficient 
funds in order to sponsor an international conference for the 
purpose of finalizing and initiating a comprehensive plan to 
sustain the protea industries in South Africa and the United 
States.

              INTERNATIONAL FERTILIZER DEVELOPMENT CENTER

    The Committee continues to support the work of the 
International Fertilizer Development Center (IFDC) and has 
provided that not less than $2,300,000 should be made available 
for its core grant. The Committee also recommends that an 
additional $1,700,000 be made available to further support the 
research and development activities of IFDC.

                           DAIRY DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee continues to place a priority on dairy 
development and recommends that USAID actively pursue 
opportunities to increase funding above the current level, with 
a goal of providing $6,000,000 in fiscal year 2002.

    ENVIRONMENT, CLEAN ENERGY AND ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAMS FUND

    The Committee has established a fund to support programs 
that address a wide range of environmental conservation and 
energy issues through the protection of tropical forests, 
biodiversity and wildlife; the promotion of cleaner and 
renewable energy technologies; and conservation. The Committee 
does not believe these programs have received adequate support 
at a time when the environment is under siege in many 
developing countries due to unchecked population growth, 
illegal logging, the burning of fossil fuels in antiquated 
power plants and other manufacturing processes, slash and burn 
agriculture, and other destructive activities.
    The Committee has provided that $295,000,000 in Development 
Assistance funds should be made available for these programs in 
fiscal year 2002, an increase of $23,000,000 above the current 
level. The Committee expects $175,000,000 from all accounts in 
the bill for programs to assist developing countries measure, 
monitor, report, verify, and reduce greenhouse gases and 
related activities, an increase of $10,000,000 above the 
current level.
    Biodiversity.--The Committee expects USAID to provide 
$100,000,000 for biodiversity programs, including initiatives 
to enhance biodiversity in marine environments. The Committee 
encourages USAID to work with other nations to hold a 
conference on second generation fisheries in order to develop a 
blueprint for preserving marine biodiversity and meeting the 
growing demands for fish protein. The Committee encourages 
USAID to coordinate its efforts in this field with the Pacific 
International Center for High Technology Research.
    Environment Offices.--The Committee requests USAID to 
consult the Committee on the future role and funding for its 
Office of Environment and Natural Resources and Office of 
Environment and Urban Programs.
    Cleaner and renewable energy.--The Committee notes that the 
demand for energy in developing countries is rapidly 
increasing, and requests USAID to consult with the Committee 
regarding the unique programs of USAID's Office of Energy, 
Environment, and Technology to promote the use of U.S. cleaner 
and renewable energy technology.
    The Committee continues to support the application of 
renewable-energy technologies for Pacific Island nations and 
recommends up to $500,000 for the Pacific International Center 
for High Technology Research to initiate a demonstration 
program on sustainable renewable energy systems.
    The Committee expects the Office of Energy, Environment, 
and Technology to explore ways to promote the use of small wind 
turbines as a renewable energy source, and requests USAID to 
submit a report by April 1, 2002, describing its efforts to 
promote the use of renewable energy technology and include a 
list of renewable energy projects that have been funded over 
the past 3 years.
    The Committee encourages the Office of Energy, Environment 
and Technology, through its partnership with the U.S. 
Hydropower Council for International Development, to work with 
foreign governments to remove market barriers and influence 
policy reform, in order to enable U.S. energy companies and 
financing organizations to invest in improvements in energy 
infrastructure in emerging markets. The Committee expects USAID 
to continue to play a leading role in the multi-agency Clean 
Energy Technology Exports Initiative, which is now underway to 
promote and deploy a range of U.S. cleaner and renewable energy 
technologies in developing countries and countries in 
transition.

             TROPICAL PLANT AND ANIMAL RESEARCH INITIATIVE

    The Committee urges USAID to consider funding a joint 
application from Israel and Hawaii to collaborate on a research 
and development project relating to the rapidly expanding 
tropical fish and plant global market.

                             PARKS IN PERIL

    The Committee continues to strongly support the Parks in 
Peril program, which matches USAID funds with private 
contributions to support conservation of imperiled ecosystems 
in Latin America and the Caribbean.

               FOUNDATION FOR SECURITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

    The Committee continues to support the work of the 
Foundation for Security and Stability, a public foundation 
chartered to further the understanding of resource scarcity and 
environmental problems that play a significant role in causing 
regional instability. The Committee recommends $2,500,000 for 
the Foundation.

                           THE PEREGRINE FUND

    Although best known for its efforts to recover the 
Peregrine Falcon, The Peregrine Fund is building a record of 
conserving birds of prey worldwide. The group has worked to 
protect many species including the California Condor, Aplomado 
Falcon, Hawaiian Crow, and the Mauritius Kestrel. A significant 
undertaking in the pursuit of preservation is the establishment 
of The Peregrine Fund's Neotropical Raptor Center in Panama. 
The Committee recommends $500,000 to support this goal, which 
the Committee understands will be matched by private 
contributions.

                           MOUNTAIN GORILLAS

    The Committee is concerned with the survival of mountain 
gorillas which inhabit the high altitude jungles of Rwanda, 
Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This 
magnificent species, once an important source of income for 
these countries from eco-tourism, has been devastated by 
poaching and civil conflict in the region. Like last year, the 
Committee expects that $1,500,000 will be provided to support 
groups that protect these animals, such as the Dian Fossey 
Gorilla Fund International and other nongovernmental 
organizations whose mission it is to deter poaching and protect 
the mountain gorillas' habitat.

                               ORANGUTANS

    The Committee remains concerned about the destruction of 
orangutan habitat in Borneo and Sumatra, and expects USAID to 
provide $1,500,000 for continued support through 
nongovernmental organizations, including the Orangutan 
Foundation and others, for activities to save the orangutan 
from extinction. The Committee requests to be consulted 
regarding the use of these funds.
    The Committee is aware of a proposal to UNESCO to declare 
Tanjung Puting National Park a World Heritage Site, and urges 
the State Department to support this proposal which could 
greatly enhance the preservation of this endangered area that 
is home to many of the last surviving orangutans.

                           WATER CONSERVATION

    The Committee is aware that the scarcity of water, both for 
drinking and irrigation, is reaching crisis proportions in some 
regions of the world. It is also increasingly a cause of civil 
unrest, particularly in the Middle East. The Committee urges 
USAID, in coordination with the State Department and other 
appropriate Federal departments and agencies, to develop a 
long-term strategy for working with other industrialized and 
developing countries, international organizations, and NGOs, to 
address this serious global problem. The Committee requests 
USAID to submit the outline of such a strategy for the 
Committee's consideration by April 1, 2002.
    The Committee also notes that International Project WET has 
been working for nearly two decades in the field of 
international water resources management and encourages USAID 
to support International Project WET's efforts to provide 
training models and educational materials to a number of 
countries.

                            DESERTIFICATION

    Desertification threatens as many as 1 billion people 
worldwide and is a serious impediment to economic development 
in many poor nations, particularly in Africa. Last year the 
Senate ratified the United Nations Convention to Combat 
Desertification (UNCCD) which encourages the coordination of 
international efforts to address the causes, impacts, and 
potential solutions to desertification in developing countries. 
The Committee requests USAID, and the State and Treasury 
Departments, to evaluate their programs and report to the 
Committee by April 1, 2002, on their progress in implementing 
the UNCCD, raising the profile of United States efforts to 
combat desertification and generating opportunities for 
American businesses.

                COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH SUPPORT PROGRAMS

    The Committee continues its strong support for the 
Collaborative Research Support Programs (CRSPs). Recognizing 
the important research and training functions of these 
programs, the Committee recommends that funding above the 
fiscal year 2001 level be provided for the CRSPs, and that the 
CRSPs be considered for funding for a broad range of 
development-related activities.
    The Committee continues its support for the Soils 
Management Collaborative Research Support Program (SM-CRSP) and 
the application of SM-CRSP's decision support system to assess 
and enhance the ability of plants and soil micro-organisms to 
remove carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and enhance soil 
productivity by storing carbon in the soil. The Committee 
recommends that USAID provide $3,000,000 for the SM-CRSP to 
continue ongoing activities and initiate work on carbon 
storage.
    The Committee also continues to support the Peanut CRSP, 
which has been providing benefits of peanut-related research to 
both the United States and developing countries since its 
inception in 1982. The Committee is informed that a recent 
USAID review confirmed the high quality of the peanut CRSP, and 
the Committee recommends that USAID increase funding for this 
program.

                          UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS

    The Committee has received a large number of requests to 
fund specific programs, projects, and activities at or through 
American institutions of higher education. The Committee 
strongly supports the funding of activities that advance U.S. 
international development assistance and foreign policy goals. 
The Committee has reviewed many of the concepts proposed for 
funding, and recommends that USAID and/or the Department of 
State (as appropriate for the proposed project) actively 
consider proposals submitted by the following organizations. In 
doing so, the Committee expects that competitive procedures 
will be followed with regard to each to the maximum extent 
possible. Unless a proposal demonstrates a unique, innovative, 
or proprietary capability, or demonstrates special 
considerations that justify limited or non-competitive 
treatment, the Committee expects that competitive procedures 
will be applied with regard to the proposals on the list that 
follows. The Committee also expects USAID to give priority to 
proposals that are well conceived, including those with 
realistic budgets and achievable objectives.
    Within 60 days after the submission of the initial report 
required by section 653(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act, USAID 
should submit a report to the Committee on the status of each 
activity identified below. Such a report should include: (1) 
the status of a funding proposal by the organization associated 
with each activity; (2) the degree to which the proposal is 
consistent with and would advance United States development 
assistance and foreign policy goals for the country or region 
in which the activity would take place; (3) the degree to which 
matching or other funds would be provided by the organization 
to complement the Federal contribution; (4) to the extent known 
at the time, any decision by USAID or the Department of State 
on funding the activity, including the proposed funding level; 
and (5) any other relevant information deemed important by 
USAID or the Department of State. The Committee also expects to 
receive a second report on the status of these proposals no 
later than May 1, 2002. In addition, the Committee expects 
USAID to identify an office or organization within USAID, or 
within the State Department if appropriate, to which inquiries 
can be directed on the status of these proposals.
    The Committee notes that, in the past, USAID has not been 
responsive to a number of proposals put forward by 
universities. While the Committee intends that USAID will judge 
these proposals on their merits, it expects USAID's 
responsiveness to dramatically improve and to consult with the 
Committee and interested Members of Congress on these 
proposals.
    With the foregoing in mind, the Committee recommends the 
following proposals for USAID's active consideration:
    Africa-America Institute.--The African Technology for 
Education and Workforce Development Initiative, which is a 
project to establish distance learning programs between several 
universities in the United States and Africa.
    Alliance of Louisiana Universities.--A proposal of the 
Louisiana/Honduras Alliance, composed of five Louisiana 
Universities (University of New Orleans, Louisiana State 
University Agricultural Center, Loyola University, Tulane 
University, and Southeastern Louisiana University) and entities 
in Honduras, to develop a plan to deliver long-term capacity-
building assistance in Honduras.
    Atlanta-Tbilisi Partnership.--A proposal of the Atlanta-
Tbilisi Partnership's Sustained Healthcare Initiative in the 
Republic of Georgia, which includes Emory University, Georgia 
State University, Moorehouse School of Medicine, Georgia 
Institute of Technology, and Grady Memorial Hospital, to 
improve health care systems.
    City University.--A proposal by City University to improve 
distance learning opportunities in Eastern Europe.
    Columbia University.--A proposal for drought monitoring 
centers in Kenya and South Africa to assist in climate 
monitoring and long-range forecasting.
    Columbia University.--A program at Columbia University's 
Center for Health and Food Security that focuses on disease and 
famine issues associated with climate forcing agents across 
Africa.
    Connecticut State University System.--A proposal to work 
with Mico and Sam Sharpe Colleges to enhance teacher education 
programs in the Carribean region.
    Dakota Wesleyan University.--A program to establish the 
Hunger Project at the George McGovern Center for Public Service 
in order to cultivate global leadership and public service to 
combat hunger around the world.
    Dartmouth Medical School.--A proposal on behalf of a 
Dartmouth Primary Heath Care Partnership with Pristina Medical 
School in Kosovo, to integrate primary health education into 
the Pristina curriculum and establish opportunities for local 
medical providers and lay people to plan for the provision of 
health services.
    DePaul University College of Law.--A project to promote 
Arab-Israeli discussions on arms control, initiatives to 
strengthen law enforcement cooperation, and compliance with 
international nonproliferation accords.
    DePaul University College of Law.--Implementation of a 
project, conducted in cooperation with the Inter-American 
Commission of Women and the Inter-American Children's 
Institute, to combat trafficking of women and children for 
sexual exploitation in the Americas.
    EARTH University.--A proposal to support EARTH University, 
an institution partnered with 23 universities in the United 
States, to further develop its Center for Sustainability and 
Biodiversity in Costa Rica, which is working on enhancing 
sustainable agriculture, developing medicines using tropical 
plants, and preserving natural resources in Central America.
    Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University.--A proposal 
for a collaborative effort with the University of Cape Coast in 
Ghana for a doctoral program for Ghanian scholars who conduct 
research specific to their country and assume educational 
leadership roles in Ghana.
    Florida International University.--A proposal to create a 
Colombian Studies Institute to support United States 
policymakers and Florida officials through the development of 
coordinated policy analysis, outreach, and educational programs 
on Colombia.
    Green Mountain College.--A proposal put forward, in 
conjunction with other institutions including the University of 
Vermont, to provide training for Israelis, Jordanians, and 
Palestinians in environmental studies and natural resource 
management.
    Iowa State University.--A proposal by the International 
Women in Science and Engineering Program at Iowa State 
University, to increase the number of women in science and 
engineering professions in developing nations and enhance the 
status of women within these professions.
    Iowa State University.--A proposal to support the 
International Institute of Theoretical and Applied Physics at 
Iowa State University, which is principally focused on 
promoting international collaboration between scientists in the 
United States and developing nations.
    Historically Black Colleges.--A proposal to support the 
efforts of these institutions to conduct research into 
agriculture issues unique to African nations.
    Johns Hopkins University.--A proposal for a program at the 
School of Public Health to support ongoing research in Nepal, 
Bangladesh, and Tanzania that is designed to improve the 
understanding of the use of micronutrients to improve health in 
developing countries.
    Kansas State University.--A proposal for Kansas State 
University's Cereal Genome Initiative, which links the genetic 
stocks, knowledge, and experience of three International 
Agricultural Research Centers to identify existing cereal 
genomic research gaps, formulate research strategies, and 
conduct collaborative research projects.
    La Roche College.--A proposal to expand programs to educate 
young people from conflict, post-conflict, and developing 
regions of the world.
    Louisiana State University.--The LSU/Latin American 
Commercial Law project to jointly assist and train Central 
American, South American, and U.S. citizens to enhance 
understanding of the civil, commercial, and trade law systems 
of these regions.
    Louisiana State University.--A proposal to further develop 
an International Emergency Training Center at Louisiana State 
University.
    Loyola University.--A proposal to develop the Family Law 
Institute for Latin American Judges at Loyola University in New 
Orleans, Louisiana.
    Marquette University.--A proposal to expand HIV/AIDS 
programs by establishing an HIV/AIDS nursing training program 
in Kenya.
    Mississippi State University.--A proposal by the Office of 
International Programs for assistance in agribusiness project 
development and management, technical assistance, training, 
applied research, and technical information transfer.
    Montana State University, Billings.--A proposal to develop 
an online Master of Health Administration Degree Program with 
October 6 University in Egypt.
    Montana State University, Billings.--A proposal to expand 
programs in international business in order to enable MSU-
Billings to offer additional courses in accounting and e-
commerce in foreign countries.
    St. Michael's College.--A project between St. Michael's 
College and the Lake Net Institute to foster international 
cooperation on preserving freshwater lakes through education 
and technology transfer.
    St. Thomas University.--A proposal to expand programs that 
promote democratic principles in Africa and provide training in 
a number of areas including civic education, entrepreneurship, 
rule of law, public health, HIV/AIDS prevention, and conflict 
resolution.
    South Dakota State University.--A proposal to expand South 
Dakota State's involvement in the International Arid Lands 
Consortium, which provides an important mechanism for 
collaboration between scientists and researchers worldwide.
    South Dakota State University.--A proposal to support an 
initiative with Washington State University, Oregon State 
University and the International Maize and Wheat Improvement 
Center to promote food security in Central Asia and the 
Caucasus.
    Temple University.--A proposal in support of rule of law 
programs in the People's Republic of China to further enable 
American legal scholars, attorneys, judges, and government 
officials to work with their Chinese counterparts on a regular, 
organized basis to provide input into proposed or needed 
legislation and enforcement issues in the Chinese legal system.
    Tufts University.--A proposal for a collaborative project 
to provide diplomacy training to Albanians and ethnic-
Albanians.
    University of Alaska.--A program with Alaska Pacific 
University and the North Slope Borough and the Northwest Arctic 
Borough to provide training and technical assistance to 
strengthen Chukotka's economy, develop market driven systems, 
and improve social conditions, particularly for indigenous 
people in the region.
    University of Arkansas Medical School.--A collaborative 
effort with the Volgograd City Health Department, Volgograd 
Medical Academy, and other public-private partners in the 
community to enhance various health care delivery systems in 
the region.
    University of Dayton.--A new program to enhance 
refrigeration technologies for the storage of medical supplies 
in developing countries.
    University of Illinois-Chicago.--A proposal to establish a 
Joint Center on the Baltics in conjunction with the University 
of New Orleans and the U.S. Baltic Foundation.
    University of Indianapolis.--A proposal for a cross-
cultural educational exchange program with Intercollege in 
Cyprus to enhance skills in business, international relations, 
and computer information systems.
    University of Iowa.--A proposal for the Global Sweatshop 
Labor Initiative at the University of Iowa Center for Human 
Rights to conduct academic-based research on this issue to help 
build greater understanding and identify best practices to 
combat this problem.
    University of Kentucky.--A program relating to the 
development of crop insurance in Romania.
    University of Louisville.--A program in partnership with 
Rand Afrikaans University to work with impoverished communities 
in South Africa on economic reform issues, including increasing 
employment opportunities.
    University of Louisville.--A program in Georgia to enhance 
the capacity and professionalism of Georgian officials to 
attract and maintain private sector and multilateral 
institutional investments.
    University of Louisville.--A collaborative program with the 
University of Alabama-Birmingham, the Medical University of 
South Carolina, and Clemson University for research on plant 
materials in the Philippine rain forest which have potential 
for improved nutrition and disease prevention.
    University of Miami.--A proposal to establish, develop, and 
implement an institute in Cuban studies to provide research on 
transition issues related to Cuba.
    University of Mississippi.--A proposal for the National 
Center for Computational Hydroscience and Engineering for a 
program that transfers agricultural, environmental, and other 
technologies to the Polish Academy of Sciences.
    University of Nebraska Medical Center.--A pilot project to 
establish an Internet-based graduate nursing course in the 
former Soviet republics to enhance educational opportunities 
for health-care professionals.
    University of New Orleans.--A proposal for the Eastern 
Caribbean Project, a collaborative effort with the Government 
of Dominica, to provide education and technical expertise in 
order to protect ecosystems and enhance economic development in 
a number of locations, including Dominica, Grenada, St. Lucia, 
St. Vincent, and the Grenadines.
    University of Notre Dame.--A proposal to support a 
collaborative effort with the University of Ulster to develop 
and implement a branch campus in the West Belfast neighborhood 
of Springvale.
    University of Northern Iowa.--A proposal for University of 
Northern Iowa's Orava Project that works to enhance democracy-
building in Central and Eastern Europe through educational 
reform.
    University of Northern Iowa.--A proposal concerning the 
Global Health Corps program, which trains university students 
to conduct community health programs in under-served areas in 
developing countries.
    University of Northern Iowa.--A proposal of the Russo-
American Institute for Mutual Understanding to deepen cultural 
understanding and promote professional collaboration through 
exchange programs.
    University of Rhode Island.--A proposal by the University 
of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center to improve coastal 
management in order to enhance economic growth, public health, 
sustainable food security, and help minimize the impact of 
natural disasters.
    University of San Francisco.--A proposal by the University 
of San Francisco Center for Law and Global Justice, Cambodia 
Law and Democracy Project, to continue rule of law and 
democracy-building activities.
    University of South Alabama.--A proposal to enhance the 
Birth Defects Monitoring Program in the Rivine and Volyn 
oblasts in the Ukraine, which will allow the program to begin 
monitoring environmentally linked birth defects.
    University of Vermont.--A project to promote the transfer 
of sustainable agricultural practices to farmers in Honduras 
through the Vermont-Honduran partnership.
    University of Vermont College of Medicine.--A proposal to 
expand the Vermont Oxford Network database on high risk newborn 
infants' care outcomes, increase the number of participating 
international member institutions, and, support quality 
improvement collaboratives and patient safety projects.
    Utah State University.--A collaborative effort between Utah 
State University and the Arab-American University of Jenin to 
establish a College of Agriculture of Jenin, including an 
Agriculture Experiment Station and Extension Service, to assist 
agricultural industry in the region.
    Utah State University.--A proposal for the World Irrigation 
Applied Research and Training Center to improve the delivery of 
irrigation technology.
    Vermont Law School.--A proposal to further the work of 
Vermont Law School in promoting environmental standards in the 
former Soviet republics by establishing a Center for 
International Environmental Law.
    Yale University.--A proposal by Yale University's Child 
Study Center, operated in conjunction with the Tel Aviv Mental 
Health Center, to continue programs to treat traumatized 
children and their families.
    Western Kentucky University.--A collaborative program with 
a media support organization to join in-the-field training with 
practical, hands-on experience with broadcast and print 
journalism expertise.

                             COUNTRY ISSUES

                                 BURMA

    The Committee continues to strongly support funding for 
building democracy and protecting human rights in Burma, and to 
address the serious humanitarian needs that exist on the 
borders of Thailand and India as a direct result of the 
oppressive policies of the State Peace and Development Council 
(SPDC). The Committee is deeply concerned with continued 
military incursions by Burmese forces and their surrogate 
militia into Thailand, and notes the SPDC's recent purchase of 
MiG-29 fighter aircraft from Russia.
    The Committee continues to condemn the actions of the SPDC 
for its denial of basic freedoms, gross human rights 
violations, child and forced labor practices, drug trafficking, 
and money laundering. While noting that discussions have taken 
place between the SPDC and the National League for Democracy 
(NLD), the Committee calls upon the SPDC to immediately release 
all political prisoners, cease its abusive practices, and 
restore to power the legitimately elected leaders of Burma.
    The Committee supports and commends the efforts of NGOs 
working with Burmese democrats, including a recent effort to 
build media capacity within the pro-democracy movement. The 
Committee has provided $6,500,000 in ESF assistance for 
democracy building and humanitarian assistance for Burma.

                                BURUNDI

    The Committee notes that the ongoing conflict in Burundi 
continues to destabilize the Great Lakes region and exacerbate 
the country's humanitarian crisis. The Committee urges all 
parties to the conflict to participate in the ongoing peace 
process and support efforts to involve the Burundian people in 
negotiations about their political future.

                                CAMBODIA

    The Committee continues to be concerned with human rights 
abuses, political intimidation, and the absence of the rule of 
law in Cambodia. In particular, the Committee notes that 
Cambodia was recently designated by the United Nations as the 
world's leading producer of marijuana, and that limited 
progress has been made on combating illegal logging practices 
and bringing to trial former Khmer Rouge leaders. The Committee 
calls for greater vigilance by international financial 
institutions in the oversight and use of donor funds, 
particularly those supporting economic and legal reforms and 
the demobilization of Cambodian military personnel.
    The Committee recognizes the Documentation Center of 
Cambodia as an invaluable resource for information on war 
crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity committed in 
Cambodia. The Committee recommends that the Center receive 
adequate funds to carry on its important work when its current 
grant expires, including, if appropriate, the purchase of a 
vehicle suitable to conduct investigations in rural areas. The 
Committee requests the State Department to consult the 
Committee regarding funding for the Center in fiscal year 2002.
    The Committee appreciates the importance of commune council 
elections scheduled for next year, but notes the dominance of 
the ruling party on national and local election commissions and 
its control of media outlets. The Committee strongly condemns 
acts of political violence and intimidation. In anticipation of 
these polls, the Committee expects the Administration to 
provide not less than $3,000,000 to support the democratic 
opposition in Cambodia, and not less than $2,000,000 to support 
the efforts of civil society in Cambodia to monitor the 
elections.
    With the exception of HIV/AIDS programs, the Committee does 
not support the provision of any assistance to the Central 
Government of Cambodia unless and until the Secretary of State 
determines that Cambodia has met the certification requirements 
contained in section 560 of the bill.

                                 CHINA

    The Committee has provided $10,000,000 for programs to 
promote political and legal changes in China. The Committee 
expects that of these funds, not less than $5,000,000 will be 
provided for programs in China to be administered by the Bureau 
of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor at the State Department, 
and not less than $5,000,000 will be provided to the National 
Endowment for Democracy to support programs and activities 
relating to China and Tibet. The Committee recommends that 
ongoing programs be supported that promote democracy, human 
rights, and the rule of law. The Committee also supports 
funding for activities conducted by the United States-Asia 
Environmental Partnership in China.

                                 CYPRUS

    The Committee has provided $15,000,000 from the ESF account 
for Cyprus to be used for scholarships, bicommunal projects, 
and measures aimed at reunification of the island and designed 
to reduce tensions and promote peace and cooperation between 
the two communities on Cyprus. The Committee intends that these 
resources be made available to maximize leverage to improve 
prospects for a peaceful settlement in Cyprus.

                    DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO

    The Committee is deeply concerned with the humanitarian 
crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DROC) and 
neighboring countries, where conflict has resulted in 
widespread suffering and the massive displacement of civilian 
populations. Moreover, a number of African nations continue to 
expend scarce resources to maintain military forces in the DROC 
that are involved in violent and destructive activities, 
including the abuse of Congolese civilians and the exploitation 
of natural resources. The Committee urges all parties in the 
conflict to comply with the Lusaka Accord and not undermine the 
inter-Congolese dialogue. The Committee supports the 
Administration's budget request for the DROC which includes 
improvements to the delivery of health care services. The 
Committee has also increased the budgets for the International 
Disaster Assistance and Migration and Refugee Assistance 
accounts to help meet these humanitarian needs.

                               EAST TIMOR

    The Committee provides not less than $25,000,000 in ESF 
assistance for East Timor. The Committee congratulates the 
people of East Timor as they move toward the election of their 
first Constituent Assembly. The first years of independence and 
self-government will be critical in setting a solid foundation 
for a stable, democratic, and prosperous Timorese nation. The 
Committee recognizes the work of USAID's Office of Transition 
Initiatives, and the efforts of numerous American 
nongovernmental humanitarian, educational, and democracy-
building organizations that are making a vital contribution to 
East Timor's development. The Committee expresses strong 
support for continued funding of these activities.
    The Committee is deeply disappointed by the failure of the 
Indonesian Government, despite repeated assurances, to 
prosecute and punish military officers and militia leaders 
responsible for planning and carrying out atrocities in East 
Timor. The Committee is dismayed that tens of thousands of East 
Timorese refugees are still controlled by militias in West 
Timor.
    The Committee is concerned about reports of a rising HIV/
AIDS infection rate caused by the large presence of foreign 
nationals in East Timor, and is dismayed by rising incidences 
of prostitution. The Committee intends to consult with USAID on 
an effective response to this problem.

                                ETHIOPIA

    The Committee is concerned about human rights in Ethiopia, 
particularly the intimidation and persecution of human rights 
activists, journalists, and opposition groups. The Committee 
calls on the State Department to continue to raise these issues 
at the highest levels of the Government of Ethiopia.

                               GUATEMALA

    Last year the Committee commended the Portillo Government 
for its commitment to dismantle the Estado Mayor Presidential 
(EMP), which has been responsible for some of the worst 
atrocities in the country's history. Since that time, little 
has been done, and the Committee is disappointed that the 
Guatemalan Government has not fulfilled its commitment. The 
United States has offered to help fund the establishment of 
civilian security and intelligence services, if the EMP is 
dismantled.
    Also last year, the Committee commended steps by the 
Portillo Government in support of human rights. Unfortunately, 
the situation subsequently deteriorated, and the government has 
failed to respond. Moreover, common crime is rampant, and there 
have been attacks against judicial personnel, witnesses, human 
rights and labor activists, and journalists. The Committee is 
also aware of reports of official complicity in the smuggling 
of contraband into Guatemala from El Salvador and elsewhere. 
The Committee has continued the prohibitions on Foreign 
Military Financing and International Military Education and 
Training (IMET) assistance, with the exception of Expanded 
IMET, and expects the Expanded IMET program to emphasize 
civilian control of the military and human rights, and to 
include civilian participation.

                               INDONESIA

    The Committee continues to be concerned with the political 
situation in Indonesia, as that country struggles to 
consolidate its recent democratic transition. While mindful of 
the many difficult and complex challenges Indonesia faces, the 
Committee is nonetheless heartened by certain positive 
developments. The vigorous debate and activist approach of the 
current, democratically elected parliaments at the national and 
local levels, and the effort to decentralize power and 
enfranchise the lower levels of government are deserving of 
particular recognition.
    In recognition of Indonesia's immense economic challenges 
and development needs, the Committee recommends $135,000,000 
for Indonesia in fiscal year 2002, a $15,000,000 increase above 
the 2001 level and the 2002 budget request. The Committee 
expects the Administration to increase support for democracy-
building activities, rule of law and legal reform, 
environmental protection, human rights monitoring and 
education, and civil society development in Indonesia. The 
Committee also supports technical assistance to encourage 
greater media freedoms in Indonesia, as well as programs to 
promote responsible broadcasting, sound management, and 
transparency.
    The Committee is acutely aware of continued reports of 
violence waged by the Indonesian military and police against 
citizens in Aceh, Papua New Guinea, and other troubled areas of 
the country, and strongly condemns these human rights 
violations. The Committee notes that human rights monitoring 
groups have documented over 1,000 deaths, overwhelmingly 
civilian, in Aceh since the beginning of the year. The 
Committee condemns the actions taken by Indonesia to arm 
militias in Central Aceh that have led to recent massacres of 
civilians. The Committee is deeply concerned with reports of 
increased intimidation, harassment, and arbitrary arrest of 
human rights workers, lawyers, and peace negotiators, and 
supports a negotiated solution to the conflict. The Committee 
recommends that $10,000,000 be made available for humanitarian, 
economic rehabilitation, and related activities in Aceh, West 
Papua and Maluka.
    While the Committee commends the Indonesian military's 
refusal to inject itself into the current turmoil of Indonesian 
politics, there is a paucity of evidence that the military is 
committed to real reform, including holding its members 
accountable for abuses in East Timor--both before and after the 
1999 referendum--and elsewhere in Indonesia. The Committee 
expresses its dismay and frustration with the failure of 
Indonesian authorities to deliver justice for the September 6, 
2000, murders of three United Nations humanitarian workers in 
West Timor, including American Carlos Caceres. The Committee is 
also concerned about the Indonesian military's continued 
involvement in illegal business practices and other activities, 
including illegal logging that threatens to undermine 
Indonesian ecosystems.
    The Committee has continued restrictions on U.S. assistance 
and training for the Indonesian military, and expects to be 
consulted on a regular basis regarding the Administration's 
efforts to renew military-to-military ties, primarily on a 
multilateral basis. It is the Committee's understanding, after 
consultations with the State Department, that the purpose of 
this modest effort to re-engage with the Indonesian military is 
to encourage reform. The Committee expects U.S. officials to 
use these opportunities to press for improvements on human 
rights and accountability issues. If, over the coming year, 
there is no convincing indication that the military is moving 
forward with serious reforms, even these limited activities 
could be curtailed. The Committee believes that such reforms 
would include opening its budget to public scrutiny, 
reorienting its mission from internal security to defense 
against external threats, curtailing involvement in such 
activities as illegal logging, prostitution and contraband 
smuggling, and upholding the rule of law including 
accountability for military personnel who commit abuses. In an 
effort to encourage civilian control of the military, which is 
a first step toward reform, the Committee has modified the 
restrictions in current law to enable Indonesian civilians to 
participate in Expanded IMET courses.

                                LEBANON

    The Committee believes that economic development in Lebanon 
should be a priority for U.S. foreign policy, and expects that 
not less than $35,000,000 in ESF assistance will be made 
available for Lebanon.
    The Committee is deeply disappointed that past efforts to 
secure the return of American children abducted to Lebanon have 
been unsuccessful. The Committee is aware that in some cases 
the Lebanese Government has failed to enforce the orders of the 
Lebanese civil courts. The Committee calls on the Lebanese 
Government to ensure that the rule of law is upheld.

                                 MEXICO

    The Committee is encouraged by recent political 
developments in Mexico. In addition to addressing more 
effectively long-standing concerns such as drug trafficking, 
immigration, and trade, the Committee supports the Mexican 
Government's efforts to resolve peacefully the conflict in 
Chiapas. This rural, mountainous region is inhabited by 
indigenous groups who have suffered for generations from 
extreme poverty and discrimination. The Committee believes that 
expanding job opportunities is key to ending the conflict.
    The Committee is aware of a proposal by an organization 
named Xanvil, located in San Cristobal de Las Casas, Chiapas, 
to work with nearby Mayan highland communities to develop a 
number of small museums devoted to preserving and supporting 
Mayan culture, textiles, pottery and other crafts. These 
museums, several of which already exist but are in need of 
technical assistance and other support, would be coupled with 
stores for marketing the diverse work of local Mayan artisans 
and a tourist guidebook to the highland museums. The Committee 
believes that USAID should give serious consideration to 
supporting this community-based, income generating project to 
preserve unique cultural traditions in an impoverished region.

                                MONGOLIA

    The Committee has provided $12,000,000 in ESF assistance 
for Mongolia. The Committee recognizes Mongolia's achievements 
in consolidating its democratic transition, and commends the 
people of Mongolia for their participation in recent 
presidential elections. The Committee encourages the continued 
development of democratic institutions and privatization of 
state-owned enterprises, including the media. The Committee is 
concerned that constitutional guarantees of free speech be 
respected for all Mongolians, regardless of political 
affiliation.

                                 TIBET

    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 in ESF assistance for 
programs that provide training and education to Tibetans on 
democracy and human rights, preserve cultural traditions, and 
promote economic development and environmental conservation in 
Tibetan communities. The Committee is aware of the valuable 
assistance the Bridge Fund has provided to promote Tibetan-
owned and operated businesses and educational, cultural, and 
natural resource conservation projects in Tibet.

                                 SUDAN

    The Committee regards the situation in southern Sudan as 
among the most serious humanitarian crises in the world, along 
with Afghanistan and the eastern region of the Democratic 
Republic of the Congo (DROC). Like the DROC, the Sudan disaster 
is largely man-made. With the discovery of large oil reserves 
in southern Sudan, the Sudanese Government appears to be 
determined to wrest control of the area regardless of the cost 
in civilian lives. Indiscriminate bombing has resulted in the 
deaths and displacement of large numbers of people, which has 
been the norm in that region for decades.
    The Committee welcomes the efforts by the Secretary of 
State and the USAID Administrator to focus attention on the 
Sudan crisis and seek solutions. Like last year, the Committee 
has included up to $10,000,000 in ESF assistance to the 
National Democratic Alliance of Sudan to enable indigenous 
civil administrations in the opposition-controlled areas of 
Sudan, including but not limited to Bahr el Ghazal, to improve 
the welfare of their people and protect villages from slavery 
raids and forced displacement. These funds may be used for 
humanitarian and development activities, and for communications 
equipment, transportation and other support for inter-communal 
peace agreements between indigenous African and Arab groups.

                              SIERRA LEONE

    The Committee is encouraged by recent developments in 
Sierra Leone, including the ability of United Nations Mission 
in Sierra Leone (UNAMSIL) to deploy in the diamond areas and 
disarm members of Revolutionary United Front and pro-government 
militias. It is critical that the international community move 
quickly to strengthen disarmament efforts and peacekeeping 
operations in the region.
    To build a lasting peace, the Committee believes that it is 
imperative for the international community to support a 
tribunal in order to bring to justice those responsible for war 
crimes and other atrocities committed in Sierra Leone, 
irrespective of where they currently reside. The Committee 
commends the Administration's decision to provide $15,000,000 
for the tribunal in Sierra Leone, and expects the 
Administration to contribute at least a total of $10,000,000 in 
ESF for this purpose by the conclusion of fiscal year 2002, if 
the tribunal meets international standards of justice. Assuming 
the tribunal is performing according to expectations, the 
Committee recommends the remaining $5,000,000 to be provided in 
fiscal year 2003. This accelerated funding will provide greater 
incentive to other donors to support the tribunal in the third 
year. The Committee has provided sufficient funding in the ESF 
account and drawdown authority to accommodate this schedule.
    The Committee recognizes the humanitarian crisis in West 
Africa involving refugees and displaced persons from Sierra 
Leone, Guinea, and Liberia, and has provided additional funds 
under the International Disaster Assistance and Migration and 
Refugees Assistance accounts to help enhance the response of 
the international community to this crisis.
    The Committee is concerned about the widespread use of rape 
and sexual violence by combatants in Sierra Leone, which has 
victimized an estimated 20 percent of women and girls in the 
country. Only a small fraction are receiving health care and 
other services needed for their recovery, and these women and 
girls are further at risk of HIV/AIDS and other sexually 
transmitted diseases as combatants demobilize and return to 
their communities. The Committee urges USAID to expand services 
to rape victims through NGOs, and requests the State Department 
to develop and support a public education program on women's 
rights for both men and women.

                                ZIMBABWE

    The Committee is alarmed by the continuing political, 
economic, and social crisis in Zimbabwe, including the collapse 
of the rule of law. Since the June 2000 election, in which the 
opposition party, Movement for Democratic Change, won more than 
one-third of the seats in the parliament, the government has 
become increasingly autocratic and continues to deploy its 
armed forces in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, sponsor 
violence against its citizens, and contribute to the economic 
decline of the nation--where at least 70 percent of the 
population is impoverished.
    The Committee has included a provision that requires U.S. 
executive directors to international financial institutions to 
vote against loans, except those for basic human needs or 
democracy-building purposes, to the Government of Zimbabwe, 
unless the Secretary of State determines and reports that the 
rule of law has been restored. The Committee continues to 
support assistance to strengthen civil society that is not 
affiliated with the ruling party, and encourages the State 
Department to financially support international monitoring of 
the 2002 elections in Zimbabwe.

                   INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $165,000,000
    Emergency supplemental..............................     135,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     200,000,000
House allowance.........................................     201,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     255,000,000

    The Committee notes that during fiscal years 1999, 2000, 
and 2001 a total of $348,000,000 in supplemental funding was 
provided for the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) 
to deal with crises in Africa, Eastern Europe, and Latin 
America. With ongoing humanitarian emergencies in Afghanistan, 
Colombia, El Salvador, India and sub-Saharan Africa, the 
demands are even greater this year. The Committee believes that 
the fiscal year 2002 request is inadequate to effectively 
respond to these emergencies, and has provided $255,000,000, 
which is $55,000,000 above the budget request and $90,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2001 level. The Committee recognizes, 
however, that even this increase may fall far short of what is 
needed to meet these critical humanitarian needs.

                              AFGHANISTAN

    The Committee believes that the situation in Afghanistan is 
perhaps the most urgent, massive humanitarian crisis anywhere. 
The Committee commends OFDA and the Bureau for Migration and 
Refugee Affairs for the efforts they have made to respond to 
the Afghan emergency, and urges them to make every effort to 
provide additional relief to Afghans who have been displaced 
within their own country, and Afghan refugees in Pakistan and 
elsewhere.

                              EL SALVADOR

    The Committee shares the House's concern about the need for 
larger amounts of relief and reconstruction assistance for 
victims of the devastating earthquakes in El Salvador. The 
Committee expects USAID to utilize funds from International 
Disaster Assistance, Transition Initiatives, and other 
appropriate accounts in the bill, to provide assistance that is 
additional to the amount requested by the Administration for El 
Salvador in fiscal year 2002.
    The Committee encourages USAID to seriously consider a 
proposal of $100,000 by Unified Salvadorians to construct homes 
in El Salvador for families left homeless from the earthquakes.

                      DISASTER RELIEF TECHNOLOGIES

    The Committee strongly supports the public-private 
partnership between the International Organization for 
Migration and United States firms working to develop the 
Colombian Digital Information Program (CDIP), an Internet-based 
communications tool capable of delivering visual reporting on 
efforts to assist refugees and internally displaced people. The 
Committee recommends funding from the Andean Counterdrug 
Initiative for CDIP to assist with the humanitarian needs in 
the region.

                         TRANSITION INITIATIVES

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $50,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      50,000,000
House allowance.........................................      40,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      52,500,000

    The Committee commends the work of USAID's Office of 
Transition Initiatives, which is on the ground in countries 
around the world providing essential assistance to bridge the 
gap between emergency relief and long-term development.

                      DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY

                         SUBSIDY APPROPRIATION

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $1,500,0000 
    (By transfer 2001)..................................     (5,000,000)
Fiscal year 2002 request................................................
    (By transfer).......................................    (25,000,000)
House allowance.........................................................
    (By transfer).......................................    (12,500,000)
Committee recommendation................................................
    (By transfer).......................................    (25,000,000)

    In addition to other uses of the Development Credit 
Authority, the Committee expects USAID to direct greater 
resources to the acute needs of the urban poor whose numbers 
are growing at an alarming rate. It is estimated that soon half 
the world's population will be urban, and almost the entire 2.5 
billion increase in population in the next 25 years will occur 
in cities in the developing countries. Poverty, malnutrition, 
and chronic disease are prevalent in these areas, where slum 
conditions adversely affect health, security, economic 
progress, and the environment.

                           OPERATING EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $4,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       7,500,000
House allowance.........................................       7,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,500,000

     PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $44,489,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      44,880,000
House allowance.........................................      44,880,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,880,000

    The Foreign Service retirement and disability fund is a 
mandatory expense of USAID.

   OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL 
                              DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $520,000,000
    Emergency funding...................................      13,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     549,000,000
House allowance.........................................     549,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     549,000,000

    The Committee provides an appropriation of $549,000,000 for 
operating expenses of the United States Agency for 
International Development.
    The fiscal year 2002 increase for operating expenses is, in 
part, the result of mandatory cost increases in such items as 
salaries and rents, as well as a reduction in the availability 
of non-appropriated sources of funds such as prior year 
recoveries that can be used to pay USAID administrative costs.

                 ADMINISTRATIVE AND MANAGEMENT REFORMS

    The Committee strongly supports the USAID Administrator's 
efforts to reform USAID's procurement, personnel, information 
technology and financial management systems. Unless these 
systems are streamlined and brought into efficient, working 
order, USAID will be unable to make the best use of 
appropriated funds. Despite the assurances of former USAID 
Administrators that these broken systems would be fixed, they 
have continued to plague USAID's employees, contractors and 
grantees, the Congress, and at least indirectly, USAID's 
intended beneficiaries. The Committee believes that there are 
few, if any, higher priorities for USAID and expects the 
Administrator to keep the Committee informed about the status 
of these efforts.

       OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $27,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      32,000,000
House allowance.........................................      30,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      32,000,000

    The Committee provides an appropriation of $32,000,000 for 
operating expenses of the Office of the Inspector General.

                  Other Bilateral Economic Assistance


                         ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $2,295,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   2,249,000,000
House allowance.........................................   2,199,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,239,500,000

                         MIDDLE EAST COUNTRIES

    In 1998, the United States reached agreements with the 
Governments of Israel and Egypt to reduce the levels of ESF 
assistance for these countries over a 10-year schedule. In 
accordance with this schedule, the Committee has included 
$720,000,000 for Israel and $655,000,000 for Egypt for fiscal 
year 2002. The Committee provides $150,000,000 for assistance 
for Jordan, which is the request level.
    The Committee has included bill language in past Foreign 
Operations Appropriations Acts providing that economic 
assistance to Israel not cause an adverse impact on the total 
level of nonmilitary exports from the United States, and has 
not changed its position on this issue. The Committee does 
understand that the Government of Israel intends to act 
consistently with past agreements in this regard and 
appreciates this expression of good will and good faith.
    The Committee recognizes that Egypt is a vital and 
strategic ally of the United States and continues to play a key 
role in the Middle East peace process. However, the Committee 
notes, with concern, several challenges to the rule of law, 
human rights, and democracy in Egypt. These include the arrest 
of human rights advocate Dr. Saad Eddin Ibrahim and repeated 
attacks on the United States in the Egyptian press. The 
Committee is also concerned about reports regarding the 
procurement of missile technology from North Korea by the 
Government of Egypt. The Committee recognizes that the 
Government of Egypt has denied those reports. The Committee 
requests the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
Director of Central Intelligence, to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of the Act in classified and/or unclassified 
form, describing Egypt's assistance in the Middle East peace 
process and the possible proliferation of weapons or missile 
technology from North Korea to the Middle East.
    The Committee has learned of the near epidemic incidence of 
diabetes in Egypt. The Committee is also aware of a proposal 
requesting that financial assistance be provided through the 
Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, Massachusetts, to construct a 
diabetes unit at Mansoura University in Egypt. The Committee 
encourages USAID to give serious consideration to supporting 
this initiative.

                    MIDDLE EAST REGIONAL COOPERATION

    The Committee supports the Middle East Regional Cooperation 
(MERC) program, which fosters mutually beneficial technical 
cooperation between experts from Israel and neighboring Arab 
countries. The Committee also supports the Galilee Society and 
Arava Institute for Environmental Studies, and urges the 
Administration to seriously consider funding proposals by these 
organizations.

                          CONFLICT RESOLUTION

    The Committee recommends at least $2,000,000 from the 
Development Assistance, SEED, and ESF accounts to support 
conflict resolution programs, including those which bring 
together teenagers of different ethnic, religious, and 
political backgrounds from areas of civil conflict and war. The 
Committee believes that the following programs are among those 
deserving financial support--
  --Seeds of Peace, a widely respected organization which 
        promotes understanding between teenagers in the Middle 
        East, Cyprus, and the Balkans;
  --The International Crisis Group, whose analysts in the field 
        identify potentially explosive problems, produce 
        objective assessments, and prescribe coherent and 
        effective policy responses to prevent or reduce the 
        level of violence resulting from complex crises;
  --A production on Israel Educational Television and Al-Quds 
        Educational Television, involving Israeli and 
        Palestinian participants, which has been a catalyst for 
        conflict resolution, changing attitudes, and breaking 
        down stereotypes among children of different 
        backgrounds in the region; and
  --The School for International Training's Conflict 
        Transformation Across Cultures Program.

                          WAR CRIMES TRIBUNALS

    The Committee commends the Administration's decisions to 
maintain the Office of War Crimes Issues and to support the war 
crimes tribunals in Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone. The 
Committee expects the Administration to ensure that the 
tribunals have sufficient budgets, staff, and equipment, and 
has provided an additional $5,000,000 in drawdown authority for 
war crimes tribunals established or authorized by the U.N. 
Security Council with U.S. support, including the tribunal in 
Sierra Leone. The Committee also urges the Administration, 
where appropriate, to support commissions or judicial bodies 
that complement the activities of these tribunals.
    The Committee notes that drawdowns made under this section 
are unrelated to the establishment of an international criminal 
court.

                     GREAT LAKES JUSTICE INITIATIVE

    The Committee notes that the recent history of the African 
Great Lakes Region has included massive starvation and ethnic 
violence, including genocide. There is an absence of 
accountability for human rights abuses and other crimes that 
inhibits reconciliation, conflict resolution, and long-term 
prospects for peace. The Committee supports full funding of the 
budget request from the ESF account for the Great Lakes Justice 
Initiative (GLJI), and encourages the Administration to direct 
a higher proportion of GLJI funds to programs traditionally 
defined as justice activities, including the support of court 
systems, training of judicial personnel, and promoting public 
awareness of laws.

                  REGIONAL DEMOCRACY PROGRAMS IN ASIA

    The Committee supports funding for programs and activities 
conducted in Asia on a regional basis that promote democracy, 
human rights, the rule of law, press freedoms, and good 
governance. The Committee commends the efforts of the Alliance 
for Reform and Democracy in Asia (ARDA), a grouping of Asian 
democrats from Australia, Burma, Cambodia, East Timor, 
Indonesia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Singapore, and Thailand. The 
Committee also applauds the recent actions taken by the ARDA in 
Malaysia to secure the release of jailed democracy activists. 
The Committee recognizes Taiwan's democratic achievements, and 
believes that Taiwan has relevant experiences to share with 
regional democrats and reformers.

          ASSISTANCE FOR EASTERN EUROPE AND THE BALTIC STATES

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $600,000,000
    Emergency funding...................................      75,825,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     605,000,000
House allowance.........................................     600,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     603,000,000

    The Committee has provided $603,000,000 for Eastern Europe 
and the Baltic States, which is $3,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2001 level.

                 INSTITUTIONALIZED CHILDREN IN ROMANIA

    The Committee is aware that approximately 150,000 Romanian 
children reside in destitute child-care institutions where they 
suffer from severe medical, nutritional, and psychological 
neglect. The Committee encourages USAID to support 
organizations with expertise in this field, such as Care for 
Children International, to combat this problem in Romania and 
around the world.

                     AMERICAN UNIVERSITY IN ALBANIA

    The Committee is aware of an initiative to establish an 
American University in Albania that will utilize distance 
learning technologies to provide graduate courses to Albanian 
students, who might otherwise emigrate for opportunities 
abroad. The Committee is informed that several American 
universities and corporations have pledged support, and that 
the Albanian Government has donated a facility to house the 
university. The Committee encourages USAID to consider 
supporting this initiative with ASHA or SEED funds.

                          INTERNATIONAL CRIME

    The Committee continues to support the Southeast European 
Cooperative Initiative (SECI), which is designed to promote 
regional cooperation to more effectively combat transnational 
crime, and recommends that the State Department provide 
additional technical assistance funds to SECI of up to 
$1,000,000.

                    INTERNATIONAL LEGAL INITIATIVES

    The Committee commends the efforts by the American Bar 
Association (ABA) to strengthen democracy through programs that 
promote the rule of law in Central and Eastern Europe. The 
Committee expects USAID to maintain funding for these projects, 
and requests USAID to seriously consider providing up to 
$500,000 for an ABA-CEELI project with the Academic Consortium 
for Global Education (ACGE), to develop a database of ongoing 
legal reform efforts by Federal agencies in CEE/FSU countries 
and to implement a multimedia distance learning network that 
will complement these efforts.

                             COUNTRY ISSUES

                                BULGARIA

    The Committee expects that, of the funds made available for 
assistance for Bulgaria, $4,600,000 will be provided to 
complete the full-scope simulator for the Kozludoy Plant (Units 
3-4). The Committee is pleased that the National Electric 
Company of Bulgaria has provided the majority of funds 
necessary for installation of this simulator for operator 
training.

                                 SERBIA

    The Committee has provided up to $115,000,000 to help the 
Serbian people recover from the economic collapse, political 
violence, and social upheaval of the Milosevic period. The 
Committee recognizes the courage of Serbian democrats in 
facilitating the historic transfer of Slobodan Milosevic to the 
International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia 
(ICTY), and commends the people of Serbia for acknowledging the 
crimes against humanity committed by Milosevic and others under 
his command. The Committee strongly supports the efforts of the 
ICTY to deliver justice for war crimes and other violations of 
international humanitarian law committed in the territory of 
the former Yugoslavia since 1991. The Committee encourages the 
efforts of Serbian democrats and reformers to implement 
political, legal, and economic reforms necessitated by years of 
corruption and warfare. The Committee has conditioned 
assistance that may be made available after March 31, 2002, to 
Serbia on continued cooperation with the ICTY, the termination 
of financial support to the Bosnian Serb entity's military and 
intelligence services, and respect for the rule of law. The 
Committee is concerned that, while many of the Kosovar 
Albanians imprisoned by the Milosevic regime have been 
released, some political prisoners remain incarcerated in 
Serbia. The Committee calls for their immediate release.

                               MONTENEGRO

    The Committee expects that not less than $45,000,000 will 
be made available for assistance for Montenegro, and strongly 
supports Montenegro's efforts to implement political, legal, 
and economic reforms. The Committee commends the people of 
Montenegro for their participation in recent parliamentary 
elections, and believes that Montenegro, alone and in 
consultation with Serbia, must decide its own fate regarding 
independence.
    The Committee is aware of a proposal to strengthen and 
modernize the Parliament of Montenegro by improving access to 
independent information and enhancing its capacity to perform 
research and analysis. The Committee encourages USAID to 
seriously consider supporting this initiative.

                               MACEDONIA

    The Committee believes that a unified and independent 
Macedonia is in United States national security interests and 
requires high level U.S. involvement. The Committee supports 
the negotiation of a political solution to the current crisis, 
and applauds the efforts of ethnic Macedonian and Albanian 
leaders, as well as the United States and European officials, 
who worked tirelessly in support of the recent agreement to end 
the conflict. The Committee is aware that the situation remains 
fragile, and will closely monitor the implementation of the 
agreement by both sides. The Committee condemns the use of 
violence against any citizens in Macedonia, and notes with 
concern the displacement of ethnic Albanians and Macedonians 
within Macedonia and in neighboring countries. The Committee 
believes that the Government of Macedonia must address the 
concerns of all Macedonian citizens, including ethnic 
Albanians, in a fair and equitable manner, and ensure the 
protection of lives and property of all citizens of Macedonia. 
The Committee expects USAID and the State Department to provide 
assistance to Macedonia relating to decentralization, 
education, census, electoral and parliamentary reform, 
institution building, and accountability and transparency in 
governance.

    ASSISTANCE FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $810,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     808,000,000
House allowance.........................................     768,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     800,000,000

    The Committee provides $800,000,000 for Assistance for the 
Independent States of the Former Soviet Union for fiscal year 
2002.

                            LEGAL EDUCATION

    The Committee is concerned about the quality of education 
for lawyers, judges, and others responsible for interpreting 
new laws in the former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern 
Europe. The Committee recommends that USAID consider funding a 
distance learning project to deliver a high quality program of 
instruction in basic legal principles.

             HEALTH CARE PARTNERSHIPS AND MEDICAL EDUCATION

    The Committee is concerned that the current funding level 
for health partnerships in the five former Soviet republics in 
Central Asia is inadequate to meet the pressing health care 
needs in the region, and recommends that USAID increase funding 
above the current level for these programs. The Committee also 
supports the continuation of the North Dakota-Turkmenistan 
Health Partnership and other health partnerships in the former 
Soviet republics that are managed through a cooperative 
agreement with the American International Health Alliance.
    The Committee has followed the work of the Eurasian Medical 
Education Program of the American College of Physicians in 
continuing the medical education of Russian physicians in the 
treatment of tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease, and 
diabetes. This exchange program has been carried out in four 
regions of the Russian Federation, and volunteer American 
physicians have shared experience and knowledge with their 
Russian colleagues to the benefit of the Russian medical 
profession and the Russian population. The Committee supports 
this program and requests to be consulted regarding future 
funding for it.

  TRAINING AND EXCHANGES IN THE FORMER SOVIET UNION AND CENTRAL EUROPE

    As in past years, the Committee recommends funding for the 
Russian, Eurasian, and East European Research and Training 
Program (Title VIII) of at least $5,000,000. This will continue 
the existing program from funds in the SEED and FSU accounts. 
The Committee strongly recommends that the existing 
administrative mechanism within the State Department for the 
Title VIII program be preserved. The Committee also supports 
other education and training programs in both regions, such as 
the East Central European Scholarship Program (ECESP). The 
Committee requests USAID to continue to support the Moscow 
School of Political Studies' efforts to teach democratic and 
free market principles to Russian students and other community 
leaders.

                                ORPHANS

    The Committee continues to support USAID's Russian orphans 
strategy, which focuses on programs to reduce the number of 
children entering state orphanages and works with orphanage 
officials to meet the immediate medical and basic needs of 
these children. The Committee applauds the work of Holt 
International Children's Services and Mercy Corps International 
and encourages USAID to also consult with Rotary International, 
the Anchorage Interfaith Council, and the Municipality of 
Anchorage to enhance programs for orphans in the Russian Far 
East. The Committee recommends $3,500,000 for this program in 
fiscal year 2002.

                         VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

    The Committee commends the efforts by USAID, the State 
Department, and the Justice Department to implement programs to 
combat domestic violence in Russia. The Committee believes the 
Administration should continue to consult closely with and 
provide direct support to the Russian Association of Crisis 
Centers for Women to further strengthen local capacity to 
respond to this endemic problem. Emphasis should be given to 
strengthening police and prosecutorial capacity to prevent and 
punish abuses. In addition, American grant recipients, 
including police trainers, should have expertise in domestic 
violence issues, and Russian NGOs should be consulted in the 
design, evaluation, and monitoring of these programs. The 
Committee recommends funding for these activities at not less 
than the current level, and requests the State Department to 
submit a report by April 1, 2002, summarizing the actions 
taken, results to date, and future plans for this initiative.

                          PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    The Committee is aware of the Primary Health Care 
Initiative of the World Council of Hellenes, which was 
instituted in the former Soviet republics to provide 
desperately needed basic health care. This program, which is 
alleviating suffering of people through thousands of visits 
each month, is also beneficial to U.S. relations with these 
countries. The Committee recommends $2,000,000 in FSU funds for 
this program in fiscal year 2002.

                           INDEPENDENT MEDIA

    The Committee recognizes that several governments in the 
former Soviet Union continue to undermine the work of 
independent media outlets and journalists. The Committee 
supports efforts to achieve a genuinely self-sustainable media, 
which operates in a fair and transparent legal environment.

                             COUNTRY ISSUES

                                 RUSSIA

    The Committee has again included language in the bill that 
withholds 60 percent of assistance for the Government of the 
Russian Federation unless the President determines and 
certifies to the Committees on Appropriations that the 
Government of the Russian Federation has terminated its nuclear 
relationship with Iran, is cooperating with international 
efforts to investigate war crimes and other atrocities in 
Chechnya, and is providing full access to international 
nongovernmental organizations to provide humanitarian relief to 
refugees and internally displaced persons in Chechnya.

                                CHECHNYA

    The Committee is alarmed by the flagrant disregard for 
human life and the use of excessive force by Russian troops 
against Chechen noncombatants. In addition to the atrocities 
committed by the Russian military, the Government of the 
Russian Federation has repeatedly failed to investigate and 
hold accountable those responsible for these crimes. The 
Committee expects the Secretaries of State and Defense to urge 
their Russian counterparts to permit international humanitarian 
organizations to have unimpeded access to Chechnya. The 
Committee also requests the State Department to submit a report 
to the Committee 90 days after the date of enactment of the Act 
describing the response of the Russian Government.

                                ARMENIA

    The Committee has provided $90,000,000 for Armenia, and 
urges the Armenian Government to continue to accelerate 
economic reforms. The Committee expects that not less than 
$5,000,000 of these funds will be provided to the Government of 
Armenia for an education initiative, including the provision of 
computers and Internet access to primary and secondary schools. 
The Committee is aware of the work of the Armenian Technology 
Group in assisting the Armenian private sector in a seed 
multiplication program. The Committee continues to support the 
expansion of these efforts in additional countries in the 
Central Asia region.

                               AZERBAIJAN

    The Committee has included a provision which continues 
current law relating to section 907 of the FREEDOM Support Act, 
by restating an exemption that allows for humanitarian and 
certain other types of assistance to the region, including for 
refugees and displaced persons.

                                UKRAINE

    The Committee has provided $180,000,000 for assistance for 
Ukraine. The Committee firmly believes that the independence 
and sovereignty of Ukraine is of crucial strategic importance 
to the United States and stability in Europe. The Committee 
notes that the level of assistance for Ukraine takes on 
heightened significance as Ukraine prepares for parliamentary 
elections in March 2002, the outcome of which may determine the 
country's future direction. The Committee urges the State 
Department to support programs that encourage free and fair 
elections, strengthen the rule of law, support the next 
generation of Ukrainians, focus on private sector development 
(particularly agriculture), reform the commercial legal code, 
and help develop the nongovernmental sector of Ukrainian 
society.
    The Committee is extremely concerned about the conditions 
under which journalists work in Ukraine. The recent murder of 
two journalists under questionable circumstances and the slow 
investigation of these two cases casts serious doubt on the 
commitment of the Government of Ukraine to an independent 
media, the rule of law, and the independence of the judicial 
system.
    The Committee believes that assistance for Ukraine can only 
succeed if the government is committed to economic and 
democratic reforms. While Ukraine's economy has started 
growing, this trend cannot be sustained without a commitment to 
the rule of law. The Committee believes that prompt, thorough, 
and competent investigations and prosecutions of these murder 
cases would help to demonstrate such a commitment. 
Alternatively, the continued absence of such actions might 
suggest that a reduced level of assistance is warranted. The 
Committee encourages the U.S. Embassy in Kiev to extend an 
offer of the services of the Federal Bureau of Investigations 
through their Legal Officer to the Government of Ukraine to 
assist in the investigations into these murders.
    The Committee expects that of the amount provided for 
nuclear safety not less than $21,500,000 will be provided for 
the installation of simulators for enhanced operator training. 
Specifically, $12,000,000 should be provided for a full-scope 
simulator at the Rivne reactor, $5,000,000 for Remote Shutdown 
Panels, $2,000,000 for two simulator Safety Parameter Display 
Systems, and $2,500,000 for an analytical simulator for the 
Sebastopol Institute which has become the primary source of 
training of engineers and operators for the Ukrainian nuclear 
industry.
    The Committee recognizes the critical nature of a diverse 
energy supply and a comprehensive, viable energy policy to 
Ukraine's independent development and economic future. The 
Committee recommends that funds as necessary be provided for 
U.S. technical assistance to the Task Force established by 
Presidential Order (#42/2001) on February 27, 2001.
    The Committee supports funding for successful community 
partnership programs and activities in Ukraine, such as those 
administered by the United States-Ukraine Foundation.

                                GEORGIA

    The Committee provides $90,000,000 for assistance for 
Georgia. The Committee notes that continued support to Georgia 
is in United States national security interests and strongly 
encourages that programs relating to border and export 
controls, energy, and political, legal, and economic reform 
continue. The Committee remains concerned with the incidence of 
corruption in Georgia, and the limited progress by Russia in 
closing military bases in Georgia. The Committee supports 
programs implemented by the American Academy in Tbilisi, and 
recommends an increased level of funding for the Academy's 
activities. The Committee provides that not less than 
$3,000,000 should be made available for a small business 
development project relating to private sector technology 
start-ups for Georgia.

                           NAGORONO-KARABAGH

    The Committee continues to be concerned about the plight of 
victims of the Nagorono-Karabagh conflict, and expects that the 
remainder of the $20,000,000 in humanitarian assistance, 
initially provided for in the fiscal year 1998 Act, will be 
promptly disbursed.

                          Independent Agencies


                              PEACE CORPS

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $265,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     275,000,000
House allowance.........................................     275,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     275,000,000

    The Committee continues to strongly support the Peace 
Corps, which has volunteers in 76 countries, and has increased 
funding by $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2001 level.

                     AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2001....................................   ($16,000,000)
Budget estimate, 2002...................................    (16,042,000)
House allowance.........................................     16,042,000 
Committee recommendation................................     16,542,000 

    The Committee includes funding for the African Development 
Foundation (ADF) under the Independent Agencies account, and 
provides $16,542,000 for the ADF, which is $542,000 above the 
fiscal year 2001 level and $500,000 above the request.

                       INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION

Appropriations, 2001....................................   ($12,000,000)
Budget estimate, 2002...................................    (12,108,000)
House allowance.........................................     12,000,000 
Committee recommendation................................     13,106,950 

    The Committee includes funding for the Inter-America 
Foundation (IAF) under the Independent Agencies account, and 
provides $13,106,950 for the IAF, which is $1,106,950 above the 
fiscal year 2001 level.
    The Committee recognizes the progress the IAF has made in 
the past year in reforming its fiscal policies and practices. 
The IAF's decision to contract with the Bureau of Public Debt 
to maintain the general ledger is a positive step. However, 
while the use of an external entity for this purpose may be a 
sensible, partial solution, the Committee wants to be assured 
that internal oversight of fiscal and programmatic activities 
do not suffer. The Committee looks forward to reviewing the 
IAF's new plans to establish and implement procedures that 
ensure sound fiscal and programmatic management by its staff.

                          Department of State


          INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $325,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     217,000,000
House allowance.........................................     217,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     217,000,000

    The Committee has provided $217,000,000, the request level, 
for International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement 
programs.

                         TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 in INL funds for 
programs and activities to counter trafficking in persons. The 
Committee commends the Department of State for its 
``Trafficking in Persons Report'', and believes that the 
ranking of nations in different tiers, according to compliance 
with standards outlined in Public Law 106-386, is an 
illustrative and effective means to highlight the efforts and 
deficiencies of countries to address this problem. The 
Committee urges continued and greater emphasis on programs and 
activities that directly address this endemic problem. The 
Committee remains strongly committed to assisting women and 
children who are often the most innocent victims of this gross 
human rights violation, which also contributes to the spread of 
HIV/AIDS. These funds should be used to provide social services 
to trafficking victims, educational and economic development 
programs to prevent trafficking, and technical assistance to 
government efforts to combat trafficking in countries of 
origin. The Committee requests to be consulted prior to the 
obligation of these funds.

                         MARITIME INTERDICTION

    The Committee believes that both the Bahamas and Costa Rica 
play important roles in combating the flow of illegal 
narcotics, especially through maritime interdiction efforts. 
Therefore, not later than 90 days after enactment, the 
Committee expects the State Department to submit a report on 
the procurement needs of the governments of the Bahamas and 
Costa Rica to implement an effective counternarcotics strategy. 
This report is to examine these needs, including an assessment 
of the procurement of high speed boats, within the context of 
the projected budget for counternarcotics programs in fiscal 
year 2003.

                     ANDEAN COUNTERDRUG INITIATIVE

Appropriations, 2001....................................................
Budget estimate, 2002...................................    $731,000,000
House allowance.........................................     675,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     567,000,000

    The Committee has provided a total of $718,000,000 for the 
Andean Regional Initiative requested by the Administration, of 
which $567,000,000 is for the Andean Counterdrug Initiative.

               FISCAL YEAR 2002 ANDEAN REGIONAL INITIATIVE
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                                            Request       recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Andean Counterdrug Initiative:
    Narcotics Programs................     $438,500,000     $367,000,000
    Security Programs.................        4,000,000        4,000,000
    Economic and Social Programs......      292,500,000      200,000,000
Other Andean Assistance: Humanitarian       147,290,000      147,000,000
 and Development Programs.............
                                       ---------------------------------
      Total, Andean Regional                882,290,000      718,000,000
       Initiative.....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    When added to fiscal year 2001 bilateral assistance to the 
region and approximately $1,300,000,000 for Plan Colombia, this 
appropriation of $718,000,000 in fiscal year 2002 will bring 
total U.S. contributions to the Andean region to more than 
$2,000,000,000 over the last 2 years.
    The Committee notes that Plan Colombia is a $7,500,000,000, 
6 year effort, developed in conjunction with the Colombian 
Government, to combat drug trafficking and support democracy 
and economic development in Colombia. An unspecified portion of 
the non-United States funds for Plan Colombia are to be 
contributed by other donors, including the European Union (EU) 
and the international financial institutions, as well as the 
Colombian Government itself. So far, few if any funds have 
actually been provided by the EU. It is unclear how much the 
Colombian Government has provided above its regular budget for 
defense, law enforcement, and social programs.
    Seventy-nine percent of the fiscal year 2001 U.S. funds 
were for military and police programs, including the purchase 
of Blackhawk helicopters, training Colombian counterdrug 
battalions, aerial fumigation of coca and poppy, and related 
activities. The remainder was for economic, social, and justice 
programs. Most of the military and police assistance has been 
committed. Although the first Blackhawks did not arrive in 
Colombia until July 27, 2001, the Colombian Government reports 
that a large portion of the coca crop has already been 
destroyed. In contrast, the economic, social, and justice 
programs have barely begun.
    The Committee believes that because of the threats posed by 
drug traffickers, rebels, and paramilitaries in Colombia, the 
United States should strongly support Colombia and its 
neighbors. However, the Congress and Administration appear to 
share the view that unless the demand for illegal drugs is 
curtailed in the United States, the Andean Counterdrug Program 
will not succeed.
    While it is too soon to pass judgment on the success or 
failure of this initiative, the Committee is concerned that far 
too little priority has been given to utilizing the fiscal year 
2001 funds for economic, social, and justice programs. Although 
the fumigation effort has gone forward rapidly, paramilitary 
violence has increased sharply, hundreds of thousands of people 
are displaced in their own country, and little has been 
provided in the way of alternative sources of income for 
Colombian farmers whose coca crops, and in some instances their 
licit crops, have been destroyed. Similarly, few of the funds 
appropriated last year to strengthen the justice system, 
particularly the Colombian Attorney General's Human Rights 
Unit, have been spent.
    The Committee believes that $718,000,000 for the Andean 
region is a substantial investment, on top of last year's 
$1,300,000,000 appropriation, and the most that can reasonably 
be provided given other demands on the budget and the lack of 
any evidence, to date, that this initiative will have an 
appreciable impact on America's drug problem. The Committee 
also notes that many Members have expressed concerns that this 
program is drawing the United States into a prolonged civil war 
that may pose grave risks to American personnel and further 
hardships for the Colombian people. At least $200,000,000 of 
the counterdrug funds are to be apportioned directly to USAID 
for economic and social programs, in order to facilitate faster 
disbursement of these funds. The Committee has retained limits 
imposed in fiscal year 2001 on the number of U.S. military on 
duty, and U.S. civilian personnel employed, in Colombia.
    The Administration did not request funds to procure new 
aircraft for the Andean countries, as the costs involved would 
limit the allocation for economic and social programs. The 
Committee, however, is aware that certain types of aircraft 
could be used by these governments to enhance counternarcotics 
efforts. Therefore, no later than 90 days after enactment, the 
Committee expects the State Department to submit a report on 
the feasibility of procuring additional aircraft for Bolivia, 
Colombia, and Ecuador, within the projected budget for 
counternarcotics programs in fiscal year 2003.
    The Committee is aware of the successful work of Aid To 
Artisans (ATA), which provides technical assistance and 
marketing support to artisans in poor countries. ATA has 
proposed an Andean Artisan Enterprise Initiative, to expand 
markets for artisans in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia. 
The Committee believes that this type of program should be 
supported to provide viable, alternative sources of income to 
people in this region.
    The Committee is supportive of biotechnology research at 
American institutions to promote the cultivation of alternative 
crops, including cocoa, in the Andean countries.

                                COLOMBIA

    The Committee believes that a peaceful and prosperous 
Colombia is important to United States interests in the western 
hemisphere, and that the foundation for any successful 
counternarcotics strategy is economic development, a lasting 
resolution of civil strife and the implementation of meaningful 
political, legal, economic, and social reforms. The Committee 
recognizes some progress on human rights, but strongly condemns 
paramilitary and insurgent groups, and the Colombian military 
involved in committing atrocities against noncombatants. The 
Committee recommends an increased emphasis on support for 
programs that protect and promote human rights, the rule of 
law, and the economic welfare of the Colombian people.
    Like last year, the Committee has included conditions on 
assistance to the Colombian military which emphasize respect 
for human rights and civilian justice. The Committee is 
particularly concerned about the surge in paramilitary 
violence, persistent reports of cooperation between the 
military and paramilitaries, and the impunity of military 
officers who order or commit atrocities. The Committee believes 
that far more aggressive action is needed, by the Colombian 
Government and military, to thwart it. This should also be a 
priority for United States policy.
    The Committee is alarmed by the pattern of attacks against 
trade unionists; 112 were killed in 2000, and another 51 by 
June 2001. Little effort, if any, has been made to apprehend 
and bring to justice those responsible.
    The Committee also deplores the ongoing abuses by the FARC, 
extensively documented by human rights organizations, including 
the forced recruitment of child soldiers, murder, kidnaping, 
and collusion with drug traffickers. The Committee calls on 
other nations, particularly Mexico and the Scandinavian 
countries, to exert greater influence on the FARC to repudiate 
these tactics and participate seriously in negotiations toward 
a settlement of the conflict.
    Similar to last year, in order to continue to monitor the 
use of the funds made available for this initiative, the 
Committee expects that, not later than 60 days after the date 
of enactment of the Act and every 120 days thereafter, the 
Secretary of State will submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations containing--
  --A description of the extent to which the Colombian armed 
        forces have suspended from the armed forces those 
        members, of whatever rank, who have been credibly 
        alleged to have committed gross violations of human 
        rights, and are providing to civilian prosecutors and 
        judicial authorities requested information concerning 
        the nature and cause of the suspension.
  --An assessment of the extent to which the Colombian armed 
        forces are cooperating with civilian authorities, 
        including providing access to witnesses and relevant 
        military information, in prosecuting and punishing in 
        civilian courts those members, of whatever rank, who 
        have been credibly alleged to have committed gross 
        violations of human rights, or to have aided or abetted 
        paramilitary groups.
  --An assessment of the extent to which the Colombian armed 
        forces are severing links, including intelligence 
        sharing, at the command, battalion, and brigade levels, 
        with paramilitary groups, and executing outstanding 
        arrest warrants for members of such groups.
  --A description of the extent to which attacks against human 
        rights defenders, trade unionists and government 
        prosecutors, investigators and civilian judicial 
        officials, are being investigated and the alleged 
        perpetrators brought to justice.
  --A description of actions taken by the United States, the 
        Colombian Government, and other countries to promote 
        and support negotiations toward a settlement of the 
        conflict in Colombia.
  --An accounting of the financial support for Plan Colombia 
        provided by the Government of Colombia (compared to its 
        expenditures prior to fiscal year 2001) and the 
        international community.
    The Committee is aware of national security legislation 
passed by the Colombian Congress on June 20, 2001. The 
Secretary of State is requested to submit a report not later 
than 90 days after the date of enactment of the Act and 120 
days thereafter, containing--
  --An accounting of incidents of arbitrary and prolonged 
        incommunicado detention by members of the Colombian 
        armed forces and police, and whether those incidents 
        have increased;
  --An assessment of the effectiveness of investigations 
        conducted by military personnel, as provided for in the 
        security law, compared to those carried out by civilian 
        authorities; and
  --An analysis of the effects of the security law on 
        Colombia's commitments under international treaties.

                         NEIGHBORING COUNTRIES

    The Committee is concerned about the spill-over of the 
narcotics trade from Colombia to its neighbors, and commends 
the Administration for its regional approach this year. It may 
only be a matter of time before Colombia's neighbors face large 
influxes of refugees, drug traffickers, and insurgents.
    Bolivia.--The Committee is concerned that this spill-over 
effect may undermine the achievements of the Bolivian 
Government in eradicating coca growth within its borders. The 
Committee recognizes the success of alternative development 
activities in Bolivia, and commends the Bolivian Government for 
its counterdrug efforts. The Committee expects the State 
Department to provide sufficient funding to continue these 
activities. The Committee continues to be concerned with 
reports of unsolved cases of human rights abuses involving 
security forces that may receive U.S. assistance. The Committee 
expects that the U.S. Embassy will be more vigilant in pursuing 
human rights issues with the Government of Bolivia and 
determining if there is compliance with applicable U.S. laws 
governing the provision of assistance.
    Ecuador.--Ecuadoran law enforcement personnel have noted 
incursions by rebels and paramilitaries, cocaine laboratories, 
kidnappings of foreign employees, and coca cultivation within 
Ecuadoran territory. The Committee urges the State Department 
to give priority to programs that assist Ecuador in 
strengthening border security.
    Peru.--The Committee notes the success of the Government of 
Peru in reducing the country's domestic coca crop. The 
Committee recognizes that narco-traffickers in Colombia may 
seek to migrate to growing areas inside Peru, should 
counterdrug efforts prove effective in Colombia. The Government 
of Peru has brought to the Committee's attention its concern 
with new methods of cocaine production, new air trafficking 
routes, and increased land and maritime transportation that may 
weaken once successful interdiction efforts. The Committee 
expects the State Department to assess Peru's priority 
counterdrug needs, as well as programs to strengthen democracy, 
civil society, and the rule of law in Peru.
    The Committee notes the tragic deaths of Veronica Bowers 
and Charity Bowers in the shooting down of their aircraft by 
the Peruvian military in April 2001, and expects the State 
Department to consult the Committee regarding any plan to 
resume a policy of shooting down suspected drug-trafficking 
aircraft.

                    MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $700,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     715,000,000
House allowance.........................................     715,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     735,000,000

    The Committee is aware that a number of urgent humanitarian 
crises around the world, including those in Afghanistan, 
Central and West Africa, Indonesia, and the North Caucasus, 
have left millions of individuals at risk of starvation, 
exposure, and disease. The Committee provides $735,000,000 for 
the Migration and Refugee Assistance account, which is 
$20,000,000 above the Administration's budget request and 
$35,000,000 above the amount provided in fiscal year 2001.

                         RESETTLEMENT IN ISRAEL

    The Committee provides $60,000,000 for the resettlement of 
humanitarian migrants from the former Soviet Union, Eastern 
Europe, Ethiopia, and other parts of the world to Israel. This 
is equal to the amount appropriated in fiscal year 2001.

             UNITED NATIONS HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR REFUGEES

    The Committee is aware that the fiscal year 2002 budget of 
the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is 
projected to be $130,000,000 below the current level, due 
primarily to a dramatic decline in contributions from European 
countries. This has caused UNHCR to reduce expenditures by 
scaling back field operations at a time of increasing demands. 
The Committee is concerned by these developments and supports 
ongoing efforts by UNHCR to seek additional contributions from 
Europe. The Committee has increased funds for Migration and 
Refugee Assistance with the expectation that the State 
Department will continue its strong support for UNHCR in fiscal 
year 2002.

        PROTECTION OF INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN RELIEF WORKERS

    The Committee recognizes that the rise of ethnic conflict 
and civil wars have required humanitarian relief workers to 
frequently operate in war zones where there is no functioning 
government and it is extremely difficult to differentiate 
between combatants and civilians. As a result, refugee and 
other disaster relief situations have become increasingly 
hazardous for international aid workers, resulting in a number 
of tragic deaths. The Committee is extremely concerned with 
these developments and expects that, no later than April 1, 
2002, the State Department will submit a report describing the 
efforts the United States and international humanitarian 
organizations, including UNHCR and the International Committee 
of the Red Cross, are taking to improve the safety of relief 
workers and identify how additional U.S. financial, technical, 
or other forms of assistance could enhance these efforts.

                            TIBETAN REFUGEES

    Like last year, the Committee supports continued funding to 
assist Tibetan refugees and recommends $2,000,000 for this 
purpose. The Committee requests the State Department to 
coordinate with USAID in determining responsibility for long 
term assistance for Tibetan refugees.

                  NORTH KOREAN AND MONTAGNARD REFUGEES

    The Committee is deeply concerned with the reported 
increase in the number of North Korean refugees fleeing to 
China, and Montagnard refugees fleeing Vietnam to Cambodia. The 
Committee recognizes that oppressive political, social, and 
economic conditions in North Korea and Vietnam contribute to 
this movement of people. The Committee is appalled at reports 
of the forcible repatriation of refugees to North Korea and 
Vietnam, and calls upon the State Department and international 
relief organizations to ensure the adequate and safe treatment 
of refugees. The Committee requests the Secretary of State to 
report to the Committees on Appropriations, not later than 60 
days after the date of enactment, on steps taken by the State 
Department, USAID, and international relief organizations to 
protect the human rights and dignity of refugees from North 
Korea and Vietnam, and on the policy implications that arise 
from the continued movement of people from North Korea to 
China, and from Vietnam to Cambodia.

            EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $15,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      15,000,000
House allowance.........................................      15,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      15,000,000

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the emergency 
refugee and migration assistance fund.

    NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $311,600,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     332,000,000
House allowance.........................................     311,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     326,500,000

    The Committee has provided $326,500,000 for the NADR 
account for fiscal year 2002. The following chart indicates 
fiscal year 2001 funding for the programs in this account, the 
Administration's request for fiscal year 2002, and the 
Committee recommendations for fiscal year 2002:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                     Committee
                       Program of activity                         2001 enacted    2002 request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund...........................     $14,967,000     $14,000,000     $14,000,000
Export Control Assistance.......................................      19,100,000      17,000,000      17,000,000
Science Centers.................................................      35,000,000      37,000,000      37,000,000
IAEA Voluntary Contribution.....................................      47,000,000      49,000,000      50,000,000
CTBT Preparatory Commission.....................................      21,056,000      20,000,000      20,000,000
Korean Penisula Energy Development Organization.................      54,879,000      95,000,000      95,000,000
Nonproliferation Contingency....................................      20,000,000  ..............  ..............
Anti-Terrorism Assistance.......................................      38,000,000      38,000,000      38,000,000
Terrorist Interdiction Program..................................       4,000,000       4,000,000       4,000,000
Lockerbie Trial Support.........................................      15,000,000      16,000,000       8,000,000
Humanitarian Demining Program...................................      39,912,000      40,000,000      40,000,000
Small Arms Destruction..........................................       2,000,000       2,000,000       3,500,000
Rescission......................................................         686,000  ..............  ..............
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
    Total Budget Authority......................................     311,600,000     332,000,000     326,500,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     TERRORIST INTERDICTION PROGRAM

    The Committee has recommended $4,000,000 for the Terrorist 
Interdiction Program, which is designed to enhance border 
security overseas to reduce terrorism. The Committee supports 
the State Department's plans and looks forward to continued 
consultations on these activities.

                   ANTI-TERRORISM ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the work of the Anti-Terrorism 
Assistance Program and recommends $38,000,000 for fiscal year 
2002. The Committee notes that ATA would like to commence 
activities in support of Anti-Terrorism Instructor Training and 
Emergency Medical Responder Instructor courses and an expansion 
of the Dignitary Protection Training Program. The Committee 
supports these efforts.

                         HUMANITARIAN DEMINING

    The Committee supports the State Department's Humanitarian 
Demining Program to clear landmines and other unexploded 
ordnance that continue to endanger people in countries around 
the world. The Committee has provided $40,000,000 for these 
activities.
    The Committee notes that several country recipients of 
demining funds from the NADR account also receive large amounts 
of assistance from the ESF, SEED, or FSU accounts. The 
Committee is concerned about pressures on the NADR budget which 
contains a limited amount of humanitarian demining funds, and 
believes that future demining programs in these countries 
should be funded jointly from both NADR and these other 
accounts.

          COMPREHENSIVE TEST BAN TREATY PREPARATORY COMMISSION

    The Committee fully funds the request of $20,000,000 for a 
contribution to the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Preparatory 
Commission. This contribution helps to leverage funds from 
other donor nations for the International Monitoring System, 
which is designed to collect data from seismic, hydroacoustic, 
infrasound, and radionuclide stations around the world, 
enhancing U.S. capabilities for detecting and monitoring 
nuclear tests.

                               LOCKERBIE

    The Committee has provided $8,000,000 toward the United 
States share of the costs incurred for holding the trial for 
the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103. The Committee 
understands that there will be a request in fiscal year 2003 
for expenses related to the appeal process and other 
incidentals. The Committee is concerned about information 
relating to some of the costs that have been incurred, and 
understands that an audit will be performed by the Inspector 
General of the State Department. The Committee expects this 
review to be completed by October, 2001.

                            SCIENCE CENTERS

    The Committee continues to be concerned about oversight of 
administrative programs and projects by the Science Centers. 
The Committee urges the State Department to investigate the 
possibility of expanding U.S. personnel at both of the sites to 
ensure that effective management practices are in place.
    The Committee is also concerned about delays that occur 
between the time of submission of projects by the scientists to 
the time the grant is finally awarded. The Committee encourages 
senior officials at the science centers to work with their 
Russian and/or Ukrainian governmental counterparts to eliminate 
these interruptions to ensure prompt and efficient review and 
implementation of these projects.

                      SMALL ARMS AND LIGHT WEAPONS

    The Committee understands that small arms and light 
weapons, including mortars, rocket propelled grenades, and 
heavy machine guns, have contributed to human rights 
violations, exacerbated conflicts, and impeded development 
efforts. The Committee recommends $3,500,000 in fiscal year 
2002 for the Small Arms Destruction Initiative, which provides 
assistance to countries that have requested help in eliminating 
stockpiles of these weapons. This is $1,500,000 above the 
fiscal year 2001 level.

                       Department of the Treasury


               INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $6,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       6,000,000
House allowance.........................................       6,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,000,000

    The Committee has provided $6,000,000 for International 
Affairs Technical Assistance. This amount is equal to the 
budget request and the fiscal year 2001 level.

       GLOBAL FUND TO COMBAT HIV/AIDS, MALARIA, AND TUBERCULOSIS

Appropriations, 2001....................................................
Budget estimate, 2002...................................    $100,000,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

    Like the House, the Committee has not established a 
separate account for a Global Fund to Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, 
and tuberculosis. The Committee's support for the Fund is 
described in the section of this report entitled Child Survival 
and Health Programs Fund.

                           DEBT RESTRUCTURING

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $238,000,000
    Emergency funding...................................     210,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     224,000,000
House allowance.........................................     224,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     235,000,000

    The Committee has provided $235,000,000 for debt 
restructuring for fiscal year 2002. Of this amount, the 
Committee expects that $224,000,000 will be for a United States 
contribution to the Heavily Indebted Poor Country Trust Fund 
(HIPC), which when added to $16,000,000 in fiscal year 2001 
carryover funds, will fulfill the U.S. pledge.
    The Committee expects that the remaining fiscal year 2002 
debt restructuring funds of $11,000,000 will be used to 
implement the Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 1998 (TFCA). 
The Committee has also provided up to an additional $14,000,000 
in carryover funds for this purpose.
    The Committee was disappointed with the Administration's 
request of only $13,000,000 in transfer authority from the 
Development Assistance account for the TFCA, rather than a 
separate request under Department of Treasury programs. The 
Committee notes that the world's tropical forests are being 
destroyed at an alarming rate, and believes that the TFCA can 
be an effective mechanism for protecting endangered forests.

                               TITLE III

                          MILITARY ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

             international military education and training

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $55,000,000
    Emergency funding...................................       2,875,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      65,000,000
House allowance.........................................      65,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      75,000,000

    The Committee provides $75,000,000 for the International 
Military Education and Training (IMET) program. The Committee 
believes that, by capitalizing on the worldwide respect for the 
U.S. armed forces, the IMET program offers a unique opportunity 
to establish valuable contacts with foreign militaries and 
promote American values, including civilian control of the 
armed forces and respect for the rule of law.
    The Committee is also aware of the significance of the 
signal that IMET sends to governments that participate in these 
programs, its citizens, and other nations. The Committee notes 
that, rightly or wrongly, many perceive IMET participation as 
bestowing a degree of legitimacy from the United States on the 
actions of the foreign militaries and governments. Therefore, 
when making decisions to provide IMET, the Committee believes 
that the Administration should consider the effects that these 
signals will have on larger U.S. foreign policy goals and 
target this assistance accordingly.
    The Committee is perplexed by the Administration's requests 
for regular IMET assistance for some countries whose armed 
forces have a recent history of actively undermining elected 
civilian authorities, corruption, and human rights abuses, and 
which have shown no commitment to reform. The Committee 
believes that these armed forces, at best, should be considered 
for Expanded IMET which focuses on civilian control and 
management of defense resources, military justice, human 
rights, and certain humanitarian activities.
    The Committee strongly supports IMET assistance for 
emerging democracies in Central and Eastern Europe, including 
$3,000,000 for the Baltic States to continue the development of 
a well trained, professional corps of civilian defense 
officials and military officers.
    The Committee is aware that the Security Assistance Act of 
2000 (Public Law 106-280) authorized additional funding, above 
the Administration's fiscal year 2002 request, for IMET 
assistance for Greece and Turkey, for joint training of Greek 
and Turkish officers to the maximum extent practicable. The 
Committee is supportive of these initiatives, which could help 
strengthen ties between two important NATO allies, and 
encourages the Administration to fund these programs at the 
highest appropriate level.

                       FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING

                          GRANT PROGRAM LEVEL

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,545,000,000
    Emergency Funding...................................      31,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,674,000,000
House allowance.........................................   3,627,000,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,674,000,000

    The Committee has included $3,674,000,000 for Foreign 
Military Financing, which is equal to the Administration's 
budget request and $129,000,000 over the fiscal year 2001 
level.

                         MIDDLE EAST COUNTRIES

    The Committee has provided the Administration's request of 
$2,040,000,000 in FMF for Israel and $1,300,000,000 for Egypt. 
The Committee has also provided the request level of 
$75,000,000 for Jordan.

                             BALTIC STATES

    The Committee applauds the strides that Lithuania, Latvia, 
and Estonia have made to bring their militaries in line with 
Western standards, and expects the Administration to provide a 
total of $21,000,000 in FMF to the Baltic States. The Committee 
is disappointed that the Administration may not provide 
$20,000,000 to the Baltic States in fiscal year 2001, despite a 
recommendation from the Committee to fund this amount.

                    FOREIGN MILITARY TRAINING REPORT

    The Committee has included language similar to the last 2 
years, requiring the State and Defense Departments to provide 
the joint report ``Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement 
Activities of Interest.'' The Committee is concerned that in 
the fiscal year 2000-2001 version of this report, the 
Administration classified a considerable amount of information, 
including U.S. Special Forces, JCET and section 1004 
counterdrug training, that had been provided in unclassified 
form in fiscal year 1999. The Committee expects the fiscal year 
2002 report to contain the maximum amount of information in 
declassified form, including information about foreign units 
trained; the location of training; U.S. trainers' units; course 
descriptions; the number of courses given and students trained; 
and estimates for next-year training in each category of 
training reported. The Committee requests to be consulted on 
the format and contents of the report.

                        LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE

    The Committee has again included a provision, identical to 
last year, which seeks to ensure that U.S. assistance does not 
go to units of foreign security forces whose members have been 
credibly implicated in human rights violations, unless the 
foreign government is taking effective measures to bring the 
individuals responsible to justice. By effective measures, the 
Committee intends that the individuals face impartial criminal 
prosecution or appropriate and timely disciplinary action in 
accordance with local law. The purposes of this provision are 
to reduce the chance that U.S. training or equipment goes to 
human rights violators, uphold the rule of law, and promote 
accountability for political crimes of violence.
    The Committee is aware that some U.S. embassies have 
expressed confusion about the meaning of ``unit'' for purposes 
of this provision. The Committee intends that ``unit'' is to be 
construed as the smallest operational group in the field that 
has been implicated in the reported violation. The Committee 
notes that in order to implement this provision, it is 
necessary for U.S. embassies to know which units are to receive 
U.S. assistance and to have in place the necessary agreements 
and mechanisms to monitor their use of the assistance.
    The Committee is concerned about the failure of some U.S. 
embassies to put in place effective mechanisms for collecting 
evidence and implementing this provision, and therefore 
believes that a centralized system is clearly needed. 
Specifically, the Committee requests the Bureau for Democracy, 
Human Rights and Labor to establish and maintain an electronic 
database of credible evidence of gross violations of human 
rights by units of foreign security forces. Each U.S. embassy 
should designate an appropriate official to collect and submit 
data to the database from a wide range of sources on a regular 
basis. Such a database would be one important depository of 
evidence for making determinations regarding the implementation 
of this provision, and should be accessible to other 
appropriate government departments and agencies and the 
Congress.

                               LANDMINES

    The Committee again includes language permitting demining 
equipment to be made available on a grant basis to foreign 
countries. The Committee supports the continued use of FMF 
funds for activities to assist in locating and destroying 
landmines and unexploded ordnance that maim and kill innocent 
people around the world.

                        PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $127,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     150,000,000
House allowance.........................................     135,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     140,000,000

    The Committee has provided $140,000,000 to support 
peacekeeping operations in troubled regions, including Africa, 
the Middle East, and the Balkans. The amount is $13,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2001 level.

                                TITLE IV

                    MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

              International Financial Institutions Summary

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,146,879,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   1,209,796,000
House allowance.........................................   1,169,796,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,178,396,000

    The Committee recommends the total level of paid-in capital 
funding shown above to provide for contributions to the 
International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, 
International Development Association, Multilateral Investment 
Guarantee Agency, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the 
Inter-American Development Bank's Inter-American Investment 
Corporation, the Asian Development, the African Development 
Bank and Fund, the European Bank for Reconstruction and 
Development, and the International Fund for Agriculture 
Development.
    The Committee is disappointed that the request did not 
include arrears for several International Financial 
Institutions (IFIs), including $128,000,000 for the Asian 
Development Fund and $204,000,000 owed to the Global 
Environmental Facility. The Committee expects the 
Administration to budget the necessary funds in fiscal year 
2003 to fully repay IFI arrears.

                       INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

               GRIEVANCE PROCESS REFORM AND GENDER ISSUES

    World Bank.--The Committee has closely followed efforts by 
the World Bank to reform its internal grievance procedures, and 
recognizes that the success of these reforms depends on their 
implementation. While the Bank has made some progress, more 
remains to be done and the latest proposals for reforming the 
Administrative Tribunal fall short in several respects. As long 
as the Bank and the other IFIs are immune from the court 
process, they need to ensure that complaints are independently 
investigated and adjudicated according to due process standards 
and procedures, and that managers are punished for misconduct, 
especially retaliation, which has been a persistent problem. 
The Committee also suggests that the Bank, International 
Monetary Fund (IMF) and other IFIs examine the role that their 
Legal Departments play in workplace misconduct cases. The 
Bank's and IMF's lawyers have expended resources prolonging 
cases that should have been settled quickly, or defended 
management when it would have been in the interests of the 
institution to represent the complainants, who often cannot 
afford lawyers of their own. The response of the Bank and other 
IFIs to these recommendations will continue to bear on 
Congress' support for these institutions.
    International Monetary Fund.--The Committee also has 
concerns about the IMF's internal grievance procedures, which 
in a recent case brought to the Committee's attention fell 
short at virtually every step. The Committee is also concerned 
about the IMF's failure to implement many of the 
recommendations of its 1994 Working Group on the Status of 
Women, especially those aimed at increasing the number of women 
in managerial positions. The Committee calls on the IMF to 
obtain a current regression analysis to determine what further 
steps are needed to correct the persistent gender disparities 
in hiring and promotion.
    Domestic workers.--The Committee continues to receive 
reports of the mistreatment of foreign domestic workers in the 
homes of Bank and IMF employees. Some of these people, often 
young women, have been lured to the United States under false 
pretenses, had their passports taken from them, kept in virtual 
servitude, and forced to work long hours for little pay. The 
Committee requests the U.S. executive directors to the Bank and 
IMF to report to the Committee by April 1, 2002, on the steps 
being taken by these institutions to address this problem.
    World Commission on Dams.--The Committee commends the World 
Bank for its role in helping to establish the World Commission 
on Dams (WCD), whose report, ``Dams and Development,'' 
addresses a complex, controversial subject in a balanced way, 
including proposing comprehensive, practical and innovative 
guidelines for future action. The Bank has a long and difficult 
history in this area, and the WCD guidelines offer 
opportunities for Bank investments in a wide range of sound 
development efforts, including existing dam improvements, 
alternatives to dams, and even new dam construction, as well as 
a blueprint for correcting and avoiding the costly mistakes of 
the past. The Committee urges the Bank to continue to engage 
with the full range of interested parties in the implementation 
of the WCD's report, and to integrate these guidelines to the 
fullest extent practicable into the Bank's relevant operational 
policies and directives, including those relating to 
resettlement, environmental assessment, and water and energy 
policies.

         International Bank for Reconstruction and Development


              INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION [IDA]

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $775,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     803,400,000
House allowance.........................................     803,400,000
Committee recommendation................................     775,000,000

                      GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT FACILITY

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $108,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     107,500,000
House allowance.........................................      82,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     109,500,000

    The Committee strongly supports the work of the Global 
Environment Facility, which helps developing nations address a 
number of important international environmental issues ranging 
from climate change to protecting biodiversity. Despite the 
fact that every dollar the U.S. contributes is matched by 
almost $15 in financing from other countries, multilateral 
institutions, the private sector, and NGOs, the United States 
is more than $204,000,000 in arrears to the GEF. The Committee 
notes that the shortage of funds is causing programs to be 
postponed and other nations to delay making their payments to 
the GEF. The Committee has provided the full amount for the 
U.S. contribution to the GEF for fiscal year 2002, plus an 
additional $2,000,000 as an initial payment of outstanding 
arrears.

                Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      10,000,000
House allowance.........................................               0
Committee recommendation................................       9,500,000

                    Inter-American Development Bank


                 INTER-AMERICAN INVESTMENT CORPORATION

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $25,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      25,000,000
House allowance.........................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,000,000

                         ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $72,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     103,017,050
House allowance.........................................      93,017,000
Committee recommendation................................     103,017,050

                        AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $6,100,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       5,100,000
House allowance.........................................       5,100,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,100,000

                        AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $100,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................     100,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     100,000,000

            European Bank for Reconstruction and Development


                            PAID-IN-CAPITAL

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $35,778,717
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      35,778,717
House allowance.........................................      35,778,717
Committee recommendation................................      35,778,717

            INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $5,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      20,000,000
House allowance.........................................      20,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,000,000

    The Committee commends IFAD for its participation in the 
enhanced HIPC initiative and for working to ensure that debt 
relief translates into real gains against poverty and hunger in 
rural areas. IFAD's rural and agricultural development projects 
help to achieve the poverty reductions and economic growth that 
debt relief is also intended to promote. The Committee 
recommends that the Administration explore ways to ensure that 
HIPC participation does not diminish IFAD's future capacity to 
assist the world's poor. The Committee also urges the 
Administration to actively encourage other governments to 
increase contributions that minimize HIPC participation's 
impact on IFAD's level of operations.

                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $186,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     186,000,000
House allowance.........................................     196,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     217,000,000

    The Committee has provided $217,000,000 for the 
``International Organizations and Programs'' account. This 
amount does not include funding for the Korean Peninsula Energy 
Development Organization and the International Atomic Energy 
Agency which are provided for in the Nonproliferation, 
Antiterrorism, Demining, and Related Programs account.

                   UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    The Committee supports the efforts of the United Nations 
Development Program (UNDP) to focus on key areas such as 
democratic governance, HIV/AIDS, conflict prevention and post-
conflict reconstruction in developing and transition countries, 
as well as its work to coordinate U.N. development agencies at 
the country level. Like the House, the Committee recommends a 
U.S. contribution of $97,300,000 for UNDP in fiscal year 2002, 
which is $10,000,000 above the request.

             UNITED NATIONS FUND FOR POPULATION ACTIVITIES

    The Committee has provided $39,000,000 for the United 
Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). UNFPA is the 
world's largest organization that provides family planning 
services in some 140 countries, including many that do not 
receive assistance from USAID. The Committee notes that UNFPA 
does not support abortion, but rather promotes voluntary 
practices and improvements in reproductive health. The 
Committee further notes that although the amount provided for 
fiscal year 2002 is $14,000,000 above the Administration's 
request, it is $11,000,000 less than the United States 
contribution in fiscal year 1995. As in the past, no United 
States funds may be used in China.

                           WORLD FOOD PROGRAM

    The Committee strongly supports the work of the World Food 
Program (WFP), which assisted 83 million of the world's poorest 
people during calendar year 2000. The Committee notes that 56 
million of these people were forced to flee their homes due to 
natural or man-made disasters, and has provided an additional 
$1,000,000 for WFP to upgrade its response to these crises.

               UNITED NATIONS FUND FOR VICTIMS OF TORTURE

    The Committee continues to support the United Nations Fund 
for Victims of Torture and recommends a U.S. contribution of 
$5,000,000 in fiscal year 2002. The Committee is aware that 
this Fund supports nearly 100 treatment programs and projects 
for victims of torture in over 50 countries. The Committee 
urges the State Department to seek additional contributions 
from other governments for the Fund.

                   UNITED NATIONS ENVIRONMENT PROGRAM

    The Committee notes the work of the United Nations 
Environment Program (UNEP) and supports the request of 
$10,750,000 in fiscal year 2002, which is $750,000 above the 
fiscal year 2001 level.

                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 501. Obligations During Last Month of availability.
    Sec. 502. Private and Voluntary Organizations.
    Sec. 503. Limitation on Residence Expenses.
    Sec. 504. Limitation on Expenses.
    Sec. 505. Limitation on Representational Allowances.
    Sec. 506. Prohibition on Financing Nuclear Goods.
    Sec. 507. Prohibition Against Direct Funding for Certain 
Countries.
    Sec. 508. Military Coups.
    Sec. 509. Transfers Between Accounts.
    Sec. 510. Deobligation/Reobligation Authority.
    Sec. 511. Availability of Funds.
    Sec. 512. Limitation on Assistance to Countries in Default.
    Sec. 513. Commerce and Trade.
    Sec. 514. Surplus Commodities.
    Sec. 515. Notification Requirements.
    Sec. 516. Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
International Organizations and Programs.
    Sec. 517. Independent States of the Former Soviet Union.
    Sec. 518. OPIC and Export-Import Bank Restrictions.
    Sec. 519. Export Financing Transfer Authorities.
    Sec. 520. Special Notification Requirements.
    Sec. 521. Definition of Program, Project, and Activity.
    Sec. 522. Child Survival and Health Activities.
    Sec. 523. Prohibition Against Indirect Funding to Certain 
Countries.
    Sec. 524. Notification on Excess Defense Equipment.
    Sec. 525. Authorization Requirement.
    Sec. 526. Democracy Programs.
    Sec. 527. Prohibition on Bilateral Assistance to Terrorist 
Countries.
    Sec. 528. Debt-For-Development.
    Sec. 529. Separate Accounts.
    Sec. 530. Compensation for United States Executive 
Directors to International Financial Institutions.
    Sec. 531. Compliance With United Nations Sanctions Against 
Iraq.
    Sec. 532. Authorities For the Peace Corps, International 
Fund for Agriculture Development, Inter-American Foundation and 
African Development Foundation.
    Sec. 533. Impact on Jobs in the United States.
    Sec. 534. Special Authorities.
    Sec. 535. Policy on Terminating the Arab League Boycott of 
Israel and Normalizing Relations With Israel.
    Sec. 536. Administration of Justice Activities.
    Sec. 537. Eligibility For Assistance.
    Sec. 538. Earmarks.
    Sec. 539. Ceilings and Earmarks.
    Sec. 540. Prohibition on Publicity or Propaganda.
    Sec. 541. Purchase of American-Made Equipment and Products.
    Sec. 542. Prohibition of Payments to United Nations 
Members.
    Sec. 543. Nongovernmental Organization--Documentation.
    Sec. 544. Prohibition on Assistance to Foreign Governments 
That Export Lethal Military Equipment to Countries Supporting 
International Terrorism.
    Sec. 545. Withholding of Assistance for Parking Fines Owed 
By Foreign Countries.
    Sec. 546. Limitation on Assistance for the PLO for the West 
Bank and Gaza.
    Sec. 547. War Crimes Tribunal Drawdown.
    Sec. 548. Landmines.
    Sec. 549. Restrictions Concerning The Palestinian 
Authority.
    Sec. 550. Prohibition of Payment of Certain Expenses.
    Sec. 551. Special Debt Relief for the Poorest.
    Sec. 552. Authority to Engage in Debt Buybacks or Sales.
    Sec. 553. Haiti Coast Guard.
    Sec. 554. Limitation on Assistance to the Palestinian 
Authority.
    Sec. 555. Limitation on Assistance to Security Forces.
    Sec. 556. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Report.
    Sec. 557. Zimbabwe.
    Sec. 558. Central America Relief and Reconstruction.
    Sec. 559. Enterprise Fund Restrictions.
    Sec. 560. Cambodia.
    Sec. 561. Foreign Military Training Report.
    Sec. 562. Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization.
    Sec. 563. Colombia.
    Sec. 564. Illegal Armed Groups.
    Sec. 565. Prohibition on Assistance to the Palestinian 
Broadcasting Corporation.
    Sec. 566. Iraq.
    Sec. 567. West Bank and Gaza Program.
    Sec. 568. Indonesia.
    Sec. 569. Restrictions on Assistance to Governments 
Destabilizing Sierra Leone.
    Sec. 570. Voluntary Separation Incentives.
    Sec. 571. American Churchwomen and Other Citizens in El 
Salvador and Guatemala.
    Sec. 572. Basic Education Assistance for Pakistan.
    Sec. 573. Commercial Leasing of Defense Articles.
    Sec. 574. War Criminals.
    Sec. 575. Funding For Serbia.
    Sec. 576. User Fees.
    Sec. 577. Heavily Indebted Poor Countries Trust Fund 
Authorization.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment, with particularity, which proposes 
an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the 
provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act 
or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that 
session.
    Items providing funding for fiscal year 2002 which lack 
authorization are as follows:

Export-Import Bank......................................    $753,323,000
Development assistance, including African Development 
    Foundation..........................................   1,251,542,000
International disaster assistance.......................     255,000,000
Debt restructuring......................................     235,000,000
Treasury technical assistance...........................       6,000,000
AID operating expenses..................................     549,000,000
AID operating expenses, Office of Inspector General.....      32,000,000
Economic support fund...................................   2,249,000,000
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltics...........     603,000,000
Assistance for the Independent States of the former 
    Soviet 
    Union...............................................     805,000,000
International narcotics control.........................     217,000,000
Migration and refugee assistance........................     745,000,000
Nonproliferation, antiterrorism, demining, and related 
    programs............................................     326,500,000
International military education and training...........      75,000,000
Foreign Military Financing Program......................   3,674,000,000
Peacekeeping operations.................................     150,000,000
International organizations and programs................     222,000,000
International Development Association Replenishment.....     775,000,000
Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency................      10,000,000

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the Committee 
ordered reported, en bloc, H.R 2506, the Foreign Operations, 
Export Financing, and Related Programs appropriations bill, 
2002, and S. 1398, an original Treasury and General Government 
appropriations bill, 2002, each subject to amendment and each 
subject to its budget allocations, by a recorded vote of 29-0, 
a quorum being present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Mrs. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Stevens
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Campbell
Mr. Craig
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. DeWine

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee report on 
a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute or 
part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

TITLE 22--FOREIGN RELATIONS AND INTERCOURSE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



CHAPTER 39--ARMS EXPORT CONTROL

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SUBCHAPTER III--MILITARY EXPORT CONTROLS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 2778. Control of arms exports and imports

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


Landmine Export Moratorium

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


      (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

      (c) Moratorium on Transfers of Anti-Personnel Landmines 
Abroad.--[During the 11-year period beginning on October 23, 
1992] During the 16-year period beginning on October 23, 1992--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1996, PUBLIC LAW 104-107

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

      For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of 
section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, and of 
section 2 of the United Nations Environment Program 
Participation Act of 1973, $285,000,000: Provided, That none of 
the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made 
available for the United Nations Fund for Science and 
Technology: Provided further, That funds appropriated under 
this heading may be made available for the International Atomic 
Energy Agency only if the Secretary of State determines (and so 
reports to the Congress) that Israel is not being denied its 
right to participate in the activities of that Agency: Provided 
further, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading 
that are made available to the United Nations Population Fund 
(UNFPA) shall be made available for activities in the People's 
Republic of China: Provided further, That not more than 
$30,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading may be 
made available to the UNFPA: Provided further, That not more 
than one-half of this amount may be provided to UNFPA before 
March 1, 1996, and that no later than February 15, 1996, the 
Secretary of State shall submit a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations indicating the amount UNFPA is budgeting for the 
People's Republic of China in 1996: Provided further, That any 
amount UNFPA plans to spend in the People's Republic of China 
in 1996 above $7,000,000, shall be deducted from the amount of 
funds provided to UNFPA after March 1, 1996 pursuant to the 
previous provisos: Provided further, That with respect to any 
funds appropriated under this heading that are made available 
to UNFPA, UNFPA shall be required to maintain such funds in a 
separate account and not commingle them with any other funds: 
Provided further, That funds may be made available to the 
Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization (KEDO) for 
administrative expenses and heavy fuel oil costs associated 
with the Agreed Framework: Provided further, That no funds may 
be provided for KEDO for funding for administrative expenses 
and heavy fuel oil costs beyond the total amount included for 
KEDO in the fiscal year 1996 congressional presentation: 
Provided further, That no funds may be made available under 
this Act to KEDO unless the President determines and certifies 
in writing to the Committees on Appropriations that (a) in 
accordance with section 1 of the Agreed Framework, KEDO has 
designated a Republic of Korea company, corporation or entity 
for the purpose of negotiating a prime contract to carry out 
construction of the light water reactors provided for in the 
Agreed Framework; and (b) the Democratic People's Republic of 
Korea is maintaining the freeze on its nuclear facilities as 
required in the Agreed Framework; and (c) the United States is 
taking steps to assure that progress is made on (1) the North-
South dialogue, including efforts to reduce barriers to trade 
and investment, such as removing restrictions on travel, 
telecommunications services and financial transactions; and (2) 
implementation of the January 1, 1992, Joint Declaration on the 
Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula[: Provided further, 
That a report on the specific efforts with regard to 
subsections (a), (b) and (c) of the preceding proviso shall be 
submitted by the President to the Committees on Appropriations 
six months after the date of enactment of this Act, and every 
six months thereafter].

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


CONSOLIDATED APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2000, PUBLIC LAW 106-113

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



APPENDIX B--H.R. 3422

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



  Voluntary Separation Incentives for Employees of the United States 
                  Agency for International Development

    Sec. 579. (a) Definitions.--For the purposes of this 
section--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (c) Authority To Provide Voluntary Separation Incentive 
Payments.--

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (2) Amount and treatment of payments.--A voluntary 
        separation incentive payment under this section--
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (D) may not be made except in the case of 
                any employee who voluntarily separates (whether 
                by retirement or resignation) on or before 
                [December 31, 2001] December 31, 2002;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001, PUBLIC LAW 106-429

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



APPENDIX A--H.R. 5526

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE


                                 BURMA

      Of the funds appropriated under the headings ``Economic 
Support Fund'', ``Child Survival and Disease Programs Fund'', 
and ``Development Assistance'', not less than $6,500,000 shall 
be made available to support democracy activities in Burma, 
democracy and humanitarian activities along the Burma-Thailand 
border, and for Burmese student groups and other organizations 
located outside Burma: Provided, That funds made available for 
Burma-related activities under this heading may be made 
available notwithstanding any other provision of law: Provided 
further, That the provision of such funds shall be made 
available subject to the regular notification procedures of the 
Committees on Appropriations.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


TITLE VIII--INTERNATIONAL DEBT FORGIVENESS AND INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL 
                          INSTITUTIONS REFORM


SEC. 801. DEBT RELIEF UNDER THE HEAVILY INDEBTED POOR COUNTRIES (HIPC) 
                    INITIATIVE.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (b) Contributions to HIPC Trust Fund.--
            (1) Authorization of appropriations for 
        contributions.--There is authorized to be appropriated 
        for the period beginning October 1, 2000, and ending 
        September 30, 2003, [$435,000,000] $600,000,000 for 
        purposes of United States contributions to the Heavily 
        Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Trust Fund administered 
        by the Bank.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  of   Committee    Amount  of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the First Concurrent
 Resolution for 2002: Subcommittee on Foreign Operations:
    General purpose, non-defense discretion-  ary...........       15,524       15,524           NA           NA
    General purpose.........................................           NA           NA       15,149       15,149
    Mandatory...............................................           45           45           45       \1\ 45
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2002....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........    \2\ 5,625
    2003....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        4,953
    2004....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        2,552
    2005....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,020
    2006 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,204
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 2002           NA  ...........           NA  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.


                 COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2001 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 2002
                                                                                    [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                            Senate Committee recommendation compared with (+ or
                                                                                                                                                                      )
                               Item                                       2001         Budget estimate   House allowance      Committee    -----------------------------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                                        recommendation         2001
                                                                                                                                              appropriation    Budget estimate   House allowance
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

             TITLE I--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE

              EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES

Subsidy appropriation.............................................          865,000           633,323           738,323           753,323          -111,677          +120,000           +15,000
(Direct loan authorization).......................................         (865,000)         (152,000)         (950,000)         (950,000)         (+85,000)        (+798,000)  ................
(Guaranteed loan authorization)...................................      (13,535,000)      (11,335,000)      (12,700,000)      (12,700,000)        (-835,000)      (+1,365,000)  ................
Administrative expenses...........................................           62,000            65,000            60,000            64,000            +2,000            -1,000            +4,000
Negative subsidy..................................................          -15,000           -11,000           -11,000           -11,000            +4,000   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export-Import Bank of the United States..............          912,000           687,323           787,323           806,323          -105,677          +119,000           +19,000

              OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION

Noncredit account:
    Administrative expenses.......................................           38,000            38,608            38,608            38,608              +608   ................  ................
    Insurance fees and other offsetting collections...............         -283,000          -290,000          -290,000          -290,000            -7,000   ................  ................
Subsidy appropriation.............................................           24,000   ................  ................  ................          -24,000   ................  ................
(Direct loan authorization).......................................         (127,000)          (45,000)          (45,000)          (45,000)         (-82,000)  ................  ................
(Guaranteed loan authorization)...................................       (1,000,000)       (1,152,000)       (1,152,000)       (1,152,000)        (+152,000)  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Overseas Private Investment Corporation..............         -221,000          -251,392          -251,392          -251,392           -30,392   ................  ................

                   TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

Trade and development agency......................................           50,000            50,024            50,024            50,024               +24   ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title I, Export and investment assistance............          741,000           485,955           585,955           604,955          -136,045          +119,000           +19,000
          (Loan authorizations)...................................      (15,527,000)      (12,684,000)      (14,847,000)      (14,847,000)        (-680,000)      (+2,163,000)  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
              TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

               Agency for International Development

Child survival and disease programs fund..........................        1,053,000           991,000         1,425,000         1,455,500          +402,500          +464,500           +30,500
    Rescission of unobligated balances............................  ................          -20,000   ................  ................  ................          +20,000   ................
    UNICEF........................................................         (110,000)         (110,000)         (120,000)         (120,000)         (+10,000)         (+10,000)  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Child survival (net)..............................        1,053,000           971,000         1,425,000         1,455,500          +402,500          +484,500           +30,500

Development assistance............................................        1,305,000         1,325,000         1,098,000         1,235,000           -70,000           -90,000          +137,000
International disaster assistance.................................          165,000           200,000           201,000           255,000           +90,000           +55,000           +54,000
    Supplemental funding..........................................          135,000   ................  ................  ................         -135,000   ................  ................
Transition Initiatives............................................           50,000            50,000            40,000            52,500            +2,500            +2,500           +12,500
    (By transfer).................................................           (5,000)  ................  ................  ................          (-5,000)  ................  ................
Micro and Small Enterprise Development program account:
    Subsidy appropriation.........................................            1,500   ................  ................  ................           -1,500   ................  ................
    (Guaranteed loan authorization)...............................          (30,000)  ................  ................  ................         (-30,000)  ................  ................
    Administrative expenses.......................................              500   ................  ................  ................             -500   ................  ................

Development credit authority:
    Subsidy appropriation.........................................            1,500   ................  ................  ................           -1,500   ................  ................
    (By transfer).................................................           (5,000)          (25,000)          (12,500)          (25,000)         (+20,000)  ................         (+12,500)
    (Guaranteed loan authorization)...............................          (49,700)         (355,000)         (177,500)         (355,000)        (+305,300)  ................        (+177,500)
    Administrative expenses.......................................            4,000             7,500             7,500             7,500            +3,500   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, development assistance............................        2,715,500         2,553,500         2,771,500         3,005,500          +290,000          +452,000          +234,000

Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund.....           44,489            44,880            44,880            44,880              +391   ................  ................
Operating expenses of the Agency for International Development....          520,000           549,000           549,000           549,000           +29,000   ................  ................
    (By transfer).................................................           (1,000)  ................  ................  ................          (-1,000)  ................  ................
    Supplemental funding..........................................           13,000   ................  ................  ................          -13,000   ................  ................
Operating expenses of the Agency for International Development               27,000            32,000            30,000            32,000            +5,000   ................           +2,000
 Office of Inspector General......................................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Agency for International Development (net)...........        3,319,989         3,179,380         3,395,380         3,631,380          +311,391          +452,000          +236,000

                Other Bilateral Economic Assistance

Economic support fund:
    Camp David countries..........................................        1,535,000         1,375,000         1,375,000         1,375,000          -160,000   ................  ................
    Other.........................................................          750,000           879,000           824,000           864,500          +114,500           -14,500           +40,500
    Rescission of unobligated balances............................  ................           -5,000   ................  ................  ................           +5,000   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Economic support fund (net).......................        2,285,000         2,249,000         2,199,000         2,239,500           -45,500            -9,500           +40,500

International Fund for Ireland....................................           25,000   ................           25,000   ................          -25,000   ................          -25,000
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States...............          600,000           605,000           600,000           603,000            +3,000            -2,000            +3,000
    Supplemental funding..........................................           75,825   ................  ................  ................          -75,825   ................  ................
Assistance for the Independent States of the former Soviet Union..          810,000           808,000           768,000           800,000           -10,000            -8,000           +32,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Other Bilateral Economic Assistance (net)............        3,795,825         3,662,000         3,592,000         3,642,500          -153,325           -19,500           +50,500

                       INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                     Inter-American Foundation

Appropriation.....................................................  ................  ................           12,000            13,107           +13,107           +13,107            +1,107
    (By transfer).................................................          (12,000)          (12,108)  ................  ................         (-12,000)         (-12,108)  ................

                  African Development Foundation

Appropriation.....................................................  ................  ................           16,042            16,542           +16,542           +16,542              +500
    (By transfer).................................................          (16,000)          (16,042)  ................  ................         (-16,000)         (-16,042)  ................

                            Peace Corps

Appropriation.....................................................          265,000           275,000           275,000           275,000           +10,000   ................  ................

                        Department of State

International narcotics control and law enforcement...............          325,000           217,000           217,000           217,000          -108,000   ................  ................
Andean Counterdrug Initiative.....................................  ................          731,000           675,000           567,000          +567,000          -164,000          -108,000
Migration and refugee assistance..................................          700,000           715,000           715,000           735,000           +35,000           +20,000           +20,000
United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund.....           15,000            15,000            15,000            15,000   ................  ................  ................
Nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, demining and related programs...          311,600           332,000           311,000           326,500           +14,900            -5,500           +15,500
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of State..................................        1,351,600         2,010,000         1,933,000         1,860,500          +508,900          -149,500           -72,500
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                    Department of the Treasury

International affairs technical assistance........................            6,000             6,000             6,000             6,000   ................  ................  ................
Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis..........  ................          100,000   ................  ................  ................         -100,000   ................
Debt restructuring................................................          238,000           224,000           224,000           235,000            -3,000           +11,000           +11,000
    Supplemental funding..........................................          210,000   ................  ................  ................         -210,000   ................  ................
United States community adjustment and investment program.........  ................              500   ................  ................  ................             -500   ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Department of the Treasury........................          454,000           330,500           230,000           241,000          -213,000           -89,500           +11,000
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title II, Bilateral economic assistance (net)........        9,186,414         9,456,880         9,453,422         9,680,029          +493,615          +223,149          +226,607
              Appropriations......................................       (8,752,589)       (9,481,880)       (9,453,422)       (9,680,029)        (+927,440)        (+198,149)        (+226,607)
              Emergency appropriations............................         (433,825)  ................  ................  ................        (-433,825)  ................  ................
              Rescission..........................................  ................         (-25,000)  ................  ................  ................         (+25,000)  ................
          (By transfer)...........................................          (39,000)          (53,150)          (12,500)          (25,000)         (-14,000)         (-28,150)         (+12,500)
          (Loan authorizations)...................................          (79,700)         (355,000)         (177,500)         (355,000)        (+275,300)  ................        (+177,500)
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
                  TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE

                FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

International Military Education and Training.....................           55,000            65,000            65,000            75,000           +20,000           +10,000           +10,000
    Supplemental funding..........................................            2,875   ................  ................  ................           -2,875   ................  ................

Foreign Military Financing Program:
    Grants:
        Camp David countries......................................        3,280,000         3,340,000         3,340,000         3,340,000           +60,000   ................  ................
        Other.....................................................          265,000           334,000           287,000           334,000           +69,000   ................          +47,000
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, grants........................................        3,545,000         3,674,000         3,627,000         3,674,000          +129,000   ................          +47,000

    (Limitation on administrative expenses).......................          (33,000)          (35,000)          (35,000)          (35,000)          (+2,000)  ................  ................
    Supplemental funding..........................................           31,000   ................  ................  ................          -31,000   ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Foreign Military Financing...........................        3,576,000         3,674,000         3,627,000         3,674,000           +98,000   ................          +47,000

Peacekeeping operations...........................................          127,000           150,000           135,000           140,000           +13,000           -10,000            +5,000
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title III, Military assistance (net).................        3,760,875         3,889,000         3,827,000         3,889,000          +128,125   ................          +62,000
              Appropriations......................................       (3,727,000)       (3,889,000)       (3,827,000)       (3,889,000)        (+162,000)  ................         (+62,000)
              Emergency appropriations............................          (33,875)  ................  ................  ................         (-33,875)  ................  ................
          (Limitation on administrative expenses).................          (33,000)          (35,000)          (35,000)          (35,000)          (+2,000)  ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
            TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

               International Financial Institutions

                         World Bank Group

Contribution to the International Bank for Reconstruction and               108,000           107,500            82,500           109,500            +1,500            +2,000           +27,000
 Development: Global Environment Facility.........................

Contribution to the International Development Association.........          775,000           803,400           803,400           775,000   ................          -28,400           -28,400

Contribution to Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency..........           10,000            10,000   ................            9,500              -500              -500            +9,500
    (Limitation on callable capital subscriptions)................          (50,000)          (50,000)          (50,000)          (50,000)  ................  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, World Bank Group.....................................          893,000           920,900           885,900           894,000            +1,000           -26,900            +8,100

Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank:
    Paid-in capital...............................................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
    Contribution to the Inter-American Investment Corporation.....           25,000            25,000            10,000            20,000            -5,000            -5,000           +10,000
    Contribution to the Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral             10,000   ................  ................  ................          -10,000   ................  ................
     Investment Fund..............................................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, contribution to the Inter-American Development                35,000            25,000            10,000            20,000           -15,000            -5,000           +10,000
         Bank.....................................................

Contribution to the Asian Development Bank:
    Paid-in capital...............................................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................  ................
    Contribution to the Asian Development Fund....................           72,000           103,017            93,017           103,017           +31,017   ................          +10,000

Contribution to the African Development Bank:
    Paid-in capital...............................................            6,100             5,100             5,100             5,100            -1,000   ................  ................
    (Limitation on callable capital subscriptions)................          (97,549)          (79,992)          (79,992)          (79,992)         (-17,557)  ................  ................
    Contribution to the African Development Fund..................          100,000           100,000           100,000           100,000   ................  ................  ................
                                                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total.......................................................          106,100           105,100           105,100           105,100            -1,000   ................  ................

Contribution to the European Bank for Reconstruction and
 Development:
    Paid-in capital...............................................           35,779            35,779            35,779            35,779   ................  ................  ................
    (Limitation on callable capital subscriptions)................         (123,238)         (123,238)         (123,238)         (123,238)  ................  ................  ................

Contribution to the International Fund for Agricultural                       5,000            20,000            20,000            20,000           +15,000   ................  ................
 Development......................................................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, International Financial Institutions.................        1,146,879         1,209,796         1,149,796         1,177,896           +31,017           -31,900           +28,100
          (Limitation on callable capital subscript)..............         (270,787)         (253,230)         (253,230)         (253,230)         (-17,557)  ................  ................

             International Organizations and Programs

Appropriation.....................................................          186,000           186,000           196,000           217,000           +31,000           +31,000           +21,000
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Multilateral economic assistance...........        1,332,879         1,395,796         1,345,796         1,394,896           +62,017              -900           +49,100
          (Limitation on callable capital subscript)..............         (270,787)         (253,230)         (253,230)         (253,230)         (-17,557)  ................  ................
                                                                   =============================================================================================================================
      Grand total (net)...........................................       15,021,168        15,227,631        15,212,173        15,568,880          +547,712          +341,249          +356,707
              Appropriations......................................      (14,553,468)      (15,252,631)      (15,212,173)      (15,568,880)      (+1,015,412)        (+316,249)        (+356,707)
              Rescissions.........................................  ................         (-25,000)  ................  ................  ................         (+25,000)  ................
              Emergency appropriations............................         (467,700)  ................  ................  ................        (-467,700)  ................  ................
          (By transfer)...........................................          (39,000)          (53,150)          (12,500)          (25,000)         (-14,000)         (-28,150)         (+12,500)
          (Limitation on administrative expenses).................          (33,000)          (35,000)          (35,000)          (35,000)          (+2,000)  ................  ................
          (Limitation on callable capital subscript)..............         (270,787)         (253,230)         (253,230)         (253,230)         (-17,557)  ................  ................
          (Loan authorizations)...................................      (15,606,700)      (13,039,000)      (15,024,500)      (15,202,000)        (-404,700)      (+2,163,000)        (+177,500)
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