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107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    107-234

======================================================================



 
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED 
  AGENCIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2002, AND FOR OTHER 
  PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

                October 11, 2001.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Skeen, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 2217]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
2217) ``making appropriations for the Department of the 
Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2002, and for other purposes'', having met, after 
full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do 
recommend to their respective Houses as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with an 
amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment, insert:
That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Department of 
the Interior and related agencies for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 2002, and for other purposes, namely:

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Bureau of Land Management


                   management of lands and resources


    For expenses necessary for protection, use, improvement, 
development, disposal, cadastral surveying, classification, 
acquisition of easements and other interests in lands, and 
performance of other functions, including maintenance of 
facilities, as authorized by law, in the management of lands 
and their resources under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of 
Land Management, including the general administration of the 
Bureau, and assessment of mineral potential of public lands 
pursuant to Public Law 96-487 (16 U.S.C. 3150(a)), 
$775,632,000, to remain available until expended, of which 
$1,000,000 is for high priority projects which shall be carried 
out by the Youth Conservation Corps, defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act; 
of which $4,000,000 shall be available for assessment of the 
mineral potential of public lands in Alaska pursuant to section 
1010 of Public Law 96-487 (16 U.S.C. 3150); and of which not to 
exceed $1,000,000 shall be derived from the special receipt 
account established by the Land and Water Conservation Act of 
1965, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-6a(i)); and of which 
$3,000,000 shall be available in fiscal year 2002 subject to a 
match by at least an equal amount by the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation, to such Foundation for cost-shared 
projects supporting conservation of Bureau lands and such funds 
shall be advanced to the Foundation as a lump sum grant without 
regard to when expenses are incurred; in addition, $32,298,000 
for Mining Law Administration program operations, including the 
cost of administering the mining claim fee program; to remain 
available until expended, to be reduced by amounts collected by 
the Bureau and credited to this appropriation from annual 
mining claim fees so as to result in a final appropriation 
estimated at not more than $775,632,000, and $2,000,000, to 
remain available until expended, from communication site rental 
fees established by the Bureau for the cost of administering 
communication site activities: Provided, That appropriations 
herein made shall not be available for the destruction of 
healthy, unadopted, wild horses and burros in the care of the 
Bureau or its contractors: Provided further, That of the amount 
provided, $28,000,000 is for the conservation activities 
defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the 
purposes of such Act: Provided further, That fiscal year 2001 
balances in the Federal Infrastructure Improvement account for 
the Bureau of Land Management shall be transferred to and 
merged with this appropriation, and shall remain available 
until expended.


                        wildland fire management


    For necessary expenses for fire preparedness, suppression 
operations, fire science and research, emergency 
rehabilitation, hazardous fuels reduction, and rural fire 
assistance by the Department of the Interior, $624,421,000, to 
remain available until expended, of which not to exceed 
$19,774,000 shall be for the renovation or construction of fire 
facilities: Provided, That such funds are also available for 
repayment of advances to other appropriation accounts from 
which funds were previously transferred for such purposes: 
Provided further, That unobligated balances of amounts 
previously appropriated to the ``Fire Protection'' and 
``Emergency Department of the Interior Firefighting Fund'' may 
be transferred and merged with this appropriation: Provided 
further, That persons hired pursuant to 43 U.S.C. 1469 may be 
furnished subsistence and lodging without cost from funds 
available from this appropriation: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding 42 U.S.C. 1856d, sums received by a bureau or 
office of the Department of the Interior for fire protection 
rendered pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 1856 et seq., protection of 
United States property, may be credited to the appropriation 
from which funds were expended to provide that protection, and 
are available without fiscal year limitation: Provided further, 
That using the amounts designated under this title of this Act, 
the Secretary of the Interior may enter into procurement 
contracts, grants, or cooperative agreements, for hazardous 
fuels reduction activities, and for training and monitoring 
associated with such hazardous fuels reduction activities, on 
Federal land, or on adjacent non-Federal land for activities 
that benefit resources on Federal land: Provided further, That 
the costs of implementing any cooperative agreement between the 
Federal government and any non-Federal entity may be shared, as 
mutually agreed on by the affected parties: Provided further, 
That in entering into such grants or cooperative agreements, 
the Secretary may consider the enhancement of local and small 
business employment opportunities for rural communities, and 
that in entering into procurement contracts under this section 
on a best value basis, the Secretary may take into account the 
ability of an entity to enhance local and small business 
employment opportunities in rural communities, and that the 
Secretary may award procurement contracts, grants, or 
cooperative agreements under this section to entities that 
include local non-profit entities, Youth Conservation Corps or 
related partnerships, or small or disadvantaged businesses: 
Provided further, That funds appropriated under this head may 
be used to reimburse the United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service and the National Marine Fisheries Service for the costs 
of carrying out their responsibilities under the Endangered 
Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) to consult and 
conference, as required by section 7 of such Act in connection 
with wildland fire management activities.
    For an additional amount to cover necessary expenses for 
burned areas rehabilitation and fire suppression by the 
Department of the Interior, $54,000,000, to remain available 
until expended, of which $34,000,000 is for wildfire 
suppression and $20,000,000 is for burned areas rehabilitation: 
Provided, That the Congress designates the entire amount as an 
emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended: Provided further, That $54,000,000 shall be available 
only to the extent an official budget request, that includes 
designation of the $54,000,000 as an emergency requirement as 
defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, as amended, is transmitted by the President to the 
Congress.


                    central hazardous materials fund


    For necessary expenses of the Department of the Interior 
and any of its component offices and bureaus for the remedial 
action, including associated activities, of hazardous waste 
substances, pollutants, or contaminants pursuant to the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.), $9,978,000, 
to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, sums recovered from or paid by 
a party in advance of or as reimbursement for remedial action 
or response activities conducted by the Department pursuant to 
section 107 or 113(f) of such Act, shall be credited to this 
account to be available until expended without further 
appropriation: Provided further, That such sums recovered from 
or paid by any party are not limited to monetary payments and 
may include stocks, bonds or other personal or real property, 
which may be retained, liquidated, or otherwise disposed of by 
the Secretary and which shall be credited to this account.


                              construction


    For construction of buildings, recreation facilities, 
roads, trails, and appurtenant facilities, $13,076,000, to 
remain available until expended.


                       payments in lieu of taxes


    For expenses necessary to implement the Act of October 20, 
1976, as amended (31 U.S.C. 6901-6907), $210,000,000, of which 
not to exceed $400,000 shall be available for administrative 
expenses and of which $50,000,000 is for the conservation 
activities defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, 
for the purposes of such Act: Provided, That no payment shall 
be made to otherwise eligible units of local government if the 
computed amount of the payment is less than $100.


                            land acquisition


    For expenses necessary to carry out sections 205, 206, and 
318(d) of Public Law 94-579, including administrative expenses 
and acquisition of lands or waters, or interests therein, 
$49,920,000, to be derived from the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund, to remain available until expended, and to be for the 
conservation activities defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended, for the purposes of such Act.


                   oregon and california grant lands


    For expenses necessary for management, protection, and 
development of resources and for construction, operation, and 
maintenance of access roads, reforestation, and other 
improvements on the revested Oregon and California Railroad 
grant lands, on other Federal lands in the Oregon and 
California land-grant counties of Oregon, and on adjacent 
rights-of-way; and acquisition of lands or interests therein 
including existing connecting roads on or adjacent to such 
grant lands; $105,165,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That 25 percent of the aggregate of all receipts 
during the current fiscal year from the revested Oregon and 
California Railroad grant lands is hereby made a charge against 
the Oregon and California land-grant fund and shall be 
transferred to the General Fund in the Treasury in accordance 
with the second paragraph of subsection (b) of title II of the 
Act of August 28, 1937 (50 Stat. 876).


               forest ecosystems health and recovery fund


                   (revolving fund, special account)


    In addition to the purposes authorized in Public Law 102-
381, funds made available in the Forest Ecosystem Health and 
Recovery Fund can be used for the purpose of planning, 
preparing, and monitoring salvage timber sales and forest 
ecosystem health and recovery activities such as release from 
competing vegetation and density control treatments. The 
Federal share of receipts (defined as the portion of salvage 
timber receipts not paid to the counties under 43 U.S.C. 1181f 
and 43 U.S.C. 1181-1 et seq., and Public Law 103-66) derived 
from treatments funded by this account shall be deposited into 
the Forest Ecosystem Health and Recovery Fund.


                           range improvements


    For rehabilitation, protection, and acquisition of lands 
and interests therein, and improvement of Federal rangelands 
pursuant to section 401 of the Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1701), notwithstanding any 
other Act, sums equal to 50 percent of all moneys received 
during the prior fiscal year under sections 3 and 15 of the 
Taylor Grazing Act (43 U.S.C. 315 et seq.) and the amount 
designated for range improvements from grazing fees and mineral 
leasing receipts from Bankhead-Jones lands transferred to the 
Department of the Interior pursuant to law, but not less than 
$10,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
not to exceed $600,000 shall be available for administrative 
expenses.


               service charges, deposits, and forfeitures


    For administrative expenses and other costs related to 
processing application documents and other authorizations for 
use and disposal of public lands and resources, for costs of 
providing copies of official public land documents, for 
monitoring construction, operation, and termination of 
facilities in conjunction with use authorizations, and for 
rehabilitation of damaged property, such amounts as may be 
collected under Public Law 94-579, as amended, and Public Law 
93-153, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
notwithstanding any provision to the contrary of section 305(a) 
of Public Law 94-579 (43 U.S.C. 1735(a)), any moneys that have 
been or will be received pursuant to that section, whether as a 
result of forfeiture, compromise, or settlement, if not 
appropriate for refund pursuant to section 305(c) of that Act 
(43 U.S.C. 1735(c)), shall be available and may be expended 
under the authority of this Act by the Secretary to improve, 
protect, or rehabilitate any public lands administered through 
the Bureau of Land Management which have been damaged by the 
action of a resource developer, purchaser, permittee, or any 
unauthorized person, without regard to whether all moneys 
collected from each such action are used on the exact lands 
damaged which led to the action: Provided further, That any 
such moneys that are in excess of amounts needed to repair 
damage to the exact land for which funds were collected may be 
used to repair other damaged public lands.


                       miscellaneous trust funds


    In addition to amounts authorized to be expended under 
existing laws, there is hereby appropriated such amounts as may 
be contributed under section 307 of the Act of October 21, 1976 
(43 U.S.C. 1701), and such amounts as may be advanced for 
administrative costs, surveys, appraisals, and costs of making 
conveyances of omitted lands under section 211(b) of that Act, 
to remain available until expended.


                       administrative provisions


    Appropriations for the Bureau of Land Management shall be 
available for purchase, erection, and dismantlement of 
temporary structures, and alteration and maintenance of 
necessary buildings and appurtenant facilities to which the 
United States has title; up to $100,000 for payments, at the 
discretion of the Secretary, for information or evidence 
concerning violations of laws administered by the Bureau; 
miscellaneous and emergency expenses of enforcement activities 
authorized or approved by the Secretary and to be accounted for 
solely on her certificate, not to exceed $10,000: Provided, 
That notwithstanding 44 U.S.C. 501, the Bureau may, under 
cooperative cost-sharing and partnership arrangements 
authorized by law, procure printing services from cooperators 
in connection with jointly produced publications for which the 
cooperators share the cost of printing either in cash or in 
services, and the Bureau determines the cooperator is capable 
of meeting accepted quality standards: Provided further, That 
section 28f(a) of title 30, United States Code, is amended:
            (1) In section 28f(a), by striking the first 
        sentence and inserting, ``The holder of each unpatented 
        mining claim, mill, or tunnel site, located pursuant to 
        the mining laws of the United States, whether located 
        before, on or after the enactment of this Act, shall 
        pay to the Secretary of the Interior, on or before 
        September 1 of each year for years 2002 through 2003, a 
        claim maintenance fee of $100 per claim or site''; and
            (2) In section 28g, by striking ``and before 
        September 30, 2001'' and inserting in lieu thereof 
        ``and before September 30, 2003''.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service


                          resource management


    For necessary expenses of the United States Fish and 
Wildlife Service, for scientific and economic studies, 
conservation, management, investigations, protection, and 
utilization of fishery and wildlife resources, except whales, 
seals, and sea lions, maintenance of the herd of long-horned 
cattle on the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge, general 
administration, and for the performance of other authorized 
functions related to such resources by direct expenditure, 
contracts, grants, cooperative agreements and reimbursable 
agreements with public and private entities, $850,597,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2003, except as otherwise 
provided herein, of which $29,000,000 is for conservation 
activities defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, 
for the purposes of such Act: Provided, That fiscal year 2001 
balances in the Federal Infrastructure Improvement account for 
the United States Fish and Wildlife Service shall be 
transferred to and merged with this appropriation, and shall 
remain available until expended: Provided further, That not 
less than $2,000,000 shall be provided to local governments in 
southern California for planning associated with the Natural 
Communities Conservation Planning (NCCP) program and shall 
remain available until expended: Provided further, That 
$2,000,000 is for high priority projects which shall be carried 
out by the Youth Conservation Corps, defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act: 
Provided further, That not to exceed $9,000,000 shall be used 
for implementing subsections (a), (b), (c), and (e) of section 
4 of the Endangered Species Act, as amended, for species that 
are indigenous to the United States (except for processing 
petitions, developing and issuing proposed and final 
regulations, and taking any other steps to implement actions 
described in subsection (c)(2)(A), (c)(2)(B)(i), or 
(c)(2)(B)(ii)), of which not to exceed $6,000,000 shall be used 
for any activity regarding the designation of critical habitat, 
pursuant to subsection (a)(3), excluding litigation support, 
for species already listed pursuant to subsection (a)(1) as of 
the date of enactment this Act: Provided further, That of the 
amount available for law enforcement, up to $400,000 to remain 
available until expended, may at the discretion of the 
Secretary, be used for payment for information, rewards, or 
evidence concerning violations of laws administered by the 
Service, and miscellaneous and emergency expenses of 
enforcement activity, authorized or approved by the Secretary 
and to be accounted for solely on her certificate: Provided 
further, That of the amount provided for environmental 
contaminants, up to $1,000,000 may remain available until 
expended for contaminant sample analyses.


                              construction


    For construction, improvement, acquisition, or removal of 
buildings and other facilities required in the conservation, 
management, investigation, protection, and utilization of 
fishery and wildlife resources, and the acquisition of lands 
and interests therein; $55,543,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                            land acquisition

    For expenses necessary to carry out the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund Act of 1965, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 
through 11), including administrative expenses, and for 
acquisition of land or waters, or interest therein, in 
accordance with statutory authority applicable to the United 
States Fish and Wildlife Service, $99,135,000, to be derived 
from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, to remain available 
until expended, and to be for the conservation activities 
defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the 
purposes of such Act: Provided, That none of the funds 
appropriated for specific land acquisition projects can be used 
to pay for any administrative overhead, planning or other 
management costs except that, in fiscal year 2002 only, not to 
exceed $2,500,000 may be used consistent with the Service's 
cost allocation methodology: Provided further, That the United 
States Fish and Wildlife Service is authorized to purchase the 
common stock of Yauhannah Properties, Inc. for the purposes of 
inclusion of real property owned by that corporation into the 
Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge.


                      landowner incentive program


    For expenses necessary to carry out the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund Act of 1965, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 
through 11), including administrative expenses, and for private 
conservation efforts to be carried out on private lands, 
$40,000,000, to be derived from the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund, to remain available until expended, and to be for 
conservation spending category activities pursuant to section 
251(c) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act 
of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of discretionary spending 
limits: Provided, That the amount provided herein is for a 
Landowner Incentive Program established by the Secretary that 
provides matching, competitively awarded grants to States, the 
District of Columbia, Tribes, Puerto Rico, Guam, the United 
States Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, and 
American Samoa, to establish, or supplement existing, landowner 
incentive programs that provide technical and financial 
assistance, including habitat protection and restoration, to 
private landowners for the protection and management of habitat 
to benefit federally listed, proposed, or candidate species, or 
other at-risk species on private lands.


                           stewardship grants


    For expenses necessary to carry out the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund Act of 1965, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 
through 11), including administrative expenses, and for private 
conservation efforts to be carried out on private lands, 
$10,000,000, to be derived from the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund, to remain available until expended, and to be for 
conservation spending category activities pursuant to section 
251(c) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act 
of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of discretionary spending 
limits: Provided, That the amount provided herein is for the 
Secretary to establish a Private Stewardship Grants Program to 
provide grants and other assistance to individuals and groups 
engaged in private conservation efforts that benefit federally 
listed, proposed, or candidate species, or other at-risk 
species.


            cooperative endangered species conservation fund


    For expenses necessary to carry out section 6 of the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531-1543), as 
amended, $96,235,000, to be derived from the Cooperative 
Endangered Species Conservation Fund, to remain available until 
expended, and to be for the conservation activities defined in 
section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of 
such Act.


                     national wildlife refuge fund


    For expenses necessary to implement the Act of October 17, 
1978 (16 U.S.C. 715s), $14,414,000.


               north american wetlands conservation fund


    For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
North American Wetlands Conservation Act, Public Law 101-233, 
as amended, $43,500,000, to remain available until expended and 
to be for the conservation activities defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act: 
Provided, That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
amounts in excess of funds provided in fiscal year 2001 shall 
be used only for projects in the United States.


                neotropical migratory bird conservation


    For financial assistance for projects to promote the 
conservation of neotropical migratory birds in accordance with 
the Neotropical Migratory Bird Conservation Act, Public Law 
106-247 (16 U.S.C. 6101-6109), $3,000,000, to remain available 
until expended.


                multinational species conservation fund


    For expenses necessary to carry out the African Elephant 
Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 4201- 4203, 4211-4213, 4221-4225, 
4241-4245, and 1538), the Asian Elephant Conservation Act of 
1997 (Public Law 105-96; 16 U.S.C. 4261-4266), the Rhinoceros 
and Tiger Conservation Act of 1994 (16 U.S.C. 5301-5306), and 
the Great Ape Conservation Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 6301), 
$4,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
funds made available under this Act, Public Law 106-291, and 
Public Law 106-554 and hereafter in annual appropriations Acts 
for rhinoceros, tiger, Asian elephant, and great ape 
conservation programs are exempt from any sanctions imposed 
against any country under section 102 of the Arms Export 
Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2799aa-1).


                         state wildlife grants


                    (including rescission of funds)


    For wildlife conservation grants to States and to the 
District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, the United States 
Virgin Islands, the Northern Mariana Islands, American Samoa, 
and federally recognized Indian tribes under the provisions of 
the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 and the Fish and Wildlife 
Coordination Act, for the development and implementation of 
programs for the benefit of wildlife and their habitat, 
including species that are not hunted or fished, $85,000,000, 
to be derived from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, to 
remain available until expended, and to be for the conservation 
activities defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, 
for the purposes of such Act: Provided, That of the amount 
provided herein, $5,000,000 is for a competitive grant program 
for Indian tribes not subject to the remaining provisions of 
this appropriation: Provided further, That the Secretary shall, 
after deducting said $5,000,000 and administrative expenses, 
apportion the amount provided herein in the following manner: 
(A) to the District of Columbia and to the Commonwealth of 
Puerto Rico, each a sum equal to not more than one-half of 1 
percent thereof: and (B) to Guam, American Samoa, the United 
States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands, each a sum equal to not more than one-fourth 
of 1 percent thereof: Provided further, That the Secretary 
shall apportion the remaining amount in the following manner: 
(A) one-third of which is based on the ratio to which the land 
area of such State bears to the total land area of all such 
States; and (B) two-thirds of which is based on the ratio to 
which the population of such State bears to the total 
population of all such States: Provided further, That the 
amounts apportioned under this paragraph shall be adjusted 
equitably so that no State shall be apportioned a sum which is 
less than 1 percent of the amount available for apportionment 
under this paragraph for any fiscal year or more than 5 percent 
of such amount: Provided further, That the Federal share of 
planning grants shall not exceed 75 percent of the total costs 
of such projects and the Federal share of implementation grants 
shall not exceed 50 percent of the total costs of such 
projects: Provided further, That the non-Federal share of such 
projects may not be derived from Federal grant programs: 
Provided further, That no State, territory, or other 
jurisdiction shall receive a grant unless it has developed, or 
committed to develop by October 1, 2005, a comprehensive 
wildlife conservation plan, consistent with criteria 
established by the Secretary of the Interior, that considers 
the broad range of the State, territory, or other 
jurisdiction's wildlife and associated habitats, with 
appropriate priority placed on those species with the greatest 
conservation need and taking into consideration the relative 
level of funding available for the conservation of those 
species: Provided further, That any amount apportioned in 2002 
to any State, territory, or other jurisdiction that remains 
unobligated as of September 30, 2003, shall be reapportioned, 
together with funds appropriated in 2004, in the manner 
provided herein.
    Of the amounts appropriated in title VIII of Public Law 
106-291, $25,000,000 for State Wildlife Grants are rescinded.


                       administrative provisions


    Appropriations and funds available to the United States 
Fish and Wildlife Service shall be available for purchase of 
not to exceed 74 passenger motor vehicles, of which 69 are for 
replacement only (including 32 for police-type use); repair of 
damage to public roads within and adjacent to reservation areas 
caused by operations of the Service; options for the purchase 
of land at not to exceed $1 for each option; facilities 
incident to such public recreational uses on conservation areas 
as are consistent with their primary purpose; and the 
maintenance and improvement of aquaria, buildings, and other 
facilities under the jurisdiction of the Service and to which 
the United States has title, and which are used pursuant to law 
in connection with management and investigation of fish and 
wildlife resources: Provided, That notwithstanding 44 U.S.C. 
501, the Service may, under cooperative cost sharing and 
partnership arrangements authorized by law, procure printing 
services from cooperators in connection with jointly produced 
publications for which the cooperators share at least one-half 
the cost of printing either in cash or services and the Service 
determines the cooperator is capable of meeting accepted 
quality standards: Provided further, That the Service may 
accept donated aircraft as replacements for existing aircraft: 
Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, the Secretary of the Interior may not spend any of the 
funds appropriated in this Act for the purchase of lands or 
interests in lands to be used in the establishment of any new 
unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System unless the purchase 
is approved in advance by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations in compliance with the reprogramming procedures 
contained in Senate Report 105-56.

                         National Park Service


                 operation of the national park system


    For expenses necessary for the management, operation, and 
maintenance of areas and facilities administered by the 
National Park Service (including special road maintenance 
service to trucking permittees on a reimbursable basis), and 
for the general administration of the National Park Service, 
$1,476,977,000, of which $10,869,000 for research, planning and 
interagency coordination in support of land acquisition for 
Everglades restoration shall remain available until expended; 
and of which $72,640,000, to remain available until September 
30, 2003, is for maintenance repair or rehabilitation projects 
for constructed assets, operation of the National Park Service 
automated facility management software system, and 
comprehensive facility condition assessments; and of which 
$2,000,000 is for the Youth Conservation Corps, defined in 
section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of 
such Act, for high priority projects: Provided, That the only 
funds in this account which may be made available to support 
United States Park Police are those funds approved for 
emergency law and order incidents pursuant to established 
National Park Service procedures, those funds needed to 
maintain and repair United States Park Police administrative 
facilities, and those funds necessary to reimburse the United 
States Park Police account for the unbudgeted overtime and 
travel costs associated with special events for an amount not 
to exceed $10,000 per event subject to the review and 
concurrence of the Washington headquarters office: Provided 
further, That none of the funds in this or any other Act may be 
used to fund a new Associate Director position for 
Partnerships.


                       united states park police


    For expenses necessary to carry out the programs of the 
United States Park Police, $65,260,000.


                   contribution for annuity benefits


    For reimbursement (not heretofore made), pursuant to 
provisions of Public Law 85-157, to the District of Columbia on 
a monthly basis for benefit payments by the District of 
Columbia to United States Park Police annuitants under the 
provisions of the Policeman and Fireman's Retirement and 
Disability Act (Act), to the extent those payments exceed 
contributions made by active Park Police members covered under 
the Act, such amounts as hereafter may be necessary: Provided, 
That hereafter the appropriations made to the National Park 
Service shall not be available for this purpose.


                  national recreation and preservation


    For expenses necessary to carry out recreation programs, 
natural programs, cultural programs, heritage partnership 
programs, environmental compliance and review, international 
park affairs, statutory or contractual aid for other 
activities, and grant administration, not otherwise provided 
for, $66,159,000, of which $500,000 are for grants pursuant to 
the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Act of 
1988 (16 U.S.C. 469l, as amended).


                     urban park and recreation fund


    For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
Urban Park and Recreation Recovery Act of 1978 (16 U.S.C. 2501 
et seq.), $30,000,000, to remain available until expended and 
to be for the conservation activities defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act.


                       historic preservation fund


    For expenses necessary in carrying out the Historic 
Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 U.S.C. 470), and the 
Omnibus Parks and Public Lands Management Act of 1996 (Public 
Law 104-333), $74,500,000, to be derived from the Historic 
Preservation Fund, to remain available until September 30, 
2003, and to be for the conservation activities defined in 
section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the 
purposes of such Act: Provided, That, of the amount provided 
herein, $2,500,000, to remain available until expended, is for 
a grant for the perpetual care and maintenance of National 
Trust Historic Sites, as authorized under 16 U.S.C. 470a(e)(2), 
to be made available in full upon signing of a grant agreement: 
Provided further, That, notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, these funds shall be available for investment with the 
proceeds to be used for the same purpose as set out herein: 
Provided further, That of the total amount provided, 
$30,000,000 shall be for Save America's Treasures for priority 
preservation projects, including preservation of intellectual 
and cultural artifacts, preservation of historic structures and 
sites, and buildings to house cultural and historic resources 
and to provide educational opportunities: Provided further, 
That any individual Save America's Treasures grant shall be 
matched by non-Federal funds: Provided further, That individual 
projects shall only be eligible for one grant, and all projects 
to be funded shall be approved by the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations prior to the commitment of grant 
funds: Provided further, That Save America's Treasures funds 
allocated for Federal projects shall be available by transfer 
to appropriate accounts of individual agencies, after approval 
of such projects by the Secretary of the Interior: Provided 
further, That none of the funds provided for Save America's 
Treasures may be used for administrative expenses, and staffing 
for the program shall be available from the existing staffing 
levels in the National Park Service.


                              construction


    For construction, improvements, repair or replacement of 
physical facilities, including the modifications authorized by 
section 104 of the Everglades National Park Protection and 
Expansion Act of 1989, $366,044,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which $66,851,000 is for conservation activities 
defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the 
purposes of such Act: Provided, That of the amount provided for 
Cuyahoga National Park, $200,000 may be used for the Cuyahoga 
Valley Scenic Railroad platform and station in Canton, Ohio.


                    land and water conservation fund


                              (rescission)


    The contract authority provided for fiscal year 2002 by 16 
U.S.C. 460l-10a is rescinded.


                 land acquisition and state assistance


    For expenses necessary to carry out the Land and Water 
Conservation Act of 1965, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l-4 through 
11), including administrative expenses, and for acquisition of 
lands or waters, or interest therein, in accordance with the 
statutory authority applicable to the National Park Service, 
$274,117,000, to be derived from the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund, to remain available until expended, and to 
be for the conservation activities defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act, of 
which $144,000,000 is for the State assistance program 
including $4,000,000 to administer the State assistance 
program, and of which $11,000,000 shall be for grants, not 
covering more than 50 percent of the total cost of any 
acquisition to be made with such funds, to States and local 
communities for purposes of acquiring lands or interests in 
lands to preserve and protect Civil War battlefield sites 
identified in the July 1993 Report on the Nation's Civil War 
Battlefields prepared by the Civil War Sites Advisory 
Commission: Provided, That lands or interests in land acquired 
with Civil War battlefield grants shall be subject to the 
requirements of paragraph 6(f)(3) of the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (16 U.S.C. 460l-8(f)(3)): 
Provided further, That of the amounts provided under this 
heading, $15,000,000 may be for Federal grants to the State of 
Florida for the acquisition of lands or waters, or interests 
therein, within the Everglades watershed (consisting of lands 
and waters within the boundaries of the South Florida Water 
Management District, Florida Bay and the Florida Keys, 
including the areas known as the Frog Pond, the Rocky Glades 
and the Eight and One-Half Square Mile Area) under terms and 
conditions deemed necessary by the Secretary to improve and 
restore the hydrological function of the Everglades watershed; 
and $16,000,000 may be for project modifications authorized by 
section 104 of the Everglades National Park Protection and 
Expansion Act: Provided further, That funds provided under this 
heading for assistance to the State of Florida to acquire lands 
within the Everglades watershed are contingent upon new 
matching non-Federal funds by the State and shall be subject to 
an agreement that the lands to be acquired will be managed in 
perpetuity for the restoration of the Everglades: Provided 
further, That none of the funds provided for the State 
Assistance program may be used to establish a contingency fund.


                       administrative provisions


    Appropriations for the National Park Service shall be 
available for the purchase of not to exceed 315 passenger motor 
vehicles, of which 256 shall be for replacement only, including 
not to exceed 237 for police-type use, 11 buses, and 8 
ambulances: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated to 
the National Park Service may be used to process any grant or 
contract documents which do not include the text of 18 U.S.C. 
1913: Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated to 
the National Park Service may be used to implement an agreement 
for the redevelopment of the southern end of Ellis Island until 
such agreement has been submitted to the Congress and shall not 
be implemented prior to the expiration of 30 calendar days (not 
including any day in which either House of Congress is not in 
session because of adjournment of more than 3 calendar days to 
a day certain) from the receipt by the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives and the President of the Senate of a full and 
comprehensive report on the development of the southern end of 
Ellis Island, including the facts and circumstances relied upon 
in support of the proposed project.
    None of the funds in this Act may be spent by the National 
Park Service for activities taken in direct response to the 
United Nations Biodiversity Convention.
    The National Park Service may distribute to operating units 
based on the safety record of each unit the costs of programs 
designed to improve workplace and employee safety, and to 
encourage employees receiving workers' compensation benefits 
pursuant to chapter 81 of title 5, United States Code, to 
return to appropriate positions for which they are medically 
able.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the National 
Park Service may convey a leasehold or freehold interest in 
Cuyahoga NP to allow for the development of utilities and 
parking needed to support the historic Everett Church in the 
village of Everett, Ohio.

                    United States Geological Survey


                 surveys, investigations, and research


    For expenses necessary for the United States Geological 
Survey to perform surveys, investigations, and research 
covering topography, geology, hydrology, biology, and the 
mineral and water resources of the United States, its 
territories and possessions, and other areas as authorized by 
43 U.S.C. 31, 1332, and 1340; classify lands as to their 
mineral and water resources; give engineering supervision to 
power permittees and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 
licensees; administer the minerals exploration program (30 
U.S.C. 641); and publish and disseminate data relative to the 
foregoing activities; and to conduct inquiries into the 
economic conditions affecting mining and materials processing 
industries (30 U.S.C. 3, 21a, and 1603; 50 U.S.C. 98g(1)) and 
related purposes as authorized by law and to publish and 
disseminate data; $914,002,000, of which $64,318,000 shall be 
available only for cooperation with States or municipalities 
for water resources investigations; and of which $16,400,000 
shall remain available until expended for conducting inquiries 
into the economic conditions affecting mining and materials 
processing industries; and of which $8,000,000 shall remain 
available until expended for satellite operations; and of which 
$26,374,000 shall be available until September 30, 2003 for the 
operation and maintenance of facilities and deferred 
maintenance; and of which $166,389,000 shall be available until 
September 30, 2003 for the biological research activity and the 
operation of the Cooperative Research Units: Provided, That 
none of these funds provided for the biological research 
activity shall be used to conduct new surveys on private 
property, unless specifically authorized in writing by the 
property owner: Provided further, That of the amount provided 
herein, $25,000,000 is for the conservation activities defined 
in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of 
such Act: Provided further, That no part of this appropriation 
shall be used to pay more than one-half the cost of topographic 
mapping or water resources data collection and investigations 
carried on in cooperation with States and municipalities.


                       administrative provisions


    The amount appropriated for the United States Geological 
Survey shall be available for the purchase of not to exceed 53 
passenger motor vehicles, of which 48 are for replacement only; 
reimbursement to the General Services Administration for 
security guard services; contracting for the furnishing of 
topographic maps and for the making of geophysical or other 
specialized surveys when it is administratively determined that 
such procedures are in the public interest; construction and 
maintenance of necessary buildings and appurtenant facilities; 
acquisition of lands for gauging stations and observation 
wells; expenses of the United States National Committee on 
Geology; and payment of compensation and expenses of persons on 
the rolls of the Survey duly appointed to represent the United 
States in the negotiation and administration of interstate 
compacts: Provided, That activities funded by appropriations 
herein made may be accomplished through the use of contracts, 
grants, or cooperative agreements as defined in 31 U.S.C. 6302 
et seq.

                      Minerals Management Service

                royalty and offshore minerals management

    For expenses necessary for minerals leasing and 
environmental studies, regulation of industry operations, and 
collection of royalties, as authorized by law; for enforcing 
laws and regulations applicable to oil, gas, and other minerals 
leases, permits, licenses and operating contracts; and for 
matching grants or cooperative agreements; including the 
purchase of not to exceed eight passenger motor vehicles for 
replacement only, $150,667,000, of which $83,344,000, shall be 
available for royalty management activities; and an amount not 
to exceed $102,730,000, to be credited to this appropriation 
and to remain available until expended, from additions to 
receipts resulting from increases to rates in effect on August 
5, 1993, from rate increases to fee collections for Outer 
Continental Shelf administrative activities performed by the 
Minerals Management Service over and above the rates in effect 
on September 30, 1993, and from additional fees for Outer 
Continental Shelf administrative activities established after 
September 30, 1993: Provided, That to the extent $102,730,000 
in additions to receipts are not realized from the sources of 
receipts stated above, the amount needed to reach $102,730,000 
shall be credited to this appropriation from receipts resulting 
from rental rates for Outer Continental Shelf leases in effect 
before August 5, 1993: Provided further, That $3,000,000 for 
computer acquisitions shall remain available until September 
30, 2003: Provided further, That funds appropriated under this 
Act shall be available for the payment of interest in 
accordance with 30 U.S.C. 1721(b) and (d): Provided further, 
That not to exceed $3,000 shall be available for reasonable 
expenses related to promoting volunteer beach and marine 
cleanup activities: Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
other provision of law, $15,000 under this heading shall be 
available for refunds of overpayments in connection with 
certain Indian leases in which the Director of the Minerals 
Management Service (MMS) concurred with the claimed refund due, 
to pay amounts owed to Indian allottees or tribes, or to 
correct prior unrecoverable erroneous payments: Provided 
further, That MMS may under the royalty-in-kind pilot program 
use a portion of the revenues from royalty-in-kind sales, 
without regard to fiscal year limitation, to pay for 
transportation to wholesale market centers or upstream pooling 
points, and to process or otherwise dispose of royalty 
production taken in kind: Provided further, That MMS shall 
analyze and document the expected return in advance of any 
royalty-in-kind sales to assure to the maximum extent 
practicable that royalty income under the pilot program is 
equal to or greater than royalty income recognized under a 
comparable royalty-in-value program.


                           oil spill research


    For necessary expenses to carry out title I, section 1016, 
title IV, sections 4202 and 4303, title VII, and title VIII, 
section 8201 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, $6,105,000, 
which shall be derived from the Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, 
to remain available until expended.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement


                       regulation and technology


    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of the 
Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, Public Law 
95-87, as amended, including the purchase of not to exceed 10 
passenger motor vehicles, for replacement only; $102,800,000: 
Provided, That the Secretary of the Interior, pursuant to 
regulations, may use directly or through grants to States, 
moneys collected in fiscal year 2002 for civil penalties 
assessed under section 518 of the Surface Mining Control and 
Reclamation Act of 1977 (30 U.S.C. 1268), to reclaim lands 
adversely affected by coal mining practices after August 3, 
1977, to remain available until expended: Provided further, 
That appropriations for the Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement may provide for the travel and per 
diem expenses of State and tribal personnel attending Office of 
Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement sponsored training.


                    abandoned mine reclamation fund


    For necessary expenses to carry out title IV of the Surface 
Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, Public Law 95-87, 
as amended, including the purchase of not more than 10 
passenger motor vehicles for replacement only, $203,455,000, to 
be derived from receipts of the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund 
and to remain available until expended; of which up to 
$10,000,000, to be derived from the Federal Expenses Share of 
the Fund, shall be for supplemental grants to States for the 
reclamation of abandoned sites with acid mine rock drainage 
from coal mines, and for associated activities, through the 
Appalachian Clean Streams Initiative: Provided, That grants to 
minimum program States will be $1,500,000 per State in fiscal 
year 2002: Provided further, That of the funds herein provided 
up to $18,000,000 may be used for the emergency program 
authorized by section 410 of Public Law 95-87, as amended, of 
which no more than 25 percent shall be used for emergency 
reclamation projects in any one State and funds for federally 
administered emergency reclamation projects under this proviso 
shall not exceed $11,000,000: Provided further, That prior year 
unobligated funds appropriated for the emergency reclamation 
program shall not be subject to the 25 percent limitation per 
State and may be used without fiscal year limitation for 
emergency projects: Provided further, That pursuant to Public 
Law 97-365, the Department of the Interior is authorized to use 
up to 20 percent from the recovery of the delinquent debt owed 
to the United States Government to pay for contracts to collect 
these debts: Provided further, That funds made available under 
title IV of Public Law 95-87 may be used for any required non-
Federal share of the cost of projects funded by the Federal 
Government for the purpose of environmental restoration related 
to treatment or abatement of acid mine drainage from abandoned 
mines: Provided further, That such projects must be consistent 
with the purposes and priorities of the Surface Mining Control 
and Reclamation Act: Provided further, That, in addition to the 
amount granted to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania under 
sections 402(g)(1) and 402(g)(5) of the Surface Mining Control 
and Reclamation Act (Act), an additional $500,000 will be 
specifically used for the purpose of conducting a demonstration 
project in accordance with section 401(c)(6) of the Act to 
determine the efficacy of improving water quality by removing 
metals from eligible waters polluted by acid mine drainage: 
Provided further, That the State of Maryland may set aside the 
greater of $1,000,000 or 10 percent of the total of the grants 
made available to the State under title IV of the Surface 
Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977, as amended (30 
U.S.C. 1231 et seq.), if the amount set aside is deposited in 
an acid mine drainage abatement and treatment fund established 
under a State law, pursuant to which law the amount (together 
with all interest earned on the amount) is expended by the 
State to undertake acid mine drainage abatement and treatment 
projects, except that before any amounts greater than 10 
percent of its title IV grants are deposited in an acid mine 
drainage abatement and treatment fund, the State of Maryland 
must first complete all Surface Mining Control and Reclamation 
Act priority one projects.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs


                      operation of indian programs


    For expenses necessary for the operation of Indian 
programs, as authorized by law, including the Snyder Act of 
November 2, 1921 (25 U.S.C. 13), the Indian Self-Determination 
and Education Assistance Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.), 
as amended, the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 U.S.C. 2001-
2019), and the Tribally Controlled Schools Act of 1988 (25 
U.S.C. 2501 et seq.), as amended, $1,799,809,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2003 except as otherwise provided 
herein, of which not to exceed $89,864,000 shall be for welfare 
assistance payments and notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, including but not limited to the Indian Self-Determination 
Act of 1975, as amended, not to exceed $130,209,000 shall be 
available for payments to tribes and tribal organizations for 
contract support costs associated with ongoing contracts, 
grants, compacts, or annual funding agreements entered into 
with the Bureau prior to or during fiscal year 2002, as 
authorized by such Act, except that tribes and tribal 
organizations may use their tribal priority allocations for 
unmet indirect costs of ongoing contracts, grants, or compacts, 
or annual funding agreements and for unmet welfare assistance 
costs; and up to $3,000,000 shall be for the Indian Self-
Determination Fund which shall be available for the 
transitional cost of initial or expanded tribal contracts, 
grants, compacts or cooperative agreements with the Bureau 
under such Act; and of which not to exceed $436,427,000 for 
school operations costs of Bureau-funded schools and other 
education programs shall become available on July 1, 2002, and 
shall remain available until September 30, 2003; and of which 
not to exceed $58,540,000 shall remain available until expended 
for housing improvement, road maintenance, attorney fees, 
litigation support, the Indian Self-Determination Fund, land 
records improvement, and the Navajo-Hopi Settlement Program: 
Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
including but not limited to the Indian Self-Determination Act 
of 1975, as amended, and 25 U.S.C. 2008, not to exceed 
$43,065,000 within and only from such amounts made available 
for school operations shall be available to tribes and tribal 
organizations for administrative cost grants associated with 
the operation of Bureau-funded schools: Provided further, That 
any forestry funds allocated to a tribe which remain 
unobligated as of September 30, 2003, may be transferred during 
fiscal year 2004 to an Indian forest land assistance account 
established for the benefit of such tribe within the tribe's 
trust fund account: Provided further, That any such unobligated 
balances not so transferred shall expire on September 30, 2004.


                              construction


    For construction, repair, improvement, and maintenance of 
irrigation and power systems, buildings, utilities, and other 
facilities, including architectural and engineering services by 
contract; acquisition of lands, and interests in lands; and 
preparation of lands for farming, and for construction of the 
Navajo Indian Irrigation Project pursuant to Public Law 87-483, 
$357,132,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That such amounts as may be available for the construction of 
the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project may be transferred to the 
Bureau of Reclamation: Provided further, That not to exceed 6 
percent of contract authority available to the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs from the Federal Highway Trust Fund may be used to 
cover the road program management costs of the Bureau: Provided 
further, That any funds provided for the Safety of Dams program 
pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 13 shall be made available on a 
nonreimbursable basis: Provided further, That for fiscal year 
2002, in implementing new construction or facilities 
improvement and repair project grants in excess of $100,000 
that are provided to tribally controlled grant schools under 
Public Law 100-297, as amended, the Secretary of the Interior 
shall use the Administrative and Audit Requirements and Cost 
Principles for Assistance Programs contained in 43 CFR part 12 
as the regulatory requirements: Provided further, That such 
grants shall not be subject to section 12.61 of 43 CFR; the 
Secretary and the grantee shall negotiate and determine a 
schedule of payments for the work to be performed: Provided 
further, That in considering applications, the Secretary shall 
consider whether the Indian tribe or tribal organization would 
be deficient in assuring that the construction projects conform 
to applicable building standards and codes and Federal, tribal, 
or State health and safety standards as required by 25 U.S.C. 
2005(a), with respect to organizational and financial 
management capabilities: Provided further, That if the 
Secretary declines an application, the Secretary shall follow 
the requirements contained in 25 U.S.C. 2505(f): Provided 
further, That any disputes between the Secretary and any 
grantee concerning a grant shall be subject to the disputes 
provision in 25 U.S.C. 2508(e): Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, not to exceed 
$450,000 in collections from settlements between the United 
States and contractors concerning the Dunseith Day School are 
to be made available for school construction in fiscal year 
2002 and thereafter.


 indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
                                indians


    For miscellaneous payments to Indian tribes and individuals 
and for necessary administrative expenses, $60,949,000, to 
remain available until expended; of which $24,870,000 shall be 
available for implementation of enacted Indian land and water 
claim settlements pursuant to Public Laws 101-618 and 102-575, 
and for implementation of other enacted water rights 
settlements; of which $7,950,000 shall be available for future 
water supplies facilities under Public Law 106-163; of which 
$21,875,000 shall be available pursuant to Public Laws 99-264, 
100-580, 106-263, 106-425, 106-554, and 106-568; and of which 
$6,254,000 shall be available for the consent decree entered by 
the U.S. District Court, Western District of Michigan in United 
States v. Michigan, Case No. 2:73 CV 26.


                 indian guaranteed loan program account


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, $4,500,000, as authorized 
by the Indian Financing Act of 1974, as amended: Provided, That 
such costs, including the cost of modifying such loans, shall 
be as defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize total loan principal, any part of which is to be 
guaranteed, not to exceed $75,000,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan programs, $486,000.


                       administrative provisions


    The Bureau of Indian Affairs may carry out the operation of 
Indian programs by direct expenditure, contracts, cooperative 
agreements, compacts and grants, either directly or in 
cooperation with States and other organizations.
    Appropriations for the Bureau of Indian Affairs (except the 
revolving fund for loans, the Indian loan guarantee and 
insurance fund, and the Indian Guaranteed Loan Program account) 
shall be available for expenses of exhibits, and purchase of 
not to exceed 229 passenger motor vehicles, of which not to 
exceed 187 shall be for replacement only.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no funds 
available to the Bureau of Indian Affairs for central office 
operations, pooled overhead general administration (except 
facilities operations and maintenance), or provided to 
implement the recommendations of the National Academy of Public 
Administration's August 1999 report shall be available for 
tribal contracts, grants, compacts, or cooperative agreements 
with the Bureau of Indian Affairs under the provisions of the 
Indian Self-Determination Act or the Tribal Self-Governance Act 
of 1994 (Public Law 103-413).
    In the event any tribe returns appropriations made 
available by this Act to the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 
distribution to other tribes, this action shall not diminish 
the Federal Government's trust responsibility to that tribe, or 
the government-to-government relationship between the United 
States and that tribe, or that tribe's ability to access future 
appropriations.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no funds 
available to the Bureau, other than the amounts provided herein 
for assistance to public schools under 25 U.S.C. 452 et seq., 
shall be available to support the operation of any elementary 
or secondary school in the State of Alaska.
    Appropriations made available in this or any other Act for 
schools funded by the Bureau shall be available only to the 
schools in the Bureau school system as of September 1, 1996. No 
funds available to the Bureau shall be used to support expanded 
grades for any school or dormitory beyond the grade structure 
in place or approved by the Secretary of the Interior at each 
school in the Bureau school system as of October 1, 1995. Funds 
made available under this Act may not be used to establish a 
charter school at a Bureau-funded school (as that term is 
defined in section 1146 of the Education Amendments of 1978 (25 
U.S.C. 2026)), except that a charter school that is in 
existence on the date of the enactment of this Act and that has 
operated at a Bureau-funded school before September 1, 1999, 
may continue to operate during that period, but only if the 
charter school pays to the Bureau a pro rata share of funds to 
reimburse the Bureau for the use of the real and personal 
property (including buses and vans), the funds of the charter 
school are kept separate and apart from Bureau funds, and the 
Bureau does not assume any obligation for charter school 
programs of the State in which the school is located if the 
charter school loses such funding. Employees of Bureau-funded 
schools sharing a campus with a charter school and performing 
functions related to the charter school's operation and 
employees of a charter school shall not be treated as Federal 
employees for purposes of chapter 171 of title 28, United 
States Code (commonly known as the ``Federal Tort Claims 
Act'').

                          Departmental Offices

                            Insular Affairs


                       assistance to territories


    For expenses necessary for assistance to territories under 
the jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior, 
$78,950,000, of which: (1) $74,422,000 shall be available until 
expended for technical assistance, including maintenance 
assistance, disaster assistance, insular management controls, 
coral reef initiative activities, and brown tree snake control 
and research; grants to the judiciary in American Samoa for 
compensation and expenses, as authorized by law (48 U.S.C. 
1661(c)); grants to the Government of American Samoa, in 
addition to current local revenues, for construction and 
support of governmental functions; grants to the Government of 
the Virgin Islands as authorized by law; grants to the 
Government of Guam, as authorized by law; and grants to the 
Government of the Northern Mariana Islands as authorized by law 
(Public Law 94-241; 90 Stat. 272); and (2) $4,528,000 shall be 
available for salaries and expenses of the Office of Insular 
Affairs: Provided, That all financial transactions of the 
territorial and local governments herein provided for, 
including such transactions of all agencies or 
instrumentalities established or used by such governments, may 
be audited by the General Accounting Office, at its discretion, 
in accordance with chapter 35 of title 31, United States Code: 
Provided further, That Northern Mariana Islands Covenant grant 
funding shall be provided according to those terms of the 
Agreement of the Special Representatives on Future United 
States Financial Assistance for the Northern Mariana Islands 
approved by Public Law 104-134: Provided further, That of the 
funds provided herein for American Samoa government operations, 
the Secretary is directed to use up to $20,000 to increase 
compensation of the American Samoa High Court Justices: 
Provided further, That of the amounts provided for technical 
assistance, not to exceed $2,000,000 shall be made available 
for transfer to the Disaster Assistance Direct Loan Financing 
Account of the Federal Emergency Management Agency for the 
purpose of covering the cost of forgiving the repayment 
obligation of the Government of the Virgin Islands on Community 
Disaster Loan 841, as required by section 504 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended (2 U.S.C. 661c): 
Provided further, That of the amounts provided for technical 
assistance, sufficient funding shall be made available for a 
grant to the Close Up Foundation: Provided further, That the 
funds for the program of operations and maintenance improvement 
are appropriated to institutionalize routine operations and 
maintenance improvement of capital infrastructure (with 
territorial participation and cost sharing to be determined by 
the Secretary based on the grantees commitment to timely 
maintenance of its capital assets): Provided further, That any 
appropriation for disaster assistance under this heading in 
this Act or previous appropriations Acts may be used as non-
Federal matching funds for the purpose of hazard mitigation 
grants provided pursuant to section 404 of the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5170c).

                      compact of free association

    For economic assistance and necessary expenses for the 
Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall 
Islands as provided for in sections 122, 221, 223, 232, and 233 
of the Compact of Free Association, and for economic assistance 
and necessary expenses for the Republic of Palau as provided 
for in sections 122, 221, 223, 232, and 233 of the Compact of 
Free Association, $23,245,000, to remain available until 
expended, as authorized by Public Law 99-239 and Public Law 99-
658.

                        Departmental Management


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for management of the Department of 
the Interior, $67,741,000, of which not to exceed $8,500 may be 
for official reception and representation expenses, and of 
which up to $1,000,000 shall be available for workers 
compensation payments and unemployment compensation payments 
associated with the orderly closure of the United States Bureau 
of Mines.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Office of the Solicitor, 
$45,000,000.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General, 
$34,302,000, of which $3,812,000 shall be for procurement by 
contract of independent auditing services to audit the 
consolidated Department of the Interior annual financial 
statement and the annual financial statement of the Department 
of the Interior bureaus and offices funded in this Act.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians


                         federal trust programs


    For operation of trust programs for Indians by direct 
expenditure, contracts, cooperative agreements, compacts, and 
grants, $99,224,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That funds for trust management improvements may be 
transferred, as needed, to the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
``Operation of Indian Programs'' account and to the 
Departmental Management ``Salaries and Expenses'' account: 
Provided further, That funds made available to Tribes and 
Tribal organizations through contracts or grants obligated 
during fiscal year 2002, as authorized by the Indian Self-
Determination Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 450 et seq.), shall remain 
available until expended by the contractor or grantee: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
statute of limitations shall not commence to run on any claim, 
including any claim in litigation pending on the date of the 
enactment of this Act, concerning losses to or mismanagement of 
trust funds, until the affected tribe or individual Indian has 
been furnished with an accounting of such funds from which the 
beneficiary can determine whether there has been a loss: 
Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, the Secretary shall not be required to provide a quarterly 
statement of performance for any Indian trust account that has 
not had activity for at least 18 months and has a balance of 
$1.00 or less: Provided further, That the Secretary shall issue 
an annual account statement and maintain a record of any such 
accounts and shall permit the balance in each such account to 
be withdrawn upon the express written request of the account 
holder.


                       indian land consolidation


    For consolidation of fractional interests in Indian lands 
and expenses associated with redetermining and redistributing 
escheated interests in allotted lands, and for necessary 
expenses to carry out the Indian Land Consolidation Act of 
1983, as amended, by direct expenditure or cooperative 
agreement, $10,980,000, to remain available until expended and 
which may be transferred to the Bureau of Indian Affairs and 
Departmental Management.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration


                natural resource damage assessment fund


    To conduct natural resource damage assessment activities by 
the Department of the Interior necessary to carry out the 
provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 9601 et 
seq.), Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 
U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (Public Law 
101-380) (33 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.), and Public Law 101-337, as 
amended (16 U.S.C. 19jj et seq.), $5,497,000, to remain 
available until expended.


                       administrative provisions


    There is hereby authorized for acquisition from available 
resources within the Working Capital Fund, 15 aircraft, 10 of 
which shall be for replacement and which may be obtained by 
donation, purchase or through available excess surplus 
property: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision of 
law, existing aircraft being replaced may be sold, with 
proceeds derived or trade-in value used to offset the purchase 
price for the replacement aircraft: Provided further, That no 
programs funded with appropriated funds in the ``Departmental 
Management'', ``Office of the Solicitor'', and ``Office of 
Inspector General'' may be augmented through the Working 
Capital Fund or the Consolidated Working Fund.

             GENERAL PROVISIONS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    Sec. 101. Appropriations made in this title shall be 
available for expenditure or transfer (within each bureau or 
office), with the approval of the Secretary, for the emergency 
reconstruction, replacement, or repair of aircraft, buildings, 
utilities, or other facilities or equipment damaged or 
destroyed by fire, flood, storm, or other unavoidable causes: 
Provided, That no funds shall be made available under this 
authority until funds specifically made available to the 
Department of the Interior for emergencies shall have been 
exhausted: Provided further, That all funds used pursuant to 
this section are hereby designated by Congress to be 
``emergency requirements'' pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of 
the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, 
and must be replenished by a supplemental appropriation which 
must be requested as promptly as possible.
    Sec. 102. The Secretary may authorize the expenditure or 
transfer of any no year appropriation in this title, in 
addition to the amounts included in the budget programs of the 
several agencies, for the suppression or emergency prevention 
of wildland fires on or threatening lands under the 
jurisdiction of the Department of the Interior; for the 
emergency rehabilitation of burned-over lands under its 
jurisdiction; for emergency actions related to potential or 
actual earthquakes, floods, volcanoes, storms, or other 
unavoidable causes; for contingency planning subsequent to 
actual oil spills; for response and natural resource damage 
assessment activities related to actual oil spills; for the 
prevention, suppression, and control of actual or potential 
grasshopper and Mormon cricket outbreaks on lands under the 
jurisdiction of the Secretary, pursuant to the authority in 
section 1773(b) of Public Law 99-198 (99 Stat. 1658); for 
emergency reclamation projects under section 410 of Public Law 
95-87; and shall transfer, from any no year funds available to 
the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement, such 
funds as may be necessary to permit assumption of regulatory 
authority in the event a primacy State is not carrying out the 
regulatory provisions of the Surface Mining Act: Provided, That 
appropriations made in this title for wildland fire operations 
shall be available for the payment of obligations incurred 
during the preceding fiscal year, and for reimbursement to 
other Federal agencies for destruction of vehicles, aircraft, 
or other equipment in connection with their use for wildland 
fire operations, such reimbursement to be credited to 
appropriations currently available at the time of receipt 
thereof: Provided further, That for wildland fire operations, 
no funds shall be made available under this authority until the 
Secretary determines that funds appropriated for ``wildland 
fire operations'' shall be exhausted within 30 days: Provided 
further, That all funds used pursuant to this section are 
hereby designated by Congress to be ``emergency requirements'' 
pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, and must be replenished 
by a supplemental appropriation which must be requested as 
promptly as possible: Provided further, That such replenishment 
funds shall be used to reimburse, on a pro rata basis, accounts 
from which emergency funds were transferred.
    Sec. 103. Appropriations made in this title shall be 
available for operation of warehouses, garages, shops, and 
similar facilities, wherever consolidation of activities will 
contribute to efficiency or economy, and said appropriations 
shall be reimbursed for services rendered to any other activity 
in the same manner as authorized by sections 1535 and 1536 of 
title 31, United States Code: Provided, That reimbursements for 
costs and supplies, materials, equipment, and for services 
rendered may be credited to the appropriation current at the 
time such reimbursements are received.
    Sec. 104. Appropriations made to the Department of the 
Interior in this title shall be available for services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, when authorized by the Secretary, 
in total amount not to exceed $500,000; hire, maintenance, and 
operation of aircraft; hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
purchase of reprints; payment for telephone service in private 
residences in the field, when authorized under regulations 
approved by the Secretary; and the payment of dues, when 
authorized by the Secretary, for library membership in 
societies or associations which issue publications to members 
only or at a price to members lower than to subscribers who are 
not members.
    Sec. 105. Appropriations available to the Department of the 
Interior for salaries and expenses shall be available for 
uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 
5901-5902 and D.C. Code 4-204).
    Sec. 106. Annual appropriations made in this title shall be 
available for obligation in connection with contracts issued 
for services or rentals for periods not in excess of 12 months 
beginning at any time during the fiscal year.
    Sec. 107. No funds provided in this title may be expended 
by the Department of the Interior for the conduct of offshore 
preleasing, leasing and related activities placed under 
restriction in the President's moratorium statement of June 12, 
1998, in the areas of northern, central, and southern 
California; the North Atlantic; Washington and Oregon; and the 
eastern Gulf of Mexico south of 26 degrees north latitude and 
east of 86 degrees west longitude.
    Sec. 108. No funds provided in this title may be expended 
by the Department of the Interior for the conduct of offshore 
oil and natural gas preleasing, leasing, and related 
activities, on lands within the North Aleutian Basin planning 
area.
    Sec. 109. No funds provided in this title may be expended 
by the Department of the Interior to conduct offshore oil and 
natural gas preleasing, leasing and related activities in the 
eastern Gulf of Mexico planning area for any lands located 
outside Sale 181, as identified in the final Outer Continental 
Shelf 5-Year Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 1997-2002.
    Sec. 110. No funds provided in this title may be expended 
by the Department of the Interior to conduct oil and natural 
gas preleasing, leasing and related activities in the Mid-
Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas.
    Sec. 111. Advance payments made under this title to Indian 
tribes, tribal organizations, and tribal consortia pursuant to 
the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 
U.S.C. 450 et seq.) or the Tribally Controlled Schools Act of 
1988 (25 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.) may be invested by the Indian 
tribe, tribal organization, or consortium before such funds are 
expended for the purposes of the grant, compact, or annual 
funding agreement so long as such funds are--
            (1) invested by the Indian tribe, tribal 
        organization, or consortium only in obligations of the 
        United States, or in obligations or securities that are 
        guaranteed or insured by the United States, or mutual 
        (or other) funds registered with the Securities and 
        Exchange Commission and which only invest in 
        obligations of the United States or securities that are 
        guaranteed or insured by the United States; or
            (2) deposited only into accounts that are insured 
        by an agency or instrumentality of the United States, 
        or are fully collateralized to ensure protection of the 
        funds, even in the event of a bank failure.
    Sec. 112. Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, the 
National Park Service shall not develop or implement a reduced 
entrance fee program to accommodate non-local travel through a 
unit. The Secretary may provide for and regulate local non-
recreational passage through units of the National Park System, 
allowing each unit to develop guidelines and permits for such 
activity appropriate to that unit.
    Sec. 113. Appropriations made in this Act under the 
headings Bureau of Indian Affairs and Office of Special Trustee 
for American Indians and any available unobligated balances 
from prior appropriations Acts made under the same headings, 
shall be available for expenditure or transfer for Indian trust 
management activities pursuant to the Trust Management 
Improvement Project High Level Implementation Plan.
    Sec. 114. A grazing permit or lease that expires (or is 
transferred) during fiscal year 2002 shall be renewed under 
section 402 of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 
1976, as amended (43 U.S.C. 1752) or if applicable, section 510 
of the California Desert Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 410aaa-50). 
The terms and conditions contained in the expiring permit or 
lease shall continue in effect under the new permit or lease 
until such time as the Secretary of the Interior completes 
processing of such permit or lease in compliance with all 
applicable laws and regulations, at which time such permit or 
lease may be canceled, suspended or modified, in whole or in 
part, to meet the requirements of such applicable laws and 
regulations. Nothing in this section shall be deemed to alter 
the Secretary's statutory authority: Provided, That any Federal 
lands included within the boundary of Lake Roosevelt National 
Recreation Area, as designated by the Secretary of the Interior 
on April 5, 1990, (Lake Roosevelt Cooperative Management 
Agreement) that were utilized as of March 31, 1997, for grazing 
purposes pursuant to a permit issued by the National Park 
Service, the person or persons so utilizing such lands as of 
March 31, 1997, shall be entitled to renew said permit under 
such terms and conditions as the Secretary may prescribe, for 
the lifetime of the permittee or 20 years, whichever is less.
    Sec. 115. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for 
the purpose of reducing the backlog of Indian probate cases in 
the Department of the Interior, the hearing requirements of 
chapter 10 of title 25, United States Code, are deemed 
satisfied by a proceeding conducted by an Indian probate judge, 
appointed by the Secretary without regard to the provisions of 
title 5, United States Code, governing the appointments in the 
competitive service, for such period of time as the Secretary 
determines necessary: Provided, That the basic pay of an Indian 
probate judge so appointed may be fixed by the Secretary 
without regard to the provisions of chapter 51, and subchapter 
III of chapter 53 of title 5, United States Code, governing the 
classification and pay of General Schedule employees, except 
that no such Indian probate judge may be paid at a level which 
exceeds the maximum rate payable for the highest grade of the 
General Schedule, including locality pay.
    Sec. 116. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of the Interior is authorized to redistribute any 
Tribal Priority Allocation funds, including tribal base funds, 
to alleviate tribal funding inequities by transferring funds to 
address identified, unmet needs, dual enrollment, overlapping 
service areas or inaccurate distribution methodologies. No 
tribe shall receive a reduction in Tribal Priority Allocation 
funds of more than 10 percent in fiscal year 2002. Under 
circumstances of dual enrollment, overlapping service areas or 
inaccurate distribution methodologies, the 10 percent 
limitation does not apply.
    Sec. 117. None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
establish a new National Wildlife Refuge in the Kankakee River 
basin that is inconsistent with the United States Army Corps of 
Engineers' efforts to control flooding and siltation in that 
area. Written certification of consistency shall be submitted 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to 
refuge establishment.
    Sec. 118. Funds appropriated for the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs for postsecondary schools for fiscal year 2002 shall be 
allocated among the schools proportionate to the unmet need of 
the schools as determined by the Postsecondary Funding Formula 
adopted by the Office of Indian Education Programs.
    Sec. 119. (a) The Secretary of the Interior shall take such 
action as may be necessary to ensure that the lands comprising 
the Huron Cemetery in Kansas City, Kansas (as described in 
section 123 of Public Law 106-291) are used only in accordance 
with this section.
    (b) The lands of the Huron Cemetery shall be used only: (1) 
for religious and cultural uses that are compatible with the 
use of the lands as a cemetery; and (2) as a burial ground.
    Sec. 120. No funds appropriated for the Department of the 
Interior by this Act or any other Act shall be used to study or 
implement any plan to drain Lake Powell or to reduce the water 
level of the lake below the range of water levels required for 
the operation of the Glen Canyon Dam.
    Sec. 121. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in 
conveying the Twin Cities Research Center under the authority 
provided by Public Law 104-134, as amended by Public Law 104-
208, the Secretary may accept and retain land and other forms 
of reimbursement: Provided, That the Secretary may retain and 
use any such reimbursement until expended and without further 
appropriation: (1) for the benefit of the National Wildlife 
Refuge System within the State of Minnesota; and (2) for all 
activities authorized by Public Law 100-696; 16 U.S.C. 460zz.
    Sec. 122. Section 412(b) of the National Parks Omnibus 
Management Act of 1998, as amended (16 U.S.C. 5961) is amended 
by striking ``2001'' and inserting ``2002''.
    Sec. 123. Notwithstanding other provisions of law, the 
National Park Service may authorize, through cooperative 
agreement, the Golden Gate National Parks Association to 
provide fee-based education, interpretive and visitor service 
functions within the Crissy Field and Fort Point areas of the 
Presidio.
    Sec. 124. Notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302(b), sums received 
by the Bureau of Land Management for the sale of seeds or 
seedlings including those collected in fiscal year 2001, may be 
credited to the appropriation from which funds were expended to 
acquire or grow the seeds or seedlings and are available 
without fiscal year limitation.
    Sec. 125. Tribal School Construction Demonstration Program. 
(a) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) Construction.--The term ``construction'', with 
        respect to a tribally controlled school, includes the 
        construction or renovation of that school.
            (2) Indian tribe.--The term ``Indian tribe'' has 
        the meaning given that term in section 4(e) of the 
        Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act 
        (25 U.S.C. 450b(e)).
            (3) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the 
        Secretary of the Interior.
            (4) Tribally controlled school.--The term 
        ``tribally controlled school'' has the meaning given 
        that term in section 5212 of the Tribally Controlled 
        Schools Act of 1988 (25 U.S.C. 2511).
            (5) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the 
        Department of the Interior.
            (6) Demonstration program.--The term 
        ``demonstration program'' means the Tribal School 
        Construction Demonstration Program.
    (b) In General.--The Secretary shall carry out a 
demonstration program to provide grants to Indian tribes for 
the construction of tribally controlled schools.
            (1) In general.--Subject to the availability of 
        appropriations, in carrying out the demonstration 
        program under subsection (b), the Secretary shall award 
        a grant to each Indian tribe that submits an 
        application that is approved by the Secretary under 
        paragraph (2). The Secretary shall ensure that an 
        eligible Indian tribe currently on the Department's 
        priority list for construction of replacement 
        educational facilities receives the highest priority 
        for a grant under this section.
            (2) Grant applications.--An application for a grant 
        under the section shall--
                    (A) include a proposal for the construction 
                of a tribally controlled school of the Indian 
                tribe that submits the application; and
                    (B) be in such form as the Secretary 
                determines appropriate.
            (3) Grant agreement.--As a condition to receiving a 
        grant under this section, the Indian tribe shall enter 
        into an agreement with the Secretary that specifies--
                    (A) the costs of construction under the 
                grant;
                    (B) that the Indian tribe shall be required 
                to contribute towards the cost of the 
                construction a tribal share equal to 50 percent 
                of the costs; and
                    (C) any other term or condition that the 
                Secretary determines to be appropriate.
            (4) Eligibility.--Grants awarded under the 
        demonstration program shall only be for construction of 
        replacement tribally controlled schools.
    (c) Effect of Grant.--A grant received under this section 
shall be in addition to any other funds received by an Indian 
tribe under any other provision of law. The receipt of a grant 
under this section shall not affect the eligibility of an 
Indian tribe receiving funding, or the amount of funding 
received by the Indian tribe, under the Tribally Controlled 
Schools Act of 1988 (25 U.S.C. 2501 et seq.) or the Indian 
Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 450 
et seq.).
    Sec. 126. White River Oil Shale Mine, Utah. (a) Sale.--The 
Administrator of General Services (referred to in this section 
as the ``Administrator'') shall sell all right, title, and 
interest of the United States in and to the improvements and 
equipment described in subsection (b) that are situated on the 
land described in subsection (c) (referred to in this section 
as the ``Mine'').
    (b) Description of Improvements and Equipment.--The 
improvements and equipment referred to in subsection (a) are 
the following improvements and equipment associated with the 
Mine:
            (1) Mine Service Building.
            (2) Sewage Treatment Building.
            (3) Electrical Switchgear Building.
            (4) Water Treatment Building/Plant.
            (5) Ventilation/Fan Building.
            (6) Water Storage Tanks.
            (7) Mine Hoist Cage and Headframe.
            (8) Miscellaneous Mine-related equipment.
    (c) Description of Land.--The land referred to in 
subsection (a) is the land located in Uintah County, Utah, 
known as the ``White River Oil Shale Mine'' and described as 
follows:
            (1) T. 10 S., R. 24 E., Salt Lake Meridian, 
        sections 12 through 14, 19 through 30, 33, and 34.
            (2) T. 10 S., R. 25 E., Salt Lake Meridian, 
        sections 18 and 19.
    (d) Use of Proceeds.--The proceeds of the sale under 
subsection (a)--
            (1) shall be deposited in a special account in the 
        Treasury of the United States; and
            (2) shall be available until expended, without 
        further Act of appropriation--
                    (A) first, to reimburse the Administrator 
                for the direct costs of the sale; and
                    (B) second, to reimburse the Bureau of Land 
                Management Utah State Office for the costs of 
                closing and rehabilitating the Mine.
    (e) Mine Closure and Rehabilitation.--The closing and 
rehabilitation of the Mine (including closing of the mine 
shafts, site grading, and surface revegetation) shall be 
conducted in accordance with--
            (1) the regulatory requirements of the State of 
        Utah, the Mine Safety and Health Administration, and 
        the Occupational Safety and Health Administration; and
            (2) other applicable law.
    Sec. 127. The Secretary of the Interior may use or contract 
for the use of helicopters or motor vehicles on the Sheldon and 
Hart National Wildlife Refuges for the purpose of capturing and 
transporting horses and burros. The provisions of subsection 
(a) of the Act of September 8, 1959 (73 Stat. 470; 18 U.S.C. 
47(a)) shall not be applicable to such use. Such use shall be 
in accordance with humane procedures prescribed by the 
Secretary.
    Sec. 128. The Lytton Rancheria of California shall not 
conduct Class III gaming as defined in Public Law 100-497 on 
land taken into trust for the tribe pursuant to Public Law 106-
568 except in compliance with all required compact provisions 
of section 2710(d) of Public Law 100-497 or any relevant Class 
III gaming procedures.
    Sec. 129. Moore's Landing at the Cape Romain National 
Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina is hereby named for George 
Garris and shall hereafter be referred to in any law, document, 
or records of the United States as ``Garris Landing''.
    Sec. 130. From within funds available to the National Park 
Service, such sums as may be necessary shall be used for 
expenses necessary to complete and issue, no later than January 
1, 2004, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to identify 
and analyze the possible effects of the 1996 increases in the 
number of vessel entries issued for Glacier Bay National Park 
and Preserve: Provided, That such EIS, upon its completion, 
shall be used by the Secretary to set the maximum level of 
vessel entries: Provided further, That until the Secretary sets 
the level of vessel entries based on the new EIS, the number of 
vessel entries into the Park shall be the same as that in 
effect during the 2000 calendar year and the National Park 
Service approval of modified Alternative 5 and promulgation of 
the final rule issued on May 30, 1996, relating to vessel 
entries, including the number of such entries, for Glacier Bay 
National Park and Preserve are hereby approved and shall be in 
effect notwithstanding any other provision of law until the 
Secretary sets the maximum level of vessel entries consistent 
with this section: Provided further, That nothing in this 
section shall preclude the Secretary from suspending or 
revoking any vessel entry if the Secretary determines that it 
is necessary to protect Park resources.
    Sec. 131. No funds contained in this Act shall be used to 
approve the transfer of lands on South Fox Island, Michigan 
until Congress has authorized such transfer.
    Sec. 132. Funds provided in this Act for Federal land 
acquisition by the National Park Service for Brandywine 
Battlefield, Mississippi National River and Recreation Area, 
Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic District, and 
Ice Age National Scenic Trail may be used for a grant to a 
State, a local government, or any other governmental land 
management entity for the acquisition of lands without regard 
to any restriction on the use of Federal land acquisition funds 
provided through the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 
1965 as amended.
    Sec. 133. Section 902(b)(5) of Public Law 106-568 is hereby 
amended by inserting a comma after ``N\1/2\''.
    Sec. 134. Clarification of the Secretary of the Interior's 
Authority Under Sections 2701-2721 of Title 25, United States 
Code. The authority to determine whether a specific area of 
land is a ``reservation'' for purposes of sections 2701-2721 of 
title 25, United States Code, was delegated to the Secretary of 
the Interior on October 17, 1988: Provided, That nothing in 
this section shall be construed to permit gaming under the 
Indian Gaming Regulatory Act on the lands described in section 
123 of Public Law 106-291 or any lands contiguous to such lands 
that have not been taken into trust by the Secretary of the 
Interior.
    Sec. 135. Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant 
Trails National Conservation Area. (a) Areas Included.--The 
Black Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National 
Conservation Area Act of 2000 is amended in sections 4(b) (16 
U.S.C. 460ppp-2(b)) and 8(a) (16 U.S.C. 460ppp-6(a)) by 
striking ``July 19, 2000'' each place it appears and inserting 
``October 3, 2001''.
    (b) Road Maintenance.--Section 5 of the Black Rock Desert-
High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation Area Act 
of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 460ppp-3) is amended by adding at the end 
the following:
    ``(h) Road Maintenance.--Within the conservation area the 
Secretary may permit the use of gravel pits for the maintenance 
of roads within the conservation area under the Materials Act 
of 1947 (30 U.S.C. 601 et seq.) to the extent consistent with 
this Act and subject to such regulations, policies, and 
practices as the Secretary considers necessary.''.
    (c) Hunting, Trapping, and Fishing.--Section 8 of the Black 
Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National 
Conservation Area Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 460ppp-6) is amended 
by adding at the end the following:
    ``(e) Hunting, Trapping, and Fishing.--
            ``(1) In general.--Nothing in this Act diminishes 
        the jurisdiction of the State of Nevada with respect to 
        fish and wildlife management, including regulation of 
        hunting and fishing on public land in the areas 
        designated as wilderness under subsection (a).
            ``(2) Applicable law.--Any action in the areas 
        designated as wilderness under subsection (a) shall be 
        consistent with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et 
        seq.).''.
    (d) Wildland Fire Protection.--Section 8 of the Black Rock 
Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation 
Area Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 460ppp-6) (as amended by subsection 
(c)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(f) Wildland Fire Protection.--Nothing in this Act or the 
Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.) precludes a Federal, 
State, or local agency from conducting wildland fire management 
operations (including prescribed burns) within the areas 
designated as wilderness under subsection (a), subject to any 
conditions that the Secretary considers appropriate.''.
    (e) Wilderness Study Release.--Section 8 of the Black Rock 
Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National Conservation 
Area Act of 2000 (16 U.S.C. 460ppp-6) (as amended by subsection 
(d)) is amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(g) Wilderness Study Release.--Congress--
            ``(1) finds that the parcels of land in the 
        wilderness study areas referred to in subsection (a) 
        that are not designated as wilderness by subsection (a) 
        have been adequately studied for wilderness designation 
        under section 603 of the Federal Land Policy and 
        Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1782); and
            ``(2) declares that those parcels are no longer 
        subject to the requirement of subsection (c) of that 
        section pertaining to the management of wilderness 
        study areas in a manner that does not impair the 
        suitability of such areas for preservation as 
        wilderness.''.

                       TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service


                     forest and rangeland research


    For necessary expenses of forest and rangeland research as 
authorized by law, $241,304,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                       state and private forestry

    For necessary expenses of cooperating with and providing 
technical and financial assistance to States, territories, 
possessions, and others, and for forest health management, 
cooperative forestry, and education and land conservation 
activities and conducting an international program as 
authorized, $291,221,000, to remain available until expended, 
as authorized by law, of which $65,000,000 is for the Forest 
Legacy Program, and $36,000,000 is for the Urban and Community 
Forestry Program, defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended, for the purposes of such Act: Provided, That none of 
the funds provided under this heading for the acquisition of 
lands or interests in lands shall be available until the Forest 
Service notifies the House Committee on Appropriations and the 
Senate Committee on Appropriations, in writing, of specific 
acquisition of lands or interests in lands to be undertaken 
with such funds: Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
other provision of law, of the funds provided under this 
heading, $4,500,000 shall be made available to Kake Tribal 
Corporation as an advanced direct lump sum payment to implement 
the Kake Tribal Corporation Land Transfer Act (Public Law 106-
283).


                         national forest system


    For necessary expenses of the Forest Service, not otherwise 
provided for, for management, protection, improvement, and 
utilization of the National Forest System, $1,331,439,000, to 
remain available until expended, which shall include 50 percent 
of all moneys received during prior fiscal years as fees 
collected under the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 
1965, as amended, in accordance with section 4 of the Act (16 
U.S.C. 460l-6a(i)): Provided, That unobligated balances 
available at the start of fiscal year 2002 shall be displayed 
by budget line item in the fiscal year 2003 budget 
justification: Provided further, That the Secretary may 
authorize the expenditure or transfer of such sums as necessary 
to the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management 
for removal, preparation, and adoption of excess wild horses 
and burros from National Forest System lands: Provided further, 
That of the funds provided under this heading for Forest 
Products, $5,000,000 shall be allocated to the Alaska Region, 
in addition to its normal allocation for the purposes of 
preparing additional timber for sale, to establish a 3-year 
timber supply and such funds may be transferred to other 
appropriations accounts as necessary to maximize 
accomplishment.


                        wildland fire management


    For necessary expenses for forest fire presuppression 
activities on National Forest System lands, for emergency fire 
suppression on or adjacent to such lands or other lands under 
fire protection agreement, hazardous fuel reduction on or 
adjacent to such lands, and for emergency rehabilitation of 
burned-over National Forest System lands and water, 
$1,214,349,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That such funds including unobligated balances under this head, 
are available for repayment of advances from other 
appropriations accounts previously transferred for such 
purposes: Provided further, That not less than 50 percent of 
any unobligated balances remaining (exclusive of amounts for 
hazardous fuels reduction) at the end of fiscal year 2001 shall 
be transferred, as repayment for past advances that have not 
been repaid, to the fund established pursuant to section 3 of 
Public Law 71-319 (16 U.S.C. 576 et seq.): Provided further, 
That notwithstanding any other provision of law, $8,000,000 of 
funds appropriated under this appropriation shall be used for 
Fire Science Research in support of the Joint Fire Science 
Program: Provided further, That all authorities for the use of 
funds, including the use of contracts, grants, and cooperative 
agreements, available to execute the Forest and Rangeland 
Research appropriation, are also available in the utilization 
of these funds for Fire Science Research: Provided further, 
That funds provided shall be available for emergency 
rehabilitation and restoration, hazard reduction activities in 
the urban-wildland interface, support to Federal emergency 
response, and wildfire suppression activities of the Forest 
Service; Provided further, That of the funds provided, 
$209,010,000 is for hazardous fuel treatment, $3,668,000 is for 
rehabilitation and restoration, $10,376,000 is for capital 
improvement and maintenance of fire facilities, $22,265,000 is 
for research activities and to make competitive research grants 
pursuant to the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources 
Research Act, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1641 et seq.), $50,383,000 
is for state fire assistance, $8,262,000 is for volunteer fire 
assistance, $11,974,000 is for forest health activities on 
state, private, and Federal lands, and $12,472,000 is for 
economic action programs: Provided further, That amounts in 
this paragraph may be transferred to the ``State and Private 
Forestry'', ``National Forest System'', ``Forest and Rangeland 
Research'', and ``Capital Improvement and Maintenance'' 
accounts to fund state fire assistance, volunteer fire 
assistance, and forest health management, vegetation and 
watershed management, heritage site rehabilitation, wildlife 
and fish habitat management, trails and facilities maintenance 
and restoration: Provided further, That transfers of any 
amounts in excess of those authorized in this paragraph, shall 
require approval of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations in compliance with reprogramming procedures 
contained in House Report No. 105-163: Provided further, That 
the costs of implementing any cooperative agreement between the 
Federal government and any non-Federal entity may be shared, as 
mutually agreed on by the affected parties: Provided further, 
That in entering into such grants or cooperative agreements, 
the Secretary may consider the enhancement of local and small 
business employment opportunities for rural communities, and 
that in entering into procurement contracts under this section 
on a best value basis, the Secretary may take into account the 
ability of an entity to enhance local and small business 
employment opportunities in rural communities, and that the 
Secretary may award procurement contracts, grants, or 
cooperative agreements under this section to entities that 
include local non-profit entities, Youth Conservation Corps or 
related partnerships with State, local or non-profit youth 
groups, or small or disadvantaged businesses: Provided further, 
That in addition to funds provided for State Fire Assistance 
programs, and subject to all authorities available to the 
Forest Service under the State and Private Forestry 
Appropriation, up to $15,000,000 may be used on adjacent non-
Federal lands for the purpose of protecting communities when 
hazard reduction activities are planned on national forest 
lands that have the potential to place such communities at 
risk: Provided further, That included in funding for hazardous 
fuel reduction is $5,000,000 for implementing the Community 
Forest Restoration Act, Public Law 106-393, title VI, and any 
portion of such funds shall be available for use on non-Federal 
lands in accordance with authorities available to the Forest 
Service under the State and Private Forestry Appropriation: 
Provided further, That:
            (1) In expending the funds provided with respect to 
        this Act for hazardous fuels reduction, the Secretary 
        of the Interior and the Secretary of Agriculture may 
        conduct fuel reduction treatments on Federal lands 
        using all contracting and hiring authorities available 
        to the Secretaries applicable to hazardous fuel 
        reduction activities under the wildland fire management 
        accounts. Notwithstanding Federal government 
        procurement and contracting laws, the Secretaries may 
        conduct fuel reduction treatments on Federal lands 
        using grants and cooperative agreements. 
        Notwithstanding Federal government procurement and 
        contracting laws, in order to provide employment and 
        training opportunities to people in rural communities, 
        the Secretaries may award contracts, including 
        contracts for monitoring activities, to--
                    (A) local private, nonprofit, or 
                cooperative entities;
                    (B) Youth Conservation Corps crews or 
                related partnerships, with State, local and 
                non-profit youth groups;
                    (C) small or micro-businesses; or
                    (D) other entities that will hire or train 
                a significant percentage of local people to 
                complete such contracts. The authorities 
                described above relating to contracts, grants, 
                and cooperative agreements are available until 
                all funds provided in this title for hazardous 
                fuels reduction activities in the urban 
                wildland interface are obligated.
            (2)(A) The Secretary of Agriculture may transfer or 
        reimburse funds to the United States Fish and Wildlife 
        Service of the Department of the Interior, or the 
        National Marine Fisheries Service of the Department of 
        Commerce, for the costs of carrying out their 
        responsibilities under the Endangered Species Act of 
        1973 (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.) to consult and conference 
        as required by section 7 of such Act in connection with 
        wildland fire management activities in fiscal years 
        2001 and 2002.
            (B) Only those funds appropriated for fiscal years 
        2001 and 2002 to Forest Service (USDA) for wildland 
        fire management are available to the Secretary of 
        Agriculture for such transfer or reimbursement.
            (C) The amount of the transfer or reimbursement 
        shall be as mutually agreed by the Secretary of 
        Agriculture and the Secretary of the Interior or 
        Secretary of Commerce, as applicable, or their 
        designees. The amount shall in no case exceed the 
        actual costs of consultation and conferencing in 
        connection with wildland fire management activities 
        affecting National Forest System lands.
    For an additional amount to cover necessary expenses for 
emergency rehabilitation, wildfire suppression and other fire 
operations of the Forest Service, $346,000,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which $200,000,000 is for 
repayment of prior year advances from other appropriations and 
accounts within the Wildland Fire appropriation previously 
transferred for fire suppression, $66,000,000 is for wildfire 
suppression operations, $59,000,000 is for land rehabilitation 
and restoration, $5,000,000 is for research activities and to 
make competitive research grants pursuant to the Forest and 
Rangeland Renewable Resources Research Act, as amended (16 
U.S.C. 1641 et seq.), $10,000,000 is for capital improvement 
and maintenance of fire facilities, $6,000,000 is for state 
fire assistance: Provided, That the Congress designates the 
entire amount as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended: Provided further, That 
$346,000,000 shall be available only to the extent that an 
official budget request, that includes designation of the 
$346,000,000 as an emergency requirement as defined in the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended, is transmitted by the President to the Congress.
    For an additional amount, to liquidate obligations 
previously incurred, $274,147,000.

                  capital improvement and maintenance

    For necessary expenses of the Forest Service, not otherwise 
provided for, $546,188,000, to remain available until expended 
for construction, reconstruction, maintenance and acquisition 
of buildings and other facilities, and for construction, 
reconstruction, repair and maintenance of forest roads and 
trails by the Forest Service as authorized by 16 U.S.C. 532-538 
and 23 U.S.C. 101 and 205, of which, $61,000,000 is for 
conservation activities defined in section 250(c)(4)(E) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended, for the purposes of such Act: Provided, That fiscal 
year 2001 balances in the Federal Infrastructure Improvement 
account for the Forest Service shall be transferred to and 
merged with this appropriation and shall remain available until 
expended: Provided further, That up to $15,000,000 of the funds 
provided herein for road maintenance shall be available for the 
decommissioning of roads, including unauthorized roads not part 
of the transportation system, which are no longer needed: 
Provided further, That no funds shall be expended to 
decommission any system road until notice and an opportunity 
for public comment has been provided on each decommissioning 
project: Provided further, That the Forest Service shall 
transfer $300,000, appropriated in Public Law 106-291 within 
the Capital Improvement and Maintenance appropriation, to the 
State and Private Forestry appropriation, and shall provide 
these funds in an advance direct lump sum payment to Purdue 
University for planning and construction of a hardwood tree 
improvement and generation facility: Provided further, That 
from funds provided to the Forest Service in Public Law 106-
291, $500,000 is hereby transferred from the Capital 
Improvement and Maintenance appropriation to the State and 
Private Forestry appropriation.


                            land acquisition


    For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965, as amended (16 
U.S.C. 460l-4 through 11), including administrative expenses, 
and for acquisition of land or waters, or interest therein, in 
accordance with statutory authority applicable to the Forest 
Service, $149,742,000 to be derived from the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund, to remain available until expended, and to 
be for the conservation activities defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act.


         acquisition of lands for national forests special acts


    For acquisition of lands within the exterior boundaries of 
the Cache, Uinta, and Wasatch National Forests, Utah; the 
Toiyabe National Forest, Nevada; and the Angeles, San 
Bernardino, Sequoia, and Cleveland National Forests, 
California, as authorized by law, $1,069,000, to be derived 
from forest receipts.


            acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges


    For acquisition of lands, such sums, to be derived from 
funds deposited by State, county, or municipal governments, 
public school districts, or other public school authorities 
pursuant to the Act of December 4, 1967, as amended (16 U.S.C. 
484a), to remain available until expended.

                         range betterment fund

    For necessary expenses of range rehabilitation, protection, 
and improvement, 50 percent of all moneys received during the 
prior fiscal year, as fees for grazing domestic livestock on 
lands in National Forests in the 16 Western States, pursuant to 
section 401(b)(1) of Public Law 94-579, as amended, to remain 
available until expended, of which not to exceed 6 percent 
shall be available for administrative expenses associated with 
on-the-ground range rehabilitation, protection, and 
improvements.

    gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research

    For expenses authorized by 16 U.S.C. 1643(b), $92,000, to 
remain available until expended, to be derived from the fund 
established pursuant to the above Act.


        management of national forest lands for subsistence uses


    For necessary expenses of the Forest Service to manage 
federal lands in Alaska for subsistence uses under title VIII 
of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (Public 
Law 96-487), $5,488,000, to remain available until expended.


               administrative provisions, forest service


    Appropriations to the Forest Service for the current fiscal 
year shall be available for: (1) purchase of not to exceed 132 
passenger motor vehicles of which eight will be used primarily 
for law enforcement purposes and of which 130 shall be for 
replacement; acquisition of 25 passenger motor vehicles from 
excess sources, and hire of such vehicles; operation and 
maintenance of aircraft, the purchase of not to exceed seven 
for replacement only, and acquisition of sufficient aircraft 
from excess sources to maintain the operable fleet at 195 
aircraft for use in Forest Service wildland fire programs and 
other Forest Service programs; notwithstanding other provisions 
of law, existing aircraft being replaced may be sold, with 
proceeds derived or trade-in value used to offset the purchase 
price for the replacement aircraft; (2) services pursuant to 7 
U.S.C. 2225, and not to exceed $100,000 for employment under 5 
U.S.C. 3109; (3) purchase, erection, and alteration of 
buildings and other public improvements (7 U.S.C. 2250); (4) 
acquisition of land, waters, and interests therein; (5) for 
expenses pursuant to the Volunteers in the National Forest Act 
of 1972 (16 U.S.C. 558a, 558d, and 558a note); (6) the cost of 
uniforms as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; and (7) for debt 
collection contracts in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3718(c).
    None of the funds made available under this Act shall be 
obligated or expended to abolish any region, to move or close 
any regional office for National Forest System administration 
of the Forest Service, Department of Agriculture without the 
consent of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Any appropriations or funds available to the Forest Service 
may be transferred to the Wildland Fire Management 
appropriation for forest firefighting, emergency rehabilitation 
of burned-over or damaged lands or waters under its 
jurisdiction, and fire preparedness due to severe burning 
conditions if and only if all previously appropriated emergency 
contingent funds under the heading ``Wildland Fire Management'' 
have been released by the President and apportioned.
    Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
for assistance to or through the Agency for International 
Development and the Foreign Agricultural Service in connection 
with forest and rangeland research, technical information, and 
assistance in foreign countries, and shall be available to 
support forestry and related natural resource activities 
outside the United States and its territories and possessions, 
including technical assistance, education and training, and 
cooperation with United States and international organizations.
    None of the funds made available to the Forest Service 
under this Act shall be subject to transfer under the 
provisions of section 702(b) of the Department of Agriculture 
Organic Act of 1944 (7 U.S.C. 2257) or 7 U.S.C. 147b unless the 
proposed transfer is approved in advance by the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations in compliance with the 
reprogramming procedures contained in House Report No. 105-163.
    None of the funds available to the Forest Service may be 
reprogrammed without the advance approval of the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations in accordance with the 
procedures contained in House Report No. 105-163.
    No funds available to the Forest Service shall be 
transferred to the Working Capital Fund of the Department of 
Agriculture that exceed the total amount transferred during 
fiscal year 2000 for such purposes without the advance approval 
of the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Funds available to the Forest Service shall be available to 
conduct a program of not less than $2,000,000 for high priority 
projects within the scope of the approved budget which shall be 
carried out by the Youth Conservation Corps, defined in section 
250(c)(4)(E) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended, for the purposes of such Act.
    Of the funds available to the Forest Service, $2,500 is 
available to the Chief of the Forest Service for official 
reception and representation expenses.
    Pursuant to sections 405(b) and 410(b) of Public Law 101-
593, of the funds available to the Forest Service, up to 
$2,250,000 may be advanced in a lump sum as Federal financial 
assistance to the National Forest Foundation, without regard to 
when the Foundation incurs expenses, for administrative 
expenses or projects on or benefitting National Forest System 
lands or related to Forest Service programs: Provided, That of 
the Federal funds made available to the Foundation, no more 
than $400,000 shall be available for administrative expenses: 
Provided further, That section 403(a) of the National Forest 
Foundation Act (16 U.S.C. 583j-1(a)) is amended by inserting 
after the first sentence the following new sentence: ``At the 
discretion of the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary may 
increase the number of Directors to not more than twenty.'': 
Provided further, That the Foundation shall obtain, by the end 
of the period of Federal financial assistance, private 
contributions to match on at least one-for-one basis funds made 
available by the Forest Service: Provided further, That the 
Foundation may transfer Federal funds to a non-Federal 
recipient for a project at the same rate that the recipient has 
obtained the non-Federal matching funds: Provided further, That 
hereafter, the National Forest Foundation may hold Federal 
funds made available but not immediately disbursed and may use 
any interest or other investment income earned (before, on, or 
after the date of the enactment of this Act) on Federal funds 
to carry out the purposes of Public Law 101-593: Provided 
further, That such investments may be made only in interest-
bearing obligations of the United States or in obligations 
guaranteed as to both principal and interest by the United 
States.
    Pursuant to section 2(b)(2) of Public Law 98-244, 
$2,650,000 of the funds available to the Forest Service shall 
be available for matching funds to the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation, as authorized by 16 U.S.C. 3701-3709, and 
may be advanced in a lump sum as Federal financial assistance, 
without regard to when expenses are incurred, for projects on 
or benefitting National Forest System lands or related to 
Forest Service programs: Provided, That the Foundation shall 
obtain, by the end of the period of Federal financial 
assistance, private contributions to match on at least one-for-
one basis funds advanced by the Forest Service: Provided 
further, That the Foundation may transfer Federal funds to a 
non-Federal recipient for a project at the same rate that the 
recipient has obtained the non-Federal matching funds.
    Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
for interactions with and providing technical assistance to 
rural communities for sustainable rural development purposes.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 80 percent of 
the funds appropriated to the Forest Service in the ``National 
Forest System'' and ``Capital Improvement and Maintenance'' 
accounts and planned to be allocated to activities under the 
``Jobs in the Woods'' program for projects on National Forest 
land in the State of Washington may be granted directly to the 
Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for 
accomplishment of planned projects. Twenty percent of said 
funds shall be retained by the Forest Service for planning and 
administering projects. Project selection and prioritization 
shall be accomplished by the Forest Service with such 
consultation with the State of Washington as the Forest Service 
deems appropriate.
    Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be available 
for payments to counties within the Columbia River Gorge 
National Scenic Area, pursuant to sections 14(c)(1) and (2), 
and section 16(a)(2) of Public Law 99-663.
    The Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to enter into 
grants, contracts, and cooperative agreements as appropriate 
with the Pinchot Institute for Conservation, as well as with 
public and other private agencies, organizations, institutions, 
and individuals, to provide for the development, 
administration, maintenance, or restoration of land, 
facilities, or Forest Service programs, at the Grey Towers 
National Historic Landmark: Provided, That, subject to such 
terms and conditions as the Secretary of Agriculture may 
prescribe, any such public or private agency, organization, 
institution, or individual may solicit, accept, and administer 
private gifts of money and real or personal property for the 
benefit of, or in connection with, the activities and services 
at the Grey Towers National Historic Landmark: Provided 
further, That such gifts may be accepted notwithstanding the 
fact that a donor conducts business with the Department of 
Agriculture in any capacity.
    Funds appropriated to the Forest Service shall be 
available, as determined by the Secretary, for payments to Del 
Norte County, California, pursuant to sections 13(e) and 14 of 
the Smith River National Recreation Area Act (Public Law 101-
612).
    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, any 
appropriations or funds available to the Forest Service not to 
exceed $500,000 may be used to reimburse the Office of the 
General Counsel (OGC), Department of Agriculture, for travel 
and related expenses incurred as a result of OGC assistance or 
participation requested by the Forest Service at meetings, 
training sessions, management reviews, land purchase 
negotiations and similar non-litigation related matters. Future 
budget justifications for both the Forest Service and the 
Department of Agriculture should clearly display the sums 
previously transferred and the requested funding transfers.
    The Forest Service shall fund indirect expenses, that is 
expenses not directly related to specific programs or to the 
accomplishment of specific work on-the-ground, from any funds 
available to the Forest Service: Provided, That the Forest 
Service shall implement and adhere to the definitions of 
indirect expenditures established pursuant to Public Law 105-
277 on a nationwide basis without flexibility for modification 
by any organizational level except the Washington Office, and 
when changed by the Washington Office, such changes in 
definition shall be reported in budget requests submitted by 
the Forest Service: Provided further, That the Forest Service 
shall provide in all future budget justifications, planned 
indirect expenditures in accordance with the definitions, 
summarized and displayed to the Regional, Station, Area, and 
detached unit office level. The justification shall display the 
estimated source and amount of indirect expenditures, by 
expanded budget line item, of funds in the agency's annual 
budget justification. The display shall include appropriated 
funds and the Knutson-Vandenberg, Brush Disposal, Cooperative 
Work-Other, and Salvage Sale funds. Changes between estimated 
and actual indirect expenditures shall be reported in 
subsequent budget justifications: Provided, That during fiscal 
year 2002 the Secretary shall limit total annual indirect 
obligations from the Brush Disposal, Knutson-Vandenberg, 
Reforestation, Salvage Sale, and Roads and Trails funds to 20 
percent of the total obligations from each fund. Obligations in 
excess of 20 percent which would otherwise be charged to the 
above funds may be charged to appropriated funds available to 
the Forest Service subject to notification of the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate.
    Any appropriations or funds available to the Forest Service 
may be used for necessary expenses in the event of law 
enforcement emergencies as necessary to protect natural 
resources and public or employee safety: Provided, That such 
amounts shall not exceed $750,000.
    The Secretary of Agriculture may authorize the sale of 
excess buildings, facilities, and other properties owned by the 
Forest Service and located on the Green Mountain National 
Forest, the revenues of which shall be retained by the Forest 
Service and available to the Secretary without further 
appropriation and until expended for maintenance and 
rehabilitation activities on the Green Mountain National 
Forest.

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY


                         clean coal technology


                               (deferral)


    Of the funds made available under this heading for 
obligation in prior years, $40,000,000 shall not be available 
until October 1, 2002: Provided, That funds made available in 
previous appropriations Acts shall be available for any ongoing 
project regardless of the separate request for proposal under 
which the project was selected.


                 fossil energy research and development


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses in carrying out fossil energy 
research and development activities, under the authority of the 
Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91), 
including the acquisition of interest, including defeasible and 
equitable interests in any real property or any facility or for 
plant or facility acquisition or expansion, and for conducting 
inquiries, technological investigations and research concerning 
the extraction, processing, use, and disposal of mineral 
substances without objectionable social and environmental costs 
(30 U.S.C. 3, 1602, and 1603), $616,490,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which $11,000,000 is to begin a 7-
year project for construction, renovation, furnishing, and 
demolition or removal of buildings at National Energy 
Technology Laboratory facilities in Morgantown, West Virginia 
and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and for acquisition of lands, and 
interests therein, in proximity to the National Energy 
Technology Laboratory, and of which $33,700,000 shall be 
derived by transfer from funds appropriated in prior years 
under the heading ``Clean Coal Technology'', and of which 
$150,000,000 and such sums as may be appropriated in fiscal 
year 2003 are to be made available, after coordination with the 
private sector, for a request for proposals for a Clean Coal 
Power Initiative providing for competitively-awarded 
demonstrations of commercial scale technologies to reduce the 
barriers to continued and expanded coal use: Provided, That the 
request for proposals shall be issued no later than 120 days 
following enactment of this Act, proposals shall be submitted 
no later than 150 days after the issuance of the request for 
proposals, and the Department of Energy shall make project 
selections no later than 160 days after the receipt of 
proposals: Provided further, That no project may be selected 
for which sufficient funding is not available to provide for 
the total project: Provided further, That funds shall be 
expended in accordance with the provisions governing the use of 
funds contained under the heading ``Clean Coal Technology'' in 
prior appropriations: Provided further, That the Department may 
include provisions for repayment of Government contributions to 
individual projects in an amount up to the Government 
contribution to the project on terms and conditions that are 
acceptable to the Department including repayments from sale and 
licensing of technologies from both domestic and foreign 
transactions: Provided further, That such repayments shall be 
retained by the Department for future coal-related research, 
development and demonstration projects: Provided further, That 
any technology selected under this program shall be considered 
a Clean Coal Technology, and any project selected under this 
program shall be considered a Clean Coal Technology Project, 
for the purposes of 42 U.S.C. Sec. 7651n, and Chapters 51, 52, 
and 60 of title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations: Provided 
further, That funds excess to the needs of the Power Plant 
Improvement Initiative procurement provided for under this 
heading in Public Law 106-291 shall be made available for the 
Clean Coal Power Initiative provided for under this heading in 
this Act: Provided further, That no part of the sum herein made 
available shall be used for the field testing of nuclear 
explosives in the recovery of oil and gas: Provided further, 
That up to 4 percent of program direction funds available to 
the National Energy Technology Laboratory may be used to 
support Department of Energy activities not included in this 
account.


                      alternative fuels production


                              (rescission)


    Of the unobligated balances under this heading, $2,000,000 
are rescinded.

                 naval petroleum and oil shale reserves

    For expenses necessary to carry out naval petroleum and oil 
shale reserve activities, $17,371,000, to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That, notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, unobligated funds remaining from prior years 
shall be available for all naval petroleum and oil shale 
reserve activities.


                      elk hills school lands fund


    For necessary expenses in fulfilling installment payments 
under the Settlement Agreement entered into by the United 
States and the State of California on October 11, 1996, as 
authorized by section 3415 of Public Law 104-106, $36,000,000, 
to become available on October 1, 2002 for payment to the State 
of California for the State Teachers' Retirement Fund from the 
Elk Hills School Lands Fund.


                          energy conservation


    For necessary expenses in carrying out energy conservation 
activities, $912,805,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That $275,000,000 shall be for use in energy 
conservation grant programs as defined in section 3008(3) of 
Public Law 99-509 (15 U.S.C. 4507): Provided further, That 
notwithstanding section 3003(d)(2) of Public Law 99-509, such 
sums shall be allocated to the eligible programs as follows: 
$230,000,000 for weatherization assistance grants and 
$45,000,000 for State energy conservation grants: Provided 
further, That 50 percent of the funds provided for the Energy 
Efficiency Science Initiative for fiscal year 2002 and 
thereafter shall be made available to the Fossil Energy 
Research and Development account.


                          economic regulation


    For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities of 
the Office of Hearings and Appeals, $1,996,000, to remain 
available until expended.


                      strategic petroleum reserve


    For necessary expenses for Strategic Petroleum Reserve 
facility development and operations and program management 
activities pursuant to the Energy Policy and Conservation Act 
of 1975, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.), $179,009,000, to 
remain available until expended, of which not to exceed 
$8,000,000 shall be available for maintenance of a Northeast 
Home Heating Oil Reserve.


                   energy information administration


    For necessary expenses in carrying out the activities of 
the Energy Information Administration, $78,499,000, to remain 
available until expended.

            administrative provisions, department of energy

    Appropriations under this Act for the current fiscal year 
shall be available for hire of passenger motor vehicles; hire, 
maintenance, and operation of aircraft; purchase, repair, and 
cleaning of uniforms; and reimbursement to the General Services 
Administration for security guard services.
    From appropriations under this Act, transfers of sums may 
be made to other agencies of the Government for the performance 
of work for which the appropriation is made.
    None of the funds made available to the Department of 
Energy under this Act shall be used to implement or finance 
authorized price support or loan guarantee programs unless 
specific provision is made for such programs in an 
appropriations Act.
    The Secretary is authorized to accept lands, buildings, 
equipment, and other contributions from public and private 
sources and to prosecute projects in cooperation with other 
agencies, Federal, State, private or foreign: Provided, That 
revenues and other moneys received by or for the account of the 
Department of Energy or otherwise generated by sale of products 
in connection with projects of the Department appropriated 
under this Act may be retained by the Secretary of Energy, to 
be available until expended, and used only for plant 
construction, operation, costs, and payments to cost-sharing 
entities as provided in appropriate cost-sharing contracts or 
agreements: Provided further, That the remainder of revenues 
after the making of such payments shall be covered into the 
Treasury as miscellaneous receipts: Provided further, That any 
contract, agreement, or provision thereof entered into by the 
Secretary pursuant to this authority shall not be executed 
prior to the expiration of 30 calendar days (not including any 
day in which either House of Congress is not in session because 
of adjournment of more than 3 calendar days to a day certain) 
from the receipt by the Speaker of the House of Representatives 
and the President of the Senate of a full comprehensive report 
on such project, including the facts and circumstances relied 
upon in support of the proposed project.
    No funds provided in this Act may be expended by the 
Department of Energy to prepare, issue, or process procurement 
documents for programs or projects for which appropriations 
have not been made.
    In addition to other authorities set forth in this Act, the 
Secretary may accept fees and contributions from public and 
private sources, to be deposited in a contributed funds 
account, and prosecute projects using such fees and 
contributions in cooperation with other Federal, State or 
private agencies or concerns.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                         Indian Health Service


                         indian health services


    For expenses necessary to carry out the Act of August 5, 
1954 (68 Stat. 674), the Indian Self-Determination Act, the 
Indian Health Care Improvement Act, and titles II and III of 
the Public Health Service Act with respect to the Indian Health 
Service, $2,389,614,000, together with payments received during 
the fiscal year pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 238(b) for services 
furnished by the Indian Health Service: Provided, That funds 
made available to tribes and tribal organizations through 
contracts, grant agreements, or any other agreements or 
compacts authorized by the Indian Self-Determination and 
Education Assistance Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 450), shall be 
deemed to be obligated at the time of the grant or contract 
award and thereafter shall remain available to the tribe or 
tribal organization without fiscal year limitation: Provided 
further, That $15,000,000 shall remain available until 
expended, for the Indian Catastrophic Health Emergency Fund: 
Provided further, That $445,776,000 for contract medical care 
shall remain available for obligation until September 30, 2003: 
Provided further, That of the funds provided, up to $22,000,000 
shall be used to carry out the loan repayment program under 
section 108 of the Indian Health Care Improvement Act: Provided 
further, That funds provided in this Act may be used for 1-year 
contracts and grants which are to be performed in 2 fiscal 
years, so long as the total obligation is recorded in the year 
for which the funds are appropriated: Provided further, That 
the amounts collected by the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services under the authority of title IV of the Indian Health 
Care Improvement Act shall remain available until expended for 
the purpose of achieving compliance with the applicable 
conditions and requirements of titles XVIII and XIX of the 
Social Security Act (exclusive of planning, design, or 
construction of new facilities): Provided further, That funding 
contained herein, and in any earlier appropriations Acts for 
scholarship programs under the Indian Health Care Improvement 
Act (25 U.S.C. 1613) shall remain available for obligation 
until September 30, 2003: Provided further, That amounts 
received by tribes and tribal organizations under title IV of 
the Indian Health Care Improvement Act shall be reported and 
accounted for and available to the receiving tribes and tribal 
organizations until expended: Provided further, That, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, of the amounts 
provided herein, not to exceed $268,234,000 shall be for 
payments to tribes and tribal organizations for contract or 
grant support costs associated with contracts, grants, self-
governance compacts or annual funding agreements between the 
Indian Health Service and a tribe or tribal organization 
pursuant to the Indian Self-Determination Act of 1975, as 
amended, prior to or during fiscal year 2002, of which not to 
exceed $20,000,000 may be used for contract support costs 
associated with new or expanded self-determination contracts, 
grants, self-governance compacts or annual funding agreements: 
Provided further, That funds available for the Indian Health 
Care Improvement Fund may be used, as needed, to carry out 
activities typically funded under the Indian Health Facilities 
account.


                        indian health facilities


    For construction, repair, maintenance, improvement, and 
equipment of health and related auxiliary facilities, including 
quarters for personnel; preparation of plans, specifications, 
and drawings; acquisition of sites, purchase and erection of 
modular buildings, and purchases of trailers; and for provision 
of domestic and community sanitation facilities for Indians, as 
authorized by section 7 of the Act of August 5, 1954 (42 U.S.C. 
2004a), the Indian Self-Determination Act, and the Indian 
Health Care Improvement Act, and for expenses necessary to 
carry out such Acts and titles II and III of the Public Health 
Service Act with respect to environmental health and facilities 
support activities of the Indian Health Service, $369,487,000, 
to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds appropriated 
for the planning, design, construction or renovation of health 
facilities for the benefit of an Indian tribe or tribes may be 
used to purchase land for sites to construct, improve, or 
enlarge health or related facilities: Provided further, That 
from the funds appropriated herein, $5,000,000 shall be 
designated by the Indian Health Service as a contribution to 
the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) to continue a 
priority project for the acquisition of land, planning, design 
and construction of 79 staff quarters in the Bethel service 
area, pursuant to the negotiated project agreement between the 
YKHC and the Indian Health Service: Provided further, That this 
project shall not be subject to the construction provisions of 
the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act and 
shall be removed from the Indian Health Service priority list 
upon completion: Provided further, That the Federal Government 
shall not be liable for any property damages or other 
construction claims that may arise from YKHC undertaking this 
project: Provided further, That the land shall be owned or 
leased by the YKHC and title to quarters shall remain vested 
with the YKHC: Provided further, That $5,000,000 shall remain 
available until expended for the purpose of funding up to two 
joint venture health care facility projects authorized under 
the Indian Health Care Improvement Act, as amended: Provided 
further, That priority, by rank order, shall be given to tribes 
with outpatient projects on the existing Indian Health Services 
priority list that have Service-approved planning documents, 
and can demonstrate by March 1, 2002, the financial capability 
necessary to provide an appropriate facility: Provided further, 
That joint venture funds unallocated after March 1, 2002, shall 
be made available for joint venture projects on a competitive 
basis giving priority to tribes that currently have no existing 
Federally-owned health care facility, have planning documents 
meeting Indian Health Service requirements prepared for 
approval by the Service and can demonstrate the financial 
capability needed to provide an appropriate facility: Provided 
further, That the Indian Health Service shall request 
additional staffing, operation and maintenance funds for these 
facilities in future budget requests: Provided further, That 
not to exceed $500,000 shall be used by the Indian Health 
Service to purchase TRANSAM equipment from the Department of 
Defense for distribution to the Indian Health Service and 
tribal facilities: Provided further, That not to exceed 
$500,000 shall be used by the Indian Health Service to obtain 
ambulances for the Indian Health Service and tribal facilities 
in conjunction with an existing interagency agreement between 
the Indian Health Service and the General Services 
Administration: Provided further, That not to exceed $500,000 
shall be placed in a Demolition Fund, available until expended, 
to be used by the Indian Health Service for demolition of 
Federal buildings: Provided further, That notwithstanding the 
provisions of title III, section 306, of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act (Public Law 94-437, as amended), construction 
contracts authorized under title I of the Indian Self-
Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975, as amended, 
may be used rather than grants to fund small ambulatory 
facility construction projects: Provided further, That if a 
contract is used, the IHS is authorized to improve municipal, 
private, or tribal lands, and that at no time, during 
construction or after completion of the project will the 
Federal Government have any rights or title to any real or 
personal property acquired as a part of the contract: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law or 
regulation, for purposes of acquiring sites for a new clinic 
and staff quarters in St. Paul Island, Alaska, the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services may accept land donated by the 
Tanadgusix Corporation.


            administrative provisions, indian health service


    Appropriations in this Act to the Indian Health Service 
shall be available for services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 
but at rates not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the 
maximum rate payable for senior-level positions under 5 U.S.C. 
5376; hire of passenger motor vehicles and aircraft; purchase 
of medical equipment; purchase of reprints; purchase, 
renovation and erection of modular buildings and renovation of 
existing facilities; payments for telephone service in private 
residences in the field, when authorized under regulations 
approved by the Secretary; and for uniforms or allowances 
therefore as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; and for expenses 
of attendance at meetings which are concerned with the 
functions or activities for which the appropriation is made or 
which will contribute to improved conduct, supervision, or 
management of those functions or activities.
    In accordance with the provisions of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act, non-Indian patients may be extended health 
care at all tribally administered or Indian Health Service 
facilities, subject to charges, and the proceeds along with 
funds recovered under the Federal Medical Care Recovery Act (42 
U.S.C. 2651-2653) shall be credited to the account of the 
facility providing the service and shall be available without 
fiscal year limitation. Notwithstanding any other law or 
regulation, funds transferred from the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development to the Indian Health Service shall be 
administered under Public Law 86-121 (the Indian Sanitation 
Facilities Act) and Public Law 93-638, as amended.
    Funds appropriated to the Indian Health Service in this 
Act, except those used for administrative and program direction 
purposes, shall not be subject to limitations directed at 
curtailing Federal travel and transportation.
    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
previously or herein made available to a tribe or tribal 
organization through a contract, grant, or agreement authorized 
by title I or title III of the Indian Self-Determination and 
Education Assistance Act of 1975 (25 U.S.C. 450), may be 
deobligated and reobligated to a self-determination contract 
under title I, or a self-governance agreement under title III 
of such Act and thereafter shall remain available to the tribe 
or tribal organization without fiscal year limitation.
    None of the funds made available to the Indian Health 
Service in this Act shall be used to implement the final rule 
published in the Federal Register on September 16, 1987, by the 
Department of Health and Human Services, relating to the 
eligibility for the health care services of the Indian Health 
Service until the Indian Health Service has submitted a budget 
request reflecting the increased costs associated with the 
proposed final rule, and such request has been included in an 
appropriations Act and enacted into law.
    Funds made available in this Act are to be apportioned to 
the Indian Health Service as appropriated in this Act, and 
accounted for in the appropriation structure set forth in this 
Act.
    With respect to functions transferred by the Indian Health 
Service to tribes or tribal organizations, the Indian Health 
Service is authorized to provide goods and services to those 
entities, on a reimbursable basis, including payment in advance 
with subsequent adjustment. The reimbursements received 
therefrom, along with the funds received from those entities 
pursuant to the Indian Self-Determination Act, may be credited 
to the same or subsequent appropriation account which provided 
the funding. Such amounts shall remain available until 
expended.
    Reimbursements for training, technical assistance, or 
services provided by the Indian Health Service will contain 
total costs, including direct, administrative, and overhead 
associated with the provision of goods, services, or technical 
assistance.
    The appropriation structure for the Indian Health Service 
may not be altered without advance approval of the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Navajo and Hopi 
Indian Relocation as authorized by Public Law 93-531, 
$15,148,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That 
funds provided in this or any other appropriations Act are to 
be used to relocate eligible individuals and groups including 
evictees from District 6, Hopi-partitioned lands residents, 
those in significantly substandard housing, and all others 
certified as eligible and not included in the preceding 
categories: Provided further, That none of the funds contained 
in this or any other Act may be used by the Office of Navajo 
and Hopi Indian Relocation to evict any single Navajo or Navajo 
family who, as of November 30, 1985, was physically domiciled 
on the lands partitioned to the Hopi Tribe unless a new or 
replacement home is provided for such household: Provided 
further, That no relocatee will be provided with more than one 
new or replacement home: Provided further, That the Office 
shall relocate any certified eligible relocatees who have 
selected and received an approved homesite on the Navajo 
reservation or selected a replacement residence off the Navajo 
reservation or on the land acquired pursuant to 25 U.S.C. 640d-
10.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development


                        payment to the institute


    For payment to the Institute of American Indian and Alaska 
Native Culture and Arts Development, as authorized by title XV 
of Public Law 99-498, as amended (20 U.S.C. 56 part A), 
$4,490,000.

                        Smithsonian Institution


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, as 
authorized by law, including research in the fields of art, 
science, and history; development, preservation, and 
documentation of the National Collections; presentation of 
public exhibits and performances; collection, preparation, 
dissemination, and exchange of information and publications; 
conduct of education, training, and museum assistance programs; 
maintenance, alteration, operation, lease (for terms not to 
exceed 30 years), and protection of buildings, facilities, and 
approaches; not to exceed $100,000 for services as authorized 
by 5 U.S.C. 3109; up to five replacement passenger vehicles; 
purchase, rental, repair, and cleaning of uniforms for 
employees, $399,253,000, of which not to exceed $37,508,000 for 
the instrumentation program, collections acquisition, 
exhibition reinstallation, the National Museum of the American 
Indian, and the repatriation of skeletal remains program shall 
remain available until expended, and including such funds as 
may be necessary to support American overseas research centers 
and a total of $125,000 for the Council of American Overseas 
Research Centers: Provided, That funds appropriated herein are 
available for advance payments to independent contractors 
performing research services or participating in official 
Smithsonian presentations: Provided further, That the 
Smithsonian Institution may expend Federal appropriations 
designated in this Act for lease or rent payments for long term 
and swing space, as rent payable to the Smithsonian 
Institution, and such rent payments may be deposited into the 
general trust funds of the Institution to the extent that 
federally supported activities are housed in the 900 H Street, 
N.W. building in the District of Columbia: Provided further, 
That this use of Federal appropriations shall not be construed 
as debt service, a Federal guarantee of, a transfer of risk to, 
or an obligation of, the Federal Government: Provided further, 
That no appropriated funds may be used to service debt which is 
incurred to finance the costs of acquiring the 900 H Street 
building or of planning, designing, and constructing 
improvements to such building.


            repair, restoration and alteration of facilities


    For necessary expenses of maintenance, repair, restoration, 
and alteration of facilities owned or occupied by the 
Smithsonian Institution, by contract or otherwise, as 
authorized by section 2 of the Act of August 22, 1949 (63 Stat. 
623), including not to exceed $10,000 for services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $67,900,000, to remain available 
until expended, of which $10,000,000 is provided for 
maintenance, repair, rehabilitation and alteration of 
facilities at the National Zoological Park: Provided, That 
contracts awarded for environmental systems, protection 
systems, and repair or restoration of facilities of the 
Smithsonian Institution may be negotiated with selected 
contractors and awarded on the basis of contractor 
qualifications as well as price.


                              construction


    For necessary expenses for construction, $30,000,000, to 
remain available until expended.


           administrative provisions, smithsonian institution


    None of the funds in this or any other Act may be used to 
make any changes to the existing Smithsonian science programs 
including closure of facilities, relocation of staff or 
redirection of functions and programs without approval by the 
Board of Regents of recommendations received from the Science 
Commission.
    None of the funds in this or any other Act may be used to 
initiate the design for any proposed expansion of current space 
or new facility without consultation with the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees.
    None of the funds in this or any other Act may be used for 
the Holt House located at the National Zoological Park in 
Washington, D.C., unless identified as repairs to minimize 
water damage, monitor structure movement, or provide interim 
structural support.
    None of the funds available to the Smithsonian may be 
reprogrammed without the advance written approval of the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations in accordance with the 
procedures contained in House Report No. 105-163.

                        National Gallery of Art


                         salaries and expenses


    For the upkeep and operations of the National Gallery of 
Art, the protection and care of the works of art therein, and 
administrative expenses incident thereto, as authorized by the 
Act of March 24, 1937 (50 Stat. 51), as amended by the public 
resolution of April 13, 1939 (Public Resolution 9, Seventy-
sixth Congress), including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109; payment in advance when authorized by the treasurer of 
the Gallery for membership in library, museum, and art 
associations or societies whose publications or services are 
available to members only, or to members at a price lower than 
to the general public; purchase, repair, and cleaning of 
uniforms for guards, and uniforms, or allowances therefor, for 
other employees as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5901-5902); 
purchase or rental of devices and services for protecting 
buildings and contents thereof, and maintenance, alteration, 
improvement, and repair of buildings, approaches, and grounds; 
and purchase of services for restoration and repair of works of 
art for the National Gallery of Art by contracts made, without 
advertising, with individuals, firms, or organizations at such 
rates or prices and under such terms and conditions as the 
Gallery may deem proper, $68,967,000, of which not to exceed 
$3,026,000 for the special exhibition program shall remain 
available until expended.


            repair, restoration and renovation of buildings


    For necessary expenses of repair, restoration and 
renovation of buildings, grounds and facilities owned or 
occupied by the National Gallery of Art, by contract or 
otherwise, as authorized, $14,220,000, to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That contracts awarded for 
environmental systems, protection systems, and exterior repair 
or renovation of buildings of the National Gallery of Art may 
be negotiated with selected contractors and awarded on the 
basis of contractor qualifications as well as price.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts


                       operations and maintenance


    For necessary expenses for the operation, maintenance and 
security of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 
$15,000,000.


                              construction


    For necessary expenses for capital repair and restoration 
of the existing features of the building and site of the John 
F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, $19,000,000, to 
remain available until expended.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary in carrying out the provisions of 
the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Act of 1968 (82 Stat. 1356) 
including hire of passenger vehicles and services as authorized 
by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $7,796,000.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       grants and administration


    For necessary expenses to carry out the National Foundation 
on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as amended, 
$98,234,000, shall be available to the National Endowment for 
the Arts for the support of projects and productions in the 
arts through assistance to organizations and individuals 
pursuant to sections 5(c) and 5(g) of the Act, for program 
support, and for administering the functions of the Act, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That funds 
previously appropriated to the National Endowment for the Arts 
``Matching Grants'' account may be transferred to and merged 
with this account.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities


                       grants and administration


    For necessary expenses to carry out the National Foundation 
on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as amended, 
$108,382,000, shall be available to the National Endowment for 
the Humanities for support of activities in the humanities, 
pursuant to section 7(c) of the Act, and for administering the 
functions of the Act, to remain available until expended.


                            matching grants


    To carry out the provisions of section 10(a)(2) of the 
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, 
as amended, $16,122,000, to remain available until expended, of 
which $12,122,000 shall be available to the National Endowment 
for the Humanities for the purposes of section 7(h): Provided, 
That this appropriation shall be available for obligation only 
in such amounts as may be equal to the total amounts of gifts, 
bequests, and devises of money, and other property accepted by 
the chairman or by grantees of the Endowment under the 
provisions of subsections 11(a)(2)(B) and 11(a)(3)(B) during 
the current and preceding fiscal years for which equal amounts 
have not previously been appropriated.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services


                       office of museum services


                       grants and administration


    For carrying out subtitle C of the Museum and Library 
Services Act of 1996, as amended, $26,899,000, to remain 
available until expended.

                      Challenge America Arts Fund


                        challenge america grants


    For necessary expenses as authorized by Public Law 89-209, 
as amended, $17,000,000, for support for arts education and 
public outreach activities to be administered by the National 
Endowment for the Arts, to remain available until expended.


                       administrative provisions


    None of the funds appropriated to the National Foundation 
on the Arts and the Humanities may be used to process any grant 
or contract documents which do not include the text of 18 
U.S.C. 1913: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated to 
the National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities may be 
used for official reception and representation expenses: 
Provided further, That funds from nonappropriated sources may 
be used as necessary for official reception and representation 
expenses.

                        Commission of Fine Arts


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses made necessary by the Act establishing a 
Commission of Fine Arts (40 U.S.C. 104), $1,224,000: Provided, 
That the Commission is authorized to charge fees to cover the 
full costs of its publications, and such fees shall be credited 
to this account as an offsetting collection, to remain 
available until expended without further appropriation.


               national capital arts and cultural affairs


    For necessary expenses as authorized by Public Law 99-190 
(20 U.S.C. 956(a)), as amended, $7,000,000.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation (Public Law 89-665, as amended), $3,400,000: 
Provided, That none of these funds shall be available for 
compensation of level V of the Executive Schedule or higher 
positions.

                  National Capital Planning Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses, as authorized by the National 
Capital Planning Act of 1952 (40 U.S.C. 71-71i), including 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, $7,253,000: Provided, 
That all appointed members of the Commission will be 
compensated at a rate not to exceed the daily equivalent of the 
annual rate of pay for positions at level IV of the Executive 
Schedule for each day such member is engaged in the actual 
performance of duties.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum


                       holocaust memorial museum


    For expenses of the Holocaust Memorial Museum, as 
authorized by Public Law 106-292 (36 U.S.C. 2301-2310), 
$36,028,000, of which $1,900,000 for the museum's repair and 
rehabilitation program and $1,264,000 for the museum's 
exhibitions program shall remain available until expended.

                             Presidio Trust


                          presidio trust fund


    For necessary expenses to carry out title I of the Omnibus 
Parks and Public Lands Management Act of 1996, $23,125,000 
shall be available to the Presidio Trust, to remain available 
until expended.

                     TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 301. The expenditure of any appropriation under this 
Act for any consulting service through procurement contract, 
pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 3109, shall be limited to those contracts 
where such expenditures are a matter of public record and 
available for public inspection, except where otherwise 
provided under existing law, or under existing Executive Order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Sec. 302. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall be available for any activity or the publication or 
distribution of literature that in any way tends to promote 
public support or opposition to any legislative proposal on 
which congressional action is not complete.
    Sec. 303. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
    Sec. 304. None of the funds provided in this Act to any 
department or agency shall be obligated or expended to provide 
a personal cook, chauffeur, or other personal servants to any 
officer or employee of such department or agency except as 
otherwise provided by law.
    Sec. 305. No assessments may be levied against any program, 
budget activity, subactivity, or project funded by this Act 
unless advance notice of such assessments and the basis 
therefor are presented to the Committees on Appropriations and 
are approved by such committees.
    Sec. 306. None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
plan, prepare, or offer for sale timber from trees classified 
as giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum) which are located 
on National Forest System or Bureau of Land Management lands in 
a manner different than such sales were conducted in fiscal 
year 2001.
    Sec. 307. None of the funds made available by this Act may 
be obligated or expended by the National Park Service to enter 
into or implement a concession contract which permits or 
requires the removal of the underground lunchroom at the 
Carlsbad Caverns National Park.
    Sec. 308. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used: (1) to demolish the bridge between Jersey City, New 
Jersey, and Ellis Island; or (2) to prevent pedestrian use of 
such bridge, when such pedestrian use is consistent with 
generally accepted safety standards.
    Sec. 309. (a) Limitation of Funds.--None of the funds 
appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to this Act 
shall be obligated or expended to accept or process 
applications for a patent for any mining or mill site claim 
located under the general mining laws.
    (b) Exceptions.--The provisions of subsection (a) shall not 
apply if the Secretary of the Interior determines that, for the 
claim concerned: (1) a patent application was filed with the 
Secretary on or before September 30, 1994; and (2) all 
requirements established under sections 2325 and 2326 of the 
Revised Statutes (30 U.S.C. 29 and 30) for vein or lode claims 
and sections 2329, 2330, 2331, and 2333 of the Revised Statutes 
(30 U.S.C. 35, 36, and 37) for placer claims, and section 2337 
of the Revised Statutes (30 U.S.C. 42) for mill site claims, as 
the case may be, were fully complied with by the applicant by 
that date.
    (c) Report.--On September 30, 2002, the Secretary of the 
Interior shall file with the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations and the Committee on Resources of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Energy and Natural 
Resources of the Senate a report on actions taken by the 
Department under the plan submitted pursuant to section 314(c) 
of the Department of the Interior and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-208).
    (d) Mineral Examinations.--In order to process patent 
applications in a timely and responsible manner, upon the 
request of a patent applicant, the Secretary of the Interior 
shall allow the applicant to fund a qualified third-party 
contractor to be selected by the Bureau of Land Management to 
conduct a mineral examination of the mining claims or mill 
sites contained in a patent application as set forth in 
subsection (b). The Bureau of Land Management shall have the 
sole responsibility to choose and pay the third-party 
contractor in accordance with the standard procedures employed 
by the Bureau of Land Management in the retention of third-
party contractors.
    Sec. 310. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
amounts appropriated to or earmarked in committee reports for 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service by 
Public Laws 103-138, 103-332, 104-134, 104-208, 105-83, 105-
277, 106-113, and 106-291 for payments to tribes and tribal 
organizations for contract support costs associated with self-
determination or self-governance contracts, grants, compacts, 
or annual funding agreements with the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
or the Indian Health Service as funded by such Acts, are the 
total amounts available for fiscal years 1994 through 2001 for 
such purposes, except that, for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
tribes and tribal organizations may use their tribal priority 
allocations for unmet indirect costs of ongoing contracts, 
grants, self-governance compacts or annual funding agreements.
    Sec. 311. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for 
fiscal year 2002 the Secretaries of Agriculture and the 
Interior are authorized to limit competition for watershed 
restoration project contracts as part of the ``Jobs in the 
Woods'' Program established in Region 10 of the Forest Service 
to individuals and entities in historically timber-dependent 
areas in the States of Washington, Oregon, northern California 
and Alaska that have been affected by reduced timber harvesting 
on Federal lands. The Secretaries shall consider the benefits 
to the local economy in evaluating bids and designing 
procurements which create economic opportunities for local 
contractors.
    Sec. 312. (a) Recreational Fee Demonstration Program.--
Subsection (f) of section 315 of the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1996 (as contained in 
section 101(c) of Public Law 104-134; 110 Stat. 1321-200; 16 
U.S.C. 460l-6a note), is amended--
            (1) by striking ``commence on October 1, 1995, and 
        end on September 30, 2002'' and inserting ``end on 
        September 30, 2004''; and
            (2) by striking ``September 30, 2005'' and 
        inserting ``September 30, 2007''.
    (b) Expansion of Program.--Subsection (b) of such section 
is amended by striking ``no fewer than 10, but as many as 
100,''.
    (c) Revenue Sharing.--Subsection (d)(1) of such section is 
amended by inserting ``the Secure Rural Schools and Community 
Self-Determination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-393; 16 U.S.C. 
500 note),'' before ``and any other provision''.
    (d) Discounted Fees.--Subsection (b)(2) of such section is 
amended by inserting after ``testing'' the following: ``, 
including the provision of discounted or free admission or use 
as the Secretary considers appropriate''.
    (e) Capital Projects.--Subsection (c)(2) of such section is 
amended by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:
    ``(D) None of the funds collected under this section may be 
used to plan, design, or construct a visitor center or any 
other permanent structure without prior approval of the 
Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate if the estimated 
total cost of the structure exceeds $500,000.''.
    Sec. 313. None of the funds made available in this or any 
other Act for any fiscal year may be used to designate, or to 
post any sign designating, any portion of Canaveral National 
Seashore in Brevard County, Florida, as a clothing-optional 
area or as an area in which public nudity is permitted, if such 
designation would be contrary to county ordinance.
    Sec. 314. Of the funds provided to the National Endowment 
for the Arts--
            (1) The Chairperson shall only award a grant to an 
        individual if such grant is awarded to such individual 
        for a literature fellowship, National Heritage 
        Fellowship, or American Jazz Masters Fellowship.
            (2) The Chairperson shall establish procedures to 
        ensure that no funding provided through a grant, except 
        a grant made to a State or local arts agency, or 
        regional group, may be used to make a grant to any 
        other organization or individual to conduct activity 
        independent of the direct grant recipient. Nothing in 
        this subsection shall prohibit payments made in 
        exchange for goods and services.
            (3) No grant shall be used for seasonal support to 
        a group, unless the application is specific to the 
        contents of the season, including identified programs 
        and/or projects.
    Sec. 315. The National Endowment for the Arts and the 
National Endowment for the Humanities are authorized to 
solicit, accept, receive, and invest in the name of the United 
States, gifts, bequests, or devises of money and other property 
or services and to use such in furtherance of the functions of 
the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment 
for the Humanities. Any proceeds from such gifts, bequests, or 
devises, after acceptance by the National Endowment for the 
Arts or the National Endowment for the Humanities, shall be 
paid by the donor or the representative of the donor to the 
Chairman. The Chairman shall enter the proceeds in a special 
interest-bearing account to the credit of the appropriate 
endowment for the purposes specified in each case.
    Sec. 316. (a) In providing services or awarding financial 
assistance under the National Foundation on the Arts and the 
Humanities Act of 1965 from funds appropriated under this Act, 
the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts shall 
ensure that priority is given to providing services or awarding 
financial assistance for projects, productions, workshops, or 
programs that serve underserved populations.
    (b) In this section:
            (1) The term ``underserved population'' means a 
        population of individuals, including urban minorities, 
        who have historically been outside the purview of arts 
        and humanities programs due to factors such as a high 
        incidence of income below the poverty line or to 
        geographic isolation.
            (2) The term ``poverty line'' means the poverty 
        line (as defined by the Office of Management and 
        Budget, and revised annually in accordance with section 
        673(2) of the Community Services Block Grant Act (42 
        U.S.C. 9902(2))) applicable to a family of the size 
        involved.
    (c) In providing services and awarding financial assistance 
under the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act of 
1965 with funds appropriated by this Act, the Chairperson of 
the National Endowment for the Arts shall ensure that priority 
is given to providing services or awarding financial assistance 
for projects, productions, workshops, or programs that will 
encourage public knowledge, education, understanding, and 
appreciation of the arts.
    (d) With funds appropriated by this Act to carry out 
section 5 of the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities 
Act of 1965--
            (1) the Chairperson shall establish a grant 
        category for projects, productions, workshops, or 
        programs that are of national impact or availability or 
        are able to tour several States;
            (2) the Chairperson shall not make grants exceeding 
        15 percent, in the aggregate, of such funds to any 
        single State, excluding grants made under the authority 
        of paragraph (1);
            (3) the Chairperson shall report to the Congress 
        annually and by State, on grants awarded by the 
        Chairperson in each grant category under section 5 of 
        such Act; and
            (4) the Chairperson shall encourage the use of 
        grants to improve and support community-based music 
        performance and education.
    Sec. 317. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall be expended or obligated to complete and issue the 5-
year program under the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources 
Planning Act.
    Sec. 318. None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
support Government-wide administrative functions unless such 
functions are justified in the budget process and funding is 
approved by the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 319. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none 
of the funds in this Act may be used for GSA Telecommunication 
Centers.
    Sec. 320. None of the funds in this Act may be used for 
planning, design or construction of improvements to 
Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House without the 
advance approval of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.
    Sec. 321. Amounts deposited during fiscal year 2001 in the 
roads and trails fund provided for in the 14th paragraph under 
the heading ``FOREST SERVICE'' of the Act of March 4, 1913 (37 
Stat. 843; 16 U.S.C. 501), shall be used by the Secretary of 
Agriculture, without regard to the State in which the amounts 
were derived, to repair or reconstruct roads, bridges, and 
trails on National Forest System lands or to carry out and 
administer projects to improve forest health conditions, which 
may include the repair or reconstruction of roads, bridges, and 
trails on National Forest System lands in the wildland-
community interface where there is an abnormally high risk of 
fire. The projects shall emphasize reducing risks to human 
safety and public health and property and enhancing ecological 
functions, long-term forest productivity, and biological 
integrity. The projects may be completed in a subsequent fiscal 
year. Funds shall not be expended under this section to replace 
funds which would otherwise appropriately be expended from the 
timber salvage sale fund. Nothing in this section shall be 
construed to exempt any project from any environmental law.
    Sec. 322. Other than in emergency situations, none of the 
funds in this Act may be used to operate telephone answering 
machines during core business hours unless such answering 
machines include an option that enables callers to reach 
promptly an individual on-duty with the agency being contacted.
    Sec. 323. No timber sale in Region 10 shall be advertised 
if the indicated rate is deficit when appraised under the 
transaction evidence appraisal system using domestic Alaska 
values for western red cedar: Provided, That sales which are 
deficit when appraised under the transaction evidence appraisal 
system using domestic Alaska values for western red cedar may 
be advertised upon receipt of a written request by a 
prospective, informed bidder, who has the opportunity to review 
the Forest Service's cruise and harvest cost estimate for that 
timber. Program accomplishments shall be based on volume sold. 
Should Region 10 sell, in fiscal year 2002, the annual average 
portion of the decadal allowable sale quantity called for in 
the current Tongass Land Management Plan in sales which are not 
deficit when appraised under the transaction evidence appraisal 
system using domestic Alaska values for western red cedar, all 
of the western red cedar timber from those sales which is 
surplus to the needs of domestic processors in Alaska, shall be 
made available to domestic processors in the contiguous 48 
United States at prevailing domestic prices. Should Region 10 
sell, in fiscal year 2002, less than the annual average portion 
of the decadal allowable sale quantity called for in the 
current Tongass Land Management Plan in sales which are not 
deficit when appraised under the transaction evidence appraisal 
system using domestic Alaska values for western red cedar, the 
volume of western red cedar timber available to domestic 
processors at prevailing domestic prices in the contiguous 48 
United States shall be that volume: (i) which is surplus to the 
needs of domestic processors in Alaska; and (ii) is that 
percent of the surplus western red cedar volume determined by 
calculating the ratio of the total timber volume which has been 
sold on the Tongass to the annual average portion of the 
decadal allowable sale quantity called for in the current 
Tongass Land Management Plan. The percentage shall be 
calculated by Region 10 on a rolling basis as each sale is sold 
(for purposes of this amendment, a ``rolling basis'' shall mean 
that the determination of how much western red cedar is 
eligible for sale to various markets shall be made at the time 
each sale is awarded). Western red cedar shall be deemed 
``surplus to the needs of domestic processors in Alaska'' when 
the timber sale holder has presented to the Forest Service 
documentation of the inability to sell western red cedar logs 
from a given sale to domestic Alaska processors at price equal 
to or greater than the log selling value stated in the 
contract. All additional western red cedar volume not sold to 
Alaska or contiguous 48 United States domestic processors may 
be exported to foreign markets at the election of the timber 
sale holder. All Alaska yellow cedar may be sold at prevailing 
export prices at the election of the timber sale holder.
    Sec. 324. The Forest Service, in consultation with the 
Department of Labor, shall review Forest Service campground 
concessions policy to determine if modifications can be made to 
Forest Service contracts for campgrounds so that such 
concessions fall within the regulatory exemption of 29 CFR 
4.122(b). The Forest Service shall offer in fiscal year 2002 
such concession prospectuses under the regulatory exemption, 
except that, any prospectus that does not meet the requirements 
of the regulatory exemption shall be offered as a service 
contract in accordance with the requirements of 41 U.S.C. 351-
358.
    Sec. 325. A project undertaken by the Forest Service under 
the Recreation Fee Demonstration Program as authorized by 
section 315 of the Department of the Interior and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 1996, as amended, 
shall not result in--
            (1) displacement of the holder of an authorization 
        to provide commercial recreation services on Federal 
        lands. Prior to initiating any project, the Secretary 
        shall consult with potentially affected holders to 
        determine what impacts the project may have on the 
        holders. Any modifications to the authorization shall 
        be made within the terms and conditions of the 
        authorization and authorities of the impacted agency.
            (2) the return of a commercial recreation service 
        to the Secretary for operation when such services have 
        been provided in the past by a private sector provider, 
        except when--
                    (A) the private sector provider fails to 
                bid on such opportunities;
                    (B) the private sector provider terminates 
                its relationship with the agency; or
                    (C) the agency revokes the permit for non-
                compliance with the terms and conditions of the 
                authorization.
    In such cases, the agency may use the Recreation Fee 
Demonstration Program to provide for operations until a 
subsequent operator can be found through the offering of a new 
prospectus.
    Sec. 326. For fiscal years 2002 and 2003, the Secretary of 
Agriculture is authorized to limit competition for fire and 
fuel treatment and watershed restoration contracts in the Giant 
Sequoia National Monument and the Sequoia National Forest. 
Preference for employment shall be given to dislocated and 
displaced workers in Tulare, Kern and Fresno Counties, 
California, for work associated with the establishment of the 
Giant Sequoia National Monument.
    Sec. 327. Revision of Forest Plans. Prior to October 1, 
2002, the Secretary of Agriculture shall not be considered to 
be in violation of subparagraph 6(f)(5)(A) of the Forest and 
Rangeland Renewable Resources Planning Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 
1604(f)(5)(A)) solely because more than 15 years have passed 
without revision of the plan for a unit of the National Forest 
System. Nothing in this section exempts the Secretary from any 
other requirement of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act (16 U.S.C. 1600 et seq.) or any other 
law: Provided, That if the Secretary is not acting 
expeditiously and in good faith, within the funding available, 
to revise a plan for a unit of the National Forest System, this 
section shall be void with respect to such plan and a court of 
proper jurisdiction may order completion of the plan on an 
accelerated basis.
    Sec. 328. Until September 30, 2003, the authority of the 
Secretary of Agriculture to enter into a cooperative agreement 
under the first section of Public Law 94-148 (16 U.S.C. 565a-1) 
for a purpose described in such section includes the authority 
to use that legal instrument when the principal purpose of the 
resulting relationship is to the mutually significant benefit 
of the Forest Service and the other party or parties to the 
agreement, including nonprofit entities.
    Sec. 329. (a) Pilot Program Authorizing Conveyance of 
Excess Forest Service Structures.--The Secretary of Agriculture 
may convey, by sale or exchange, any or all right, title, and 
interest of the United States in and to excess buildings and 
other structures located on National Forest System lands and 
under the jurisdiction of the Forest Service. The conveyance 
may include the land on which the building or other structure 
is located and such other land immediately adjacent to the 
building or structure as the Secretary considers necessary.
    (b) Limitation.--Conveyances on not more than 10 sites may 
be made under the authority of this section, and the Secretary 
of Agriculture shall obtain the concurrence of the Committee on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Appropriations of the Senate in advance of each 
conveyance.
    (c) Use of Proceeds.--The proceeds derived from the sale of 
a building or other structure under this section shall be 
retained by the Secretary of Agriculture and shall be available 
to the Secretary, without further appropriation until expended, 
for maintenance and rehabilitation activities within the Forest 
Service Region in which the building or structure is located.
    (d) Duration of Authority.--The authority provided by this 
section expires on September 30, 2005.
    Sec. 330. Section 323(a) of the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999, as included in 
Public Law 105-277, Div. A, section 101(e) is amended by 
inserting ``and fiscal years 2002 through 2005,'' before ``to 
the extent funds are otherwise available''.
    Sec. 331. No funds provided in this Act may be expended to 
conduct preleasing, leasing and related activities under either 
the Mineral Leasing Act (30 U.S.C. 181 et seq.) or the Outer 
Continental Shelf Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331 et seq.) within the 
boundaries of a National Monument established pursuant to the 
Act of June 8, 1906 (16 U.S.C. 431 et seq.) as such boundary 
existed on January 20, 2001, except where such activities are 
allowed under the Presidential proclamation establishing such 
monument.
    Sec. 332. Section 347(a) of the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999, as included in 
Public Law 105-277, is amended by striking ``2002'' and 
inserting ``2004''. The authority to enter into stewardship and 
end result contracts provided to the Forest Service in 
accordance with section 347 of title III of section 101(e) of 
division A of Public Law 105-277 is hereby expanded to 
authorize the Forest Service to enter into an additional 28 
contracts subject to the same terms and conditions as provided 
in that section: Provided, That of the additional contracts 
authorized by this section at least 9 shall be allocated to 
Region 1 and at least 3 to Region 6.
    Sec. 333. Any regulations or policies promulgated or 
adopted by the Departments of Agriculture or the Interior 
regarding recovery of costs for processing authorizations to 
occupy and use Federal lands under their control shall adhere 
to and incorporate the following principle arising from Office 
of Management and Budget Circular, A-25; no charge should be 
made for a service when the identification of the specific 
beneficiary is obscure, and the service can be considered 
primarily as benefiting broadly the general public.
    Sec. 334. The Chief of the Forest Service shall issue a 
special use permit for the Sioux Charlie Cabin within the 
boundary of the Custer National Forest, Montana, to Montana 
State University-Billings, for a term of 20 years for 
educational purposes compatible with the cabin's location. The 
permit shall be administered under normal national forest 
system authorities and regulations, with an additional review 
after 10 years to ensure the facility is being used for 
educational purposes.
    Sec. 335. Section 551(c) of the Land Between the Lakes 
Protection Act of 1998 (16 U.S.C. 460lll-61(c)) is amended by 
striking ``2002'' and inserting ``2004''.
    Sec. 336. Modification to Steel Loan Guarantee Program. (a) 
In General.--Section 101 of the Emergency Steel Loan Guarantee 
Act of 1999 (Public Law 106-51; 15 U.S.C. 1841 note) is amended 
as follows:
            (1) Terms and conditions.--Subsection (h) is 
        amended--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``2005'' 
                and inserting ``2015''; and
                    (B) by amending paragraph (4) to read as 
                follows:
            ``(4) Guarantee level.--
                    ``(A) In general.--Except as provided in 
                subparagraphs (B) and (C), any loan guarantee 
                provided under this section shall not exceed 85 
                percent of the amount of principal of the loan.
                    ``(B) Increased level one.--A loan 
                guarantee may be provided under this section in 
                excess of 85 percent, but not more than 90 
                percent, of the amount of principal of the 
                loan, if--
                            ``(i) the aggregate amount of loans 
                        guaranteed at such percentage and 
                        outstanding under this section at any 
                        one time does not exceed $100,000,000; 
                        and
                            ``(ii) the aggregate amount of 
                        loans guaranteed at such percentage 
                        under this section with respect to a 
                        single qualified steel company does not 
                        exceed $50,000,000.
                    ``(C) Increased level two.--A loan 
                guarantee may be provided under this section in 
                excess of 85 percent, but not more than 95 
                percent, of the amount of principal of the 
                loan, if--
                            ``(i) the aggregate amount of loans 
                        guaranteed at such percentage and 
                        outstanding under this section at any 
                        one time does not exceed $100,000,000; 
                        and
                            ``(ii) the aggregate amount of 
                        loans guaranteed at such percentage 
                        under this section with respect to a 
                        single qualified steel company does not 
                        exceed $50,000,000.''.
            (2) Termination of guarantee authority.--Subsection 
        (k) is amended by striking ``2001'' and inserting 
        ``2003''.
    (b) Applicability.--The amendments made by this section 
shall apply only with respect to any guarantee issued on or 
after the date of the enactment of this Act.
    This Act may be cited as the ``Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002''.
    And the Senate agree to the same.
                                   Joe Skeen,
                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   Jim Kolbe,
                                   Charles H. Taylor,
                                   George R. Nethercutt, Jr.,
                                   Zach Wamp,
                                   Jack Kingston,
                                   John E. Peterson,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Norman D. Dicks,
                                   John P. Murtha,
                                   James P. Moran,
                                   Maurice Hinchey,
                                   Martin Olav Sabo,
                                   David Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Robert Byrd,
                                   Patrick Leahy,
                                   Ernest F. Hollings,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Byron L. Dorgan,
                                   Dianne Feinstein,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Daniel K. Inouye,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Thad Cochran,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Robert F. Bennett,
                                   Judd Gregg,
                                   Ben Nighthorse Campbell,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.

       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 2217), making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for 
other purposes, submit the following joint statement to the 
House and the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action 
agreed upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
conference report.
      The conference agreement on H.R. 2217 incorporates some 
of the provisions of both the House and the Senate versions of 
the bill. Report language and allocations set forth in either 
House Report 107-103 or Senate Report 107-36 that are not 
changed by the conference are approved by the committee of 
conference. The statement of the managers, while repeating some 
report language for emphasis, does not negate the language 
referenced above unless expressly provided herein.

                        Reprogramming Guidelines

      The Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations 
reprogramming guidelines were last published in the House and 
Senate reports accompanying the FY 1998 Interior and Related 
Agencies Appropriations Act (H. Rep. 105-163, S. Rep. 105-56). 
While the managers have agreed to only one minor change to 
these guidelines for the National Park Service (addressed under 
the land acquisition and State assistance account), recent 
dealings with several agencies suggest that the following 
clarifications are needed to prevent any future 
misunderstandings regarding the applicability of reprogramming 
procedures in certain situations.
      Though a reprogramming is in part defined in the 
guidelines as a reallocation of funds from one budget activity 
(or other applicable level of detail) to another, the 
guidelines also state that any significant departure from the 
program described in the agency's budget justification shall be 
considered a reprogramming. This latter portion of the 
definition encompasses the reallocation of funds within a 
budget activity, if such reallocation represents a 
``significant departure'' from the description provided in the 
relevant budget justification. In this regard, the managers 
would view as a ``significant departure'' any reallocation of 
funds within a budget activity for programs or contracts 
involving out-year mortgages that are not discussed in detail 
in the budget justification. Multi-year and no-year funds do 
not lose their program identities when carried over to 
subsequent years and a reprogramming is required if such carry-
over funds are to be used for purposes other than those 
originally directed.

                     Conservation Spending Category

      The conservation spending category created in title VIII 
of the fiscal year 2001 Interior and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, provided that up to $1,320,000,000 could be 
appropriated for conservation related activities, in addition 
to ongoing activities funded in this bill. The conference 
agreement fully funds the conservation spending category at 
$1,320,000,000. The distribution of funds as agreed to by the 
managers is shown in the table below.

                                    SUMMARY OF CONSERVATION SPENDING CATEGORY
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Subcategory/appropriation account         Budget request       House          Senate        Conference
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Federal, State and Other LWCF Programs:
    BLM Federal Land Acquisition................          47,686          47,686          45,686          49,920
    FWS Federal Land Acquisition................         104,401         104,401         108,401          99,135
    NPS Federal Land Acquisition................         107,036         107,036         123,036         130,117
    FS Federal Land Acquisition.................         130,877         130,877         128,877         149,742
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal Land Acquisition........         390,000         390,000         406,000         428,914
                                                 ===============================================================
    Stateside Grants (Recreation and Wildlife)..         450,000               0               0  ..............
        NPS Stateside Grants (and                              0         154,000         164,000         144,000
         Administration)........................
        State Wildlife Grants...................               0         100,000         100,000          85,000
            Competitive Grants for Indian Tribes               0           5,000               0           \1\ 0
    FWS Incentive Grant Programs................          60,000          60,000          60,000          50,000
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, State and Other Grant Programs..         510,000         319,000         324,000         279,000
                                                 ===============================================================
      Total LWCF................................         900,000         709,000         730,000         707,914
                                                 ===============================================================
State and Other Conservation Programs:
    FWS Coop. Endangered Species Conserv. Fund..          54,694         107,000          91,000          96,235
    FWS North American Wetlands Conserv. Fund...          14,912          45,000          42,000          43,500
    FWS Neotropical Migratory Birds.............               0           5,000               0           \2\ 0
    USGS State Planning Partnerships............               0          25,000          25,000          25,000
    FS, Forest Legacy...........................          30,079          60,000          65,000          65,000
    FS, Stewardship Incentives Program..........               0           8,000               0           \3\ 0
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..................................          99,685         250,000         223,000         229,735
                                                 ===============================================================
Urban and Historic Preservation Programs:
    NPS Historic Preservation Fund..............          67,055          77,000          74,000          74,500
    NPS Urban Parks and Recreation Recovery                    0          30,000          20,000          30,000
     Grants.....................................
    FS Urban and Community Forestry.............          31,804          36,000          36,000          36,000
    BLM Youth Conservation Corps................           1,000           1,000           1,000           1,000
    FWS Youth Conservation Corps................           2,000           2,000           2,000           2,000
    NPS Youth Conservation Corps................           2,000           2,000           2,000           2,000
    FS Youth Conservation Corps.................           2,000           2,000           2,000           2,000
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..................................         105,859         150,000         137,000         147,500
                                                 ===============================================================
National Wildlife Refuge Fund--FWS..............               0           5,000               0           \4\ 0
Payments in Lieu of Taxes--BLM..................               0          50,000          50,000          50,000
Federal Infrastructure Improvement Programs:
    BLM--Management of Lands & Resources........          25,000          28,000          28,000          28,000
    FWS--Resource Management....................          25,000          28,000          31,000          29,000
    NSP--Construction...........................          50,000          50,000          60,000          66,851
    FS--Capital Improvement and Maintenance.....          50,497          50,000          61,000          61,000
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..................................         150,497         156,000         180,000         184,851
                                                 ===============================================================
FS Total........................................         245,257         286,877         292,877         313,742
DOI Total.......................................       1,010,784       1,033,123       1,027,123       1,006,258
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Conservation Spending Category.....       1,256,041       1,320,000       1,320,000       1,320,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ $5,000,000 for Tribal grants included in State Wildlife grants category.
\2\ $3,000,000 in FWS, but not charged to the conservation spending category (CSC).
\3\ $3,000,000 in FS, but not charged to CSC.
\4\ $3,000,000 above budget request in FWS, but not charged to CSC.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Bureau of Land Management

                   management of lands and resources

      The conference agreement provides $775,632,000 for 
management of lands and resources instead of $768,711,000 as 
proposed by the House and $775,962,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within this amount, $29,000,000 is from the 
conservation spending category.
      Increases above the House for land resources include 
$501,000 for noxious weeds for the Montana State University 
weed program, $500,000 for Idaho weed control, and $400,000 for 
the Headwaters Forest reserve and a decrease of $1,000,000 for 
the natural resource challenge program.
      Increases above the House for recreation management 
include $1,000,000 for Missouri River undaunted stewardship.
      Increases above the House for energy and minerals include 
$45,000 for management reforms, $2,000,000 for the National 
Petroleum Reserve/Alaska, and $1,775,000 for Alaska minerals 
for the continued development of an interagency geological 
database that was initiated in fiscal year 2001.
      The managers have provided $6,000,000 to address the 
Bureau's increased operational workload for oil and gas 
permitting and related activities, with an emphasis on 
expediting permit applications for coalbed methane development. 
The managers direct the Bureau to focus all possible efforts 
towards completion of environmental reviews that are necessary 
to proceed with further leasing.
      The managers did not agree with the $700,000 earmark 
included in the Senate version of the bill to address the oil 
and gas permit backlog in the State of Utah. However, the 
managers did provide a significant increase for oil and gas 
permitting activities, a portion of which should be used to 
address the Utah backlog.
      Increases above the House for realty and ownership 
management include $350,000 for the Montana cadastral project, 
$300,000 for the Utah geographic reference project, and 
$1,500,000 for Alaska conveyance to establish a public lands 
database.
      The managers note that the increase provided for the 
Montana cadastral project fully funds the Federal share of this 
effort, however, the Bureau is encouraged to continue working 
with the State of Montana to finalize the project and 
facilitate data sharing.
      Decreases below the House for resource protection and 
maintenance include $200,000 for desert rangers, for a total 
increase of $400,000 in fiscal year 2002.
      There is an increase above the House level for 
transportation and facilities maintenance of $250,000 for the 
Iditarod National Historic Trail.
      There is a decrease of $500,000 below the House level for 
workforce organizational support, which reflects a transfer to 
the Inspector General for Bureau audits.
      The managers agree to the following:
      1. The managers note that both the House and Senate 
included the Bureau's request of $3,000,000 to identify and 
evaluate oil and gas resources and reserves on public lands. In 
light of recent attacks on the United States that have 
underscored the potential for disruptions to America's energy 
supply, the managers believe this project should be considered 
a top priority for the Department. Additionally, the managers 
direct the Bureau to provide the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations biannual reports on the progress of this effort 
and a final report detailing the findings of this review.
      2. The managers wish to clarify the language dealing with 
the allocation of funds from the conservation spending 
category. Funding included in the management of lands and 
resources appropriation for the conservation spending category 
can be used for infrastructure improvements on all public lands 
including Oregon and California grant lands.
      3. The managers are aware of the significant success the 
military services have had in utilizing pulse technology in 
their vehicles and other equipment to reduce costs and increase 
environmental benefits through the extension of the service 
life of batteries. The managers urge the Department as a whole, 
and specifically the Bureau of Land Management, the National 
Park Service, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to examine 
the opportunity for cost savings and associated environmental 
benefits of using pulse technology for battery management 
programs. The managers believe that this technology, if adopted 
by the Department, will directly benefit the Bureaus.
      4. The managers urge the Department and the Bureau to 
place the highest possible priority on completion of the 
Imperial Sand Dunes Recreation Management Plan.
      5. The managers have not provided $300,000 for the 
Southwest Strategy as proposed by the Senate.
      Bill Language:
      1. Language is included under the Bureau's administrative 
provisions reauthorizing the hard rock mining holding fee for 2 
years.
      2. The managers have earmarked $700,000 for the Rio 
Puerco watershed project, which is $300,000 above the budget 
request. The increase above the request shall be used for 
projects and initiatives developed by the Rio Puerco Management 
Committee (section 401 of Public Law 104-333).
      3. The managers have earmarked $4,000,000 for the 
assessment of mineral potential in Alaska as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $2,225,000 as proposed by the House.
      4. The conference agreement includes a technical 
correction to the conservation spending category statutory 
language as proposed by the Senate.

                        WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT

      The conference agreement provides $678,421,000 for 
wildland fire management instead of $700,806,000 as proposed by 
the House and $659,421,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers have provided $280,807,000 for preparedness, 
$161,424,000 for fire suppression of which $34,000,000 is a 
contingent emergency appropriation, and $236,190,000 for other 
operations of which $20,000,000 is a contingent emergency 
appropriation for the rehabilitation and restoration program. 
The bureau may allocate up to an additional $2,838,000 for the 
Ecological Restoration Institute, Arizona for fuels reduction 
work including work at Mt. Trumbull.
      The managers have not earmarked funds in bill language 
for hazardous fuels reduction work in the wildland-urban 
interface as proposed by the Senate. Instead, the managers 
direct the Department of the Interior to allocate the funding 
level proposed in the Administration's budget request of 
$111,255,000 on projects in the wildland-urban interface. If 
for any reason the Department is unable to attain the proposed 
levels, it shall promptly notify the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations explaining why the Department was 
unable to expend such sums. The managers continue to believe 
that an emphasis on fuels reduction work in the wildland-urban 
interface is critical to protecting the safety of rural 
communities.
      Within the funds provided for other operations, 
$1,000,000 is for the National Center for Landscape Fire 
Analysis at Montana State University including funding for the 
purchase of a hyperspectral digital camera.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Non-emergency     Emergency         Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Preparedness....................................................    $280,807,000  ..............    $280,807,000
Suppression.....................................................     127,424,000     $34,000,000     161,424,000
  Other Operations:
    Hazardous Fuels.............................................     186,190,000  ..............     186,190,000
    Rehabilitation..............................................      20,000,000      20,000,000      40,000,000
    Rural Fire Assistance.......................................      10,000,000  ..............      10,000,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Other Operations Subtotal.................................     216,190,000      20,000,000     236,190,000
Total Fire Funding..............................................     624,421,000      54,000,000     678,421,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The managers believe that the full, integrated national 
fire plan effort needs to be sustained in future years in order 
to reduce the risks of catastrophic fire in many areas of the 
Nation. The managers note that the Administration, working 
along with governors and local communities, have submitted a 
framework for a ten-year national fire plan. However, after 
reviewing the plan, the managers are concerned that the plan 
does not lay out clear funding requirements for various aspects 
of this important endeavor. Therefore, the managers direct the 
Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to provide to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 15, 
2002, an updated fire plan that includes detailed schedules of 
activities and funding requirements. The managers understand 
that funding requirements for wildfire activities include 
considerable year-to-year uncertainty depending on weather and 
fire circumstances and therefore the managers view the funding 
requirements for the national fire plan as being an iterative 
process, which requires annual updates. The managers direct the 
Departments of the Interior and Agriculture to continue to work 
together to formulate complementary budget requests that 
reflect the same principles and a similar budget organization 
and submit a cross-cutting budget request to the Committees, 
which covers all federal wildfire responsibilities. In 
addition, the managers expect the agencies to seek the advice 
of governors, and local and tribal government representatives 
in setting priorities for fuels treatments, burned area 
rehabilitation, and public outreach and education.
      The managers remain concerned about the variation in 
methods by which the Departments calculate wildfire fighting 
readiness and how the Departments plan their distribution of 
firefighting resources to attain efficiency. The managers 
direct the two Departments to develop and implement a 
coordinated and common system for calculating readiness which 
includes provisions for working with the shared fire fighting 
resources of the States and other cooperators and considers 
values of various resources on both Federal and other lands.
      The managers are also concerned about the fire 
suppression costs during major incidents and therefore the 
Forest Service and the Department of the Interior are directed 
to contract for a thorough, independent review of wildfire 
suppression costs and strategies. The Departments should 
equally share the cost of the review and a preliminary report 
should be issued by May 31, 2002 and the final report should be 
delivered to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
by September 30, 2002.

                    CENTRAL HAZARDOUS MATERIALS FUND

      The conference agreement provides $9,978,000 for the 
central hazardous materials fund as proposed by the House and 
Senate.

                              CONSTRUCTION

      The conference agreement provides $13,076,000 for 
construction instead of $11,076,000 as proposed by the House 
and $12,976,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds should be 
distributed as follows:

        Program/Area                                              Amount
Pompey's Pillar visitor center, MT......................      $2,900,000
California Trail Interpretive Center, NV................       2,000,000
Fort Benton Visitor Center, MT..........................       2,500,000
Rock Springs admin. Building, WY........................       2,500,000
Caliente warehouse building, NV.........................         200,000
Hult Pond Dam repair, OR................................         582,000
Wildwood/Fisherman's Bend Sewer systems, OR.............       1,214,000
NHOTIC water treatment system, OR.......................         103,000
North Sand Hills road & sanitation, CO..................         212,000
Blackwell Island recreation site, ID....................         765,000
Lone Pine visitor center, CA............................         100,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      13,076,000

                       PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES

      The conference agreement provides $210,000,000 for 
payments in lieu of taxes instead of $200,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $220,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within 
this amount, $50,000,000 is from the conservation spending 
category.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

      The conference agreement provides $49,920,000 for land 
acquisition instead of $47,686,000 as proposed by the House and 
$45,686,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds should be 
distributed as follows:

        Area (State)                                              Amount
Beaver Creek NWSR/White Mountains National Recreation 
    Area (AK)...........................................        $300,000
Catellus (CA)...........................................       3,100,000
Continental Divide National Scenic Trail (WY)...........         320,000
Cosumnes River Preserve (CA)............................         650,000
Douglas Point (MD)......................................       2,000,000
El Dorado (rare plants) (CA)............................       3,000,000
El Malpais National Conservation Area (NM)..............         700,000
Garnet Ghost Town (MT)..................................         650,000
Grande Ronde National Wild and Scenic River (OR/WA).....         500,000
Gunnison Basin ACEC (CO)................................       2,500,000
King Range National Conservation Area (CA)..............       1,900,000
Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail (ID)............       1,000,000
Lower Salmon River ACEC (ID)............................       2,000,000
Organ Mtns. (NM)........................................       2,000,000
Otay Mountain/Kuchamaa HCP (CA).........................       2,000,000
Rio Grande National Wild and Scenic River (NM)..........       4,500,000
San Pedro Ecosystem (Gap/Borderlands--easements) (AZ)...       2,000,000
Sandy River (OR)........................................       3,000,000
Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mtns. National Monument (CA).       1,000,000
Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area 
    (ID)................................................       2,400,000
Soda Springs Hills (ID).................................         900,000
St. George (Johnson tract) (UT).........................         500,000
Upper Arkansas River Basin (CO).........................       1,500,000
Upper Crab Creek/Rock Creek (WA)........................       1,000,000
Upper Snake/South Fork Snake River (ID).................       2,500,000
West Eugene Wetlands (OR)...............................       1,500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................      43,420,000
Emergency/hardship/inholding............................       1,000,000
Land Exchange Equalization Payments.....................         500,000
Acquisition Management..................................       5,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      49,920,000

      Of the $650,000 included for the Garnet Ghost Town, 
$400,000 shall be used for the Blackfoot Challenge.
      Of the $5,000,000 provided for acquisition management, 
$1,000,000 shall be used for land exchanges in eastern 
Washington State including, but not limited to, the Moses 
Coulee, Rock Creek, and Upper Crab Creek projects.

                   OREGON AND CALIFORNIA GRANT LANDS

      The conference agreement provides $105,165,000 for Oregon 
and California grant lands as proposed by the House instead of 
$106,061,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                           RANGE IMPROVEMENTS

      The conference agreement provides an indefinite 
appropriation for range improvements of not less than 
$10,000,000 as proposed by the House and Senate.

               SERVICE CHARGES, DEPOSITS, AND FORFEITURES

      The conference agreement provides an indefinite 
appropriation for service charges, deposits, and forfeitures, 
which is estimated to be $8,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and Senate.

                       MISCELLANEOUS TRUST FUNDS

      The conference agreement provides an indefinite 
appropriation of $11,000,000 for miscellaneous trust funds as 
proposed by the House and Senate.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

                          Resource Management

      The conference agreement provides $850,597,000 for 
resource management instead of $839,852,000 as proposed by the 
House and $845,814,000 as proposed by the Senate. The numerical 
changes described below are to the House recommended level.
      In endangered species programs there are increases of 
$400,000 in candidate conservation for the Idaho sage grouse 
management plan, $524,000 for the listing program, and $250,000 
in consultation for the Central Valley and Southern California 
habitat conservation plan. There is also a decrease of 
$1,500,000 for the consultation program backlog.
      Changes in the endangered species recovery program 
include increases of $800,000 for eider recovery at the Alaska 
Sealife Center, $200,000 for wolf monitoring in Idaho, $500,000 
for the Preble's meadow jumping mouse in Colorado, $700,000 for 
Upper Colorado River endangered fish recovery, $600,000 for 
Lahonton cutthroat trout in Nevada, and $1,100,000 for Atlantic 
salmon of which $1,000,000 is for grants through the National 
Fish and Wildlife Foundation and $100,000 is for Service 
activities. There is also a decrease of $1,000,000 for the 
recovery program backlog.
      Changes to habitat conservation programs include 
increases in partners for fish and wildlife of $750,000 for the 
Hawaii ESA community conservation plan, $1,250,000 for Reno 
biodiversity research and conservation in Nevada, $400,000 for 
the Montana Water Center wild fish habitat initiative, and 
$100,000 for landowner assistance at the Fairfield Marsh 
Waterfowl Production Area in Wisconsin. For project planning, 
there is an increase of $250,000 for Middle Rio Grande/Bosque 
research and a decrease of $500,000 for the CALFED program. In 
coastal programs, there are increases of $1,000,000 for the 
Cook Inlet Aquaculture Association king salmon program in 
Alaska and $200,000 for the Regional Aquaculture Association 
king salmon program in Alaska. There is also an increase of 
$9,000 for the environmental contaminants program. Cormorant 
work at the National Aquaculture Center in Arkansas and 
alternative habitat and food sources for Idaho terns are 
addressed in the migratory bird program.
      In refuge operations and maintenance, there are decreases 
of $700,000 for refuge maintenance and $1,000,000 for the 
natural resource challenge program. There are no refuge-
specific earmarks. Ohio River Islands NWR, WV equipment 
replacement and Canaan Valley NWR, WV maintenance are addressed 
in the construction account.
      In migratory bird management, there are increases of 
$575,000 to reduce seabird bycatch in Alaska, $1,000,000 for 
the Canada geese depredation program, $200,000 for the National 
Aquaculture Center in Arkansas to address cormorant depredation 
problems, and $250,000 to address alternative habitat and food 
sources for terns in Idaho. There is also a decrease of $68,000 
for joint venture programs, which reflects the elimination of 
the ``general program activities'' category. The funding level 
for each joint venture is identical to that shown in the House 
report.
      There are no refuge-specific earmarks for law 
enforcement. Canaan Valley NWR, WV law enforcement maintenance 
needs are addressed in the construction account.
      Changes to fisheries programs include an increase of 
$1,500,000 in hatchery operations and maintenance for Leadville 
NFH, CO trout (alternative 2), and increases in fish and 
wildlife management of $100,000 for Great Lakes fish and 
wildlife restoration, $850,000 for wildlife enhancement in 
Starkville, Mississippi, $100,000 for Yukon River escapement 
monitoring in Alaska, $200,000 for Yukon River management 
studies in Alaska, $160,000 for Yukon River public education on 
the salmon treaty in Alaska, $1,000,000 for Yukon River treaty 
implementation, $1,270,000 for marine mammal protection in 
Alaska, $250,000 for whirling disease research in Montana, and 
$100,000 for salmon and trout recovery work on the Columbia and 
Snake Rivers by the University of Idaho. Sewer replacement for 
the White Sulphur Springs NFH, WV is addressed in the 
construction account. Atlantic salmon recovery is addressed in 
the Endangered Species Act recovery program.
      In general administration, there is an increase of 
$750,000 for travel and decreases of $1,000,000 for the 
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and $825,000 for audits 
(which are funded under the Office of Inspector General 
salaries and expenses account). Grants for Atlantic salmon 
(Gulf of Maine) through the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation are addressed in the Endangered Species Act recovery 
program.
      The managers agree to the following:
      1. A total of $29,000,000 for infrastructure improvement 
is charged against the conservation spending category.
      2. $850,000 is allocated to the Service for the Pima 
County, Arizona, regional multi-species habitat conservation 
planning effort that will result in Endangered Species Act 
Section 10 permits and is developed in cooperation with the 
following entities: the municipalities in Pima County (to 
include at least the City of Tucson, Town of Marana, and Town 
of Oro Valley) through a Cooperative Agreement by and among the 
County and participating municipalities based on the Service's 
Habitat Conservation Planning Handbook HCP MOU, and with the 
State of Arizona, Pima County interest groups, and Pima County 
citizens.
      3. The $200,000 increase for wolf monitoring activities 
in Idaho is to be managed by the Service's Snake River Basin 
Office in Boise, Idaho.
      4. The Service is strongly encouraged to work with the 
Idaho Office of Species Conservation and Bruneau Hot Springs 
Snail Conservation Committee in support of the Bruneau Hot 
Springs snail program, including conservation easement 
financing and water conservation practices, using appropriate 
grant programs administered by the Service.
      5. The Service should place a high priority on the 
staffing and planning needs at the Hanford Reach National 
Monument, WA and on the unmet need for invasive plant control 
at the Loxahatchee NWR, FL.
      6. The additional funds in hatchery operations and 
maintenance for the Leadville NFH, CO are provided with the 
expectation that the Department will ensure that the Bureau of 
Reclamation provides its share of funds for the project, 
consistent with the Bureau's mitigation responsibility.
      7. Work by the Service to mitigate the adverse effects of 
water resource development projects conducted by other Federal 
agencies should be performed on a cost reimbursable basis and 
the Service should receive full and fair compensation for such 
work.
      8. Funding for the wildlife enhancement program in 
Starkville, Mississippi is provided to assist in the 
establishment of an educational program to assist private 
landowners. There is no commitment to future funding.
      9. Of the $2,246,000 provided for the continuation of 
activities begun in fiscal year 1997 to combat whirling disease 
and related fish health issues, $700,000 is for the National 
Partnership on the Management of Wild and Native Cold Water 
Fisheries, $250,000 is for the purpose of resistant trout 
research to be coordinated through the Whirling Disease 
Foundation, and $1,296,000 is to continue the National Wild 
Fish Health Survey, to expand whirling disease investigations, 
and to recruit and train health professionals.
      10. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is currently 
conducting a major review of different approaches to preserving 
the Meadowlands wetlands area in northern New Jersey. The 
managers understand that the Service has no plan to establish a 
new National Wildlife Refuge System unit in this area but 
believes that the Service can be a helpful partner in this 
review by adding its unique expertise on the elements of the 
study that pertain to conservation of wildlife, particularly 
migratory birds. The managers have deleted without prejudice 
the earmark in the Senate bill for a separate U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service Meadowlands study. Instead, the managers 
direct the Service to provide in-depth advice and consultation 
to the Corps to ensure that the study reflects the most 
appropriate recommendations for the support of wildlife in any 
future Meadowlands plans. The managers believe this will 
involve a substantial commitment of Fish and Wildlife Service 
resources to the Corps' effort, approximately equal to the 
$140,000 specified in the Senate bill.
      11. The Service is encouraged to work with Marion County, 
Oregon and other stakeholders to address the long-term 
preservation of critical wetlands and wildlife habitat in the 
Lake Labish Basin.
      The managers have agreed to a technical change to the 
conservation spending category bill language as proposed by the 
Senate, and a technical change as proposed by the House on 
merging prior year funds for infrastructure improvement under 
the conservation spending category.
      The House proposed bill language designating specific 
amounts for the endangered species listing program and for 
critical habitat designations has been modified to adopt the 
Senate funding level for the listing program and to specify 
that the critical habitat designation limitation is exclusive 
of funds needed for litigation support.
      Senate proposed earmarks for a study of the Hackensack 
Meadowlands in New Jersey, for Atlantic salmon grants in Maine, 
and for University of Idaho research on salmon and trout 
recovery are not retained in statutory language. Each of these 
items is addressed above.

                              CONSTRUCTION

      The conference agreement provides $55,543,000 for 
construction instead of $48,849,000 as proposed by the House 
and $55,526,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds are to be 
distributed as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
            Project                    Description            Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anahuac NWR, TX................  Bridge Rehabilitation/          330,000
                                  Replacement--Phase II
                                  (c).
Bear River NWR, UT.............  Dikes and related               500,000
                                  facilities.
Bear River NWR, UT.............  Maintenance facility...         500,000
Big Branch NWR, LA.............  Facilities renovation..         400,000
Big Muddy NWR, MO..............  Headquarters design (p)         250,000
Blackwater NWR, MD.............  Renovation of existing          899,000
                                  facility.
Bozeman Fish Technology Center,  Construction of               2,556,000
 MT.                              Laboratory/
                                  Administration
                                  Building.
Bridge Safety Inspections......  .......................         545,000
Canaan Valley NWR, WV..........  Maintenance............         875,000
Chincoteague NWR, VA...........  Herbert H. Bateman            3,400,000
                                  Education & Admin.
                                  Center--Phase III (c).
Condor Facilities, CA & ID.....  Recovery facility             1,750,000
                                  construction and
                                  renovation.
Creston NFH, MT................  Jessup Mill Dam--Phase        1,900,000
                                  III (c).
Crystal River NWR, FL..........  Office renovation (p/d)         125,000
Dam Safety Program and           .......................         650,000
 Inspections.
Eufala NWR, AL.................  Environmental learning          100,000
                                  center (p).
Hagerman NWR, TX...............  Bridge Rehabilitation--       1,800,000
                                  Phase II (c).
Humboldt Bay NWR, CA...........  Seismic Safety                  190,000
                                  Rehabilitation--Phase
                                  I (p/d).
Iron River NFH, WI.............  Replace Domes at                740,000
                                  Schacte Creek with
                                  Building.
John Hay NWR, NH...............  Barn rehabilitation....         150,000
John Heinz NWR, PA.............  Complete/equipment              600,000
                                  furnish admin. Wing.
Jordan River NFH, MI...........  Replace Great Lakes             200,000
                                  Fish Stocking Vessel.
Kealia Pond NWR, HI............  Mitigation (c).........         750,000
Klamath Basin Complex, OR......  Water Supply and              1,700,000
                                  Management--Phase III.
Kodiak NWR, AK.................  Visitor Center (p).....         500,000
Leavenworth NFH, WA............  Seismic Safety                  170,000
                                  Rehabilitation--Phase
                                  I (p/d).
Mammoth Springs NFH, AR........  Water supply &                   60,000
                                  management--Phase II.
Mattamuskeet NWR, NC...........  Lodge renovation.......       3,500,000
Midway Atoll NWR...............  Hangar roof replacement         650,000
Montezuma NWR, NY..............  Crusoe Conservation             400,000
                                  Center (c).
National Black-Footed Ferret     New Endangered Species        2,260,000
 Conservation Center, CO.         Facility--Phase III
                                  (c).
Necedah NWR, WI................  Rynearson #1 Dam--Phase       2,725,000
                                  II (c).
Northwest Power Planning Area..  Fish screens, etc......       4,000,000
Ohio River Islands NWR, WV.....  Equipment replacement..          50,000
Quinault NFH, WA...............  Replace Quarters.......         290,000
Red Rock Lakes NWR, MT.........  Seismic Safety                  135,000
                                  Rehabilitation--Phase
                                  I (p/d).
San Pablo Bay NWR, CA..........  Renovate Office--Phase        2,500,000
                                  II (c).
Silvio O. Conte NWR, VT........  Education center                750,000
                                  (completes
                                  construction).
Six NFHs in New England........  Water Treatment               2,630,000
                                  Improvements--Phase
                                  III (c).
Ted Stevens Anchorage Int'l      Hangar--Phase I (p/d)..         536,000
 Airport, AK.
Waccamaw NWR, SC...............  Visitor and Education           400,000
                                  Center (p).
White Sulphur Springs NFH, WV..  Sewer replacement and           185,000
                                  maintenance needs.
Wolf Creek NFH, KY.............  Visitor and Education           400,000
                                  Center (p/d).
                                                         ---------------
      Subtotal: Line Item        .......................      43,051,000
       Construction.
                                                         ===============
Nationwide Engineering
 Services:
    Demolition Fund............  .......................       1,000,000
    Environmental Compliance...  .......................       1,856,000
    Seismic Safety Program.....  .......................         180,000
    Waste Prevention and         .......................         150,000
     Recycling.
                                                         ---------------
    Other Engineering Services.  .......................       9,306,000
                                                         ===============
      Total....................  .......................      55,543,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The managers are concerned that the Service's 
construction program is not based on a sound strategic plan 
that clearly identifies priorities for the construction of 
headquarters, maintenance, visitor, and education facilities. 
For the past few years, construction budget requests have been 
inadequate and limited, almost exclusively, to health and 
safety-related projects. As a result, construction priorities 
outside that narrow scope have been set by the Congress. 
Management personnel within the Service have taken advantage of 
Congressional earmarks by attempting to convert a large number 
of Congressionally earmarked projects, including basic repair 
projects, into proposals for large, expensive visitor and 
education centers. The managers believe that the Service needs 
to take control of the priority setting process for 
construction and to set fair and reasonable priorities for 
construction outside the health and safety arena. Further, 
funding for the highest priority refuge and hatchery 
headquarters, visitor/education center construction projects, 
and visitor contact stations should be justified and requested 
in annual budget submissions.
      The managers expect the Service to focus on providing on-
the-ground refuge experiences for visitors and modest visitor/
education centers and visitor contact stations. The Service 
should develop standardized designs for education and visitor 
centers and for visitor contact stations. The managers suggest 
that the maximum cost for any visitor center should not exceed 
$3 million unless there are extreme, extenuating circumstances, 
such as the high cost of materials transport and construction 
in Alaska. The managers expect the Service to treat the maximum 
amount as a true ceiling and not as the amount that every 
visitor center will receive. Also, visitor contact stations 
should have a much lower maximum funding level.
      The managers expect the Service to pursue cost sharing, 
including in-kind services and contributions, in establishing 
priorities for construction. Further, the size of visitor 
centers and headquarters buildings should be related to current 
visitation and currently established ``minimum staffing 
levels'' and not based on comprehensive conservation plan or 
other projections. The guidelines and specifications developed 
by the Service should address size and function, 
sustainability, energy efficiency, people flow, and operating 
costs. The managers also expect the Service to develop unified 
outreach materials for visitor facilities.
      The Service should report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than February 1, 2002, on 
its priority setting and evaluation process for construction 
projects. Supervisory and management personnel within the 
Service should be held accountable for implementing Service 
construction priorities and should be clearly directed to 
refrain from operating as ``free agents'' in support of 
specific construction proposals outside that process.
      Finally, the managers caution the Service that its 
refuge-specific comprehensive conservation plans are raising 
unrealistic expectations, both within and outside the Service, 
with respect to construction, land acquisition, and operations 
and maintenance funding availability. The managers expect the 
Service to place a clear and realistic statement in the front 
of each comprehensive conservation plan stating that such plans 
detail program planning levels that are substantially above 
current budget allocations and, as such, are for Service 
strategic planning and program prioritization purposes only. 
Such plans do not constitute a commitment for refuge boundary 
expansions, staffing increases, or funding for future refuge-
specific land acquisitions, construction projects or 
operational and maintenance increases.
      The managers agree to the following:
      1. The funds provided for the Northwest Power Planning 
Area are for construction of fish screens, fish passage 
devices, and related features, pursuant to Public Law 106-502.
      2. No funds are provided for an administrative center and 
visitor facility at Pelican Island NWR, FL. The Service should 
identify a site for, and justify the cost of, such a facility 
in future budget requests.
      3. The Crusoe Conservation Center at the Montezuma NWR, 
NY is being funded largely with State and local funding from 
the State of New York, the local school district, Ducks 
Unlimited, and the Audubon Society. The managers encourage the 
Service to pursue such cost sharing for construction projects 
on other refuges.
      4. The Service should pursue potential cost-sharing 
arrangements for construction of the Waccamaw NWR, SC visitor 
and education center.
      5. No funds are included for planning and design of a 
research facility at the Sevilleta NWR, NM. The Service should 
consider such a facility in the context of its construction 
priorities for fiscal year 2003.
      6. Further funding for barn rehabilitation at John Hay 
NWR, NH, if needed, should be provided from other sources such 
as historic preservation groups.

                            LAND ACQUISITION

      The conference agreement provides $99,135,000 for land 
acquisition instead of $104,401,000 as proposed by the House 
and $108,401,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds should be 
distributed as follows:

        Area (State)                                              Amount
Back Bay NWR (VA).......................................      $3,900,000
Big Muddy NFWR (MO).....................................       2,000,000
Bon Secour NWR (AL).....................................       1,000,000
Cahaba NWR (AL).........................................       2,500,000
Canaan Valley NWR (WV)..................................       7,800,000
Cape May NWR (NJ).......................................       1,100,000
Cat Island NWR (LA).....................................       4,000,000
Charles M. Russell NWR (MT).............................       1,000,000
Clarks River NWR (KY)...................................       1,500,000
Dakota Tallgrass Prairie WMA (ND/SD)....................       2,500,000
Edwin B. Forsythe NWR (NJ)..............................       2,500,000
Fairfield Marsh Waterfowl Production Area (WI)..........       1,000,000
Florida Panther NWR (FL)................................         500,000
Great Bay NWR (NH)......................................       1,200,000
Great Meadows NWR (MA)..................................       1,000,000
Great Salt Pond NWR (RI)................................         500,000
Great Swamp NWR (NJ)....................................       1,000,000
Iron River Fish Hatchery (Glacial Springs) (WI).........         285,000
J.N. Ding Darling NWR Complex (FL)......................       3,000,000
James Campbell NWR (HI).................................       2,000,000
Kenai NWR (Point Possession) (AK).......................       3,300,000
Laguna Atascosa NWR (TX)................................       5,000,000
Louisiana Black Bear Complex--Black Bayou NWR (LA)......         500,000
Neal Smith NWR (IA).....................................       1,000,000
Nisqually NWR Complex (WA)..............................       1,000,000
Northern Tallgrass Prairie NWR (MN/IA)..................         550,000
Pelican Island NWR (Completes Lear and Michael tracts) 
    (FL)................................................       5,000,000
Petit Manan NWR (ME)....................................         750,000
Rachel Carson NWR (ME)..................................       1,000,000
Rappahannock River Valley NWR (VA)......................       2,000,000
Red River NWR (LA)......................................       1,000,000
Red Rocks Lakes NWR (MT)................................         500,000
Reelfoot NWR Complex (TN)...............................       1,000,000
Rhode Island NWR Complex (RI)...........................       1,000,000
San Diego NWR (CA)......................................       5,000,000
Silvio O. Conte NFWR....................................       1,100,000
Southeast Louisiana NWR Complex (LA)....................         500,000
Stewart B. McKinney NWR (CT)............................       2,000,000
Waccamaw NWR (SC).......................................       2,000,000
Wallkill River NWR (NJ).................................       2,000,000
Western Montana Project (MT)............................       3,000,000
White Sulphur Springs NFH (WV)..........................         150,000
Whittlesey Creek NWR (WI)...............................         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Subtotal........................................      80,135,000
Emergency & Hardship....................................       1,500,000
Inholdings..............................................       1,500,000
Exchanges...............................................       1,000,000
Acquisition Management..................................      15,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total...........................................      99,135,000

      The funds included for the Great Salt Pond NWR, RI are 
subject to authorization.
      The managers direct the Service to make land acquisition 
requests for individual refuge units, rather than the current 
practice of making requests at the refuge complex level.
      None of the funding provided for land acquisition shall 
be used to acquire land for the placement of a visitor/
interpretive center, without specifically identifying this 
purpose in the budget justification for both the land 
acquisition and construction accounts.
      The managers have included bill language authorizing the 
purchase of common stock of Yauhannah Properties, Inc. The 
managers understand that the Yauhannah Properties, Inc. sole 
holding is property within the boundary of the Waccamaw 
National Wildlife Refuge, and they are only making the property 
available through the sale of common stock. Therefore, the 
managers are aware that it may be necessary for the Service to 
acquire this parcel by purchasing the common stock. The 
managers note that this purchase presents a number of 
complexities outside the Service's expertise, including 
potential tax implications. The managers expect that the 
Service should not assume any Federal, State, or other 
jurisdiction tax liability by acquiring this property through 
the purchase of common stock. The managers also expect that the 
purchase of common stock should only occur if the United States 
does not assume any material unanticipated liabilities or 
assume any additional liability or expense than it would 
otherwise assume if the underlying property were acquired.
      The managers continue to be concerned about the Service's 
land acquisition budgeting and its land acquisition policy. In 
response to continuing oversight by the Appropriations 
Committees, the Service has developed a proposal to streamline 
staffing and to reform its approach to land acquisition 
budgeting and program implementation. The managers expect the 
Service to implement its proposal to reduce staffing from the 
current FTE level of 198 to 156 FTEs by October 1, 2003. The 
Service should make much greater use of contract resources for 
appraisals, cartography and surveying associated with land 
acquisition. The practice of refuge personnel and endangered 
species personnel charging costs to land acquisition should be 
terminated unless there are reimbursable agreements in place.
      The managers have agreed to bill language to permit the 
limited use of project funding for overhead cost allocation 
consistent with the Service's cost allocation methodology 
during fiscal year 2002 only. The maximum amount that can be 
assessed against all land acquisition projects in fiscal year 
2002 is $2,500,000 and the managers urge the Service to use 
savings from staffing attrition and other streamlining efforts 
to reduce, to the greatest extent possible, the amount assessed 
to a number well below the maximum allowable level.
      The managers expect the Service to identify clearly its 
land acquisition planning requirements in the fiscal year 2003 
and future budget requests and to justify fully those 
requirements as a separate line item in the land acquisition or 
resource management account. Likewise, any overhead cost 
allocation should be minimized and justified fully as a 
separate ``cost allocation methodology'' line item in the land 
acquisition account.
      The managers expect the Service to report semi-annually 
on progress in implementing its land acquisition streamlining 
proposal and to achieve the October 1, 2003 staffing goals 
sooner than that date to the maximum extent practicable. The 
first progress report is due no later than February 1, 2002. 
Also, the managers strongly support the policy requiring 
Director approval of any refuge boundary expansion and expect 
the Service to justify any such approvals in the semi-annual 
report.
      Land acquisition reform should be incorporated as a 
critical performance element in the Service's supervisory 
performance standards at the highest levels in headquarters, 
regional offices and the field. This performance element should 
be taken very seriously within the Service and the semi-annual 
reports to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
should address specifically management performance on this 
element. The managers remind the Service that land acquisition 
reform should not be limited to implementing the Service's 
streamlining proposal. It should also apply to the individual 
manager's responsibility to adhere to the Service's land 
acquisition prioritization process and not operate as a ``free 
agent'' in support of specific land acquisition proposals 
outside that process.
      Finally, the managers caution the Service that its 
refuge-specific comprehensive conservation plans are raising 
unrealistic expectations, both within and outside the Service, 
with respect to future land acquisition, construction, and 
operations and maintenance funding availability. The managers 
expect the Service to place a clear and realistic statement in 
the front of each comprehensive conservation plan stating that 
such plans detail program planning levels that are 
substantially above current budget allocations and, as such, 
are for Service strategic planning and program prioritization 
purposes only. Such plans do not constitute a commitment for 
refuge boundary expansions, staffing increases, or funding for 
future refuge-specific land acquisitions, construction projects 
or operational and maintenance increases.

                      LANDOWNER INCENTIVE PROGRAM

      The conference agreement provides $40,000,000 for the 
landowner incentive program instead of $50,000,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                           STEWARDSHIP GRANTS

      The conference agreement provides $10,000,000 for 
stewardship grants as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.

            COOPERATIVE ENDANGERED SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

      The conference agreement provides $96,235,000 for the 
cooperative endangered species conservation fund instead of 
$107,000,000 as proposed by the House and $91,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Changes to the House level include a 
decrease of $12,000,000 for habitat conservation plan land 
acquisition and an increase of $1,235,000 for program 
administration.

                     NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE FUND

      The conference agreement provides $14,414,000 for the 
national wildlife refuge fund as proposed by the Senate instead 
of $16,414,000 as proposed by the House. None of these funds 
are charged against the conservation spending category.

               NORTH AMERICAN WETLANDS CONSERVATION FUND

      The conference agreement provides $43,500,000 for the 
North American wetlands conservation fund instead of 
$45,000,000 as proposed by the House and $42,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Decreases to the House level include 
$1,440,000 for wetlands conservation grants and $60,000 for 
program administration.
      The managers understand that the Caddo Lake Institute in 
partnership with the Division of International Conservation and 
the National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette, Louisiana 
are interested in pursuing a RAMSAR-based wetlands science, 
site management and education program. The managers strongly 
encourage the Service to work with these groups to explore the 
possibility of funding such an activity through a North 
American Wetlands Conservation Act grant or another Service 
program.
      The managers have agreed to bill language, as proposed by 
the House, limiting increased grant funding above the fiscal 
year 2001 level to projects in the United States. The Senate 
had no similar provision.

                NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRD CONSERVATION

      The conference agreement provides $3,000,000 for the 
neotropical migratory bird conservation program instead of 
$5,000,000 as proposed by the House and no funding as proposed 
by the Senate. None of these funds are charged against the 
conservation spending category.
      The managers expect the program to be administered by the 
division of bird habitat conservation but the Service should 
incorporate international program staff expertise into the 
oversight and administration of the program.

                MULTINATIONAL SPECIES CONSERVATION FUND

      The conference agreement provides $4,000,000 for the 
multinational species conservation fund as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.
      The managers have agreed to bill language, as proposed by 
the House, specifying the public law citations for the Asian 
elephant and the rhino and tiger funds.

                         STATE WILDLIFE GRANTS

                    (INCLUDING RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $85,000,000 for State 
wildlife grants in fiscal year 2002 instead of $100,000,000 as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate. Within this amount, 
$5,000,000 is for a competitive grant program for Indian 
tribes. The agreement also provides for the rescission of 
$25,000,000 from the fiscal year 2001 appropriation rather than 
a rescission of $49,890,000 as proposed by the Senate and no 
rescission as proposed by the House.
      The managers agree to the clarification of the ``full 
array'' of wildlife requirement for planning contained in the 
House report.
      The managers have agreed to the distribution formula in 
bill language proposed by the Senate rather than the formula 
proposed by the House. The managers have also agreed to a 
technical change to the conservation spending category bill 
language proposed by the Senate.

                         TRIBAL WILDLIFE GRANTS

      The conference agreement provides no funding under this 
heading for tribal wildlife grants; however, $5,000,000 is 
earmarked under the State wildlife grant program for this 
purpose.

                         National Park Service

                 OPERATION OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM

      The conference agreement provides $1,476,977,000 for the 
operation of the National park system instead of $1,480,336,000 
as proposed by the House and $1,473,128,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Of this amount, $2,000,000 for the Youth Conservation 
Corps program is derived from the conservation spending 
category.
      The agreement provides $318,827,000 for resource 
stewardship as proposed by the House instead of $317,996,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The agreement provides $297,543,000 for 
visitor services as proposed by the House instead of 
$298,343,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The agreement provides $481,088,000 for maintenance 
instead of $483,197,000 as proposed by the House and 
$478,701,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes to the House 
level include increases totaling $600,000 for the New River 
Gorge National River to hire local crews to improve visitor 
access and facilities, remove structures posing hazards to 
visitors, and provide technical support and maintenance for the 
parkway. There is a reduction of $2,709,000 for the repair and 
rehabilitation program. Within the total for repair and 
rehabilitation the following projects should be funded: 
$675,000 for the Great Smoky Mountains National Park including 
$375,000 to repair the historic log cabins and a $300,000 
general increase for maintenance needs, $400,000 for the George 
Washington Memorial Parkway, $175,000 for the Klondike Goldrush 
National Historic Park, and $400,000 for the Indiana Dunes 
National Lakeshore.
      The conference agreement provides $272,921,000 for park 
support instead of $271,371,000 as proposed by the House and 
$271,490,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes to the House 
level include increases of $200,000 for Wild and Scenic 
Partnership Rivers, $2,000,000 for Lewis and Clark Challenge 
Cost Share program grants and a decrease of $650,000 for 
financial audits, which have been funded under the Inspector 
General account. The entire $200,000 increase for Wild and 
Scenic Partnerships Rivers should be allocated directly to the 
eight partnership rivers through the Northeast Regional Office. 
The funds should be equally divided among the areas. The 
managers direct that no overhead costs may be charged to this 
money including the hiring of new staff. Any technical 
assistance should be provided by the existing rivers, trails 
and conservation assistance regional staff.
      The agreement provides $104,598,000 for external 
administrative costs as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$107,398,000 as proposed by the House. The change to the House 
level is a reduction of $2,800,000 for bandwidth needs.
      Following enactment of this Act, the National Park 
Service should make the necessary adjustments to align the 
additional operation funds for the purposes approved by the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations with the proper 
budget subactivities.
      The managers remain supportive of the parks and programs 
of the Service. Each year, efforts are made to provide 
additional operational increases, over and above the request, 
to keep pace with the growing demands on the system and the 
Service. While some additional hiring may be necessary, the 
managers strongly encourage the Service to consider carefully 
the outyear implications of hiring decisions being made with 
available funds. Inflationary adjustments, pay cost 
requirements, and other dollars necessary to support employees 
grow over time. At a time of budget uncertainty, NPS managers 
should be cautious in committing to the hiring of additional 
personnel that may not be sustainable over time if budget 
increases are not forthcoming in future years.
      The managers reinforce the direction in the House report 
regarding the cost and size of visitor centers, heritage 
centers and environmental education centers. Nearly five years 
ago, the Service was cautioned to be more realistic about the 
development of General Management Plans, which, in many cases, 
have become unrealistic documents which tend to include 
expensive, oversized buildings and other projects that are not 
essential or central to the mission of the park. In many 
instances, superintendents, working outside the National Park 
Service's budget process, put forward proposals for visitor 
centers that are oversized and do not take into account the 
location, current visitation and staffing levels of the 
specific unit. These projects often compete directly against 
backlog maintenance projects and other construction priority 
needs of the Service.
      The managers direct the Director to take these repeated 
concerns seriously and prepare a response by February 1, 2002, 
which proposes a new National policy regarding the preparation 
of General Management Plans, addresses the issue of oversized 
structures, establishes appropriate scope for new proposed 
facilities, and establishes cost and planning parameters to be 
followed by all parks.
      The managers expect the Director and the Regional 
Directors to be familiar with the scope of projects proposed, 
and to withhold approval of plans and projects that are not 
consistent with the policy to be articulated. This applies to 
proposals that are being officially considered through the 
budget process and proposals that are being considered 
independently. The managers understand that lines of authority 
flow from the Director through the Regional Directors to the 
parks, and greater discipline must be imposed in complying with 
established policy.
      The managers also suggest that there should be a priority 
process for proposing new visitor facilities, when needed, and 
that the Service consider seriously the inclusion of this type 
of facility in the budget process when it meets a priority need 
of the Park System. The managers are concerned that priority 
systems for line-item construction which rely solely on backlog 
maintenance as a determining factor for funding will exacerbate 
the trend towards bypassing the established budget process for 
visitor services facilities. The National Park Service and the 
Department of the Interior are encouraged to agree on one 
common priority system that reflects the breadth of the 
Service's mission, with a strong emphasis on addressing backlog 
issues while responding to the emerging challenges facing the 
Service.
      The managers have agreed to the Senate bill language 
providing two-year availability for maintenance, repair or 
rehabilitation projects, an automated facility management 
software system, and comprehensive facility condition 
assessments.
      The managers have retained language, proposed by the 
House, which precludes the Service from establishing a new 
associate director position for business practices and 
partnerships. The managers agree that the Service needs to 
enhance its capacities in these areas, particularly with regard 
to strategic direction in the areas of concessions and fee 
management. Rather than reorganizing and creating more 
positions, at a time when the Administration is requiring 
agencies to review their workforces and streamline their 
organizations, the managers expect the Service to focus on 
increasing the technical and financial expertise needed to 
improve and protect the financial interests of parks on behalf 
of the taxpayers. Not all of these skills need to be hired on a 
permanent basis. Contracts and consultants should be used as 
appropriate. In filling positions in the concessions and fee 
areas, the managers expect the Service to abandon the 
traditional position descriptions and job screening criteria, 
and recruit for new employees who possess the necessary 
financial and strategic backgrounds. The managers have 
supported most of the business plans developed to date, and 
recommend that the types of skills used in that project be put 
to greater use within the National Park Service.
      The managers have agreed to modify the Senate language 
regarding the Lewis and Clark Challenge Cost Share program to 
limit single awards to no more than $250,000 instead of 
$100,000 as proposed by the Senate. The managers also want to 
make clear that the competitive funds may be used for signature 
events, planning, visitor services and safety information.
      The managers are aware of work that has been done at 
Glacier National Park to make several boat docks and trails 
accessible to park visitors with disabilities. The managers 
applaud these efforts, and urge the Service to allocate the 
funds necessary to complete similar work at the heavily used 
dock at Lake McDonald Lodge.
      The managers commend the Service for beginning to include 
the role of slavery in its interpretations at Civil War 
Battlefields and Monuments along with other factors such as 
State sovereignty rights, economics including trade and 
tariffs, and broader cultural differences. The managers 
encourage the Service to continue to diversify and expand its 
interpretations so that all of these complex factors can be 
better understood.
      The managers are supportive of efforts by the Service to 
expand diversity, not only in the workforce but also in the 
types of parks that comprise the system and in the outreach 
that is done to attract a broader spectrum of visitors to the 
resources of the Service. The managers are supportive of the 
cultural resources diversity initiative and encourage the 
Service to build on the successes of this effort in support of 
greater progress across all programs. The managers direct the 
Service to have an interdisciplinary team representing 
headquarters and the field prepare a comprehensive report on 
its various diversity initiatives, especially as they affect 
visitation and employment, and report back to the Committees on 
these findings by March 31, 2002. The report should incorporate 
those aspects of the Service's diversity action plan, which are 
targeted at improving performance, as well as the Director's 
plan for communicating internally and externally to the Service 
on the importance of these issues. The report should then be 
updated annually. The Service is encouraged to pursue 
opportunities to extend its outreach efforts in ways that do 
not require increased funding.
      The managers are aware of efforts by the Department of 
the Interior to work with State and local authorities to 
prepare land use plans for the former Bureau of Mines property 
near Fort Snelling, Minnesota. The managers have deferred 
consideration of funding for this project pending conclusion of 
these discussions and presentation to the Committees of a land 
use plan which clarifies the total cost of the project, the 
Federal share of such costs, and more precise details regarding 
the role to be played by the Federal government. The managers 
are hopeful that a formal proposal can be considered prior to 
conference on the fiscal year 2003 bill.

                       United States Park Police

      The conference agreement provides $65,260,000 for the 
United States Park Police as proposed by the House, instead of 
$66,106,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers have been concerned for several years about 
fiscal management and accountability of the U.S. Park Police. 
As a result, the Committees directed the National Academy of 
Public Administration (NAPA) to conduct a review of the USPP's 
goals, mission, financial management and accountability as well 
as its staffing, equipment, and other needs. The Academy 
completed its review in August and made extensive 
recommendations on needed improvements.
      The managers direct the Department, in cooperation with 
the National Park Service and the United States Park Police, to 
develop a detailed plan to implement the comprehensive 
recommendations of NAPA described in the August 2001 report. 
The Department should forward its implementation plan to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 
December 15, 2001.

                  National Recreation and Preservation

      The conference agreement provides $66,159,000 for 
National recreation and preservation instead of $51,804,000 as 
proposed by the House and $66,287,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The agreement provides $549,000 for recreation programs 
as proposed by the House instead of $555,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The agreement provides $10,930,000 for natural programs 
as proposed by the House instead of $11,595,000 as proposed by 
the Senate. Within the amount provided for the Rivers and 
Trails Conservation Assistance program, $250,000 is earmarked 
for work establishing a 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail 
through the States of Vermont, New York, Maine, and New 
Hampshire. The managers urge the program to give priority 
consideration to the Eightmile River, the Washington-Rochambeau 
National Historic Trail and Clark County, Nevada. The managers 
are concerned with National Park Service decisions to continue 
Rivers and Trails Conservation Assistance earmarks as permanent 
increases to base funding. If the National Park Service wishes 
to continue an earmark it should be identified as a continuing 
project in the budget justification.
      The agreement provides $20,769,000 for cultural programs 
instead of $20,019,000 as proposed by the House and $20,451,000 
as proposed by the Senate. Changes to the House level include 
an increase of $250,000 for the Heritage Education Model and 
$500,000 for the newly authorized Underground Railroad grant 
program, of which $250,000 is for a grant to the Underground 
Railroad Coalition of Delaware. This program should be managed 
by the same grants staff as the Underground Railroad technical 
assistance program. This entire amount should be used for 
grants. The $250,000 earmarked in the House report to continue 
development of a model Heritage Education Initiative is in 
cooperation with Northwestern State University of Louisiana. 
Within available funds, the managers direct that $300,000 be 
available for Heritage Preservation, Inc.
      The conference agreement provides $1,718,000 for 
international park affairs as proposed by the House instead of 
$1,732,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The agreement provides $397,000 for environmental 
compliance and review as proposed by the House instead of 
$401,000 as proposed by the Senate. Also provided is $1,582,000 
for grant administration as proposed by the House instead of 
$1,605,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement provides $13,209,000 for 
heritage partnership programs instead of $12,458,000 as 
proposed by the House and $13,368,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. This total includes $13,092,000 for individual heritage 
areas and $117,000 for administrative support. Funds are to be 
distributed as follows:

America's Agricultural Heritage Partnership.............        $700,000
Augusta Canal National Heritage Area....................         492,000
Automobile National Heritage Area.......................         500,000
Cache La Poudre River Corridor..........................          50,000
Cane River National Heritage Area.......................         650,000
Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor..........         700,000
Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor................         210,000
Essex National Heritage Area............................       1,000,000
Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area..............         900,000
Illinois and Michigan Canal National Heritage Corridor..         500,000
John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage 
    Corridor............................................         800,000
Lackawanna Valley National Heritage Area................         500,000
National Coal Heritage Area.............................         210,000
Ohio and Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor..........       1,000,000
Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage 
    Corridor............................................         750,000
Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area..................       1,000,000
Schuykill National Heritage Area........................         210,000
Shenandoah River Valley Battlefields National Historic 
    District............................................         500,000
South Carolina National Heritage Corridor...............       1,000,000
Tennessee Civil War Heritage Area.......................         210,000
Wheeling National Heritage Area.........................       1,000,000
Yuma Crossing National Heritage Area....................         210,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Project total.......................................      13,092,000
Administrative..........................................         117,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Total...............................................      13,209,000


      The managers reiterate that previously appropriated 
technical assistance money for heritage areas is to be used to 
assist local governments and partner organizations implement 
locally supported projects consistent with the overall plans 
for these congressionally designated areas.
      The conference agreement provides $17,005,000 for 
statutory or contractual aid instead of $4,151,000 as proposed 
by the House and $16,580,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
funds are to be distributed as follows:

Anchorage Museum........................................      $2,500,000
Barnanoff Museum/Erksin House...........................         250,000
Bishop Museum's Falls of Clyde..........................         300,000
Brown Foundation........................................         101,000
Chesapeake Bay Gateways.................................       1,200,000
Dayton Aviation Heritage Commission.....................         299,000
Denver Natural History and Science Museum...............         750,000
Ice Age National Scientific Reserve.....................         806,000
Independence Mine.......................................       1,500,000
Jamestown 2007..........................................         200,000
Johnstown Area Heritage Association.....................          49,000
Lake Roosevelt Forum....................................          50,000
Lamprey River...........................................         500,000
Mandan On-a-Slant Village...............................         750,000
Martin Luther King, Jr. Center..........................         528,000
Morris Thomson Cultural and Visitor Center..............         750,000
National Constitution Center............................         500,000
Native Hawaiian Culture and Arts Program................         740,000
New Orleans Jazz Commission.............................          66,000
Penn Center National Landmark...........................       1,000,000
Roosevelt Campobello International Park Commission......         766,000
Sewall-Belmont House....................................         500,000
St. Charles Interpretive Center.........................         500,000
Vancouver National Historic Reserve.....................         400,000
Vulcan Monument.........................................       2,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     $17,005,000

      The managers have included $750,000 for the Denver 
Natural History and Science Museum, $500,000 for the St. 
Charles Interpretive Center, and $750,000 for Mandan-on-a-Slant 
Village. This completes the Federal commitment to these 
projects.

                     URBAN PARK AND RECREATION FUND

      The conference agreement provides $30,000,000 for the 
urban park and recreation fund as proposed by the House instead 
of $20,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. This program is 
funded under the conservation spending initiative.

                       HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND

      The conference agreement provides $74,500,000 for the 
historic preservation fund instead of $77,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $74,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
change to the House is a reduction of $2,500,000 for a grant to 
the National Trust for Historic Preservation for its historic 
sites program.
      Included in the total is $30,000,000 to continue the Save 
America's Treasures program. Save America's Treasures funds are 
subject to a fifty percent cost share, and no single project 
may receive more than one grant from this program. A total of 
$15,000,000 is provided for competitive grants and the 
remaining $15,000,000 is to be distributed as follows:

        Project/State                                             Amount
1901 Pan Am Building, NY................................        $100,000
Academy of Music, Philadelphia Orchestra, PA............         200,000
Akron Civic Theatre, OH.................................         500,000
Alaska Moving Image Preservation Association, AK........         500,000
Amer. Air Power Museum (hangar restoration & Tuskegee 
    Airmen exhibits), NY................................         200,000
Arthurdale Historic Community (restoration), WV.........         300,000
B&O; Railroad/Vanadalia Corridor Restoration, WV.........         200,000
Bailly Chapel House, IN.................................         200,000
Belknap Mill, NH........................................         250,000
Biltmore School, NC.....................................         300,000
Bishop Museum Moving Image Collection, HI...............          50,000
Camp Ouachita, AR.......................................         365,000
Charles Washington Hall, WV.............................         200,000
City Hall, Taunton, MA..................................         250,000
Documentation of the Immigrant Experience, MN...........         250,000
Eagle Block rehabilitation, NH..........................         250,000
Englert Theatre, Iowa City, IA..........................         365,000
Florence Griswold Museum, Old Lyme, CT..................         100,000
Fort Mitchell, AL.......................................         300,000
Fort Nisqually, WA......................................         250,000
Fort Pike, LA...........................................         200,000
Franklin House, NY......................................         100,000
Frederick Douglass Junior and Senior High School, 
    Huntington, WV......................................         270,000
George Ohr Museum and Cultural Center, MS...............         425,000
Harborview (Great Lakes Historical Society), OH.........         100,000
Harrison Brothers Hardware, AL..........................         100,000
Hegeler-Carus Mansion, IL...............................         200,000
Hill Stead Museum, CT...................................         115,000
Lewis and Clark College (artifact preservation), OR.....         400,000
Lincoln Courthouse, WI..................................         280,000
Lincoln Historic Building, NM...........................       1,000,000
Lion House at the Bronx Zoo, NY.........................         200,000
Lloyd House, VA.........................................         125,000
Mahaiwe Theater, MA.....................................         250,000
Masonic Temple, PA......................................         200,000
McDowell House, KY......................................         150,000
Moss Mansion, MT........................................          70,000
Orpheum Theatre, KS.....................................         200,000
Paducah-McCracken County River Heritage Museum, KY......         250,000
Paul Robeson House, PA..................................         200,000
Pawtucket Armory, RI....................................         250,000
Peter Augustus Jay House, NY............................         100,000
Pickens County Courthouse, AL...........................         100,000
Prairie Churches, ND....................................         100,000
Quarry Pond Farm Barn, OH...............................         200,000
Quindaro Archaelogical Site Preservation, KS............         200,000
Robert Mills Courthouse, Camden, SC.....................         330,000
Rose Hill Farm, VA......................................         100,000
Scarsdale National Historic Railroad Station, NY........         100,000
Scranton Cultural Center, PA............................         250,000
Shreveport Oakland Cemetery, LA.........................         365,000
Sotterly Plantation (Manor House), MD...................         220,000
Squire Earick House, KY.................................         150,000
State Theatre, NY.......................................         150,000
Tinner Hill, VA.........................................         125,000
U.S. Air Force Museum (restoration of XC-99 aircraft), 
    OH..................................................         200,000
University of Missouri (Audubon's ``Birds of America''), 
    MO..................................................         155,000
University of South Dakota Old Women's Gym/Original 
    Armory, SD..........................................         365,000
University of Vermont Morgan Horse Farm, VT.............         365,000
USS Alabama, AL.........................................         250,000
Vermont Historical Society, Spaulding Grade School, 
    Barre, VT...........................................         365,000
West Virginia State Museum--Civil War Regimental Flag 
    Collection, WV......................................          95,000
Wooster City Schools Administrative Building, OH........         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      15,000,000

                              CONSTRUCTION

      The conference agreement provides $366,044,000 for 
construction instead of $349,249,000 as proposed by the House 
and $338,585,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of this total, 
$66,851,000 is funded under the conservation spending category. 
The funds are to be distributed as follows:

                        [In thousands of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Project                       Planning   Construction
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Abraham Lincoln Library, IL..................  ...........         8,000
Apostle Islands NL, WI (utility systems).....  ...........           436
Arches NP, UT (visitor center planning)......          680  ............
Assateague Island NS, MD (upgrade water        ...........           550
 treatment plant)............................
Assateague Island NS, MD (Coastal Barrier              500  ............
 Island Education Center environmental
 assessment).................................
Big Bend NP, TX (sewer planning).............          400  ............
Big Cypress NPres, FL (rehabilitate trails)..  ...........         3,000
Blue Ridge Parkway, NC (rehabilitate/replace   ...........         3,796
 guardrails).................................
Blue Ridge Parkway, Fisher Peak, VA..........  ...........         1,000
Boston NHP, MA (rehabilitate Bunker Hill       ...........         3,751
 monument)...................................
Brown v. Board of Education NHS, KS            ...........         2,475
 (rehabilitate Monroe School)................
Cane River Creole NHP, LA (Oakland Plantation  ...........         1,983
 stabilization and preservation).............
Cape Cod NS, MA (complete Salt Pond visitor    ...........           710
 center).....................................
Cape Cod NS, MA (Highlands Center water,       ...........           775
 fire, and septic systems)...................
Cape Hatteras NS, NC (complete lighthouse      ...........         1,173
 relocation project).........................
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal NHP, MD (stabilize   ...........         6,415
 Monocacy Aqueduct)..........................
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal NHP, DC (preserve    ...........         1,838
 Georgetown waterfront masonry walls)........
Colonial NHP, VA (preserve Poor Potter         ...........           718
 archaeological site)........................
Cumberland Island NS, GA (restore chimneys)..  ...........           450
Cuyahoga Valley NP, OH (rehabilitation and     ...........         3,000
 restoration)................................
Dayton Aviation Heritage NHP, OH (Huffman &    ...........         3,100
 west exhibits)..............................
Delaware Water Gap NRA, PA (planning)........           67  ............
Denali NP&P;, AK (entrance visitor facilities)  ...........         7,000
Downeast Heritage Center, ME (completion)....  ...........         2,000
Everglades NP, FL (modified water delivery     ...........        19,199
 system).....................................
Everglades NP, FL (Flamingo wastewater         ...........         4,192
 system).....................................
Fort McHenry NM & HS, MD (repair historic      ...........         1,480
 seawall)....................................
Fort Washington Park, MD (repair masonry       ...........           700
 wall).......................................
Franklin D. Roosevelt NHS, NY (construct FDR   ...........         5,630
 Library visitor center).....................
Gateway NRA, NJ (Sandy Hook access)..........  ...........         2,346
Gateway NRA, NY (complete Jacob Riis Park      ...........         4,130
 rehabilitation).............................
Gateway NRA, NY (Jacob Riis Park natatorium            200  ............
 study)......................................
George Washington Memorial Parkway, MD         ...........         2,400
 (complete rehabilitation of Glen Echo
 facilities).................................
George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA         ...........         1,562
 (rehab. Arlington House, outbuildings and
 grounds)....................................
Gettysburg NMP, PA (restore Cyclorama).......  ...........         2,500
Glacier NP, MT (Many Glacier Hotel emergency   ...........         4,500
 stabilization)..............................
Glacier NP, MT (Lake McDonald wastewater       ...........         1,500
 treatment)..................................
Glacier NP, MT (reconstruct Apgar District     ...........         5,485
 and Headquarters water system)..............
Glacier Bay NP&P;, AK (construct maintenance    ...........         4,233
 support facility)...........................
Glen Canyon NRA, UT (Wahweap sewage system)..  ...........         5,138
Golden Gate NRA, CA (Immigration Museum                450  ............
 studies)....................................
Golden Gate NRA, CA (Pier 2 seismic).........  ...........        13,000
Grand Canyon NP, AZ (rehabilitate South Rim    ...........           987
 comfort stations)...........................
Great Basin NP, NV (visitor learning center            500  ............
 planning and design)........................
Great Smoky Mountains NP, TN (replace science  ...........         4,703
 facilities).................................
Harpers Ferry NHP, WV (restoration and         ...........         1,890
 rehabilitation of train station)............
Hispanic Cultural Center, NM (construction)..  ...........         1,800
Hot Springs NP, AR (rehabilitation)..........  ...........         2,000
Independence NHP, PA (replace walkways)......  ...........           966
Independence NHP, PA (utilities and exhibits   ...........         6,583
 at 2nd Bank)................................
Jamestown NHS, VA (DCP/EIS, storage for                795  ............
 collections)................................
Jean Lafitte NHP&P;, LA (rehabilitate Decatur   ...........           500
 House & Chalmette Battlefield)..............
John Adams Presidential Memorial, DC                 1,000  ............
 (planning)..................................
John Day Fossil Beds NM, OR (construct         ...........         8,421
 paleontological center and rehabilitate
 headquarters)...............................
John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley NHC,    ...........         1,000
 RI & MA.....................................
Keweenaw NHP, MI (restore historic Union       ...........         2,500
 Building)...................................
Lava Beds NM, CA (replace visitor center)....  ...........         4,131
Little Bighorn Battlefield National Indian     ...........         2,300
 Memorial, MT................................
Mesa Verde NP, CO (water systems)............  ...........         4,037
Mojave NPres, CA (Kelso exhibits)............  ...........           750
Morris Thomson Visitor and Native Cultural     ...........         1,500
 Center, AK..................................
Morristown NHP, NJ (rehabilitation)..........  ...........           600
Mt. Rainier NP, WA (Guide House).............           56         1,590
National Capital Parks-Central, DC (complete   ...........         2,600
 Jefferson Memorial rehabilitation)..........
National Capital Parks-Central, DC (upgrade    ...........         1,562
 Ford's Theater and Petersen's House)........
National Capital Parks-Central, DC (capitol    ...........           950
 concert canopy).............................
National Center for the American Revolution,           350  ............
 PA (development concept planning)...........
National Underground Railroad Freedom Center,  ...........         3,000
 OH..........................................
New River Gorge NR, WV (upgrade water system)  ...........           556
Niagara River & Gorge, NY (special resource            300  ............
 study)......................................
Olympic NP, WA (Elwha River restoration).....  ...........        25,847
Palace of the Governors, NM (complete federal  ...........         5,000
 contribution to annex)......................
Petrified Forest NP, AZ (replace water line).  ...........         5,929
Point Reyes NS, CA (lighthouse access,         ...........         1,285
 utilities)..................................
Puukohola Heiau NHS, HI (relocate maintenance  ...........           837
 facilities).................................
Redwood NP, CA (remove failing roads)........  ...........         2,552
Saint Croix Island IHS, ME (provide basic      ...........           713
 facilities).................................
Saint Croix NSR, WI (visitor center planning)          360  ............
San Francisco Maritime NHP, CA (rehabilitate   ...........         4,639
 C.A. Thayer)................................
Sequoia NP, CA (complete restoration of Giant  ...........         1,480
 Forest).....................................
Shiloh NMP Corinth Civil War Interpretive      ...........         3,062
 Center, MS (complete construction)..........
Southwestern Pennsylvania IHR, PA              ...........         3,000
 (rehabilitation)............................
Statue of Liberty NM, (Ellis Island, NJ                600  ............
 seawall repair planning)....................
Stones River NB, TN (rehabilitation).........  ...........         2,900
Timucuan Ecological and Historic Reserve, FL   ...........           500
 (visitor access, signs and exhibits)........
Tumacacori NHP, AZ (relocate maintenance and   ...........           944
 administrative facilities)..................
Tuskegee Airmen NHS, AL (Moton Field                 1,000  ............
 rehabilitation and restoration).............
Ulysses S. Grant NHS, (restore historic        ...........         5,200
 structures).................................
Vancouver NHR, WA (Barracks repairs).........  ...........         1,500
Vicksburg NMP, MS (Mint Spring stabilization)  ...........           920
White House, DC (structural and utility        ...........         6,500
 rehabilitation).............................
Wilson's Creek NB, MO (rehabilitation).......  ...........           250
Wrangell St. Elias NP&P;, AK (exhibits).......  ...........           700
Yellowstone NP, WY (replace Norris water and   ...........         2,008
 wastewater treatment facilities)............
Yellowstone NP, WY (replace deficient          ...........         7,224
 collections storage & build collections
 management facility)........................
                                              --------------------------
      Subtotal...............................        7,258       268,081
                                              ==========================
      Grand Subtotal, planning and             ...........       275,339
       construction..........................
                                                           =============
Emergency and Unscheduled Projects...........  ...........         3,500
Housing Replacement..........................  ...........        12,500
Dam Safety...................................  ...........         2,700
Equipment Replacement........................  ...........        17,960
Construction Planning, Pre-design and          ...........        25,400
 Supplementary Services......................
Construction Program Management and            ...........        17,405
 Operations..................................
General Management Planning..................  ...........        11,240
                                                           -------------
      Subtotal...............................  ...........        90,705
                                                           =============
Total, NPS Construction......................  ...........       366,044
------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The managers have not included the $4,972,000 for 
utilities and campground replacement at Acadia National Park 
because the funds cannot be obligated until 2003. However, the 
managers are strongly supportive of this project and intend to 
provide these funds in fiscal year 2003. The managers have 
included $680,000 to initiate planning for a visitor center at 
Arches National Park in Utah. The Service is directed to 
complete this project for $6,800,000 including all design, 
construction and exhibits. The funds provided for a memorial 
commemorating President John Adams are for planning and design, 
in cooperation with non-Federal partners.
      The managers have included $500,000 in planning to 
complete an environmental assessment for proposed visitor 
education centers at Assateague Island National Seashore. The 
managers are aware of proposals for two separate facilities 
that would be constructed in close proximity to one another at 
this location. The park has advocated for a new 7,000 square 
foot Barrier Island Education Center; and the State of 
Maryland, in partnership with the park, has proposed an 11,000 
square foot Coastal Ecology Learning Center. The managers are 
concerned about the potential duplication of efforts in these 
proposed facilities, as well as both the construction and 
operational costs. The preliminary cost estimate for the 
proposed park facility alone is $9,500,000. The managers 
strongly encourage the park and its partners to develop a 
comprehensive program that addresses and prioritizes the 
proposed program requirements and reduces the overall scope and 
cost of the consolidated project. Combining these two efforts 
into one facility will save both Federal and State resources. 
The managers expect the Service to report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to the obligation of 
any funds for construction of this project. This is not a 
commitment to fund this project in the future.
      Although the conference agreement contains no specific 
funding for the Stiltsville project in Biscayne National Park, 
as soon as the Service assumes direct responsibility for the 
structures the managers expect the Service to allocate such 
repair and rehabilitation funds as are necessary to maintain 
properly the structures in a manner consistent with the 
management policy that is adopted.
      The managers have included $775,000 for the Highlands 
Center in the Cape Cod National Seashore to accomplish core 
utility system replacement at the closed North Truro Air Force 
Station. The potable water and fire suppression systems will be 
repaired and the septic facilities will be replaced to prepare 
for the conversion of the station into the Highlands Center. 
The Center is a cooperative effort between the National Park 
Service and other public and private groups and will serve as 
the focal point for environmental sciences, traditional Cape 
Cod culture, and the arts for the public on Cape Cod. The total 
Federal investment for infrastructure improvements will be 
$2,500,000; the balance will be raised through private sources.
      The managers have agreed to provide $1,000,000 towards 
the construction of a music center at Fisher Peak in the Blue 
Ridge Parkway. The managers direct that the $500,000 in 
unobligated balances from the Fisher Peak amphitheater funding, 
appropriated by the Committees in fiscal year 1998, be 
reprogrammed to this project. These funds complete the National 
Park Service commitment to this project.
      Both the House and Senate bills included $6,000,000 for 
stabilization of the Many Glacier Hotel at Glacier National 
Park. The managers have agreed to reallocate $1,500,000 of 
these funds to complete the wastewater treatment system at Lake 
McDonald, the cost of which is higher than original estimates 
due to design modifications required to comply with State and 
Federal treatment requirements. The remaining $4,500,000 
provided for Many Glacier stabilization are sufficient to 
complete the most urgently needed repairs. The managers note 
that this reallocation of funds will have no impact on the 
expected ability of the Hotel to open for the 2002 season, and 
will in no way enhance the concessionaire's possessory interest 
in the Hotel. The managers encourage the Service to continue 
working with interested parties to resolve the question of 
possessory interest, and to address other issues that require 
resolution in order to ensure the restoration and continued 
operation of the Hotel.
      The managers have included $2,000,000 for the Downeast 
Heritage Center in Maine. This completes the Federal commitment 
to this project. The managers have provided $700,000 for 
restoration work at Fort Washington Park in Maryland. The 
managers direct that the balance of the funds to complete this 
project be provided from unobligated 2001 funds available to 
the park.
      Included in the conference report is $4,130,000 to 
complete the Jacob Riis Park bathhouse facilities at Gateway 
NRA in New York. The conference report includes $200,000 for a 
feasibility study at Gateway NRA that should: (1) evaluate the 
demand for a year-round swimming pool at Jacob Riis Park; (2) 
determine the costs of constructing and operating such a 
facility; (3) identify viable funding options for the project 
(including concessions, third party contributions, 
partnerships, leasing opportunities etc.); and (4) assess the 
economic impact of alternative development sites at Riis Park. 
The managers remind the Service that funding for the 
feasibility study is not a commitment for future construction.
      The managers have included $795,000 in planning for 
improvements associated with the upcoming 400th anniversary of 
the settlement at Jamestown, VA. These funds are to be used to 
complete the development concept plan and environmental impact 
statement initiated with funding provided in fiscal year 2001, 
and to conduct planning for the proposed collections storage 
building for the NPS collection and the associated access road. 
None of the funds are to be used to initiate planning 
associated with demolition or rehabilitation of the existing 
visitor center nor with planning for any other new facilities, 
which might be envisioned for Jamestown. The Service should 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by 
April 1, 2002 on the private fundraising effort.
      The managers have included $500,000 for the planning and 
design of a visitor learning center at Great Basin National 
Park, NV. The total Federal share for the center is not to 
exceed $4,200,000, including the planning and design funds.
      The conference report includes $1,500,000 for the 
construction of the Morris Thomson Visitor and Native Cultural 
Center in Alaska. It is the intent of the managers that the 
National Park Service commitment to this project will not 
exceed $10,000,000 including planning, construction, 
furnishings and exhibits.
      The managers have included $600,000 to complete planning 
at Morristown NHP in New Jersey. A total of $3,200,000 will be 
required in fiscal year 2003 to complete the Federal share of 
this project.
      Also included is $350,000 to develop a concept plan for 
the National Center for the American Revolution. This funding 
is not a guarantee of a future Federal commitment, and it is 
the intent of the managers that the Center be mostly funded 
through private sources.
      The $300,000 included for a Niagara River and Gorge 
special resource study is subject to authorization. The 
managers have included $5,000,000 for the Palace of the 
Governors. This completes the Federal commitment to this 
project. The conference agreement provides $3,062,000 to 
complete the Shiloh NMP visitor facility.
      The conference agreement provides $1,000,000 for planning 
the rehabilitation of Moton Field at the Tuskegee Airmen 
National Historic Site. Before making these funds available for 
obligation, the managers direct the Service to consult with the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations in order to 
define better the overall scope, cost and timing of the 
project.
      The managers note that the $1,500,000 appropriation for 
preservation of the barracks at the Vancouver National Historic 
Reserve exceeds the currently authorized amount. Further 
appropriations for this project will not be considered unless 
the authorization is increased.
      The managers have included $250,000 to complete the 
Wilson's Creek National Battlefield. This completes federal 
funding for this project.
      The managers direct the National Park Service to contract 
with the National Academy of Public Administration to conduct a 
review of how effectively the Service has implemented the 
recommendations of the Academy's 1998 report on reforms to the 
Service's construction program, including the Denver Service 
Center operations.
      The managers have consolidated the pre-design, 
supplementary services, and planning activities into one 
activity. The managers understand that the National Park 
Service will still track spending in each of these categories 
separately to ensure that the NAPA guidelines are followed. 
This consolidation will not affect the planning requirements of 
projects that will be worked on, but rather, contribute to the 
appropriate accounting of funds in support of projects 
appropriated or scheduled in the five year construction plan, 
while allowing sufficient flexibility to direct funds to the 
appropriate planning category.
      The managers urge the NPS to include sufficient funds in 
the fiscal year 2003 budget request for necessary repairs and 
improvement of facilities at the Wright Brothers National 
Memorial in North Carolina in preparation for the First Flight 
Centennial Celebration.
      Within the amount provided for Cuyahoga National Park, 
the managers have provided $200,000 for a platform and station 
at the south terminus of the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad. 
Twenty-four miles of the railroad run through the national park 
and addition of the platform and station will enhance the 
experience of park visitors.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

      The conference agreement rescinds the contract authority 
provided for fiscal year 2002 by 16 U.S.C. 460l-10a as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                 LAND ACQUISITION AND STATE ASSISTANCE

      The conference agreement provides $274,117,000 for land 
acquisition and State assistance instead of $261,036,000 as 
proposed by the House and $287,036,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Funds should be distributed as follows:

        Area (State)                                              Amount
Adams National Historic Park (MA).......................      $2,000,000
Blue Ridge Parkway (NC/VA)..............................       1,000,000
Brandywine Battlefield (PA).............................       1,500,000
Civil War Battlefields..................................      11,000,000
Cumberland Gap NHP (Fern Lake) (KY/VA)..................         500,000
Cumberland Gap NHP (KY/VA)..............................         100,000
Cuyahoga Valley NP (OH).................................       1,000,000
Dayton Aviation Heritage NHP (OH).......................         750,000
Delaware Water Gap NRA (PA/NJ)..........................         700,000
Denali NP & P (AK)......................................       1,200,000
Ebey's Landing NHR (WA).................................       1,000,000
Everglades--Grant to the State of Florida...............      15,000,000
Everglades--Modified Water Delivery Project.............      16,000,000
Fort Smith NHS (AR/OK)..................................         850,000
Fort Sumter NM (SC).....................................       1,750,000
Fort Union Trading Post NHS (ND)........................         100,000
Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania County Battlefields 
    Memorial NMP (VA)...................................       2,000,000
Golden Gate NRA (Mori Point) (CA).......................       2,500,000
Grand Teton NP (Resor Ranch) (WY).......................       3,500,000
Great Sand Dunes NM&P; (CO)..............................       2,000,000
Greenbelt Park (Jaeger Tract) (MD)......................       1,000,000
Guilford Courthouse NMP (NC)............................         800,000
Gulf Islands NS (Cat Island) (MS).......................       9,000,000
Hawaii Volcanoes NP (HI)................................       6,000,000
Ice Age NST (WI)........................................       3,000,000
Indiana Dunes NL (IN)...................................       2,000,000
Keweenaw NHP (MI).......................................         800,000
Lowell NHP (MA).........................................         857,000
Mississippi NRRA (Riverview) (MN).......................         850,000
Moccasin Bend (Rock-Tenn and Serodino tracts) (TN)......       1,000,000
Morristown NHS (NJ).....................................         750,000
New River Gorge NR (WV).................................       6,800,000
Nez Perce NHP (Canoe Camp and Weippe Prairie) (ID)......       1,500,000
Olympic NP (WA).........................................       1,210,000
Puuhonua O Honaunau NHP (HI)............................         500,000
Saguaro NP (AZ).........................................       4,000,000
Sand Creek Massacre NHS (CO)............................         800,000
Santa Monica Mtns. NRA (Upper Ramirez Canyon) (CA)......       1,000,000
Shenandoah Valley Battlefields NHD (VA).................       1,200,000
Sleeping Bear Dunes NL (MI).............................       1,100,000
Timucuan Ecological and Historic Preserve (FL)..........       1,000,000
Vicksburg NMP (Pemberton HQ) (MS).......................         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................     110,117,000
Emergency & Hardship....................................       4,000,000
Inholdings & Exchanges..................................       4,000,000
Acquisition Management..................................      12,000,000
Stateside Grants........................................     140,000,000
Administrative Assistance to States.....................       4,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     274,117,000

      The managers agree to the following revision to the 
reprogramming guidelines for the National Park Service only. 
Lands shall not be acquired for more than the approved 
appraised value (as addressed in section 301(3) of Public Law 
91-646) except for condemnations and declarations of taking and 
tracts with an appraised value of $500,000 or less, unless such 
acquisitions are submitted to the Committees on Appropriations 
for approval in compliance with established procedures.
      The managers have not provided funding for Fuez 
conservation easements at the Grand Teton NP, as proposed by 
the Senate. Instead, the managers have provided funding for the 
Fuez conservation easements in the Forest Service land 
acquisition account under the Bridger-Teton NF.
      The managers have provided $1,200,000 for the acquisition 
of the Weiler property at Denali NP. The National Park Service 
is directed to use the Bureau of Land Management as the 
appraiser of the property. The appraisal shall take into 
consideration the value of surface and subsurface rights, 
mineral rights, and any other development rights attendant with 
the property in accordance with applicable appraisal standards.
      The funds included for Cumberland Gap NHP (Fern Lake), 
Moccasion Bend NHS, Puuhonua o Honaunau NHP and Vicksburg NMP 
are subject to authorization.
      The conference agreement provides $1,000,000 for the 
Ebey's Landing National Historical Reserve. The managers direct 
that this sum, together with any unexpended funds from the 
fiscal year 2001 appropriation for Ebey's Landing, shall first 
be used to complete the purchase of the Pratt Estate 
properties. If any funds remain after the Pratt Estate 
properties have been acquired by the National Park Service, 
they may be used for acquisition of such other properties as 
the Service finds desirable.
      The funds included for Greenbelt Park are subject to a 
non-Federal match.
      The managers direct that $400,000 of the unobligated 
$2,400,000 currently available at the Petroglyph NM be used to 
conduct a boundary survey of that monument. The managers 
understand that this may ultimately mean that additional funds 
are required to complete acquisitions at Petroglyph NM.

                       administrative provisions

      The managers have agreed to language contained in the 
House bill, which allows the Service to convey a leasehold or 
freehold interest in Cuyahoga NP, OH to allow for the 
development of utilities and parking needed by Everett Church 
within the national park.

                    United States Geological Survey

                 surveys, investigations, and research

      The conference agreement provides $914,002,000 for 
surveys, investigations, and research instead of $900,489,000 
as proposed by the House and $892,474,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within this amount, $25,000,000 is from the 
conservation spending category.
      Changes to the House for the national mapping programs 
include increases of $3,000,000 for Landsat 5 operations, 
$300,000 for the civil applications program, and $300,000 for 
urban dynamics, and a decrease of $996,000 for internet access.
      Changes to the House for geology programs include 
increases of $1,000,000 for volcanic hazard equipment in 
Shemya, Alaska, $1,500,000 for the minerals at risk program, 
$500,000 for coastal erosion in North Carolina, $500,000 for 
land subsidence in Louisiana, $299,000 for Lake Mead studies, 
$450,000 for geologic mapping for Lake Mojave, and $474,000 for 
Yukon Flats geology surveys, and a decrease of $100,000 for the 
advanced seismic network.
      Changes to the House for water resources include 
increases of $200,000 for a Berkley Pit study in Montana, 
$299,000 for the Lake Champlain toxic study, $499,000 for 
Hawaiian water monitoring, $5,000 for the Southern Maryland 
aquifer study, and $195,000 for the Noyes Slough study in 
Alaska, and decreases of $596,000 for the National Water 
Quality Assessment program, and $296,000 for water information 
and delivery.
      The managers concur with the House direction to contract 
with the National Academy of Sciences to examine water 
resources research funded by all Federal agencies and by 
significant non-Federal organizations. Based on information 
that the managers have received, it appears that water 
resources research is not well coordinated. The managers 
therefore direct that the Academy primarily consider the level 
and allocation of resources that are currently deployed in 
water research programs, both Federal and non-Federal, and 
provide recommendations for a national research program that 
maximizes the efficiency and effectiveness of existing 
programs. While the primary focus of this study deals with the 
existing research agenda, the managers would like an answer to 
the question of whether the Nation is making an adequate level 
of investment in water resources research.
      Increases above the House for biological research include 
$400,000 for the Leetown science center, $300,000 for the 
Columbia environmental research center for pallid sturgeon 
studies, $250,000 for Chesapeake Bay terrapin research, 
$500,000 for a NBII Hawaii node, $180,000 for a Yukon River 
chum salmon study, $500,000 for biological information 
management and delivery, $50,000 for an Atlantic Salmon 
restoration study at the Tunison laboratory, and $748,000 for 
the continuation of the Mark Twain National Forest mining study 
to be accomplished in cooperation with the water resources 
division and the Forest Service.
      Changes to the House for facilities include increases of 
$2,000,000 for phase one of the Leetown research center 
expansion, and $2,250,000 for the Center for Coastal Geology in 
Florida, and decreases of $300,000 for Leetown research center 
design and $898,000 for uncontrollable costs.
      The funding provided for the construction of the Center 
for Coastal Geology in St. Petersburg, Florida is for a 
cooperative effort between the Survey and the St. Petersburg 
Downtown Partnership. The Partnership is providing a two-to-one 
match for the costs of constructing this science facility.

                      Minerals Management Service

                royalty and offshore minerals management

      The conference agreement provides $150,667,000 for 
royalty and offshore minerals management instead of 
$149,867,000 as proposed by the House and $151,933,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Changes to the House for royalty and offshore minerals 
management include increases of $800,000 for the Center for 
Marine Resources, and $800,000 for the Marine Mineral 
Technology Center in Alaska, and a decrease of $800,000 as a 
transfer to the Inspector General for Bureau audits.
      The managers have again provided $1,400,000 to the 
Offshore Technology Research Center to perform research for MMS 
through the cooperative agreement dated June 18, 1999.
      The managers have agreed to the Senate proposed language 
for the royalty-in-kind program instead of the House language. 
The House language requiring that revenues be equal to or 
greater than royalty-in-value as determined by the regulations 
of March 15, 2000 has been dropped.

                           oil spill research

      The conference agreement provides $6,105,000 for oil 
spill research as proposed by the House instead of $6,118,000 
as proposed by the Senate.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

                       regulation and technology

      The conference agreement provides $102,800,000 for 
regulation and technology instead of $102,900,000 as proposed 
by the House and $102,144,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
Funding for the activities should follow the House 
recommendation except that the conference agreement reduces 
executive direction funding by $100,000 as proposed by the 
Senate; this transfers funds for external audits to the 
Inspector General's office. The Senate proposal to include 
$98,000 for fixed costs is not included. An additional $275,000 
is estimated to be available for use from performance bond 
forfeitures.

                    abandoned mine reclamation fund

      The conference agreement provides $203,455,000 for the 
abandoned mine reclamation fund instead of $203,554,000 as 
proposed by the House and $203,171,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Funding for the activities should follow the House 
recommendation except that the conference agreement reduces 
executive direction funding by $99,000 as proposed by the 
Senate; this transfers funds for external audits to the 
Inspector General's office. The Senate proposal to include 
$57,000 for fixed costs is not included. The managers have also 
included the House proposed bill language for minimum program 
States and the Senate proposed bill language continuing 
language carried in previous years dealing with certain aspects 
of the State of Maryland program.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs

                      operation of indian programs

      The conference agreement provides $1,799,809,000 for the 
operation of Indian programs instead of $1,790,781,000 as 
proposed by the House and $1,804,322,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      There is a decrease below the House for tribal priority 
allocations of $1,675,000 for self-governance compacts.
      Changes to the House level for other recurring programs 
include increases of $2,000,000 for tribally controlled 
community colleges, $500,000 for Washington shellfish, and 
$150,000 for the Nez Perce rare species program, and a decrease 
of $45,000 for tribal management and development programs. None 
of the funds for Washington shellfish can be used to support 
access onto private lands by tribal fishers for their harvest 
purposes.
      Increases above the House for non-recurring programs 
include $1,700,000 for the distance learning program in 
Montana, $500,000 for the Cheiron Foundation physician training 
program for rural and underserved education and outreach, 
$500,000 for a rural Alaska fire program, $350,000 for oil and 
gas permitting for the Uintah and Ouray agency, $400,000 for 
the tribal guiding program in Alaska, $326,000 for Cheyenne 
River Sioux prairie management, and $146,000 for Alaska legal 
services.
      The managers believe that the aim of the Cheiron 
Foundation to utilize distance learning technology to train 
physicians' assistants and nurses to serve Native American 
communities is extremely promising. The managers expect the 
Foundation to focus the funding provided from this account on 
the aspects of the project that will bring the most benefit to 
Native American students and tribal communities, while pursuing 
other sources of funding to enhance the overall project.
      There is an increase above the House for central office 
operations of $1,000 for general administration/policy.
      Increases above the House for special programs and pooled 
overhead include $250,000 for enhancements to the Pomo Indian 
exhibits at the Grace Hudson Museum in Ukiah, California, 
$250,000 for the Alaska market access program, $509,000 for the 
United Tribes Technical College, $250,000 for the United Sioux 
Tribe Development Corporation, $100,000 for the Ponca Tribe 
development plan, $1,200,000 for the Crownpoint Institute, 
$1,000,000 for the Yuut Elitnauviate, and $1,000,000 for an 
Alaska native aviation training program. The Bureau is directed 
to report to the Committees regularly regarding the expenditure 
of the funds provided for the native aviation training program 
and development of the program, including the partners 
involved, the number of pilots to be trained, out-year 
financing alternatives and other pertinent information.
      The managers are concerned that the Bureau has shown 
little progress in addressing the land issues of the Canoncito 
Band of Navajos. The managers direct the Bureau to accelerate 
its efforts to open, at least, a part time office at Canoncito, 
New Mexico.

                              construction

      The conference agreement provides $357,132,000 for 
construction as proposed by the House instead of $360,132,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The managers have not provided 
$3,000,000 for the tribal school construction demonstration 
program as proposed by the Senate. The managers support the 
goal of this demonstration program and have been approached by 
a number of tribes regarding additional funding following the 
demonstration's success in removing schools from the BIA 
priority list. While budgetary constraints have forced the 
managers to adopt the House proposal, the managers recommend 
that the Bureau of Indian Affairs continue the demonstration 
project as part of the President's fiscal year 2003 budget 
request.

 indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
                                indians

      The conference agreement provides $60,949,000 for Indian 
land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
Indians as proposed by the House and the Senate.

                 indian guaranteed loan program account

      The conference agreement provides $4,986,000 for the 
Indian guaranteed loan program as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.

                          Departmental Offices

                            insular affairs

                       assistance to territories

      The conference agreement provides $78,950,000 for 
assistance to territories instead of $72,289,000 as proposed by 
the House and $76,450,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
managers have agreed to Compact impact assistance funding 
increases above the levels proposed by the House of $4,000,000 
for Hawaii and $1,000,000 each for Guam and the Commonwealth of 
the Northern Mariana Islands. The managers acknowledge the May 
30, 2001, letter and report by the Secretary of the Interior 
concerning compact impact and therefore the Administration is 
encouraged to see that negotiations on the continuation of the 
Compacts are concluded in a timely fashion and to provide for 
future compact impact payments out of the available mandatory 
compact payments. The managers agree that the Secretary should 
ensure that representatives of Hawaii are consulted during the 
upcoming Compact renegotiations process so the impact to Hawaii 
of migrating citizens from the freely associated states is 
appropriately considered. The conference agreement also 
includes the $200,000 for a utility privatization study in the 
U.S. Virgin Islands as proposed by the House, and the full 
funding level and bill language proposed by the Senate for the 
U.S. Virgin Islands FEMA loan repayment. The conference 
agreement retains the House proposed bill language concerning 
compensation for American Samoa High Court Justices and the 
House proposed report language concerning potential withholding 
of American Samoa operations funding.

                      compact of free association

      The conference agreement provides $23,245,000 for the 
Compact of Free Association as proposed by both the House and 
the Senate.

                        Departmental Management

                         salaries and expenses

      The conference agreement provides $67,741,000 for 
salaries and expenses for departmental management, instead of 
$55,177,000 as proposed by the House and $67,541,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Funds should be distributed as follows:

Departmental direction..................................     $12,964,000
Management and coordination.............................      24,905,000
Hearings and appeals....................................       8,559,000
Central services........................................      20,425,000
Bureau of Mines workers compensation/unemployment.......         888,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      67,741,000

      The managers concur with the concerns expressed in the 
Senate report regarding the capability, capacity, accuracy and 
security of departmental information systems. The managers are 
particularly concerned about information security weaknesses 
that have been identified by both the Inspector General and the 
General Accounting Office, and believe the Department should 
take immediate steps to address these weaknesses. The most 
efficient and effective means of improving information security 
will likely be through department-wide solutions, but 
individual program managers should also work in conjunction 
with the Department's Chief Information Officer to develop 
short and long term plans to address vulnerabilities that have 
been identified. Program managers must also be held accountable 
for ensuring that computer security is adequately implemented 
within their areas of responsibility. Methods to establish this 
accountability should include performance reviews, 
administrative sanctions for non-compliance, or adjustments in 
program funding if necessary.
      The managers direct the Department of the Interior to 
study the viability of establishing an Enterprise Management 
Center to facilitate the Department's objective for budget and 
performance integration using financial information technology 
within the bureaus. As part of the review, the Department 
should consider which bureaus might benefit from being part of 
an initial pilot project. The managers expect this report to be 
forwarded to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
by March 1, 2002.
      The managers note that they have received numerous budget 
requests and reprogramming requests from the Federal land 
management agencies to purchase updated wireless communication 
infrastructure. In light of the Federal Communication 
Commission's ongoing review of spectrum allocations for 
wireless technologies, and the Government Accounting Office's 
current compilation of information for reports to Congress on 
this subject, the managers are concerned that substantial 
investments in wireless technologies may become obsolete due to 
imminent policy decisions regarding spectrum reallocation. The 
managers urge the agencies, whenever possible, to purchase 
equipment that can be reprogrammed to meet future spectrum 
allocations, and to purchase equipment that does not interfere 
with current emergency radio and GPS based systems.

                        Office of the Solicitor

                         salaries and expenses

      The conference agreement provides $45,000,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Office of the Solicitor as 
proposed by the House instead of $44,074,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Funds should be distributed as follows:

Legal services..........................................     $37,276,000
General administration..................................       7,724,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      45,000,000

                      Office of Inspector General

                         salaries and expenses

      The conference agreement provides $34,302,000 as proposed 
by the Senate instead of $30,490,000 as proposed by the House. 
Funds should be distributed as follows:

Audit...................................................     $18,680,000
Investigations..........................................       6,763,000
Policy & Management.....................................       7,402,000
Program Integrity.......................................       1,457,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      34,302,000

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians

                         FEDERAL TRUST PROGRAMS

      The conference agreement provides $99,224,000 for Federal 
trust programs as proposed by the House and Senate.
      The managers wish to clarify the language included in the 
House report with respect to funding for an historical 
accounting. The managers note that both the House and Senate 
have provided the funds requested by the Administration for an 
historical accounting. However, the managers remain very 
concerned about the costs associated with such an accounting. 
Therefore, these funds may not be allocated prior to the report 
requested by the Committees detailing the methods and costs 
associated with an historical accounting.
      The managers reiterate the position that they will not 
appropriate hundreds of millions of dollars for an historical 
accounting that provides funds for a protracted reconciliation 
process whose outcome is unlikely to be successful. If the 
Department, working with the plaintiffs and the Court, cannot 
find a cost effective method for an historical accounting, the 
Congress may have to consider a legislative remedy to resolve 
this and other litigation related issues.

                       INDIAN LAND CONSOLIDATION

      The conference agreement provides $10,980,000 for Indian 
land consolidation programs as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration

                NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT FUND

      The conference agreement provides $5,497,000 for the 
natural resource damage assessment fund as proposed by the 
House instead of $5,872,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
managers agree that, to the extent a national data management 
system is needed, funding for such a system should be addressed 
within the context of the fiscal year 2003 budget.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior

      The conference agreement includes sections 101, 103 
through 106, and 108 through 111, which were identical in both 
the House and the Senate bills.
      The conference agreement includes sections 113, 115, 116, 
118, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, and 126, which contained 
identical text in both the House and Senate bills, but the 
section numbers were different in the Senate bill.
      Section 102 retains the text of section 102 as proposed 
by the Senate. Section 102 as proposed by the House had 
identical language as the Senate except for a grammatical 
difference of not spelling out ``thirty days''.
      Section 107 retains the text of Senate section 107, which 
prohibits the Department of the Interior from using funds to 
conduct offshore preleasing, leasing and related activities in 
those areas under the June 12, 1998, moratorium. House section 
107 had identical language except for omitting the term 
``preleasing''.
      Section 112 retains the language of House section 112 
that prohibits the National Park Service from developing a 
reduced entrance fee program to accommodate non-local travel 
through a unit of the Park system. The Senate had no similar 
provision.
      Section 114 modifies language proposed by the House and 
by the Senate (in section 113 of the Senate bill) dealing with 
grazing on BLM lands. The modification extends traditional 
grazing use on Federal lands managed by the National Park 
Service at Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area in eastern 
Washington.
      Section 117 retains the language of House section 117 
continuing a provision carried in previous years placing a 
limitation on establishment of a Kankakee NWR in Indiana and 
Illinois that is inconsistent with the U.S. Army Corp of 
Engineers' efforts to control flooding and siltation. The 
Senate had no similar provision. The managers understand that 
this issue will be resolved shortly and this provision will not 
be carried in future years.
      Section 119 retains the text of House section 119, which 
provides for the protection of lands at Huron Cemetery, KS. 
Section 117 as proposed by the Senate has identical text, with 
the exception of a difference in the use of punctuation.
      Section 120 retains the text of section 120 as proposed 
by the House which continues a provision carried last year 
prohibiting the study or implementation of a plan to drain Lake 
Powell, or to reduce the water below that required to operate 
Glen Canyon Dam. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Section 127 retains the text of section 124 as proposed 
by the Senate, which authorizes the Secretary of the Interior 
to use helicopters or motor vehicles to capture and transport 
horses and burros at the Sheldon and Hart NWRs. The House had 
no similar provision.
      Section 128 modifies the text of section 126 as proposed 
by the Senate clarifying that the lands taken into trust for 
the Lytton Rancheria of California are still subject to all of 
the provisions of Public Law 100-497 and, in particular with 
respect to Class III gaming, the compact provisions of section 
2710(d) or any relevant Class III gaming procedures. The 
managers further recognize that nothing in section 819 of 
Public Law 106-568 should be construed as permitting off 
reservation gaming by Indian tribes except in compliance with 
all relevant provisions of Public Law 100-497.
      Section 129 retains the text of section 127 as proposed 
by the Senate, which renames Moore's Landing at the Cape Romain 
NWR in South Carolina as ``Garris Landing.'' The House had no 
similar provision.
      Section 130 makes technical modifications to language 
proposed by the Senate in section 130 regarding cruise ship 
entries at Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve.
      Section 131 retains the text of Senate section 131, which 
prevents the use of funds for the transfer of land on South Fox 
Island, Michigan without Congressional approval. The House had 
no similar provision. This section allows the Department of the 
Interior to continue working on processes pursuant to NEPA, 
including preparation of an EIS on the proposed land exchange, 
analysis of the State's proposal and a range of alternatives, 
and consideration of public input. Absent a showing that the 
agencies have not complied with NEPA, the managers, at this 
time, do not intend to include this or similar restrictions 
next year. This language affects current regulatory and legal 
processes, which are sufficient to protect the environment and 
the public's interests, by unnecessarily preventing the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service from 
releasing a record of decision on the proposed land exchange 
until Congress passes a law authorizing the exchange.
      Section 132 includes language, agreed to in previous 
years, authorizing the transfer of Federal land acquisition 
funds for Brandywine Battlefield, Mississippi National River 
and Recreational Area, Shenandoah Valley National Historic 
District, and Ice Age National Scenic Trail.
      Section 133 makes a technical change to Public Law 106-
568 regarding land transfer boundaries.
      Section 134 clarifies that the Secretary of the Interior 
has the authority to determine whether Indian lands constitute 
a reservation. Nothing in this section shall be construed to 
permit gaming on the lands described in section 123 of Public 
Law 106-291.
      Section 135 makes a technical correction to the Black 
Rock Desert-High Rock Canyon Emigrant Trails National 
Conservation Area Act, Public Law 106-554.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate in section 125 permitting the transfer 
of funds between State grant programs managed by the U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service and the National Park Service.
      The conference agreement does not include the text of 
Senate section 128, which prevents the use of funds for mineral 
leasing and related activities in national monuments. This 
issue is addressed in Title III where the House language 
addressing this issue is retained.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate in section 129 that would have expanded 
the special resource study area for Loess Hills in Iowa, or in 
section 132 dealing with the Pechanga Band of Indians, or in 
section 133 regarding Coastal Impact Assistance.

                       TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES

                       Department of Agriculture

                             Forest Service

                     FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

      The conference agreement provides $241,304,000 for forest 
and rangeland research instead of $236,979,000 as proposed by 
the House and $242,822,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes 
from the House bill include $475,000 for the Forest Products 
Lab lumber salvage research, WI, $500,000 for the Center for 
Bottomlands research, MS, $175,000 for applied research in the 
hardwood region of Pennsylvania and nearby areas, and 
$4,000,000 for Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA). The 
conference agreement does not include the House proposed 
increase of $1,250,000 above the request for FIA and the 
managers agree that the Forest Service should not follow the 
House report instructions concerning the FIA program under this 
heading or under the national forest system heading. The 
conference agreement does not include the Senate proposal to 
add funds for fixed costs but it does include the Senate 
proposed general reduction below the House of $175,000. The 
conference agreement includes the House proposed increases for 
Bent Creek, NC, urban forestry research at Syracuse, NY, and 
Davis, CA, and Coweeta watershed research, NC. The conference 
agreement provides that the Northeastern States Research 
Cooperative, as authorized in Public Law 105-185, receive 
$2,000,000, $600,000 above the request. Of this amount, 
$1,000,000 should go to ecosystem research at the Hubbard Brook 
Project of the Forest Service Northeastern research station, 
NH, and $1,000,000 should go to the Vermont George Aiken School 
of Natural Resources for collaborative research with Forest 
Service scientists and other cooperators on economic 
development, forest management, and forest product research. 
The managers direct the Forest Service to maintain the research 
related presence at the former Intermountain Research Station 
at, or above, the current level, including the position of 
Assistant Station Director.

                       STATE AND PRIVATE FORESTRY

      The conference agreement provides $291,221,000 for State 
and private forestry instead of $277,771,000 as proposed by the 
House and $287,331,000 as proposed by the Senate. These funds 
include $101,000,000 within the conservation spending category 
for forest legacy, and urban and community forestry as proposed 
by the Senate instead of $104,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement provides $43,304,000 for Federal 
lands forest health management as proposed by the House, 
$25,000,000 for cooperative lands forest health management as 
proposed by the Senate, $25,310,000 for State fire assistance 
as proposed by the House, and $5,053,000 for volunteer fire 
assistance as proposed by both the House and the Senate. The 
conference agreement also includes additional funds for State 
fire and volunteer fire assistance as part of the national fire 
plan funding within the wildland fire management account.
      The conference agreement includes $33,171,000 for forest 
stewardship instead of $32,941,000 as proposed by the House and 
$33,268,000 as proposed by the Senate. The only change from the 
House proposal for forest stewardship is the addition of 
$230,000 for the Chesapeake Bay program as proposed by the 
Senate. The conference agreement also includes $3,000,000 for 
the stewardship incentives program instead of $8,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. This allocation is not derived from the 
conservation spending category as proposed by the House. The 
managers direct the Forest Service to target the stewardship 
incentives program funds for non-Federal forestlands impacted 
by, or at immediate risk from, major forest pests such as gypsy 
moth and the southern pine beetle. The managers intend the 
stewardship incentives program to be administered by the Forest 
Service with cost-share payments to landowners to be provided 
by the State foresters or an equivalent State official.
      The conference agreement includes $65,000,000 for the 
forest legacy program as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$60,000,000 as proposed by the House. This allocation is 
derived from the conservation spending category. The conference 
agreement provides specific funding levels for high priority 
projects and also provides $22,135,000 for the Forest Service 
to allocate to other projects and to cover the costs of Forest 
Service technical assistance, program administration, and State 
needs assessments and planning. The conference agreement has 
modified bill language proposed by the House and the Senate 
concerning approval of the Forest Service project selection. 
The conference agreement now requires the Forest Service to 
notify the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations in 
advance of undertaking specific forest legacy projects. The 
managers note the recent revision to the Puerto Rico forest 
legacy program standards and accordingly direct the Forest 
Service not to follow the House direction concerning this 
program in Puerto Rico. The conference agreement includes the 
following distribution of funds for the forest legacy program:

        Project/State                                         Conference
Adirondack Lakes, NY....................................      $2,000,000
Anderson-Tully, TN......................................       3,500,000
Bar-J tract, phase III, UT..............................         780,000
Castle Rock, UT.........................................       1,000,000
Catawba-Wateree Forest, SC..............................       2,950,000
Chateaugay, VT..........................................         500,000
Coastal Forest ecosystem restoration, SC................         650,000
Connecticut Lakes, NH...................................       3,600,000
Howe Creek Ranch, CA....................................         500,000
Kimball Pond, NH........................................         700,000
McCandless Ranch, HI....................................       1,000,000
Melvin Valley, NH.......................................         500,000
Mt. Washington, Hi-Rock Camp, MA........................         500,000
Nanejoy, MD.............................................         450,000
NJ Highlands, Newark watershed, NJ......................       5,000,000
North Chickamauga, TN...................................         500,000
NY City watershed, NY...................................         500,000
Range Creek Headwaters, UT..............................         500,000
Thompson-Fisher phase II, MT............................       7,000,000
TN River Gorge, Cummings Cove, TN.......................       1,000,000
TN small projects, TN...................................         135,000
Tomahawk Northwoods phase II, WI........................       4,000,000
Treetops, CT............................................       1,000,000
Tumbledown/Mt. Blue, ME.................................         600,000
West Branch phase II, ME................................       4,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Project subtotal..................................      42,865,000
Unallocated projects & administration...................      22,135,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Total Forest Legacy.................................      65,000,000

      The conference agreement includes $36,000,000 for the 
urban and community forestry program as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate. This allocation is derived from the 
conservation spending category. The managers agree to the House 
proposal for this activity plus $50,000 for the West Virginia 
partnership coordinator, $350,000 for the Chicago, IL 
wilderness program, and $200,000 for the Cook County forest 
preserve, IL. The managers agree to the Senate proposed 
$600,000 general decrease. The managers are aware of 
Treepeople's proposed Center for Community Forestry in Los 
Angeles, CA, and its value as a national resource. The managers 
encourage the Forest Service to consider supporting this 
important urban forestry program. The managers encourage the 
Forest Service to participate in developing living memorials 
using trees, that will recognize the tragic losses that 
occurred on September 11, 2001 in New York City, the Pentagon 
area, and southwest Pennsylvania.
      The conference agreement includes the following 
distribution of funds for the economic action programs:
        Program or project                                    Conference
Economic Recovery program:..............................
    Economic recovery base program......................      $3,685,000
    Overhill regional economic development, TN..........         200,000
    Graham & Swain Counties, NC.........................          75,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total economic recovery.........................       3,960,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Rural development program:
    Rural development base program......................       2,400,000
    NE & Midwest allocation.............................       2,500,000
    N Rockies Heritage Center, MT.......................         350,000
    Four Corners Sustainable Forestry...................       1,000,000
    Hawaii forestry initiative..........................         200,000
    NY City watershed rural development.................         300,000
    NY City watershed enhancement.......................         500,000
    Kiski Basin economic development, PA................         200,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total rural development.........................       7,450,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Forest products conservation & recycling program........       1,300,000
Small diameter initiative...............................       2,000,000
Wood in transportation program..........................       1,920,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Programs total....................................      16,630,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Special projects:
    Wood Education & Resource Center, WV................       2,700,000
    Lake Tahoe erosion control grants, CA, NV...........       3,500,000
    Cradle of forestry conservation education, NC.......         250,000
    KY mine waste reforestation.........................       1,000,000
    Envir. Sci. & Public Policy Research Inst., ID......         250,000
    Kake Land Exchange, AK..............................       4,500,000
    Ketchikan Public Utilities, right-of-way clear, AK..       2,500,000
    Kilns in SE and SC Alaska...........................       2,000,000
    Navaho County, AZ biomass energy....................         350,000
    Tillamook State Forest Interpretive Center, OR......         500,000
    South Lake Tahoe MTBE study.........................         500,000
    Cordova visitor center, AK..........................         300,000
    Allegheny NF area tourism, PA.......................         200,000
    State of Alaska expedited envir. studies............         500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total special projects............................      18,850,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Total Economic Action Programs..................      35,680,000

      The conference agreement includes the bill language 
proposed by the Senate concerning a direct lump sum payment to 
the Kake Tribal Corporation, AK, but the funding total is 
$4,500,000. The managers understand that this is the final year 
of funding for kilns in Alaska. The Forest Service shall follow 
Senate instructions concerning the distribution of funds for 
the Ketchikan public utilities right-of-way clearing project. 
The managers have provided $500,000 for the Tahoe Regional 
Planning Authority and the South Lake Tahoe public utility to 
conduct the study of MTBE contamination authorized in the Lake 
Tahoe Restoration Act. The managers stress that subsequent 
funding to remedy this MTBE problem is not authorized by that 
Act and must come from sources other than Interior and related 
agencies appropriations acts, such as within the Environmental 
Protection Agency funding. The Cradle of Forestry conservation 
education funds include $100,000 for activities at the Cradle 
of Forestry in America in the Pisgah National Forest and 
$150,000 for the Education and Research Consortium of North 
Carolina to continue its cooperative environmental education 
activities with the Cradle of Forestry in the Pisgah National 
Forest.
      The conference agreement includes $9,425,000 for Pacific 
Northwest Assistance instead of $9,200,000 as proposed by the 
House and $9,625,000 as proposed by the Senate. This funding 
includes House-proposed allocations plus an additional $225,000 
for the base program. The conference agreement includes 
$5,015,000 for forest resource information and analysis as 
proposed by the Senate; the Forest Service should follow Senate 
directions concerning this program. The conference agreement 
also includes $5,263,000 for the international forestry 
program.

                         national forest system

      The conference agreement provides $1,331,439,000 for the 
National forest system instead of $1,320,445,000 as proposed by 
the House and $1,324,491,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds 
should be distributed as follows:

Land management planning................................     $70,358,000
Inventory and monitoring................................     173,266,000
Recreation, heritage & wilderness.......................     245,500,000
Wildlife & fish habitat management......................     131,847,000
Grazing management......................................      34,775,000
Forest products.........................................     266,340,000
Vegetation & watershed management.......................     190,113,000
Minerals and geology management.........................      48,956,000
Landownership management................................      88,434,000
Law enforcement operations..............................      79,000,000
Valles Caldera National Preserve, NM....................       2,800,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................   1,331,439,000

      The following discussion describes funding changes from 
the House passed bill. The inventory and monitoring activity 
does not include the funding for the Lake Tahoe basin watershed 
assessment. The wildlife and fish habitat management activity 
does not include any funds, as proposed by the Senate, for the 
State of Alaska to conduct monitoring on the Tongass National 
Forest. The recreation, heritage and wilderness activity has a 
general program increase of $3,500,000 and it does not include 
a special allocation for the fee demo program revolving 
account, although this could be pursued at agency discretion. 
Funds for national scenic trails operations and Pacific Crest 
Trail maintenance are not included in the recreation activity 
but have been transferred to the capital improvement and 
maintenance appropriation account. Wildlife and fish habitat 
management includes $200,000 for work on the Batten Kill River, 
VT as proposed by the Senate and a general program reduction of 
$400,000. The grazing management activity is funded at the 
Senate proposed level. Changes from the House in the vegetation 
and watershed management activity include, for the Lake Tahoe 
basin, increases of $150,000 for watershed improvement 
activities, $400,000 for adaptive management, and $450,000 for 
the management of urban lots. The managers allow the Forest 
Service, upon notification of the House and Senate Committees 
on Appropriations, to reprogram national forest system funds 
within the Lake Tahoe basin.
      The conference agreement also includes $200,000 for 
Dakota Prairie grasslands weed control. The Forest Service 
should maintain the noxious weed program at the Okanogan 
National Forest, WA, at $300,000 as in fiscal year 2001. The 
managers revise the House direction concerning the full time 
lands team working on the Pacific Crest Trail to direct the 
full time team to continue its functions but allow work on 
other high priority land projects as well as the Pacific Crest 
Trail. Funding for the law enforcement activity includes a 
general increase of $2,000,000. The managers have not agreed to 
the Senate proposal to provide $200,000 for the Southwest 
strategy. The managers direct the report required by both the 
House and the Senate concerning the budget formulation and 
execution system be due March 15, 2002.
      The managers direct the Forest Service, in their 
completion of the Chugach National Forest and land resource 
management plan, to analyze the impact that restrictions 
proposed within the plan regarding mechanical fuel treatments 
and forest access will have on the level of prescribed burning 
and the implementation of the national fire plan on the Chugach 
National Forest. The managers direct that this analysis be 
completed before the release of the Chugach forest plan and 
that it shall be included in the plan.
      The managers understand that the budget request for land 
management planning included $2,500,000 for the Chippewa and 
Superior National Forests, MN, to continue work on forest 
plans. The managers expect such funds shall be used to continue 
work in an expeditious manner.
      Funding for the newly established Valles Caldera National 
Preserve, NM, is increased by $1,789,000 above the House level; 
much of this increase is for one-time infrastructure 
improvements to facilitate public access to this unique part of 
the national forest system. The managers expect the Valles 
Caldera directors to use these funds efficiently; they should 
begin the revenue generating activities authorized for this 
area and submit to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations a plan and schedule, including cost estimates, 
for its management that is consistent with National funding 
priorities. The conference agreement does not include the 
general reduction to the national forest system account adopted 
in House floor action.
      The managers have revised House report language 
concerning the management of urban lots in the Lake Tahoe 
basin. The managers note that the Forest Service faces 
significant challenges in order to manage and care for urban 
properties. The intensive effort required for management of 
these properties must be evaluated in light of the need for the 
agency to manage the large portions of the basin under its 
jurisdiction. The managers request that the Forest Service 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no 
later than October 1, 2003 on the adaptive management practices 
that are suitable for urban lots acquired under the Santini-
Burton program in the Lake Tahoe basin, and make 
recommendations as to those practices that are most effective 
in meeting the goals of the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act (P.L. 
106-506). The managers expect that this analysis will consider 
the role and function of urban lots relative to water quality 
and watershed protection, biological diversity, recreation, 
public access, and forest vegetation management for wildfire 
control. The managers expect the Forest Service and partners in 
the basin to evaluate alternatives to continued urban lot 
purchases and to develop alternative methods of managing 
Federal urban lots, and to implement monitoring and research 
regarding the function that the lots play in supporting 
ecological integrity in the basin.

                        wildland fire management

      The conference agreement provides $1,560,349,000 for 
wildland fire management instead of $1,402,305,000 as proposed 
by the House and $1,280,594,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
managers note that this funding total includes $346,000,000 in 
contingent emergency appropriations instead of $165,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate and no emergency funding proposed by the 
House, and that $200,000,000 is to pay back emergency wildfire 
expenditures of fiscal year 2001. This emergency funding should 
be used to repay sums previously advanced for fiscal year 2001 
wildfire emergencies as well as to fund various components of 
the national fire plan as discussed below.
      The managers believe that the full, integrated national 
fire plan effort needs to be sustained in future years in order 
to reduce the risks of catastrophic fire in many areas of the 
Nation. The managers note that the Administration, working 
along with governors and local communities, have submitted a 
framework for a ten-year national fire plan. However, after 
reviewing the plan, the managers are concerned that the plan 
does not lay-out clear funding requirements for various aspects 
of this important endeavor. Therefore, the managers direct the 
Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to provide to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 15, 
2002, an updated fire plan that includes detailed schedules of 
activities and funding requirements. The managers understand 
that funding requirements for wildfire activities include 
considerable year-to-year uncertainty depending on weather and 
fire circumstances and therefore the managers view the funding 
requirements for the national fire plan as being an iterative 
process, which requires annual updates. The managers direct the 
Departments of the Interior and Agriculture to continue to work 
together to formulate complementary budget requests that 
reflect the same principles and a similar budget organization 
and submit a cross-cutting budget request to the Committees, 
which covers all federal wildfire responsibilities. The 
managers expect the Forest Service to emphasize the use of 
cooperative agreements and grants to a wide-range of interests 
to help meet the national fire plan goals and objectives on all 
lands, including information compilation and analysis, public 
education, and applied research. In addition, the managers 
expect the agencies to seek the advice of governors, and local 
and tribal government representatives in setting priorities for 
fuels treatments, burned area rehabilitation, and public 
outreach and education.
Wildfire preparedness
      The conference agreement includes $622,618,000 for 
preparedness as proposed by the Senate instead of $616,618,000 
as proposed by the House. The $6,000,000 in fire technology 
development included within the Senate proposal for 
preparedness has been transferred to the other fire operations 
activity and base funding for preparedness has been increased 
accordingly. The managers reiterate the House direction 
concerning the need for completed fire plans for all forest 
service units and the managers direct that a schedule for this 
implementation be included in the next budget request. The 
managers also remain concerned about the variation in methods 
by which the departments calculate wildfire fighting readiness 
and how the departments plan their distribution of firefighting 
resources to attain efficiency. The managers direct the 
Secretaries of Agriculture and the Interior to develop and 
implement a coordinated and common system for calculating 
readiness which includes provisions for working with the shared 
fire fighting resources of the States and other cooperators and 
considers values of various resources on both Federal and other 
lands.
Wildfire suppression operations
      The conference agreement includes $521,321,000 for 
wildfire suppression activities instead of $321,321,000 
proposed by both the House and Senate. This includes 
$255,321,000 for non-emergency wildfire suppression activities 
instead of $321,321,000 proposed by the House and $221,321,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The agreement also includes 
$266,000,000 in emergency wildfire suppression funding instead 
of no emergency funding proposed by the House and $100,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The managers direct the Forest 
Service to use $200,000,000 in emergency contingency funding to 
repay funds advanced for emergency wildfire suppression 
activities in fiscal year 2001 from other activities, trust 
funds, and other appropriation accounts.
      The managers are very concerned about fire fighter safety 
issues in light of the tragic Thirty Mile fire in northern 
Washington. The managers direct the Forest Service to continue 
development and testing of a new fire shelter for the 
protection and safety of fire fighters. The testing shall 
include products being advanced by private industry. The Forest 
Service should submit a report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations on the results of these tests by 
September 30, 2002.
      The managers are concerned about fire suppression costs 
during major incidents and therefore the Forest Service and the 
Department of the Interior are directed to contract for a 
thorough, independent review of wildfire suppression costs and 
strategies. The Departments should equally share the cost of 
the review and a preliminary report should be issued by May 31, 
2002, and the final report be delivered to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by September 30, 2002.
      The managers note that even after enactment of this bill 
the KV reforestation trust fund will lack $320,000,000, which 
has not been repaid but which was advanced for emergency 
wildfires during previous years. The Administration should 
strive to repay these funds.
Other wildfire operations
      The conference agreement includes $416,410,000 for other 
fire operation activities instead of $464,366,000 as proposed 
by the House and $336,655,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of 
this allocation, $80,000,000 is designated as emergency funds 
instead of $65,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
allocation of this funding is as follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Non-emergency     Emergency         Total
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hazardous Fuels.................................................    $209,010,000  ..............    $209,010,000
Fire Facilities.................................................      10,376,000     $10,000,000      20,376,000
Rehabilitation..................................................       3,668,000      59,000,000      62,668,000
Research & Development..........................................      22,265,000       5,000,000      27,265,000
Joint Fire Science..............................................       8,000,000  ..............       8,000,000
Forest Health Management........................................      11,974,000  ..............      11,974,000
Economic Action.................................................      12,472,000  ..............      12,472,000
State fire assistance...........................................      50,383,000       6,000,000      56,383,000
Volunteer fire assistance.......................................       8,262,000  ..............       8,262,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total other wildfire operations...........................     336,410,000      80,000,000     416,410,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The conference agreement includes $209,010,000 for 
hazardous fuels treatments as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$227,010,000 as proposed by the House. The managers expect the 
Forest Service to ensure that fuels treatments are accomplished 
quickly and in an environmentally sound manner. In conducting 
treatments, local contract personnel are to be used wherever 
practical and efficient. The managers expect the agency to show 
planned and actual funding and accomplishments for fuels 
management activities in future budget requests to the 
Congress. The managers understand that actual amounts may 
differ from planned levels. The managers expect the agencies to 
work closely with States and local communities in implementing 
this program in an effective and efficient manner.
      The managers have not included bill language proposed by 
the Senate, which required that the Forest Service spend no 
less than $125,000,000 on hazardous fuels reduction projects in 
the wildland-urban interface. Instead, the managers expect that 
the Forest Service will expend this amount, as stated in the 
budget request, on projects in the wildland-urban interface. If 
the agency does not attain such levels, it shall promptly 
notify the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations and 
provide a report explaining why the Forest Service was unable 
to expend such sums. The managers continue to believe that an 
emphasis on fuels reduction work in the wildland-urban 
interface is critical to protecting the safety of rural 
communities.
      The managers have included bill language proposed by the 
Senate providing that up to $15,000,000 in available funds may 
be used on adjacent, non-Federal lands to reduce hazardous 
fuels. The managers have not included bill language proposed by 
the Senate concerning resource management and access issues on 
the Chugach National Forest, AK. Instead, the managers have 
included direction under the national forest system heading 
regarding the upcoming Chugach National Forest plan. The 
conference agreement includes the Senate proposal to provide 
$5,000,000 for authorized Community Forest Restoration Act 
activities. The managers have not provided Forest Service funds 
for the Ecological Research Institute and its activities at Mt. 
Trumbull. This issue is addressed under the Bureau of Land 
Management. The conference agreement also includes hazardous 
fuels funding of $16,000,000 for the Quincy Library group 
activities, CA and $2,000,000 for the Lake Tahoe Basin as 
indicated by the House, which is $500,000 above the request.
      The managers direct the Forest Service to provide 
technical assistance to the Tule River Tribal Reservation with 
its ground fuels mitigation program, the acquisition of 
appropriate fire suppression equipment, and the training of a 
tribal hot-shot crew.
      The conference agreement includes $20,376,000 for 
wildfire management facilities as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $38,000,000 as proposed by the House. Of these 
funds, $10,000,000 are available as emergency funds.
      The conference agreement includes $62,668,000 for 
rehabilitation and restoration activities, including 
$59,000,000 as emergency funds, instead of $81,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $3,913,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
The managers have provided this funding to continue work on the 
many areas impacted by the year 2000 fires as well as more 
recent events. The managers direct the departments to continue 
to implement the long-term program to manage and supply native 
plant materials for use in various Federal land management 
restoration and rehabilitation needs directed for fiscal year 
2001.
      The conference agreement includes $27,265,000 for 
research and development activities as proposed by the House; 
$5,000,000 of these funds are designated for emergency needs. 
The research and development allocation consolidates funds, 
which were requested within both the preparedness and fire 
operations activities. It is vital that activities related to 
wildfire management and natural resource management have a firm 
scientific basis. To this end, the managers have also included 
$8,000,000 for the joint fire science program as proposed by 
the House instead of $4,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
joint fire program is matched with similar funding within the 
Department of the Interior and this program should continue the 
direction it has taken in fiscal year 2001. The managers have 
designated $1,000,000 within the available, non-emergency 
research and development funds for cooperative research and 
technology development for the University of Montana National 
Center for Landscape Fire Analysis. This replaces designations 
for this project in the House and Senate recommended bills.
      The managers note that devastating windstorms have caused 
great damage on the Superior and Chippewa National Forests, MN. 
The budget request for wildland fire management included 
$8,000,000 to continue efforts to reduce the fuels 
accumulation, continue reforestation, and rehabilitate the 
wilderness and non-wilderness areas of these forests. The 
managers expect the scheduled work to be completed 
expeditiously with these funds.
      The managers have included $56,383,000 for State fire 
assistance instead of $50,383,000 as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate. Of this total, $6,000,000 is designated as 
emergency funds and this total includes $5,000,000 for 
hazardous fuels work in Anchorage, AK instead of $6,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate, and $1,000,000 to continue hazardous 
fuels work in the Kenai Borough, AK, as proposed by the Senate. 
The Forest Service should follow Senate direction concerning 
the distribution of these funds. State fire assistance includes 
support for the FIREWISE program and the use of cost share 
incentives. The conference agreement includes $12,472,000 for 
economic action activities associated with the national fire 
plan as proposed by both the House and the Senate. The managers 
note that the State and private forestry appropriation includes 
funds for the small diameter initiative so the House 
instructions concerning this project need not be followed.

                  capital improvement and maintenance

      The conference agreement provides $546,188,000 for 
capital improvement and maintenance instead of $535,513,000 as 
proposed by the House and $541,286,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. This funding includes $61,000,000 as recommended by the 
Senate for priority deferred maintenance and infrastructure 
improvement within the conservation spending category. The 
conference agreement provides for the following distribution of 
funds:

        Activity or project                                   Conference
Facilities:
    Maintenance.........................................     $93,926,000
    Capital improvement.................................      70,678,000
    Congressional priorities:
        Allegheny NF campgrounds, PA....................         900,000
        Allegheny NF Marienville RS, PA.................         975,000
        Big Bear center, CA.............................       1,000,000
        Cherokee NF recreation projects, TN.............       1,000,000
        Cradle of Forestry volunteer facilities, NC.....       1,165,000
        Franklin County Lake, MS........................       1,400,000
        Francis Marion NF, SC...........................         100,000
        Gladie Creek center, KY.........................         718,000
        Grey Towers NHS, PA.............................         500,000
        Hardwood Tree Improvement & Regeneration Center 
          at Purdue, IN.................................         500,000
        Inst. of Pacific Islands Forestry, HI...........       2,000,000
        Lake Tahoe, restrooms & Tallic rehab............         115,000
        Midewin Nat. Tallgrass Prairie horticulture 
          building, IL..................................         450,000
        Mitchell Mill, Ozark NF AR......................         350,000
        Monongahela NF sanitation, WV...................         440,000
        Mt. Tabor work center, VT.......................         650,000
        Nantahala NF recreation projects, NC............         850,000
        Rapid City research lab, SD.....................       2,558,000
        Timberline Lodge ADA rehab, OR..................       1,240,000
        Tuckerman Ravine, NH............................         330,000
        Waldo Lake rehab, OR............................         500,000
        Wayne NF SO, OH.................................       1,000,000
        Wayne NF facilities improvements, OH............       1,000,000
        Winding Stair Mtn. NRA, OK......................       1,102,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Congressional priorities....................      20,843,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Facilities..................................     185,447,000
Roads:
    Maintenance.........................................     159,291,000
    Capital improvement.................................      67,600,000
    Congressional priorities:
        Franklin County Lake, MS........................         600,000
        Lake Tahoe, Eagle Falls rehab...................         455,000
        Lake Tahoe roads................................         800,000
        Monongahela NF, WV..............................         920,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Congressional priorities....................       2,775,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Roads.......................................     229,666,000
Trails:
    Maintenance.........................................      40,434,000
    Capital improvement.................................      26,955,000
    Congressional priorities:
        Continental Divide Trail........................       1,000,000
        FL National Scenic Trail........................         500,000
        Pinhoti Trail, GA...............................         186,000
        National Scenic trails maintenance add-on.......         800,000
        Pacific Crest Trail maintenance.................         200,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Congressional priorities....................       2,686,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Trails......................................      70,075,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Capital Improvement and Maintenance.........     485,188,000
  Infrastructure improvement, conservation category.....      61,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total with conservation category..................     546,188,000

      The conference agreement includes bill language proposed 
by the Senate concerning a fiscal year 2001 appropriation for 
improvements at the Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration 
Center at Purdue University, IN, and language transferring a 
fiscal year 2001 appropriation for certain recreational 
facilities near the Allegheny National Forest, PA.
      The managers concur with the Senate in providing 
$2,558,000 for the design, planning, and acquisition of 
property to support the efficient collocation of the Mystic 
Ranger District and the Rapid City Research Laboratory in South 
Dakota. The managers have also included $500,000 for the 
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC) at 
Purdue University, IN. The managers emphasize that construction 
of other facilities on the Black Hills National Forest and 
further Federal funding for the Hardwood Tree Improvement and 
Regeneration Center, IN, be proposed in the agency budget 
justification using the normal process for ranking and 
prioritizing facility needs. The Forest Service should submit 
reports detailing all future funding needs for these two 
projects no later than April 15, 2002. The conference agreement 
does not provide $2,000,000 for the Pike's Peak Highway as 
proposed by the Senate due to ongoing litigation directly 
related to the project.
      The managers encourage the Forest Service to establish a 
suitable memorial for the four brave firefighters who lost 
their lives July 10, 2001, at the Thirtymile fire near 
Winthrop, WA.

                            land acquisition

      The conference agreement provides $149,742,000 for land 
acquisition instead of $130,877,000 as proposed by the House 
and $128,877,000 as proposed by the Senate. Funds should be 
distributed as follows:

        Area (State)                                              Amount
Allegheny NF (Allegheny Wild & Scenic Rivers) (PA)......        $220,000
Arapaho NF (Beaver Brook) (CO)..........................       6,600,000
Beaverhead-Deerlodge NF (Watershed, RY Timber) (MT).....       7,000,000
Bonneville Shoreline Trail (UT).........................       1,000,000
Bridger-Teton NF (Feuz conservation easements) (WY).....       3,500,000
Chattahoochee NF (Mt. Yonah and Jacks River) (GA).......       1,200,000
Chattooga W&SR;/Watershed (NC/GA)........................       3,600,000
Cheq-Nicolet NF (Wisconsin Wild Waterways) (WI).........       2,500,000
Chippewa and Superior NF (MN Wilderness) (MN)...........       1,400,000
Cibola NF (La Madera) (NM)..............................       3,000,000
Coconino NF (Hancock Ranch) (AZ)........................       4,000,000
Columbia River Gorge NSA (OR/WA)........................       6,000,000
Dakota Prairie Grasslands (Griffin Ranch) (ND)..........       1,450,000
Daniel Boone NF (Red River Gorge) (KY)..................       2,037,000
Florida National Scenic Trail (FL)......................       4,000,000
Francis Marion NF (SC)..................................       7,000,000
Gallatin NF (Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem) (MT)........       3,500,000
Green Mtn. NF (including Prickly Hill, Blueberry Lake, 
    and Gomez tracts) (VT)..............................       1,250,000
Hoosier NF (Unique Areas) (IN)..........................       1,500,000
I-90 Corridor/Plum Creek (WA)...........................       4,000,000
Idaho Wilderness/W&S; Rivers--Sulphur Creek Ranch (ID/MT)       2,200,000
Lake Tahoe Basin MU (High Meadows) (CA).................       4,000,000
Lake Tahoe NF (Urban lots) (CA).........................       2,600,000
Lewis and Clark Historic Trail (ID/MT)..................       1,500,000
Los Padres NF (Big Sur Ecosystem) (CA)..................       7,660,000
Mark Twain NF (Ozark Mtn. Streams & Rivers) (MO)........       1,500,000
Midewin NTGP (IL).......................................         500,000
Ouchita NF (Lake Winona) (AR)...........................       1,500,000
Pacific Crest Trail (CA/WA/OR)..........................       2,000,000
Pacific Northwest Streams (Drift Creek and Davidson) 
    (OR)................................................       4,250,000
Payette NF (Thunder Mtn.)...............................       1,000,000
Pisgah NF (Lake James) (NC).............................       2,500,000
San Bernardino NF (CA)..................................       1,500,000
Santa Fe NF (Santa Fe Watershed) (NM)...................       1,750,000
Sawtooth NF (easements--Sawtooth NRA) (ID)..............       5,000,000
St. Francis NF (Stumpy Point, Anderson Tulley) (AR).....       1,500,000
Sumter NF (Broad River Corridor) (SC)...................       1,500,000
Swan Valley Conservation Project (MT)...................       7,000,000
Tahoe NF (North Fork Am. River) (CA)....................       1,700,000
Tongass NF, Admiralty NM (Favorite Bay, Mental Health 
    Lands) (AK).........................................       5,225,000
Uncompahgre NF (Red Mountain) (CO)......................       4,600,000
Wayne NF (OH)...........................................       1,000,000
White Mtn. NF (Jericho Lake) (NH).......................       2,000,000
White Mtn. NF (NH)......................................       1,500,000
Wild and Scenic Rivers PNW (Skagit River) (WA)..........       2,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................     132,242,000
Wilderness Protection...................................       1,000,000
Critical Inholdings, Opportunities......................       2,000,000
Cash Equalization.......................................       1,500,000
Acquisition Management..................................      13,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     149,742,000

      The managers direct the Forest Service to continue its 
ongoing work to implement an acquisition program for the 
Pacific Crest Trail as rapidly as possible, utilizing 
assistance from the National Park Service, if desirable. 
Acquisition efforts should focus on properties where access and 
public service needs are the greatest. A progress report should 
be submitted to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than March 1, 2002.

         ACQUISITION OF LANDS FOR NATIONAL FORESTS SPECIAL ACTS

      The conference agreement provides $1,069,000 for the 
acquisition of lands for national forests special acts as 
recommended by both the House and the Senate.

            ACQUISITION OF LANDS TO COMPLETE LAND EXCHANGES

      The conference agreement provides an indefinite 
appropriation estimated to be $234,000 for the acquisition of 
lands to complete land exchanges as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.

                         RANGE BETTERMENT FUND

      The conference agreement provides an indefinite 
appropriation estimated to be $3,290,000 for the range 
betterment fund as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

    GIFTS, DONATIONS AND BEQUESTS FOR FOREST AND RANGELAND RESEARCH

      The conference agreement provides $92,000 for gifts, 
donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

        MANAGEMENT OF NATIONAL FOREST LANDS FOR SUBSISTENCE USES

      The conference agreement provides $5,488,000 for 
management of national forest system lands for subsistence uses 
in Alaska as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

               ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS, FOREST SERVICE

      The managers have modified bill language proposed by the 
Senate concerning the use of funds for land exchanges and have 
included language recommended by the Senate allowing the Forest 
Service to transfer any funds available to the Forest Service 
to the wildland fire management account during wildfire 
emergencies. The conference agreement also includes the House 
language prohibiting transfers to the USDA working capital 
funds in excess of the fiscal year 2000 level without advance 
approval from the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations. The managers have included the Senate proposed 
funding level for the administrative funds of the National 
Forest Foundation and the managers have included language 
expanding the National Forest Foundation board of directors. 
The conference agreement includes the House proposed bill 
language concerning the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. 
The managers have not included the House proposed bill language 
concerning the use and reimbursement of detailees who are used 
for more than 30 days. Instead, the managers direct the 
Secretary to provide written notification to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations of any employee to be 
detailed or assigned from an agency or office funded by this 
Act to any other agency or office of the Department for more 
than 60 days if the receiving office is not going to reimburse 
the donor office for detailee time in excess of 60 days. Such 
notification should include the name of the employee to be 
detailed, the location of the detail, the estimated length of 
the detail, and a justification for the work to be performed 
during the detail.
      The managers have agreed to revise instructions proposed 
by the House regarding the management of trust funds. In place 
of items numbered two and three in the House report, the 
managers agree to the following: (1) the Forest Service is 
directed to submit a detailed display in all future budget 
justifications of the anticipated program of work for these 
funds; (2) the plan shall provide sufficient detail to explain 
and justify the program of work and expected accomplishments in 
each region; and (3) the plan shall contain a full explanation 
of how planned improvement activities contribute to an 
integrated approach to forest management in conjunction with 
activities planned to be accomplished with discretionary funds.

                          Department of Energy

                         CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGY

                               (DEFERRAL)

      The conference agreement provides for the deferral of 
$40,000,000 in previously appropriated funds for the clean coal 
technology program. These funds will become available on 
October 1, 2002, to complete the remaining projects in this 
program.

                 FOSSIL ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conference agreement provides $616,490,000 for fossil 
energy research and development instead of $579,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $604,090,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Of the amount provided, $33,700,000 is derived by 
transfer from previous clean coal technology appropriations as 
proposed by the Senate. The numerical changes described below 
are to the House recommended level.
      There is a decrease of $33,700,000 for the clean coal 
power initiative, which reflects the transfer of previously 
appropriated funds in that amount from the clean coal 
technology account. This transfer should not interfere with the 
timely completion of the remaining, unfinished clean coal 
technology projects. The funding provided for the clean coal 
power initiative in fiscal year 2002 is $150,000,000.
      In the innovations for existing plants activity, there is 
an increase of $1,000,000 for materials research as part of the 
vision 21 program. This increase originally was proposed by the 
Senate under the advanced research account. Guidance on its use 
is provided below.
      In advanced systems, increases include $3,000,000 for ITM 
oxygen research as part of the integrated gasification combined 
cycle program, $3,000,000 for vision 21 advanced combustion 
systems as part of the pressurized fluidized bed program, and 
$3,000,000 for syngas applications in the advanced turbine 
systems program. There is also a decrease of $3,000,000 in 
general program activities in the turbine program.
      In distributed generation, increases include $2,000,000 
for electro-chemical engineering in the advanced research 
program, $2,000,000 for systems development in the molten 
carbonate fuel cells program, and $6,000,000 for the solid-
state energy conversion alliance in the innovative concepts 
program.
      In transportation fuels and chemicals, there is an 
increase of $2,000,000 for the La Porte facility in Texas. The 
managers expect the Department to continue existing projects in 
the ultra clean fuels program. There is also an increase of 
$1,000,000 in the ultra clean fuels program for a clean diesel 
fuel program at the University of Alaska.
      In solid fuels and feedstocks, there is an increase of 
$3,000,000 for advanced separation technology.
      In advanced fuels research, there are increases of 
$500,000 for C-1 chemistry and $1,700,000 in advanced concepts 
for advanced products from coal, and a decrease of $1,000,000 
for advanced separation technology (which is addressed above 
under solid fuels and feedstocks).
      In advanced research, there is an increase of $2,000,000 
in the technology crosscut program for the Computational Center 
of Excellence at the National Energy Technology Laboratory.
      For natural gas technologies, there is an increase of 
$950,000 in exploration and production for coalbed methane 
water filtration research and increases in infrastructure 
programs of $1,000,000 for infrastructure technology and 
$1,000,000 for storage technology. There is also an increase of 
$2,000,000 in emerging processing technology for the coal mine 
methane program.
      For oil technology, there is an increase of $3,000,000 in 
exploration and production for arctic research by the Office of 
Arctic Energy in Alaska and a decrease of $1,000,000 for the 
Oil Prime program in advanced research. There is also a 
decrease of $1,000,000 in the reservoir life extension program 
for reservoir field demonstrations.
      In cooperative research and development, there is an 
increase of $2,240,000 for existing programs. Arctic technology 
research is addressed in the oil technology program above.
      In general plant projects, there is a decrease of 
$900,000 in general plant projects for the National Energy 
Technology Laboratory and an increase of $11,000,000 for the 
first year of a 7-year program to upgrade the infrastructure at 
the National Energy Technology Laboratory. This upgrade is 
discussed in more detail below.
      Finally, there is a decrease of $6,000,000, which 
reflects the one-time use of unobligated prior year funds that 
are available from a coal project that has been substantially 
reworked, with resultant cost savings. This amount should be 
restored to the base program in fiscal year 2003.
      The managers are very supportive of the clean coal power 
initiative and expect the Department to ensure that the program 
is based on competitively awarded government-industry 
partnerships that demonstrate technologies that can strengthen 
electricity reliability for the Nation in an environmentally 
clean manner. The managers agree that industry will be required 
to provide at least 50 percent of each project's cost and that 
all projects must use U.S. coals, which must constitute at 
least 75 percent of the fuel. Further, all co-production 
projects must provide at least half of their output in the form 
of electricity.
      The managers expect the Department to ensure that the 
solicitation for proposals is open to technologies that will: 
(1) reduce emissions of criteria pollutants (including mercury) 
from both existing and new plants, including management of 
plant byproducts; (2) improve the generation efficiencies of 
existing and new plants through such technologies as coal 
gasification; and/or (3) cost-effectively manage carbon 
emissions.
      The managers agree to the following:
      1. The $1,000,000 in the innovations for existing plants 
program for vision 21/materials is to accelerate the 
development of advanced alloys and materials for high 
efficiency, ultra-supercritical steam plants, allowing ultra-
supercritical steam conditions to be used in a variety of fuel 
flexible, highly efficient, zero emission plants.
      2. Available funding balances from contract closeouts may 
be used without reprogramming to minimize disruptions to 
ongoing research and development projects. Follow-on research 
areas consistent with plans and schedules developed in 
cooperation with industry partners, include ultra-supercritical 
materials, computational and fuels focus areas at the National 
Energy Technology Laboratory, gas-to-liquids, advanced research 
on coal-based fuels, solid-state energy conversion alliance 
(planar solid oxide fuel cells), vision 21/oxygen-based 
combustion, Wilsonville testing, power plant sensors and 
controls, carbon dioxide capture and geologic sequestration 
testing, and oil and gas offshore technology.
      3. There is no earmark in the syngas ceramic membrane 
funding for any specific program. The available funds should be 
used to continue all existing projects as equitably as 
possible.
      4. The distribution of the increase above the budget 
request for effective environmental protection programs in the 
oil technology activity should be consistent with the House 
recommendation.
      5. The funding for risk assessment programs under the oil 
technology activity assumes that the risk based data management 
system will continue to be funded at the fiscal year 2001 
level.
      6. Within the funds provided in oil technology for the 
Office of Arctic Energy $1,000,000 is to support oxygen 
transport ceramic membrane research.
      7. The Department should review the fuel flexibility for 
industrial boilers program developed by Pennsylvania State 
University and consider incorporating follow-on work in this 
area into the fiscal year 2003 budget priorities.
      8. The $2,000,000 increase above the budget request for 
distributed generation/vision 21 hybrids, included in both the 
House and Senate recommendations, is for the tubular solid 
oxide fuel cell program.
      9. The increase above the budget request for the solid-
state energy conversion alliance under distributed generation/
innovative concepts is to be added to the base funding for 
planar solid oxide fuel cell programs and is to be used to 
continue existing projects, consistent with program plans 
developed in cooperation with industry partners. The managers 
understand that base funding for this program will need to be 
increased substantially in fiscal year 2003 to keep this 
program on schedule to meet critical program goals.
      10. Of the funds provided for turbine systems, $3,000,000 
is for the industry/university consortium.
      11. The Department should develop a five-year plan 
reorienting the turbine program to support vision 21 and 
focusing on the development of a technology base to increase 
fuel flexibility (including coal) and efficiency as well as 
reliability, availability, and maintainability, with low 
emissions and low life cycle costs. The plan should be 
submitted to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
no later than January 15, 2002.
      12. In the carbon sequestration program, the Department 
should continue and expand International Utility Efficiency 
Partnerships as part of the U.S. Initiative on Joint 
Implementation.
      The conference agreement modifies bill language proposed 
by the Senate earmarking $11,000,000 for planning and design of 
an infrastructure upgrade at the National Energy Technology 
Laboratory. The modification provides land acquisition 
authority, which the managers understand will be used on a 
limited basis. This funding represents the first year of a 7-
year improvement plan for the Laboratory and the managers 
expect the Department to keep this amount in the base budget 
for each of the next 6 years.
      The conference agreement includes bill language proposed 
by the Senate deriving $33,700,000 by transfer from the clean 
coal technology program to offset new budget authority in 
fiscal year 2002. The managers note that this is a one-time 
transfer and this amount will need to be restored to the Fossil 
Energy Research and Development base budget in fiscal year 
2003.
      The conference agreement also modifies language to extend 
the proposal submission period for the Clean Coal Power 
Initiative from 90 days to 150 days and to permit the combining 
of fiscal year 2002 and fiscal year 2003 funds for contract 
awards made in fiscal year 2003.

                      alternative fuels production

                              (rescission)

      The conference agreement provides for the rescission of 
$2,000,000 in unobligated balances from the alternative fuels 
production account as proposed by the Senate instead of no 
rescission as proposed by the House.

                 naval petroleum and oil shale reserves

      The conference agreement provides $17,371,000 for the 
naval petroleum and oil shale reserves as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

                      elk hills school lands fund

      The conference agreement provides $36,000,000 to become 
available on October 1, 2002, for the Elk Hills school lands 
fund as proposed by the Senate instead of $36,000,000 to be 
derived by transfer from unobligated balances in the clean coal 
technology account as proposed by the House.

                          energy conservation

      The conference agreement provides $912,805,000 for energy 
conservation instead of $940,805,000 as proposed by the House 
and $870,805,000 as proposed by the Senate. The numerical 
changes described below are to the House recommended level.
      In building technology assistance, there are decreases of 
$19,000,000 for the weatherization assistance program and 
$17,000,000 for State energy conservation grants. There is also 
an increase of $1,000,000 for the energy star program.
      In industries of the future/crosscutting, there is an 
increase of $2,000,000 for the innovations and inventions 
program.
      In transportation programs, there is a general increase 
of $2,000,000 in technology deployment for the clean cities 
program.
      In policy and management, there is an increase of 
$3,000,000 for the regional support offices.
      The managers agree to the following:
      1. The increase in funding for the regional support 
offices is to restore base funding for these important 
entities. The Department should do a better job of using these 
offices to manage programs and projects and should not short-
fund these offices in future budget requests while protecting 
funding for headquarters offices in Washington, DC. Funding 
comparisons (prior year, current year, budget year) and 
activity descriptions for each regional support office should 
be included in the annual budget request beginning in fiscal 
year 2003. The managers encourage the Department to consider 
shifting resources from headquarters to the regional support 
offices.
      2. Consistent with the policy of fuel neutrality, no 
funds are earmarked in the Clean Cities program for increasing 
E-85 fueling capacity. The managers encourage the Department to 
give careful consideration to proposals that would help 
increase such capacity, consistent with the goals of the Clean 
Cities program.
      3. Within the funds provided, the managers understand 
that the Northwest Alliance for Transportation Technologies 
will be funded at a higher level than in fiscal year 2001.
      4. Within the transportation sector hybrid program, the 
Department should continue 3 contracts through completion of 
phase I of the advanced power electronics program and should 
down select to 2 contracts, as planned, prior to funding the 
next phase of the program.
      5. Within the increase provided above the budget request 
for lightweight materials technology in transportation 
programs, the Department should foster research aimed at 
developing lightweight composites for heavy vehicles in 
conjunction with MSE, Inc.'s High Performance Materials Group.
      6. The Department should report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations, within twelve months of the date 
of enactment of this Act, on the technical and economic 
barriers to the use of fuel cells in transportation, portable 
power, stationary, and distributed generation applications. The 
report should include recommendations on program adjustments 
based on an assessment of the technical, economic, and 
infrastructure requirements needed for the commercial use of 
fuel cells for stationary and transportation applications by 
2012. Within six months of the date of enactment of this Act, 
the Department should also provide an interim assessment that 
describes preliminary findings about the need for public and 
private cooperative programs to demonstrate the use of fuel 
cells in commercial scale applications.
      The conference agreement earmarks $275,000,000 for energy 
conservation grant programs instead of $311,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $251,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within 
the funds provided, $230,000,000 is further earmarked for 
weatherization assistance grants instead of $249,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $213,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate, and $45,000,000 is earmarked for State energy 
conservation grants instead of $62,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $38,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      No statutory language on cost sharing for weatherization 
grants is included in the conference agreement but the managers 
strongly urge the Department to pursue actively such cost 
sharing from State and local governments and other entities. 
Detailed cost-sharing information (and the amount of Federal 
funds provided) should be included for each State or eligible 
entity in the budget submission for fiscal year 2003 and in 
future submissions.
      The conference agreement includes statutory language 
requiring that one-half of the funding made available in fiscal 
year 2002 and thereafter for the energy efficiency science 
initiative be managed by the fossil energy research and 
development program. The managers expect the Department to 
issue a single solicitation for this program that covers both 
energy conservation and fossil energy programs.

                          economic regulation

      The conference agreement provides $1,996,000 for economic 
regulation as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                      strategic petroleum reserve

      The conference agreement provides $179,009,000 for the 
strategic petroleum reserve as proposed by the House instead of 
$169,009,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement modifies statutory language 
contained in both the House and Senate bills, specifying that 
``not to exceed'' $8,000,000 is for the Northeast Heating Oil 
Reserve. If the full $8,000,000 is not needed, the managers 
encourage the Department to apply any excess funds to the 
Strategic Petroleum Reserve vapor pressure project to remove 
excess heat and gas from the oil in the reserve. Funds for this 
critical project should be continued in the base for each of 
the next 3 years (at least at the $12 million level provided in 
fiscal year 2002) so that it can be completed no later than 
fiscal year 2005.

                   ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement provides $78,499,000 for the 
energy information administration as proposed by the House 
instead of $75,499,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                Department of Health and Human Services

                         Indian Health Service

                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES

      The conference agreement provides $2,389,614,000 for 
Indian health services instead of $2,390,014,000 as proposed by 
the House and $2,388,614,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
numerical changes described below are to the House recommended 
level.
      For hospital and health clinic programs there are 
decreases of $500,000 for Joslin diabetes programs and $500,000 
for technology upgrades. For Indian health professions there 
are increases of $50,000 for the InPsych program at the 
University of North Dakota, $50,000 for the InPsych program at 
the University of Montana, and $500,000 for the InMed program 
at the University of North Dakota.
      The managers agree to the following:
      1. The additional contract health services funding 
provided for fiscal year 2002 should be distributed following a 
methodology developed in consultation with the tribes. The 
managers have received expressions of concern from many 
different tribes on this issue and ask that the Service base 
the funding distribution on a methodology that considers the 
needs of all eligible tribes at the same time as addressing 
disparities in funding.
      2. The Service should continue to follow last year's 
direction on the level of need funded methodology and the 
distribution of the Indian health care improvement fund.
      The conference agreement provides the House proposed 
statutory earmarks for contract health services and contract 
support costs. As in past years, there is no specific earmark 
for any individual tribe for contract support costs.
      The managers have not agreed to statutory language 
proposed by the House dealing with certain limitations on 
contract support costs. The managers believe the disparities 
between BIA and IHS in the funding of contract support costs 
should be resolved. While there has been some discussion of 
this issue by the two agencies over the past few years, no 
resolution to these differences has resulted. The managers urge 
the Office of Management and Budget to serve as a coordinator 
for further discussion of the issue with the two agencies, with 
the goal of resolving existing discrepancies. The Office of 
Management and Budget should address this issue as part of the 
fiscal year 2003 budget request.

                        INDIAN HEALTH FACILITIES

      The conference agreement provides $369,487,000 for Indian 
health facilities instead of $369,795,000 as proposed by the 
House and $362,854,000 as proposed by the Senate. The changes 
to the House level are all in the hospital and clinic 
construction category. The managers agree to the following 
distribution of facilities construction funds (excluding 
sanitation facilities):

        Project                                     Conference agreement
Fort Defiance, AZ (hospital and staff quarters).........     $27,827,000
Pinon, AZ (clinic infrastructure).......................       2,600,000
Winnebago, NE (hospital)................................      15,000,000
Red Mesa, AZ (clinic infrastructure)....................       5,000,000
Pawnee, OK (clinic infrastructure)......................       5,000,000
Sisseton, SD (clinic infrastructure)....................       2,333,000
St. Paul and Metlakatla, AK (clinics infrastructure)....       5,500,000
Bethel, AK quarters.....................................       5,000,000
Zuni, NM quarters.......................................       2,000,000
Dental units............................................       1,000,000
Small ambulatory care facilities........................      10,000,000
Joint ventures..........................................       5,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................     $86,260,000

      The managers agree to the following:
      1. The funds provided for the Portland Area AMEX program 
should remain in the base in fiscal year 2003 for addressing 
the nationwide need for maintenance funds, and the Service 
should request an increase to the base maintenance funding in 
fiscal year 2003 to enable the Service to keep pace with the 
expanding facilities infrastructure for Federal and tribal 
facilities, including Alaska village-built clinics.
      2. Given the tremendous unmet need for new and 
replacement hospitals and clinics in Indian country, the 
managers urge that, beginning in fiscal year 2003, the 
Department and the Office of Management and Budget establish a 
recurring base budget for hospital and clinic facilities 
construction rather than building from a zero-based budget each 
year. The managers suggest that the base amount for fiscal year 
2003 should be at least $90,000,000 (the fiscal year 2002 level 
plus inflation) and projects should be identified based on the 
established priority list (including hospitals, clinics, staff 
quarters, dental units, small ambulatory care facilities, and 
joint ventures) to total the base funding level.
      3. The Service should use balances available from 
completed construction projects to fund the additional site 
work and infrastructure needs of the Pinon, AZ clinic and, to 
the extent available, to fund additional site work and 
infrastructure at the Red Mesa, AZ clinic.
      4. The Service should continue funding for a new drinking 
water system for the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes of the Fort Hall 
reservation in Idaho to the extent such project is ranked 
within the established sanitation facility priority ranking 
system.
      5. Rather than issuing a new solicitation for the small 
ambulatory grant program in fiscal year 2002, the Service 
should fund high priority, unfunded projects from the ranked 
order list generated from the fiscal year 2001 application 
process.
      6. The Service should establish a reasonably low maximum 
funding threshold for the small ambulatory grant program so 
that several projects can be funded under that program each 
fiscal year. The maximum amount should not be construed as the 
amount available for each project, and the managers expect that 
most projects will be funded well below the maximum funding 
threshold.
      7. The Service should ensure, in evaluating joint venture 
proposals, that any needed staff quarters are included in 
tribal construction proposals and that the cost of staff 
quarters construction and all related costs are funded by the 
tribe. Once constructed, staff quarters should be self-
supporting from revenues generated from rental fees. The 
Service should not be responsible for any construction or 
subsequent operating costs for staff quarters that are 
associated with a joint venture.
      The conference agreement includes statutory language that 
modifies the Senate proposed language on the Bethel, AK 
hospital staff quarters construction project. The modification 
permits the use of funds for staff quarters construction for 
sub-regional clinics in the Bethel area. The managers expect 
that this authority will be used on a limited basis only to the 
extent that such sub-regional staff quarters fit within the 
agreed upon overall cost for the Bethel staff quarters project 
and that there is no impact on the effort now underway to 
provide an adequate number of staff quarters at the Bethel 
hospital.
      The conference agreement also includes statutory language 
permitting the Service to accept donated land for the St. Paul, 
AK clinic.

                         Other Related Agencies

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $15,148,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian 
Relocation as proposed by the House and the Senate.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development

                        PAYMENT TO THE INSTITUTE

      The conference agreement provides $4,490,000 for payment 
to the institute as proposed by the House and the Senate.

                        Smithsonian Institution

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $399,253,000 for 
salaries and expenses at the Smithsonian Institution instead of 
$396,200,000 as proposed by the House and $401,192,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Changes to the House proposed funding 
levels for fiscal year 2002 are described below.
      An increase of $1,497,000 is provided for the Smithsonian 
Center for Materials Research and Education. Within this 
amount, program funding for the Center is restored to the 
fiscal year 2001 enacted level and an additional $128,000 is 
included to meet anticipated annual pay costs. The managers 
expect that no decision will be made on an earlier proposal by 
Smithsonian management to eliminate this Center, as well as the 
Conservation Research Center, until the Science Commission has 
conducted a full evaluation of all science programs at the 
Institution and reported their findings to the Committees.
      An increase of $26,000 is provided to the National Zoo 
for the hiring of a curator and preliminary operations and 
maintenance of the permanent Farm Exhibit, which is scheduled 
to open to the public in the spring of 2003.
      An increase of $200,000 is provided for the Smithsonian 
Institution Libraries. This amount was proposed for reduction 
in the fiscal year 2002 budget estimate, but has been included 
by the managers in order to maintain the library at the Museum 
Support Center that supports the Center for Materials Research 
and Education.
      An amount of $7,200,000 is provided within the 
Administration line item to continue the Institution's 
technology initiative. The Senate included $6,000,000 for this 
work. The House included $7,645,000 for this effort, but within 
the line item for Institution-wide Programs. The managers 
expect that the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
will be provided with quarterly reports that detail the 
Institution's progress with this initiative.
      An increase of $58,000 is included to maintain existing 
health clinics as proposed by the Senate.
      An increase of $1,743,000 is included for the Office of 
Protection Services. The budget estimate called for a reduction 
of the guard force in this amount. In light of recent events, 
the managers agree that it would not be appropriate to 
implement this proposal.
      A decrease of $7,645,000 has been taken to the 
Institution-wide Programs line item. This amount was proposed 
by the House to fund costs associated with the technology 
initiative. As stated above, the managers recommend an amount 
of $7,200,000, the budget estimate, for this activity and have 
provided the funds within the Administration line item, which 
includes the Office of Technology.
      A general reduction of $26,000 to the House proposed 
level has been taken to the Administration line item.
      The conference report designates an amount of $37,508,000 
to remain available until expended for the following 
activities: the instrumentation program, collections 
acquisition, exhibition reinstallation, the National Museum of 
the American Indian and the repatriation of skeletal remains 
program. The House proposal included no such designation for 
these activities. The Senate proposal provided $43,713,000 to 
remain available until expended for the activities listed 
above, as well as security funding and institution-wide 
programs.
      The conference report includes bill language proposed by 
both the House and Senate instructing the Smithsonian to adhere 
to the reprogramming procedures described in House Report 105-
163. In addition, the managers direct the Smithsonian to submit 
a quarterly report to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations that displays all redirections of Federal funds, 
both above and below the reprogramming threshold, for each 
quarter. By implementing this reporting process, the Committees 
expect to gain a better and more timely understanding of the 
Institution's spending priorities throughout the fiscal year. 
Each of the Bureaus within the Department of the Interior 
currently submits a similar report.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION AND ALTERATION OF FACILITIES

      The conference agreement provides $67,900,000 for repair, 
restoration and alteration of facilities as proposed by the 
House and the Senate.
      The managers direct the Smithsonian to assess its 
facility maintenance program as a result of the National 
Academy of Public Administration's recommendations. The 
Institution should identify the current program, describe the 
desired state, and provide an implementation plan with resource 
and organizational requirements needed to achieve the necessary 
maintenance level. The plan should be reliability based with 
preventive, predictive, proactive and reactive components 
utilizing a computer-based maintenance management system. This 
plan should be submitted to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations no later than December 15, 2001.

                              CONSTRUCTION

      The conference agreement provides $30,000,000 for 
construction of the National Museum of the American Indian as 
proposed by the House, instead of $25,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                        National Gallery of Art

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $68,967,000 for 
salaries and expenses of the National Gallery of Art as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

            REPAIR, RESTORATION AND RENOVATION OF BUILDINGS

      The conference agreement provides $14,220,000 for repair, 
restoration and renovation of buildings as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

                       OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE

      The conference agreement provides $15,000,000 for 
operations and maintenance of the Kennedy Center as proposed by 
the House and the Senate.

                              CONSTRUCTION

      The conference agreement provides $19,000,000 for 
construction as proposed by the House and the Senate.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $7,796,000 for salaries 
and expenses of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for 
Scholars as proposed by the House and the Senate. Funds should 
be distributed as follows:

Fellowship program......................................      $1,218,000
Scholar support.........................................         615,000
Public service..........................................       2,164,000
General administration..................................       1,656,000
Smithsonian fee.........................................         208,000
Conference planning.....................................       1,770,000
Space...................................................         165,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................       7,796,000

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

                    National Endowment for the Arts

                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement includes $98,234,000 for grants 
and administration of the National Endowment for the Arts as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate. The Challenge 
America Arts Fund, a separate appropriation administered by the 
NEA, is funded at $17,000,000, as indicated later in the 
statement of the managers.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement provides $108,382,000 for grants 
and administration of the National Endowment for the Humanities 
instead of $107,882,000 as proposed by the House and 
$109,882,000 as proposed by the Senate. Increases above the 
House funding level include $361,000 for Federal/State 
partnerships, $217,000 for preservation and access, $155,000 
for public programs, $145,000 for research programs, and 
$150,000 for education programs. In agreement with the budget 
estimate and the Senate proposal, the administration activity 
is funded at $18,450,000, a reduction of $528,000 from the 
House level. In addition to funds provided in this account, 
further appropriations for the NEH are included in the matching 
grants category below.

                            MATCHING GRANTS

      The conference agreement provides $16,122,000 for 
matching grants instead of $15,622,000 as proposed by the House 
and the Senate. The agreement includes an increase of $500,000 
for regional centers.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services

                       OFFICE OF MUSEUM SERVICES

                       GRANTS AND ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement provides $26,899,000 for grants 
and administration of the Office of Museum Services as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.

                      Challenge America Arts Fund

                        CHALLENGE AMERICA GRANTS

      The conference agreement includes $17,000,000 for 
Challenge America grants as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. This account is administered by the National Endowment 
for the Arts according to all previously authorized 
requirements and serves to provide additional funding for arts 
education and outreach activities in rural and underserved 
areas.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $1,224,000 for salaries 
and expenses of the Commission of Fine Arts instead of 
$1,274,000 as proposed by the House and $1,174,000 as proposed 
by the Senate. The conference agreement does not include 
$100,000 for the management of a competitive grants program as 
proposed in the budget estimate and proposed by the House. The 
$50,000 increase above the Senate proposed funding level is 
intended to meet the cost of technological improvements, such 
as equipment and the development of a web page, that will 
enable the Commission to have direct communication with the 
public. Given the significant public projects that come before 
the Commission, such as the World War II Memorial, the managers 
believe it is in the public interest to provide better access 
to the Commission's activities and decisions.

               National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs

      The conference agreement provides $7,000,000 for National 
Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $3,400,000 for salaries 
and expenses of the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation 
as proposed by the House instead of $3,310,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      The conference agreement provides $7,253,000 for salaries 
and expenses of the National Capital Planning Commission as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

                       HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL MUSEUM

      The conference agreement provides $36,028,000 for the 
Holocaust Memorial Museum as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.

                             Presidio Trust

                          PRESIDIO TRUST FUND

      The conference agreement provides $23,125,000 for the 
Presidio Trust Fund as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$22,427,000 as proposed by the House.

                     TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS

      The conference agreement includes sections 301, and the 
text of sections 314 through 317, and 320 through 322, which 
were identical in both the House and the Senate bills, although 
section numbers have been changed in some cases in the 
conference agreement.
      The conference agreement includes House sections 302 
through 307, 309, 311, 318, 324, 325, and 330. Identical 
language was proposed by the Senate in sections 303 through 
308, 310, 312, 319, 325, 326, and 332.
      Section 308 retains the text of section 309 as proposed 
by the Senate concerning a pedestrian bridge between New Jersey 
and Ellis Island. The House had similar language in section 
308, but included text carried in last year's law.
      Section 310 retains the text of section 311 as proposed 
by the Senate, which limits payments for contract support costs 
for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service. 
The text of section 310 as proposed by the House is identical 
except for the use of capitalization.
      Section 312 modifies language in section 312 as proposed 
by the House concerning an extension of the recreational fee 
demonstration program. The managers have agreed to a two year 
extension of this program through fiscal year 2004 rather than 
the four year extension recommended by the House. The managers 
have provided this extension to allow the authorizing 
committees with jurisdiction to continue their assessment of 
this program and to provide for a permanent solution to this 
issue. The managers strongly encourage the authorizing 
committees to address this matter forthwith so short-term 
extensions via the appropriations process are no longer 
germane. The managers have also modified the House language by 
deleting subsection (e), which extended the program to certain 
Forest Service special use permits. The managers recommend that 
the authorizing committees examine various options in this 
regard. The managers have retained language proposed by the 
House and contained in Senate recommended section 313 
concerning the use of receipts from this program to construct 
permanent structures when the total cost of the facility 
exceeds $500,000. The managers note that the recreational fee 
demonstration program has generated substantial revenue, which 
has made a major impact on many parks, forests, refuges and 
public land units. By the end of fiscal year 2002, the program 
will have generated $937 million for the four participating 
agencies. The managers continue to believe that a user fee 
program, which focuses the fees directly to local, on-the-
ground improvements, is an essential tool to help fund major 
Federal recreational assets. The managers expect the agencies 
implementing this program to focus on public service, to work 
closely with local communities and the recreational industry, 
and to use the receipts to enhance visitor services and reduce 
the backlog in deferred maintenance.
      Section 317 retains the text of section 318 as proposed 
by the Senate prohibiting the Forest Service from expending or 
obligating appropriations in the Act to complete and issue the 
5-year program under the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act. The House had no similar provision.
      Section 319 retains the text of section 319 as proposed 
by the House prohibiting the use of funds in the Act for GSA 
Telecommunication Centers. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Section 323 retains the text of section 323 as proposed 
by the Senate. The language as proposed by the House in section 
323 differed only in reference to fiscal years.
      Section 326 retains the text of section 326 as proposed 
by the House which gives preference to dislocated workers for 
certain restoration contracts in the Giant Sequoia National 
Monument and the Sequoia National Forest. Section 329 as 
proposed by the Senate consisted of virtually identical text, 
except for language extending the length of authorization.
      Section 327 modifies the text of section 327 as proposed 
by the House which provides that the Secretary of Agriculture 
shall not be considered to be in violation of subparagraph 
6(f)(5)(A) of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources 
Planning Act of 1974 solely because more than fifteen years 
have passed without revision of the plan, including its 
accompanying documents, for a unit of the National Forest 
System. It is the managers' intent that the passage of more 
than 15 years without revision of a plan for a unit of the 
National Forest System shall not, in and of itself, cause a 
violation of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (43 
U.S.C. 4332). Instead, the standards at 40 C.F.R. 1502.9(c) and 
project-level NEPA requirements shall govern when a 
supplemental or additional environmental impact statement is 
required. It is the responsibility of the court to determine 
whether the good faith requirement of this section has been met 
and, if not, to order an accelerated schedule for plan 
revision. The managers understand that all plans for units of 
the National Forest System that will be revised during fiscal 
year 2002 will be revised pursuant to current rules (36 C.F.R. 
Part 219 and Part 217). Given the intense interest in the 
Administration's ongoing revision of forest planning rules, the 
managers intend that this section will be in effect for only 
one year. It is the managers' understanding that the 
authorizing Committees must consider legislation regarding this 
issue in the near future. The managers direct the Forest 
Service to provide a detailed report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by January 31, 2002, describing 
the status and activities regarding each National forest unit 
land management plan. The report shall also include a plan and 
schedule, along with funding needs, to complete the forest plan 
revision process. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Section 328 retains the text of section 328 as proposed 
by the House, which clarifies the requirement for mutually 
significant benefits when the Forest Service conducts 
cooperative agreements. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Section 329 includes a minor technical modification of 
section 329 as proposed by the House concerning the conveyance 
of excess properties by the Forest Service. The Senate had no 
similar provision.
      Section 330 retains the text of section 331 as proposed 
by the House which amends section 323 of the fiscal year 1999 
Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act by extending 
for four years the cooperative agreements authority, thereby 
allowing the Forest Service to enter into cooperative 
agreements with willing Federal, tribal, State, and local 
governments, private and non-profit entities and landowners to 
implement watershed restoration agreements both on and near 
National forest system lands. Section 331 as proposed by the 
Senate was composed of similar language, but differed in length 
of authorization.
      Section 331 retains the text of section 333 as proposed 
by the House that prohibits oil, natural gas and mining related 
activities within current National Monument boundaries. The 
Senate proposed similar language in section 128 under General 
Provisions, Department of the Interior.
      Section 332 modifies the text of section 327 as proposed 
by the Senate expanding the number of stewardship end result 
contracts available to the Forest Service. The modified 
language extends the duration of the contracts by two years. 
The House had no similar provision.
      Section 333 retains the text of section 328 as proposed 
by the Senate requiring that regulations and policies issued by 
the Departments of the Interior or Agriculture regarding cost 
recovery for processing authorizations adhere and incorporate a 
specific principle arising from Office of Management and Budget 
Circular, A-25. The House had no similar provision.
      Section 334 modifies section 330 as proposed by the 
Senate regarding a cabin within the boundary of the Custer 
National Forest. After considering the special and unique 
circumstances surrounding the use of this facility, the 
managers agree to a provision that requires issuance of a 
special use permit to Montana State University--Billings for 
use of this cabin for a 20-year term, with a proviso for a 
review of the cabin's use after 10 years. The managers expect 
the agency to administer the permit in a manner that allows the 
University to utilize the cabin's location for suitable 
educational programs while recognizing the ecological and 
cultural values associated with the cabin's location and 
historical significance. The permit shall restrict use of the 
cabin to educational and scientific activities overseen by the 
University and necessary maintenance related to these 
activities consistent with the cabin's location. The managers 
expect the Forest Service to oversee the special use permit 
under current standards to ensure the cabin's use is consistent 
with this provision. The managers note that the issuance of 
this special use permit to bolster educational programs, while 
providing an opportunity to further enhance resource management 
in the area, shall not be deemed to set precedent for other 
structures within the national forest system.
      Section 336 retains the text of section 334 as proposed 
by the Senate, which modifies the Steel Loan Guarantee program. 
The House had no similar provision.
      The conference agreement does not include language as 
proposed by the Senate in section 302 concerning the leasing of 
oil and natural gas on public lands within the Shawnee National 
Forest, Illinois, or in section 324 prohibiting the use of 
funds for the Kyoto Protocol, or in section 333 which exempted 
residents within the boundaries of the White Mountain National 
Forest from the recreation fee program. The House had no 
similar provisions.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the House in section 313 making a provision 
permanent that exempts properties administered by the Presidio 
Trust from certain taxes and assessments, since this provision 
was made permanent in the fiscal year 2001 Interior 
Appropriations Act, or in section 332 that prohibits funding 
for anyone convicted of violating the ``Buy American Act,'' or 
in section 334 that would have prohibited the use of funds to 
execute a final lease agreement for oil and gas development in 
the area of the Gulf of Mexico known as Lease Sale 181, or in 
section 335 dealing with a limitation of funds for revising 
hardrock mining regulation. The Senate had no similar 
provisions.


                   CONFERENCE TOTAL--WITH COMPARISONS

      The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
fiscal year 2002 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
with comparisons to the fiscal year 2001 amount, the 2002 
budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 2002 
follow:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2001...     $18,892,320
Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal 
    year 2002...........................................      18,072,635
House bill, fiscal year 2002............................      18,863,855
Senate bill, fiscal year 2002...........................      18,644,035
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2002..................      19,078,220
Conference agreement compared with:
    New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 
      2001..............................................        +185,900
    Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, 
      fiscal year 2002..................................      +1,005,585
    House bill, fiscal year 2002........................        +214,365
    Senate bill, fiscal year 2002.......................        +414,185

                                   Joe Skeen,
                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   Jim Kolbe,
                                   Charles H. Taylor,
                                   George R. Nethercutt, Jr.,
                                   Zach Wamp,
                                   Jack Kingston,
                                   John E. Peterson,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Norman D. Dicks,
                                   John P. Murtha,
                                   James P. Moran,
                                   Maurice Hinchey,
                                   Martin Olav Sabo,
                                   David Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Robert Byrd,
                                   Patrick Leahy,
                                   Ernest F. Hollings,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Byron L. Dorgan,
                                   Dianne Feinstein,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Daniel K. Inouye,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Thad Cochran,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Robert F. Bennett,
                                   Judd Gregg,
                                   Ben Nighthorse Campbell,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.