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                                                       Calendar No. 891
106th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     106-446

======================================================================



 
  ROSIE THE RIVETER/WORLD WAR II HOME FRONT NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK 
                       ESTABLISHMENT ACT OF 2000

                                _______
                                

               September 29, 2000.--Ordered to be printed

   Filed under authority of the order of the Senate of September 28 
                 (legislative day, September 22), 2000

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Murkowski, from the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 4063]

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, to which was 
referred the Act (H.R. 4063) to establish the Rosie the 
Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical Park in the 
State of California, and for other purposes, having considered 
the same, reports favorably thereon with amendments and 
recommends that the Act, as amended, do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    1. On page 5, beginning on line 6, revise subsection (d)(1) 
to read as follows:

          ``(d)(1) The Secretary shall require a match of not 
        less than 50% for the expenditure of any federal funds 
        for the purpose of the cooperative agreements under 
        subsection (b)(2). The non-federal match may be in 
        funds or, with the approval of the Secretary, in goods, 
        services, or in-kind contributions.''.

    2. On page 6, line 15, strike ``interests in'' and insert 
``interests within the boundaries of the park in''.

                         purpose of the measure

    The purpose of H.R. 4063 is to establish Rosie the Riveter-
World War II Home Front National Historical Park in the State 
of California.

                          background and need

    The story of World War II Home Front efforts is a 
significant chapter in America's history. The story of the 
cooperation of government, private industry, and the unions to 
mobilize the work force, and the creation of innovative plants 
and production methods designed to rapidly supply the war 
effort is an important story in the history of the United 
States, as are the themes of life on the Home Front and the 
aftermath of the war.
    Richmond, California was ideally situated as a site for the 
Home Front industrial buildup with a West Coast rail terminus 
on San Francisco Bay and the Golden Gate opening to the Pacific 
Ocean. Beginning in early 1941, four shipyards were built in 
rapid succession by the firm of industrialist Henry J. Kaiser. 
These four shipyards employed 90,000 people and built 747 ships 
in record time for use by the U.S. Navy and Merchant Marine. 
The payroll of these shipyards included tens of thousands of 
women of all ages and backgrounds, whose labor marked an 
unprecedented entry into jobs never before performed by women 
and played a critical role in increasing American war 
productivity.
    The phrase ``Rosie the Riveter'' was a propaganda term that 
was coined to help recruit female civilian workers and came to 
symbolize a workforce that was mobilized to meet the Nation's 
wartime needs. After some initial resistance from employers, 
women replaced men in many traditionally male jobs to support 
World War II Home Front production efforts as men enlisted in 
active military service. Nationwide, six million women entered 
the World War II Home Front workforce. Employment opportunities 
for black women and other women of color were unprecedented, 
with African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans 
employed for the first time to work side by side with whites in 
specialized, high-paying jobs previously unavailable to them. 
Rosie the Riveter has survived as the most remembered icon of 
the civilian workforce that helped win World War II and has a 
powerful resonance in the women's movement.
    Section 505 of Public Law 105-355 directed the Secretary of 
the Interior to conduct a study to determine the feasibility of 
designating Rosie the Riveter Park in the city of Richmond, 
California as an affiliated site of the National Park Service 
(NPS). In June, 2000 the NPS completed the study and determined 
that the site is nationally significant and offers an 
exceptional opportunity to interpret the World War II Home 
Front experience. The study concluded that the resources at the 
site are suitable and feasible to support their designation as 
a unit of the National Park System, provided that the city of 
Richmond continues its commitment to protection and management 
of key sites within and adjacent to the proposed park boundary, 
and only if the role for the National Park Service is carefully 
defined to include interpretive services and technical 
assistance regarding preservation of the historic sites.
    H.R. 4063 provides for the establishment of Rosie the 
Riveter-World War II Home Front National Historical Park in 
Richmond, California. The site would consist of a number of 
historic structures, including Shipyard #3, the Ford Assembly 
Building, the Atchison Village worker housing, structures used 
for day care, the Kaiser Permanente Field Hospital, a fire 
station, and other important period structures. The majority of 
these structures are easily accessed and in public ownership.
    H.R. 4063 authorizes the NPS to enter into cooperative 
agreements which would provide for the acquisition and curation 
of historic artifacts and materials related to the park, and 
which would provide for the interpretation of the story of the 
World War II Home Front and the preservation of the properties 
associated with the story. The measure authorizes the Secretary 
to acquire several specific properties within the boundaries of 
the park, including a leasehold interest in the Ford Assembly 
Building for the purpose of operating a World War II Home Front 
Education Center.

                          legislative history

    H.R. 4063 was passed by the House of Representatives by 
voice vote on July 12, 2000. A similar bill, S. 2294, was 
introduced by Senators Feinstein and Boxer on March 27, 2000. 
The Subcommittee on National Parks, Historic Preservation and 
Recreation held a hearing on S. 2294 on July 13, 2000. At the 
business meeting on September 20, 2000, the Committee on Energy 
and Natural Resources ordered H.R. 4063, as amended, favorably 
reported.

                        committee recommendation

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, in open 
business session on September 20, 2000, by a unanimous voice 
vote of a quorum present, recommends that the Senate pass H.R. 
4063, if amended as described herein.

                          committee amendments

    During the consideration of H.R. 4063, the Committee 
adopted an amendment to make technical and clarifying changes.

                      section-by-section analysis

    Section 1 designates the short title of the bill as the 
``Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home Front National Historical 
Park Establishment Act of 2000.''
    Section 2 establishes Rosie the River/World War II Home 
Front National Historical Park (park), and defines the 
boundaries of the park as those depicted on the specified map.
    Section 3(a) requires the Secretary of the Interior 
(Secretary) to administer the park as a unit of the National 
Park System. The Secretary is authorized to interpret the story 
of Rosie the Riveter and the World War II Home Front theme, 
conduct and maintain oral histories that relate to the theme, 
and provide technical assistance in the preservation of 
historic properties that support this story.
    Subsection (b) authorizes the Secretary to enter into 
cooperative agreements with the owners of several specified 
properties, pursuant to which the Secretary may mark, 
interpret, improve, restore, and provide technical assistance 
with respect to preservation and interpretation of the 
properties. In addition, the Secretary is authorized to enter 
into cooperative agreements that are limited to interpretation 
and technical assistance for several other specified 
properties.
    Subsection (c) authorizes the Secretary to establish an 
education center in the Ford Assembly Building.
    Subsection (d) requires that any Federal funds expended 
pursuant to a cooperative agreement be matched by an equal 
amount of funds from non-Federal sources. With the approval of 
the Secretary, the match may be provided in the form of goods, 
services, or in-kind contributions.
    Subsection (e) authorizes the Secretary to acquire a 
leasehold interest in the Ford Assembly Building for the 
purpose of operating a World War II Home Front Education 
Center. The Secretary is also authorized to acquire several 
other properties within the boundaries of the park, and may 
acquire and provide for the curation of historic artifacts that 
relate to the park.
    Subsection (f) authorizes the Secretary to accept donations 
of funds, property, and services.
    Subsection (g) requires the Secretary to prepare, in 
consultation with the city of Richmond, California, a general 
management plan for the park. The plan must be completed within 
three years of the date that funds are made available. The 
general management plan must include a plan to preserve the 
historic setting of the Rosie the Riveter/World War II Home 
Front National Historical Park, and must be jointly developed 
and approved by the city of Richmond. The general management 
plan must also determine whether there are additional sites in 
Richmond that should be added to the park, or if there are 
sites elsewhere in the United States that should be linked to 
and interpreted at the park.
    Section 4 requires the Secretary to conduct a theme study 
of the World War II home front to determine whether other sites 
in the United States meet the criteria for potential inclusion 
in the National Park System.
    Section 5 authorizes the appropriation of such sums as may 
be necessary to conduct oral histories and to carry out the 
preservation, interpretation, education, and other visitor 
services provided for by this legislation, and for the 
acquisition of the properties listed in section 3(e)(2). In 
addition, the appropriation of $1,000,000 is authorized for the 
acquisition and curation of artifacts related to the park. None 
of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this section may 
be used for the operation, maintenance, or preservation of the 
vessel S.S. Red Oak Victory.

                   cost and budgetary considerations

    The Congressional Budget Office cost estimate report had 
not been received at the time the report was filed. When the 
report becomes available, the Chairman will request that it be 
printed in the Congressional Record for the advice of the 
Senate.

                      regulatory impact evaluation

    In compliance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee makes the following 
evaluation of the regulatory impact which would be incurred in 
carrying out H.R. 4063. The bill is not a regulatory measure in 
the sense of imposing Government-established standards or 
significant economic responsibilities on private individuals 
and businesses.
    No personal information would be collected in administering 
the program. Therefore, there would be no impact on personal 
privacy.
    Little, if any, additional paperwork would result from the 
enactment of H.R. 4063, as ordered reported.

                        executive communications

    On July 17, 2000, the Committee on Energy and Natural 
Resources requested legislative reports from the Department of 
the Interior and the Office of Management and Budget setting 
forth Executive agency recommendations on S. 2294, a bill 
similar to H.R. 4063. These reports had not been received at 
the time the report on H.R. 4063 was filed. When the reports 
become available, the Chairman will request that they be 
printed in the Congressional Record for the advice of the 
Senate. The testimony provided by the National Park Service at 
the Subcommittee hearing follows:

 Statement of Denis P. Galvin, Deputy Director, National Park Service, 
                       Department of the Interior

    Thank you for the opportunity to present the position of 
the Department of the Interior on S. 2294, a bill to establish 
the Rosie the Riverter-World War II Home Front National 
Historical Park in California.
    The Department of the Interior supports this bill with the 
amendments discussed in this testimony. A recently completed 
study found that the area in Richmond, California, covered by 
this bill is worthy of inclusion into the National Park System. 
This study was authorized under Public Law 105-355. The study 
looked closely at the social and community context of Rosie the 
Riveter and the World War II home front issues and 
achievements, as well as the historic fabric of the Richmond, 
California, shipyards. The study has found that the collection 
of historic structures and sites meets the NPS standards for 
national significance and are suitable and feasible to be 
designated a unit of the National Park System.
    During the war years photos and posters displaying the 
likeness of Rosie the Riveter were everywhere. Many showed a 
woman hard at work riveting nuts and bolts to machinery needed 
for the war effort. Yet, although Rosie was based on real 
people, she existed primarily as a symbol invented by industry, 
and embraced by the public, for the idea that everyone had an 
important role in the war effort.
    Over 100,000 men and women, many of whom sharing the 
patriotism and work ethic of the fictional Rosie the Riveter, 
worked at the site that would be protected by S. 2294, helping 
to build the arsenal of democracy that defeated the axis powers 
in World War II. They served as the engine for the nation's 
largest shipbuilding program, which produced 747 Liberty and 
Victory ships. They also manufactured over 60,000 tanks at the 
site's Ford Assembly Building. The infrastructure that 
supported these operations--one of the country's largest public 
housing programs, and one of the first 24-hour day care 
programs in the U.S. became models for similar development 
throughout the country. Kaiser Permanente, the world's largest 
health care provider today, was created to serve the shipyard 
workers in Richmond. Indeed, the Kaiser Permanente Field 
Hospital, and the First Aid Station at Shipyard #3, remain 
intact today. Many innovative industrial processes and employee 
services were initiated in Richmond during the war years 
through public-private partnerships.
    The World War II home front engaged Americans in a manner 
that has been unequaled since. The changes to society and 
industry had sweeping and lasting impacts on the nation. The 
change wrought by the home front in rapid industrialization and 
migration and resettlement were most significant for Pacific 
coast states, especially in California. The unprecedented 
integration of the industrial workforce included women first 
and subsequently African Americans, Hispanics and Asians, thus 
adding momentum to the later women's and civil rights 
movements.
    The World War II home front is not yet adequately 
represented and interpreted in the National Park System. 
Richmond represents a significant place to tell this story and 
also offers an opportunity to link together World War II home 
front sites across the country including places such as Willow 
Run in Michigan, Boeing Field in Seattle, and Bell Aircraft in 
Marietta, Georgia.
    Richmond's home front experience is nationally recognized 
and is well-documented. Nationally recognized World War II home 
front historians and academicians have submitted letters to us 
supporting the designation of a World War II Home Front 
National Historical Park in Richmond. In addition, the City of 
Richmond fully supports national designation and unanimously 
passed a resolution in support of S. 2294.
    Richmond has a critical mass of intact historic structures, 
including Shipyard #3, the Ford Assembly Building, the 
Atchinson Village worker housing, structures used for day care, 
the Kaiser Permanente Field Hospital, a fire station, and other 
important period structures. Also intact are the S.S. Red Oak 
Victory, a victory ship built at shipyard #1, and ``Whirley 
Cranes'', which were used to move material between various 
points on the shipyard. The majority of these structures are 
easily accessed and in public ownership.
    S. 2294 would authorize the establishment of the Rosie the 
Riveter-World War II Home Front National Historical Park as a 
unit of the National Park System. The bill would authorize the 
National Park Service to enter into cooperative agreements, 
which would provide for the acquisition and duration of 
historic artifacts and materials related to the park, and which 
would provide for the interpretation of the story of the World 
War II home front and the preservation of properties associated 
with the story. S. 2294 also would authorize the Secretary to 
acquire a leasehold interest in the Ford Assembly Building that 
would be used as a World War II Home Front education center. 
Funds for these activities in the new unit would be subject to 
the availability of appropriations and NPS priorities.
    As presently drafted, S. 2294 is a good start to 
accomplishing the important objectives of protecting the 
resources on this site, and allowing the historically important 
home front story to be told. We do believe, however, that some 
amendments to the bill are needed to more effectively preserve 
the resources in the park and to better tell this important 
story. To this end, we would like placed in the bill language 
that would require structures to be maintained to a level that 
would suit their National Park status, and language that would 
include within the park's boundary significant historic 
structures that are in close proximity to the shipyard and are 
important to the story of the World War II home front. We would 
also recommend language that would clarify the relationship 
that would exist between the National Park Service and its 
partners. Language that accomplishes these goals was added to 
H.R. 4063, a similar House bill, and approved by the House 
Resources Committee on June 20, 2000. We support these 
amendments and request that S. 2294 be amended to conform to 
the marked up version of H.R. 4063.
    The preservation of this site merits a sense of urgency for 
two reasons. First, the survivors who worked on the home front 
are in their seventies and eighties. Our nation benefited from 
their service in the war years and will be enriched by their 
experiences and recollections in oral histories. Their 
contribution and sacrifice should be recognized in their 
lifetimes. Second, the strong Bay Area economy is accelerating 
pressures to redevelop this site, placing at risk the surviving 
structures and artifacts.
    We look forward to working with the committee to refine the 
language of the bill so that the committee can expeditiously 
move it forward. This concludes my testimony. I would be happy 
to answer any of your questions.

                        changes in existing law

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee notes that no 
changes in existing law are made by the Act H.R. 4063, as 
ordered reported.