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106th Congress                                                   Report
 2d Session                      SENATE                         106-384

_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       Calendar No. 760


 
                EARTH, WIND, AND FIRE AUTHORIZATION ACT

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 of the

           COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION

                                   on

                                S. 1639




                August 25, 2000.--Ordered to be printed
   Filed under authority of the order of the Senate of July 26, 2000

       SENATE COMMITTEE ON COMMERCE, SCIENCE, AND TRANSPORTATION
                       one hundred sixth congress
                             second session

                     JOHN McCAIN, Arizona, Chairman
TED STEVENS, Alaska                  ERNEST F. HOLLINGS, South Carolina
CONRAD BURNS, Montana                DANIEL K. INOUYE, Hawaii
SLADE GORTON, Washington             JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER IV, West 
TRENT LOTT, Mississippi                  Virginia
KAY BAILEY HUTCHISON, Texas          JOHN F. KERRY, Massachusetts
OLYMPIA SNOWE, Maine                 JOHN B. BREAUX, Louisiana
JOHN ASHCROFT, Missouri              RICHARD H. BRYAN, Nevada
BILL FRIST, Tennessee                BYRON L. DORGAN, North Dakota
SPENCER ABRAHAM, Michigan            RON WYDEN, Oregon
SAM BROWNBACK, Kansas                MAX CLELAND, Georgia
                       Mark Buse, Staff Director
                   Ann H. Choiniere, General Counsel
               Kevin D. Kayes, Democratic Staff Director
                  Moses Boyd, Democratic Chief Counsel
                Gregg Elias, Democratic General Counsel
                                                       Calendar No. 760
106th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     106-384

======================================================================




                EARTH, WIND, AND FIRE AUTHORIZATION ACT

                                _______
                                

                August 25, 2000.--Ordered to be printed

   Filed under authority of the order of the Senate of July 26, 2000

                                _______
                                

       Mr. McCain, from the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
                Transportation, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1639]

    The Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, to 
which was referred the bill (S. 1639) the Earth, Wind, and Fire 
Authorization Act, ``A bill to authorize appropriations for 
carrying out the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, 
the National Weather Service and Related Agencies, and the 
United States Fire Administration for fiscal years 2001, 2002, 
and 2003'', having considered the same, reports favorably 
thereon with an amendment in the nature of a substitute, and 
recommends that the bill do pass.

                          Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of the bill, as reported, is to authorize 
appropriations for carrying out the National Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Program (NEHRP), the National Weather Service (NWS) 
and Related Agencies, and the United States Fire Administration 
(USFA) for fiscal years 2001, 2002, and 2003.

                          Background and Needs

    Earthquake.--Established by the Earthquake Hazards 
Reduction Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-124), NEHRP is an inter-
agency program designed to help minimize the loss of life and 
property caused by earthquakes. The Act reflected a general 
optimism about the potential for developing accurate short-term 
forecasts of the location, magnitude, and timing of 
earthquakes. In 1980, Congress reauthorized the Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Act, Public Law 96-472, defining FEMA as lead 
agency and authorizing funding for FEMA and the National Bureau 
of Standards, now National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST).
    NEHRP includes funding for the four principal agencies and 
provides coordination of the earthquake-related activities that 
12 other contributing agencies perform as part of their 
missions. The principal agencies are FEMA, NIST, the United 
States Geological Survey (USGS), and the National Science 
Foundation (NSF).
    As lead agency of NEHRP, FEMA coordinates Federal 
earthquake hazard reduction efforts. FEMA is primarily 
responsible for translating the research programs of the other 
agencies into effective earthquake hazard reduction measures 
for implementation at the state and local levels. That 
responsibility includes developing and disseminating improved 
seismic design and construction techniques and standards for 
application by Federal, state, and local entities, and for 
voluntary use by model code groups and design professionals. It 
also includes coordinating the Federal response to catastrophic 
earthquakes, providing financial and technical assistance to 
state and local governments to implement comprehensive 
earthquake hazard reduction programs, and developing public 
awareness and education programs. FEMA prepares a coordinated 
budget document for the NEHRP and, through the inter-agency 
NEHRP group, plans and participates in the development of 
earthquake research agendas and new mitigation techniques to 
help ensure that unnecessary duplication among agency programs 
does not occur.
    USGS conducts basic research on earthquakes and provides 
assessments of earthquake hazards. The agency studies the 
geology and seismicity of an area to identify and assess the 
seismic hazards using instruments, paleoseismological 
techniques, and historical records to predict the likelihood 
and size of potential earthquakes. The information generated 
provides local communities and other bodies a basis for 
prioritizing hazard reduction activities. Further, USGS 
monitors strong ground motion during earthquakes, which, 
coupled with surface geology, is used to improve buildings 
design. USGS also conducts research to understand how 
earthquakes occur and to identify precursors that would make it 
possible to predict earthquakes.
    NSF supports fundamental earthquake research through large-
scale, small-group, and individual research activities, and by 
funding centers, facilities, and instrumentation. Research 
funded by NSF includes engineering research, basis earth 
science research, and earthquake-related social science 
research. The earthquake engineering research includes studying 
how buildings respond to earthquakes, how to design and 
construct buildings to better resist earthquakes, and how to 
transfer that knowledge to the engineers and architects who 
design buildings and develop building codes. In 1986, NSF 
established a National Earthquake Engineering Research Center 
at the State University of New York Buffalo to be a focal point 
for earthquake engineering research.
    NIST is mandated by Congress to conduct research and 
development in earthquake engineering, aiming to improve 
building codes and standards as well as advance practices for 
structures and lifelines including water lines, natural gas 
pipelines, and electrical lines. This work focuses on the 
development of design guidelines and test requirements through 
problem-focused research and development (R&D;) to introduce the 
use of new and innovative mitigation measures to the design and 
construction professions. NIST investigators use damaging 
earthquakes as laboratories in post-earthquake studies. By 
examining the response of the environment, investigators seek 
to improve the design practices used for structures and 
lifeline systems.
    Weather and Atmospheric Science.--In 1970, the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) was created at 
the Department of Commerce by combining the existing Bureau of 
Commercial Fisheries, U.S. Weather Bureau, Coast and Geodetic 
Society, Environmental Data Service, National Satellite Center, 
and Research Libraries. NOAA conducts research and gathers data 
about the global oceans, atmosphere, space, and sun and applies 
this knowledge to science and services that touch the lives of 
all Americans.
    The budget for NOAA is divided into two primary accounts, 
Operations, Research and Facilities (ORF), which consists of 
approximately 70 percent of NOAA's budget, and Procurement, 
Acquisition and Construction (PAC), comprising 25 percent. A 
newly-created account established in fiscal year (FY) 2000 
under the authority of the Endangered Species Act to fund 
salmon conservation measures represents 4 percent; several 
smaller accounts make up the remaining 1 percent.
    The ORF account consists of eight activities. They 
include--
          (1) National Ocean Service;
          (2) National Marine Fisheries Service;
          (3) Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR);
          (4) NWS;
          (5) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and 
        Information Service (NESDIS);
          (6) Program Support;
          (7) Facilities; and
          (8) Fleet Maintenance and Planning.
    The Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space has 
joint jurisdiction over OAR, and complete oversight for NWS and 
NESDIS. The remaining activities fall under the jurisdiction of 
the Subcommittee on Oceans and Fisheries of the Senate 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.
    OAR provides the research and technology development 
necessary to improve NOAA weather services, solar terrestrial 
forecasts, and marine services. OAR conducts the scientific 
analyses used in developing national policy decisions in areas 
such as climate change, air quality, and stratospheric ozone 
depletion. OAR research promotes economic growth through 
efforts in marine biotechnology and development of 
environmental observation. The President's budget request for 
OAR is $202 million for FY 2001, $213.1 million for FY 2002, 
and $224.8 million for FY 2003.
    NWS provides weather and flood warnings and forecasts to 
the general public. Weather satellites and staffed and 
automated stations on land and at sea gather meteorological 
observations of the atmosphere and the Earth's service. Based 
upon these observations, professional meteorologists prepare 
warnings and forecasts and disseminate them to the public. The 
President's budget request for NWS is $634.9 million for FY 
2001, $669.8 million for FY 2002, and $706.6 million for FY 
2003.
    NESDIS provides for the operation of the polar-orbiting and 
geo-stationary operational environmental satellites, 
development of the converged polar-orbiting satellite series 
with the Department of Defense and the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration and management of NOAA's environmental 
data collections. The polar and geostationary satellites 
provide meteorological data to NWS for use in developing 
warnings and forecasts. Environmental data and information are 
collected from NOAA and other sources disseminated, and 
archived for future use. The President's budget request for 
NESDIS is $108.2 for FY 2001, $114.2 for FY 2002, and $120.43 
for FY 2003.
    The PAC account, established in FY 1998 as an annual 
appropriation, includes costs associated with acquisition of 
NOAA's major capital assets. The Administration's FY 2001 
request of $635.2 million for PAC expands the scope of an 
annual appropriation for incrementally funded capital projects 
to include advanced appropriations for entire projects or 
divisible segments of larger ones. Requesting advanced 
appropriations for capital assets responds to the requirements 
of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act of 1994 and the 
Information Technology Management Reform Act of 1996 for multi-
year PAC projects or divisible segments will improve the 
decision-making process by allowing managers to understand the 
full cost of project implementation when making funding 
decisions.
    The Administration has proposed three initiatives in FY 
2001 that are of interest to the Subcommittee on Science, 
Technology, and Space; the National Disaster Reduction 
Initiative (NDRI), Climate in the 21st Century, and the 
Minority Serving Institutions initiative. In FY 2001, the 
Administration requested in increase of $110 million for NDRI 
to implement the second phase of the Department of Commerce's 
strategy to reduce and mitigate the impacts of extreme natural 
events. This strategy calls for an end-to-end approach to 
natural disaster mitigation, including research to improve 
prediction and understanding of extreme events, advances in 
developing response and recovery plans, assessments of 
vulnerabilities of communities and infrastructure, and 
dissemination of information, technology and training to reduce 
vulnerability before and after natural disasters. NOAA is 
requesting $28 million in FY 2001 for the second initiative, 
Climate in the 21st Century. This effort is designed to meet 
the needs of emergency managers, the private sector, the 
research community, decision-makers in the United States and 
international government agencies to provide timely data and 
information about climate variability, climate change and 
trends in extreme weather events. Finally, NOAA's FY 2001 
budget includes $17 million to continue educational training 
relationships through a joint partnership with a consortium of 
Minority Serving Institutions.
    Fire.--USFA is a directorate with FEMA. Its mission is to 
provide leadership, coordination, and support for the nation's 
fire prevention and control, fire training and education, and 
emergency medical services activities. USFA's programs promote 
the ultimate goal of a significant reduction of the nation's 
loss of life and property from fire. Although fire loss has 
decreased substantially over the past 25 years, the fire 
problem in the United States remains serious. The United States 
still has one of the highest fire death rates in the 
industrialized world, with 14.9 deaths per million people in 
1998. Between 1993 and 1996, an average of more than 4,400 
Americans lost, their, lives and another 26,000 were injured 
annually as the result of fire. In addition, approximately 100 
firefighters are killed each year in duty-related incidents. 
The nation's fire loss also includes direct property loss 
estimated at $8.5 billion annually.
    During the early 1980s, the Reagan Administration proposed 
the elimination of the USFA while preserving the Fire Academy. 
Although Congress did not allow the termination of the USFA, 
the agency suffered severe staff reductions and the Fire 
Academy was separated from the USFA and housed with other FEMA 
emergency training programs. In 1991, the Fire Academy 
subsequently was reorganized and put back into the USFA, where 
it remains today. USFA programs are divided into four basic 
area: data collection, public education and awareness, 
training, and technology.
    For FY 2001, the Administration is requesting $69.8 million 
for USFA, a 60 percent, or $27 million increase over FY 2000 
levels. $25 million of this increase will be used to support a 
new grants program to needy and distressed communities for life 
safety equipment for firefighters.

                          Legislative History

    The Earth, Wind, and Fire Act of 1999 was introduced on 
September 24, 1999, by Senators Frist, Breaux, McCain, 
Hollings, and Rockefeller.
    On June 29, 1999, Senator Frist held a Science, Technology, 
and Space Subcommittee hearing on public safety science and 
technology. The Administrator of NOAA, the Director of the U.S. 
Fire Administration, and participating agency leaders of NEHRP 
testified regarding their agencies' contributions to public 
safety research and development.
    On April 13, 2000, the Commerce Committee in open session 
considered S. 1639 as introduced by Senator Frist, and without 
objection, ordered S. 1639, with an amendment in the nature of 
a substitute, to be reported.

                            Estimated Costs

    In accordance with paragraph 11(a) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate and section 403 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Committee provides the 
following cost estimate, prepared by the Congressional Budget 
Office:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                      Washington, DC, May 11, 2000.
Hon. John McCain,
Chairman, Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, U.S. 
        Senate, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for S. 1639, the Earth, 
Wind, and Fire Authorization Act of 2000.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Megan 
Carroll.
            Sincerely,
                                          Barry B. Anderson
                                    (For Dan L. Crippen, Director).
    Enclosure.

               congressional budget office cost estimate

S. 1639--Earth, Wind, and Fire Authorization Act of 2000

    Summary: S. 1639 would authorize appropriations for several 
research programs primarily related to natural hazards, 
weather, and the atmosphere. CBO estimates that implementing S. 
1639 would cost about $5.5 billion over the next five years, 
assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts. The bill 
would not affect direct spending or receipts; therefore, pay-
as-you-go procedures would not apply. S. 1639 contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would impose no costs 
on state, local, or tribal governments.
    Title I of S. 1639 would authorize appropriations totaling 
$318 million over the 2001-2003 period for the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), 
the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology to carry out provisions 
of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977. Title I also 
would authorize the appropriation of $187 million over the 
2001-2005 period for the USGS to implement a new system of 
seismic research and monitoring, and $74 million over the 2001-
2004 period for the NSF to establish a network for engineering 
simulations of earthquakes.
    Title II would authorize appropriations for three branches 
of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration--the 
National Weather Service, the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Research, and the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and 
Information Service. For these programs, the bill would 
authorize the appropriations of about $1.5 billion for fiscal 
year 2001, $1.6 billion for 2002, and $1.7 billion for 2003.
    Title III would authorize appropriations totaling $163 
million over the 2001-2003 period for the programs, salaries, 
and expenses of the U.S. Fire Administration.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: For the purposes 
of this estimate, CBO assumes that S. 1639 will be enacted by 
the end of fiscal year 2000 and that the authorized amounts 
will be provided each year. Estimates of outlays are based on 
historical spending patterns for these and similar programs. 
The estimated budgetary impact of S. 1639 is shown in the 
following table. The costs of this legislation fall within 
budget functions 250 (general science, space, and technology), 
300 natural resources and environment), 370 (commerce and 
housing credit), and 450 (community and regional development).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                                                              2000     2001     2002     2003     2004     2005
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending Under Current Law for Research Programs
 Authorized by S. 1639:
    Budget Authority \1\..................................    1,559        0        0        0        0        0
    Estimated Outlays.....................................    1,553      624      408       88        4        0
Proposed Changes:
    Authorization Level...................................        0    1,727    1,835    1,903       52       34
    Estimated Outlays.....................................        0    1,040    1,588    1,837      775      253
Spending Under S. 1639:
    Authorization Level \1\...............................    1,559    1,727    1,835    1,903       52       34
    Estimated Outlays.....................................    1,553    1,664    1,996    1,925      779      253
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 2000 level is the amount appropriated for these research programs for that year.

    Pay-as-you-go considerations: None.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: S. 1639 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments. Some of the appropriations authorized by 
this bill would fund grants and other services to state and 
local governments.
    Previous CBO estimate: During 1999, CBO transmitted cost 
estimates for three bills that would authorize appropriations 
for the same programs authorized under each of the titles in S. 
1639:
           On April 21, 1999, CBO transmitted a cost 
        estimate for H.R. 1184, the Earthquake Hazards 
        Reduction Authorization Act of 1999, as reported by the 
        House Committee on Science on April 19, 1999;
           On May 7, 1999, CBO transmitted a cost 
        estimate for H.R. 1553, the National Weather Service 
        and Related Agencies Authorization Act of 1999, as 
        ordered reported by the House Committee on Science on 
        April 29, 1999;
           On May 6, 1999, CBO transmitted a cost 
        estimate for H.R. 1550, the Fire Administration 
        Authorization Act of 1999, as ordered reported by the 
        House Committee on Science on April 29, 1999.
    Differences in the amounts authorized and the fiscal years 
covered by these previous bills and by S. 1639 account for the 
differences in our cost estimates.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Megan Carroll (Title 
I), Deborah Reis (Title II), and Rachel Applebaum (Title III); 
Impact on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Marjorie 
Miller; and Impact on the Private Sector: Jean Wooster.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      Regulatory Impact Statement

    In accordance with paragraph 11(b) of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides the 
following evaluation of the regulatory impact of the 
legislation, as reported:
    Because S. 1639, as reported, does not create any new 
programs, the legislation will have no additional regulatory 
impact, and will result in no additional reporting 
requirements. The legislation have no further effect on the 
number or types of individuals and businesses regulated, the 
economic impact of such regulation, the personal privacy of 
affected individuals, or the paperwork required from such 
individuals and businesses.

                       number of persons covered

    S. 1639, as reported, authorizes appropriations for the 
Earth, Wind, and Fire Act for fiscal years 2001, 2002, and 
2003. The Committee believes that the reported bill will not 
subject any individuals or businesses affected by the bill to 
any additional regulations.

                            economic impact

    This legislation will not have an adverse economic impact 
on the Nation.

                                privacy

    This legislation would not have an adverse impact on 
personal privacy of individuals.

                               paperwork

    This reported bill contains 6 reporting requirements--
          (1) the Director of USGS shall transmit to Congress a 
        5-year management plan for establishing and operating 
        the Advanced National Seismic Research and Monitoring 
        System;
          (2) each participating NEHRP agency shall include in 
        its annual appropriations request a report identifying 
        elements of the proposed NEHRP activities;
          (3) the Director of FEMA shall transmit a report to 
        Congress, after a period of public comment, describing 
        the elements of NEHRP that specifically address the 
        needs of at-risk populations, including the elderly, 
        persons with disabilities, non-English-speaking 
        families, single-parent households, and the poor;
          (4) the Administrator of USFA shall prepare and 
        submit to the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, 
        and Transportation, and the House of Representatives 
        Committee on Science a five-year strategic plan of the 
        program activities for USFA not later than April 30, 
        2000;
          (5) the Administrator of USFA, in consultation with 
        the Director of NIST, trade representatives, 
        professional and non-profit associations, state and 
        local firefighting services, and other appropriate 
        entities, shall transmit a report to the Senate 
        Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and 
        the House of Representatives Committee on Science, 
        describing USFA's research agenda, including a plan to 
        implement that agenda; not later than 120 days after 
        the date of enactment of the reported bill; and
          (6) the Administrator of USFA shall conduct an 
        assessment of the need for additional capabilities for 
        Federal counterterrorism training of emergency response 
        personnel and submit the report containing the results 
        of this assessment to Congress not later than 180 days 
        after the date of enactment of the reported bill.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis


               TITLE I--EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION ACT


Section 101. Authorization of appropriations

    This section of the reported bill would authorize 
appropriations for NEHRP and the four participating agencies 
for fiscal years 2001, 2002, and 2003, as follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             Agency                                   FY 2001         FY 2002         FY 2003
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
FEMA............................................................     $19,861,000     $20,953,000     $22,105,000
USGS............................................................      47,360,000      49,965,000      52,713,000
NSF.............................................................      30,900,000      32,600,000      34,393,000
NIST............................................................       2,332,000       2,460,000       2,595,300
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sec. 102. Repeals

    This section of the reported bill would repeal section 10 
and subsections (e) and (f) of section 12 of the Earthquake 
Hazards Reduction Act of 1977.

Sec. 103. Advanced National Seismic Research and Monitoring System

    Under this section of the reported bill, the Director of 
USGS would be authorized to establish and operate an Advanced 
National Seismic Research and Monitoring System to organize, 
modernize, and stabilize the national, regional, and urban 
seismic monitoring systems in the United States. Not later than 
90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Director 
would be required to transmit to Congress a five-year 
management plan for establishing and operating the new system. 
Funds for expansion, modernization, and operation of an 
Advanced National Seismic Research and Monitoring System would 
be authorized at $38 million in FY 2001, $44 million in FY 
2002, $35.1 million in FY 2003, $35 million in FY 2004, and 
$33.5 million in FY 2005.

Sec. 104. Network for earthquake engineering simulations

    The Director of NSF would be authorized, under the reported 
bill, to establish a Network for Earthquake Engineering 
Simulation to upgrade, link, and integrate a system of 
geographically distributed experimental facilities for 
earthquake engineering testing of full-size structures and 
their components and partial-scale physical models. Funding for 
the above Network would be authorized for the NSF at $24.4 
million in FY 2001, $4.5 million in FY 2002, and $17 million in 
FY 2003.

Sec. 105. Budget coordination

    This section of the reported bill directs FEMA to provide 
budget coordination annually to other program agencies for 
activities related to NEHRP. The annual program budget would be 
submitted to OMB in the report outlining each element of the 
proposed program activities of the participating agencies.

Sec. 106. Report on at-risk populations

    This section of the reported bill would require the 
Director of FEMA to transmit a report to Congress describing 
the elements of NEHRP that specifically address the needs of 
at-risk populations, including the elderly, persons with 
disabilities, non-English-speaking families, single-parent 
households, and the poor not later than one year after the date 
of the enactment of this Act.

Sec. 107. Public access to earthquake information

    This section of the reported bill would amend FEMA's 
program responsibilities under section 5(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 to include development 
of means of increasing public access to available locality-
specific information that may assist the public in preparing 
for or responding to earthquakes.

Sec. 108. Lifelines

    As reported, the bill would amend section 4(6) of the 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 by inserting ``and 
infrastructure'' after ``communication facilities.'' This 
change would clarify the meaning of the term ``lifelines.''

 TITLE II--NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE AND RELATED AGENCIES AUTHORIZATION 
                                  ACT


Sec. 201. Definitions

    This section of the reported bill defines certain key terms 
applicable to Title II of the reported bill including 
``Administrator'' and ``Secretary.''

Sec. 202. National Weather Service

    Subsection (a) authorizes $634.9 million for FY 2001, 
$669.8 million for FY 2002, and $706.6 million for FY 2003 to 
enable NOAA to carry out the ORF activities for NWS. Of these 
funds, the following funding is outlined:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           Program                                 FY 2001          FY 2002          FY 2003
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Local Warnings and Forecasts.................................     $466,471,000     $492,127,000     $519,194,000
Advanced Hydrological Prediction System......................        1,000,000        1,055,000        1,113,000
Susquehanna River Basin Flood System.........................          619,000          653,000          689,000
Aviation Forecasts...........................................       35,596,000       37,554,000       39,619,000
Weather Forecast Offices Facilities Maintenance..............        5,250,000        5,339,000        5,843,000
Central Forecast Guidance....................................       38,001,000       40,091,000       42,296,000
Atmospheric and Hydrological Research........................        3,068,000        3,237,000        3,415,000
Next Generation Weather Radar................................       38,802,000       40,936,000       43,188,000
Automated Surface Observing System...........................        7,423,000        7,831,000        8,262,000
Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System...............       38,642,000       40,767,000       43,010,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Subsection (b) would authorize $75.36 million for FY 2001, 
$77.75 million for FY 2002, and $71.01 for FY 2003 to enable 
NOAA to carry out the PAC activities of the NWS. Of these 
funds, the following funding is outlined:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           Program                                 FY 2001          FY 2002          FY 2003
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Next Generation Weather Radar................................       $9,580,000      $16,798,000      $15,931,000
Automated Surface Observing System...........................        5,125,000        5,125,000        5,125,000
Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System...............       17,300,000       17,300,000        9,645,000
Center Computer Facilities Upgrades..........................       13,085,000       17,505,000       19,285,000
Radiosonde Replacement.......................................        7,000,000        7,000,000        7,000,000
Weather Forecast Office Construction.........................        9,526,000        9,526,000        9,526,000
NOAA Weather Radio Expansion.................................        6,244,000        4,500,000        4,500,000
Evansville Infrastructure Protection.........................        5,500,000  ...............  ...............
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee, in providing authorization for full funding 
of NWS, has not included language concerning the existing 
relationships between NWS and the private sector.

Sec. 203. Atmospheric research

    Subsection (a) paragraph (1) would authorize $202 million 
for FY 2001, $213.1 million for FY 2002, and $224.8 million for 
FY 2003 to enable NOAA to carry out the Atmospheric Research 
Operations, Research, and Facilities environmental research and 
development activities of the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Research.
    Of the amounts of paragraph (1) subsection (a), paragraph 
(2) would authorize $154.4 million for FY 2001, $162.8 million 
for FY 2002, and $171.8 million for FY 2003 for Climate and Air 
Quality Research. The reported bill enumerates other programs 
within Climate and Air Quality Research.
    Of the amounts of paragraph (1), subsection (a), paragraph 
(3) would authorize $47.6 million for FY 2001, $50.2 million 
for FY 2002, and $53 billion for FY 2003 for Atmospheric 
Programs. The reported bill enumerates other subactivities 
within Atmospheric Programs.
    Subsection (b) would authorize $7 million for FY 2001, $7 
million for FY 2002, and $7 million FY 2003 to enable NOAA to 
carry out Atmospheric Research PAC environmental research and 
development activities of the Office of Oceanic, and 
Atmospheric Research. These monies would fund the Geophysical 
Fluid Dynamics Lab Supercomputer.

Sec. 204. National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service

    Subsection (a), paragraph (1) of this section of the 
reported bill would authorize $108.2 million for FY 2001, 
$114.2 million for FY 2002, and $120.43 for FY 2003 to enable 
NOAA to carry out ORF environmental research and development 
and related activities of NESDIS.
    Subsection (a), paragraph (2) would authorize $63.412 
million for FY 2001, $66.9 million for FY 2002, and $70.579 
million for FY 2003 of the amounts referred to in paragraph (1) 
of this subsection for Satellite Observing Systems. The 
reported bill provides for additional programs within Satellite 
Observing Systems.
    Of the amounts authorized under paragraph (1) of subsection 
(a), paragraph (3) of this subsection would authorize $44.789 
million for FY 2001, $47.252 million for FY 2002, and $49.851 
million for FY 2003 for Environmental Data Management Systems.
    Subsectin (b) would authorize $445.828 million for FY 2001, 
$515.271 million for FY 2002, and $554.945 million for FY 2003 
to enable NOAA to carry out PAC environmental research and 
development and related activities of the NESDIS.
    Subsection (b), paragraph (1) would authorizes $136.965 
million for FY 2001, $136.965 million for FY 2002, and $103.010 
million for FY 2003 for procurement and launch of the Polar 
Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), K, L, M, and N.
    Subsection (b), paragraph (2) would authorize $76.654 
million for FY 2001, $156.731 million for FY 2002, and $236.471 
million for FY 2003 for procurement and launch for the National 
Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System 
(NPOESS).
    Subsection (b), paragraph (3) would authorize $323.209 
million for FY 2001, $221.575 million for FY 2002, and $215.464 
million for FY 2003 for the procurement and launch for the 
Geostationary Operational Environment NEXT follow-on Satellites 
(GOES N-Q).

Sec. 205. Minority Serving Institutions

    This section in the reported bill would authorize $17 
million for FY 2001, $17.935 million for FY 2002, and $18.921 
million for FY 2003 for Minority Serving Institutions in the 
Atmospheric, Environmental, and Oceanic Sciences. The Committee 
supports this initiative designed to train more minorities in 
the scientific disciplines that support NOAA's missions.

Sec. 206. Internet availability of information

    This section of the reported bill requires the 
Administrator to make available through the Internet the 
abstracts relating to all research grants and awards with funds 
authorized by this Act.

                   TITLE III--FIRE ADMINISTRATION ACT


Sec. 301. Authorization of appropriations

    This section of the reported bill would authorize $69.753 
million for FY 2001, $46.096 million for FY 2002, and $47.479 
million for FY 2003 for USFA. The FY 2001 authorization 
includes funding for a $25 million grant program to assist 
local firefighters in rural and needy communities.

Sec. 302. Strategic plan

    This section of the reported bill would require the USFA 
Administrator to submit a strategic plan, by April 30, 2001, to 
the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the 
Senate and the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives. Subsection (b) specifies the contents of the 
plan.

Sec. 303. Research agenda

    This section of the reported bill would require the USFA 
Administrator, within 120 days of enactment, and in 
consultation with NIST; FEMA; representatives of trade, 
professional, and non-profit associations; state and local 
firefighting services; and other appropriate entities to 
prepare and submit to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Science of 
the House of Representatives a research agenda along with an 
implementation plan. Subsection (b) specifies the contents of 
the plan.

Sec. 304. Surplus and excess federal equipment

    This section of the reported bill would require the 
Administrator to provide information to the public on 
procedures to acquire surplus and excess equipment or property 
that may be useful to state and local fire, emergency, and 
hazardous material handling service providers.

Sec. 305. Cooperative agreements with Federal facilities

    This section of the reported bill would require the 
Administrator to provide information to the public on 
procedures to establish cooperative agreements between State 
and local fire and emergency services and federal facilities in 
their regions relating to the provision of fire and emergency 
services.

Sec. 306. Need for additional training in counterterrorism

    This section of the reported bill would require the 
Administrator to conduct an assessment of the need for 
additional capabilities for Federal counterterrorism training 
of emergency response personnel. Subsection (b) specifies the 
contents of the plan. Subsection (c) requires the report to be 
submitted within 180 days of enactment of this Act.

                        Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
material is printed in italic, existing law in which no change 
is proposed is shown in roman):

            Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974


SEC. 17. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS. [15 U.S.C. 2216]

    (a) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
the foregoing provisions of this Act, except as otherwise 
specifically provided, with respect to the payment of claims, 
under section 11 of this Act, an amount not to exceed 
$25,210,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980, 
which amount includes--
          (1) $4,781,000 for programs which are recommended in 
        the report submitted to the Congress by the 
        Administrator pursuant to section 24(b)(1);
          (2) $9,430,000 for the National Academy for Fire 
        Prevention and Control;
          (3) $307,000 for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits;
          (4) $500,000 for additional rural firefighting 
        technical assistance and information activities;
          (5) $500,000 for the study required by section 26 of 
        this Act; and
          (6) $110,000 for the study required by section 27 of 
        this Act.
    (b) There are authorized to be appropriated for the 
additional administrative expenses of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, which are related to this Act and which 
result from Reorganization Plan Numbered 3 of 1978 (submitted 
June 19, 1978) and related Executive orders, an amount not to 
exceed $600,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980.
    (c) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
this Act, except as otherwise specifically provided with 
respect to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, 
an amount not to exceed $23,814,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1981, which amount includes--
          (1) not less than $1,100,000 for the first year of a 
        three-year concentrated demonstration program of fire 
        prevention and control in two States with high fire 
        death rates;
          (2) not less than $2,575,000 for rural fire 
        prevention and control; and
          (3) not less than $4,255,000 for research and 
        development for the activities under section 18 of this 
        Act at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau 
        of Standards of which not less than $250,000 shall be 
        available for adjustments required by law in salaries, 
        pay, retirement, and employee benefits.
The funds authorized in paragraph (3) shall be in addition to 
funds authorized in any other law for research and development 
at the Fire Research Center.
    (d) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated--
          (1) $20,815,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1982, and $23,312,800 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1983, which amount shall include--
                  (A) such sums as may be necessary for the 
                support of research and development at the Fire 
                Research Center of the National Bureau of 
                Standards under section 18 of this Act, which 
                sums shall be in addition to those funds 
                authorized to be appropriated under the 
                National Bureau of Standards Authorization Act 
                for fiscal years 1981 and 1982; and
                  (B) $654,000 for the fiscal year ending 
                September 30, 1982, and $732,480 for the fiscal 
                year ending September 30, 1983, for executive 
                direction by the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency of program activities for which 
                appropriations are authorized by this 
                subsection; and
          (2) such further sums as may be necessary in each of 
        the fiscal years ending September 30, 1982, and 
        September 30, 1983, for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits 
        incurred in the conduct of activities for which funds 
        are authorized by paragraph (1) of this subsection.
The funds authorized under section 18 shall be in addition to 
funds authorized in any other law for research and development 
at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau of 
Standards.
    (e) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated--
          (1) $15,720,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1984, and $20,983,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1985; and
          (2) such further sums as may be necessary in each of 
        the fiscal years ending September 30, 1984, and 
        September 30, 1985, for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits 
        incurred in the conduct of activities for which funds 
        are authorized by paragraph (1) of this subsection.
The funds authorized under this subsection shall be in addition 
to funds authorized in any other law for research and 
development at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau 
of Standards.
    (f) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated $22,037,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1987.
    (g)(1) Except as otherwise specifically provided with 
respect to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, 
there are authorized to be appropriated to carry out the 
purposes of this Act--
          (A) $17,039,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1989;
          (B) $17,737,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1990;
          (C) $18,464,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1991;
          (D) $25,550,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1992;
          (E) $26,521,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1993;
          (F) $27,529,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1994;
          (G) $29,664,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1998; [and]
          (H) $30,554,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, [1999.] 1999;
          (I) $69,753,000 for fiscal year 2001;
          (J) $46,096,000 for fiscal year 202; and
          (K) $47,479,000 for fiscal year 2003.
    (2) Of the amounts referred to in paragraph (1), not more 
than $4,150,000 is authorized to be appropriated for each 
fiscal year for National Emergency Training Center site 
administration.
    (h) In addition to any other amounts that are authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this Act, there are authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this Act--
          (1) $500,000 for fiscal year 1995 for basic research 
        on the development of an advanced course on arson 
        prevention;
          (2) $2,000,000 for fiscal year 1996 for the expansion 
        of arson investigator training programs at the Academy 
        under section 24 and at the Federal Law Enforcement 
        Training Center, or through regional delivery sites;
          (3) $4,000,000 for each of fiscal years 1995 and 1996 
        for carrying out section 25, except for salaries and 
        expenses for carrying out section 25; and
          (4) $250,000 for each of the fiscal years 1995 and 
        1996 for salaries and expenses for carrying out section 
        25.

SEC. 33. SURPLUS AND EXCESS FEDERAL EQUIPMENT.

    The Administrator shall make publicly available, including 
through the Internet, information on procedures for acquiring 
surplus and excess equipment or property that may be useful to 
State and local fire, emergency, and hazardous material 
handling service providers.

SEC. 34. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH FEDERAL FACILITIES.

    The Administrator shall make publicly available, including 
through the Internet, information on procedures for 
establishing cooperative agreements between State and local 
fire and emergency services and Federal facilities in their 
region relating to the provision of fire and emergency 
services.

                Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977


SEC. 7701. CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS. [42 U.S.C. 7701]

    The Congress finds and declares the following:
          (1) All 50 States are vulnerable to the hazards of 
        earthquakes, and at least 39 of them are subject to 
        major or moderate seismic risk, including Alaska, 
        California, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Missouri, 
        Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, South Carolina, 
        Utah, and Washington. A large portion of the population 
        of the United States lives in areas vulnerable to 
        earthquake hazards.
          (2) Earthquakes have caused, and can cause in the 
        future, enormous loss of life, injury, destruction of 
        property, and economic and social disruption. With 
        respect to future earthquakes, such loss, destruction, 
        and disruption can be substantially reduced through the 
        development and implementation of earthquake hazards 
        reduction measures, including (A) improved design and 
        construction methods and practices, (B) land-use 
        controls and redevelopment, (C) prediction techniques 
        and early-warning systems, (D) coordinated emergency 
        preparedness plans, and (E) public education and 
        involvement programs.
          (3) An expertly staffed and adequately financed 
        earthquake hazards reduction program, based on Federal, 
        State, local, and private research, planning, 
        decisionmaking, and contributions would reduce the risk 
        of such loss, destruction, and disruption in seismic 
        areas by an amount far greater than the cost of such 
        program.
          (4) A well-funded seismological research program in 
        earthquake prediction could provide data adequate for 
        the design, of an operational system that could predict 
        accurately the time, place, magnitude, and physical 
        effects of earthquakes in selected areas of the United 
        States.
          (5) The geological study of active faults and 
        features can reveal how recently and how frequently 
        major earthquakes have occurred on those faults and how 
        much risk they pose. Such long-term seismic risk 
        assessments are needed in virtually every aspect of 
        earthquake hazards management, whether emergency 
        planning, public regulation, detailed building design, 
        insurance rating, or investment decision.
          (6) The vulnerability of buildings, lifelines, public 
        works, and industrial and emergency facilities can be 
        reduced through proper earthquake resistant design and 
        construction practices. The economy and efficacy of 
        such procedures can be substantially increased through 
        research and development.
          (7) Programs and practices of departments and 
        agencies of the United States are important to the 
        communities they serve; some functions, such as 
        emergency communications and national defense, and 
        lifelines, such as dams, bridges, and public works, 
        must remain in service during and after an earthquake. 
        Federally owned, operated, and influenced structures 
        and life-lines should serve as models for how to reduce 
        and minimize hazards to the community.
          (8) The implementation of earthquake hazards 
        reduction measures would, as an added benefit, also 
        reduce the risk of loss, destruction, and disruption 
        from other natural hazards and manmade hazards, 
        including hurricanes, tornadoes, accidents, explosions, 
        landslides, building and structural cave-ins, and 
        fires.
          (9) Reduction of loss, destruction, and disruption 
        from earthquakes will depend on the actions of 
        individuals, and organizations in the private sector 
        and governmental units at Federal, State, and local 
        levels. The current capability to transfer knowledge 
        and information to these sectors is insufficient. 
        Improved mechanisms are needed to translate existing 
        information and research findings into reasonable and 
        usable specifications, criteria. And practices so that 
        individuals, organizations, and governmental units may 
        make informed decisions and take appropriate actions.
          (10) Severe earthquakes are a worldwide problem. 
        Since damaging earthquakes occur infrequently in any 
        one nation, international cooperation is desirable for 
        mutual learning from limited experiences.
          (11) an effective Federal program in earthquake 
        hazards reduction will require input from and review by 
        persons outside the Federal Government expert in the 
        sciences of earthquake hazards reduction and in the 
        practical application of earthquake hazards reduction 
        measures.

SEC. 4. DEFINITIONS. [42 U.S.C. 7703]

    As used in this Act, unless the context otherwise requires:
          (1) The term ``includes'' and variants thereof should 
        be read as if the phrase ``but is not limited to'' were 
        also set forth.
          (2) The term ``Program'' means the National 
        Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program established under 
        section 5.
          (3) The term ``seismic'' and variants thereof mean 
        having to do with, or caused by earthquakes.
          (4) The term ``State'' means each of the States of 
        the United States, the District of Columbia, the 
        Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, 
        American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Mariana 
        Islands, and any other territory or possession of the 
        United States.
          (5) The term ``United States'' means, when used in a 
        geographical sense, all of the States as defined in 
        section 4(4).
          (6) The term ``lifelines'' means public works and 
        utilities, including transportation facilities and 
        infrastructure, oil and gas pipelines, electrical power 
        and communication facilities and infrastructure, and 
        water supply and sewage treatment facilities.
          (7) The term ``Program agencies'' means the Federal 
        Emergency Management Agency, the United States 
        Geological Survey, the National Science Foundation, and 
        the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

SEC. 5. NATIONAL EARTHQUAKE HAZARDS REDUCTION PROGRAM. [42 U.S.C. 7704]

    (a) Establishment.--There is established a National 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program.
    (b) Responsibilities of Program Agencies.--
          (1) Lead agency.--The Federal Emergency Management 
        Agency (hereafter in this Act referred to as the 
        ``Agency'') shall have the primary responsibility for 
        planning and coordinating the Program. In carrying out 
        this paragraph, the Director of the Agency shall--
                  [(A) prepare, in conjunction with the other 
                Program agencies, an annual budget for the 
                Program to be submitted to the Office of 
                Management and Budget;]
                  [(B)] (A) ensure that the Program includes 
                the necessary steps to promote the 
                implementation of earthquake hazard reduction 
                measures by Federal, State, and local 
                governments, national standards and model 
                building code organizations, architects and 
                engineers, and others with a role in planning 
                and constructing buildings and lifelines;
                  [(C)] (B) prepare, in conjunction with the 
                other Program agencies, a written plan for the 
                Program, which shall include specific tasks and 
                milestones for each Program agency, at such 
                times as may be required by significant Program 
                events, but in no event less frequently than 
                every 3 years;
                  [(D)] (C) prepare, in conjunction with the 
                other Program agencies, a biennial report, to 
                be submitted to the Congress within 90 days 
                after the end of each even-numbered fiscal 
                year, which shall describe the activities and 
                achievements of the Program during the 
                preceding two fiscal years;
                  [(E)] (D) request the assistance of Federal 
                agencies other than the Program agencies, as 
                necessary to assist in carrying out this Act; 
                and
                  [(F)] (E) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the National Institute of Standards 
                and Technology, and the United States 
                Geological Survey, to develop a comprehensive 
                plan for earthquake engineering research to 
                effectively use existing testing facilities and 
                laboratories (existing at the time of the 
                development of the plan), upgrade facilities 
                and equipment as needed, and integrate new, 
                innovative testing approaches to the research 
                infrastructure in a systematic manner.
        The principal official carrying out the 
        responsibilities described [in this paragraph] in 
        subparagraph (E) shall be at a level no lower than that 
        of Associate Director.
          (2) Federal emergency management agency.--
                  (A) Program responsibilities.--In addition to 
                the lead agency responsibilities described in 
                paragraph (1), the Director of the Agency 
                shall--
                          (i) operate a program of grants and 
                        technical assistance which would enable 
                        States to develop preparedness and 
                        response plans, prepare inventories and 
                        conduct seismic safety inspections of 
                        critical structures and lifelines, 
                        update building and zoning codes and 
                        ordinances to enhance seismic safety, 
                        increase earthquake awareness and 
                        education, and encourage the 
                        development of multi-State groups for 
                        such purposes;
                          (ii) prepare and execute, in 
                        conjunction with the Program agencies, 
                        the Department of Education, other 
                        Federal agencies, and private sector 
                        groups, a comprehensive earthquake 
                        education and public awareness program, 
                        to include development of materials and 
                        their wide dissemination to schools and 
                        the general public, and development of 
                        means of increasing public access to 
                        available locality-specific information 
                        that may assist the public in preparing 
                        for or responding to earthquakes;
                          (iii) prepare and disseminate widely, 
                        with the assistance of the National 
                        Institute of Standards and Technology, 
                        other Federal agencies, and private 
                        sector groups, information on building 
                        codes and practices for structures and 
                        lifelines;
                          (iv) develop, and coordinate the 
                        execution of, Federal interagency plans 
                        to respond to an earthquake, with 
                        specific plans for each high-risk area 
                        which ensure the availability of 
                        adequate emergency medical resources, 
                        search and rescue personnel and 
                        equipment, and emergency broadcast 
                        capability;
                          (v) develop approaches to combine 
                        measures for earthquake hazards 
                        reduction with measures for reduction 
                        of other natural and technological 
                        hazards; and
                          (vi) provide response recommendations 
                        to communities after an earthquake 
                        prediction has been made under 
                        paragraph (3)(D).
                In addition, the Director of the Agency may 
                enter into cooperative agreements or contracts 
                with States and local jurisdictions to 
                establish demonstration projects on earthquake 
                hazard mitigation, to link earthquake research 
                and mitigation efforts with emergency 
                management programs, or to prepare educational 
                materials for national distribution.
                  (B) State assistance program criteria.--In 
                order to qualify for assistance under 
                subparagraph (A)(i), a state must--
                          (i) demonstrate that the assistance 
                        will result in enhanced seismic safety 
                        in the State;
                          (ii) provide a share of the costs of 
                        the activities for which assistance is 
                        being given, in accordance with 
                        subparagraph (C); and
                          (iii) meet such other requirements as 
                        the Director of the Agency shall 
                        prescribe.
                  (C) Non-federal cost sharing.--
                          (i) In the case of any state which 
                        has received, before October 1, 1990, a 
                        grant from the Agency for activities 
                        under this Act which included a 
                        requirement for cost sharing by 
                        matching such grant, any grant obtained 
                        from the Agency for activities under 
                        subparagraph (A)(i) after such date 
                        shall not include a requirement for 
                        cost sharing in an amount greater than 
                        50 percent of the cost of the project 
                        for which the grant is made.
                          (ii) In the case of any State which 
                        has not received, before October 1, 
                        1990, a grant from the Agency for 
                        activities under this Act which 
                        included a requirement for cost sharing 
                        by matching such grant, any grant 
                        obtained from the Agency for activities 
                        under subparagraph (A)(i) after such 
                        date--
                                  (I) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing 
                                for the first fiscal year of 
                                such a grant;
                                  (II) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing in 
                                an amount greater than 25 
                                percent of the cost of the 
                                project for which the grant is 
                                made for the second fiscal year 
                                of such grant, and cost sharing 
                                requirement may be satisfied 
                                through in-kind contributions;
                                  (III) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing in 
                                an amount greater than 35 
                                percent of the cost of the 
                                project for which the grant is 
                                made for the third fiscal year 
                                of such grant, and any cost 
                                sharing requirement may be 
                                satisfied through in-kind 
                                contributions; and
                                  (IV) shall not include a 
                                requirement for cost sharing in 
                                an amount greater than 50 
                                percent of the cost of the 
                                project for which the grant is 
                                made for the fourth and 
                                subsequent fiscal years of such 
                                grant.
          (3) United states geological survey.--The United 
        States Geological Survey shall conduct research 
        necessary to characterize and identify earthquake 
        hazards, assess earthquake risks, monitor seismic 
        activity, and improve earthquake predictions. In 
        carrying out this paragraph, the Director of the United 
        States Geological Survey shall--
                  (A) conduct a systematic assessment of the 
                seismic risks in each region of the Nation 
                prone to earthquakes, including, where 
                appropriate, the establishment and operation of 
                intensive monitoring projects on hazardous 
                faults, seismic microzonation studies in urban 
                and other developed areas where earthquake risk 
                is determined to be significant, and 
                engineering seismology studies;
                  (B) work with officials of State and local 
                governments to ensure that they are 
                knowledgeable about the specific seismic risks 
                in their areas;
                  (C) develop standard procedures, in 
                consultation with the Agency, for issuing 
                earthquake predictions, including aftershock 
                advisories;
                  (D) issue when necessary, and notify the 
                Director of the Agency of, an earthquake 
                prediction or other earthquake advisory, which 
                may be evaluated by the National Earthquake 
                Prediction Evaluation Council, which shall be 
                exempt from the requirements of section 
                10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act 
                when meeting for such purposes;
                  (E) establish, using existing facilities, a 
                Center for the International Exchange of 
                Earthquake Information which shall--
                          (i) promote the exchange of 
                        information on earthquake research and 
                        earthquake preparedness between the 
                        United States and other nations;
                          (ii) maintain a library containing 
                        selected reports, research papers, and 
                        data produced through the Program;
                          (iii) answer requests from other 
                        nations for information on United 
                        States earthquake research and 
                        earthquake preparedness programs; and
                          (iv) direct foreign requests to the 
                        agency involved in the Program which is 
                        best able to respond to the request;
                  (F) operate a national Seismic Network;
                  (G) support regional seismic networks, which 
                shall complement the National Seismic Network; 
                and
                  (H) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, and the National Institute of Standards 
                and Technology to develop a comprehensive plan 
                for earthquake engineering research to 
                effectively use existing testing facilities and 
                laboratories (in existence at the time of the 
                development of the plan), upgrade facilities 
                and equipment as needed, and integrate new, 
                innovative testing approaches to the research 
                infrastructure in a systematic manner.
          (4) National science foundation.--The National 
        Science Foundation shall be responsible for funding 
        research on earth sciences to improve the understanding 
        of the causes and behavior of earthquakes, on 
        earthquake engineering, and on human response to 
        earthquakes. In carrying out this paragraph, the 
        Director of the National Science Foundation shall--
                  (A) encourage prompt dissemination of 
                significant findings, sharing of data, samples, 
                physical collections, and other supporting 
                materials, and development of intellectual 
                property so research results can be used by 
                appropriate organizations to mitigate 
                earthquake damage;
                  (B) in addition to supporting individual 
                investigators, support university research 
                consortia and centers for research in 
                geosciences and in earthquake engineering;
                  (C) work closely with the United States 
                Geological Survey to identify geographic 
                regions of national concern that should be the 
                focus of targeted solicitations for earthquake-
                related research proposals;
                  (D) emphasize, in earthquake engineering 
                research, development of economically feasible 
                methods to retrofit existing buildings and to 
                protect lifelines to mitigate earthquake 
                damage;
                  (E) support research that studies the 
                political, economic, and social factors that 
                influence the implementation of hazard 
                reduction measures; and
                  (F) develop, in conjunction with the Federal 
                Emergency Management Agency, the National 
                Institute of Standards and Technology, and the 
                United States Geological Survey, a 
                comprehensive plan for earthquake engineering 
                research to effectively use existing testing 
                facilities and laboratories (in existence at 
                the time of the development of the plan), 
                upgrade facilities and equipment as needed, and 
                integrate new, innovative testing approaches to 
                the research infrastructure in a systematic 
                manner.
          (5) National institute of standards and technology.--
        The National Institute of Standards and Technology 
        shall be responsible for carrying out research and 
        development to improve building codes and standards and 
        practices for structures and lifelines. In carrying out 
        this paragraph, the Director of the National Institute 
        of Standards and Technology shall--
                  (A) work closely with national standards and 
                model building code organizations, in 
                conjunction with the Agency, to promote the 
                implementation of research results;
                  (B) promote better building practices among 
                architects and engineers;
                  (C) work closely with national standards 
                organizations to develop seismic safety 
                standards and practices for new existing 
                lifelines; and
                  (D) work with the National Science 
                Foundation, the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency, and the United States Geological Survey 
                to develop a comprehensive plan for earthquake 
                engineering research to effectively use 
                existing testing facilities and laboratories 
                (in existence at the time of the development of 
                the plan), upgrade facilities and equipment as 
                needed, and integrate new, innovative testing 
                approaches to the research infrastructure in a 
                systematic manner.
    (c) Budget Coordination.--
          (1) Guidance.--The Agency shall each year provide 
        guidance to the other Program agencies concerning the 
        preparation of requests for appropriations for 
        activities related to the Program, and shall prepare, 
        in conjunction with the other Program agencies, an 
        annual Program budget to be submitted to the Office of 
        Management and Budget.
          (2) Reports.--Each Program agency shall include with 
        its annual request for appropriations submitted to the 
        Office of Management and Budget a report that--
                  (A) identifies each element of the proposed 
                Program activities of the agency;
                  (B) specifies how each of these activities 
                contributes to the Program; and
                  (C) states the portion of its request for 
                appropriations allocated to each element of the 
                Program.

[SEC. 10. NON-FEDERAL COST SHARING FOR SUPPLEMENTAL FUNDS. [42 U.S.C. 
                    7705D]

    [A grant under this Act to a State from the Agency that is 
made with funds appropriated under the Fiscal Year 1990 Dire 
Emergency Supplemental to Meet the Needs of Natural Disasters 
of National Significance (Public Law 101-130; 103 Stat. 775) 
shall not include a requirement for cost sharing in an amount 
greater than 25 percent of the cost of the project for which 
the grant is made, and any cost sharing requirement may be 
satisfied through in-kind contributions.]

SEC. 12. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS. [42 U.S.C. 7706]

    (a) General Authorization for the Program.--
          (1) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        President to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act (in addition to any authorizations for 
        similar purposes included in other Acts and the 
        authorizations set forth in subsections (b) and (c) of 
        this section), not to exceed $1,000,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1978, not to exceed 
        $2,000,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1979, and not to exceed $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1980.
          (2) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1981--
                  (A) $1,000,000 for continuation of the 
                Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in 
                Construction and the Building Seismic Safety 
                Council programs,
                  (B) $1,500,000 for plans and preparedness for 
                earthquake disasters,
                  (C) $500,000 for prediction response 
                planning,
                  (D) $600,000 for architectural and 
                engineering planning and practice programs,
                  (E) $1,000,000 for development and 
                application of a public education program,
                  (F) $3,000,000 for use by the National 
                Science Foundation in addition to the amount 
                authorized to be appropriated under subsection 
                (c), which amount includes $2,400,000 for 
                earthquake policy research and $600,000 for the 
                strong ground motion element of the siting 
                program, and
                  (G) $1,000,000 for use by the Center for 
                Building Technology, National Bureau of 
                Standards in addition to the amount authorized 
                to be appropriated under subsection (d) for 
                earthquake activities in the Center.
          (3) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1982, 
        $2,000,000 to carry out the provisions of sections 5 
        and 6 of this Act.
          (4) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director, to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act, $1,281,000 for fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1983.
          (5) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director, to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1984, $3,705,000, and for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1985, $6,096,000.
          (6) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director, to carry out the provisions of sections 5 and 
        6 of this Act, for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1986, $5,596,000, and for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1987, $5,848,000.
          (7) There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Director of the Agency, to carry out this Act 
        $5,778,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1988, $5,788,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1989, $8,798,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1990, $14,750,000 for the fiscal year 
        ending September 30, 1991, $19,000,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 1992, $22,000,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 1993, $25,000,000 for 
        the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995, $25,750,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, 
        $20,900,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1998, [and] $21,500,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, [1999.] 1999; $19,861,000 for the fiscal 
        year ending September 30, 2001, of which $450,000 shall 
        be used to support the National Earthquake Hazard 
        Reduction Program-eligible efforts of an established 
        multi-state consortium to reduce the unacceptable 
        threat of earthquake damages in the New Madrid seismic 
        region through efforts to enhance preparedness, 
        response, recovery, and mitigation; $20,953,000 for the 
        fiscal year ending September 30, 2002; and $22,105,000 
        for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2003.
    (b) Geological Survey.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of the Interior for purposes of 
carrying out, through the Director of the United States 
Geological Survey, the responsibilities that may be assigned to 
the Director under this Act not to exceed $27,500,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1978; not to exceed 
$35,000,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1979; not 
to exceed $40,000,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1980; $32,484,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1981; $34,425,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1982; $31,843,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1983; $35,524,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1984; $37,300,200 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1985; $35,578,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1986; $37,179,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1987; $38,540,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1988; $41,819,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1989; $55,283,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1990, of which $8,000,000 shall be for earthquake 
investigations under section 11; $50,000,000 for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 1991; $54,500,000 for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1992; $62,500,000 for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1993; $49,200,000 for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1995; $50,676,000 for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1996; $52,565,000 for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1998, of which $3,800,000 shall be used 
for the Global Seismic Network operated by the Agency; and 
$54,052,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1999, of 
which $3,800,000 shall be used for the Global Seismic Network 
operated by the Agency. There are authorized to be appropriated 
to the Secretary of the Interior for purposes of carrying out, 
through the Director of the United States Geological Survey, 
the responsibilities that may be assigned to the Director under 
this Act $47,360,000 for fiscal year 2001; $49,965,000 for 
fiscal year 2002; and $52,713,000 for fiscal year 2003. Of the 
amounts authorized to be appropriated under this subsection, at 
least--
          (1) $8,000,000 of the amount authorized to be 
        appropriated for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        1998; [and]
          (2) $8,250,000 of the amount authorized to be 
        appropriated for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
        [1999,] 1999;
          (3) $9,000,000 of the amount authorized to be 
        appropriated for fiscal year 2001;
          (4) $9,250,000 of the amount authorized to be 
        appropriated for fiscal year 2002; and
          (5) $9,500,000 of the amount authorized to be 
        appropriated for fiscal year 2003.
shall be used for carrying out a competitive, peer-reviewed 
program under which the Director, in close coordination with 
and as a complement to related activities of the United States 
Geological Survey, awards grants to, or enters into cooperative 
agreements with, State and local governments and persons or 
entities from the academic community and the private sector.
    (c)  National Science Foundation.--To enable the Foundation 
to carry out responsibilities that may be assigned to it under 
this Act, there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Foundation not to exceed $27,500,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1978; not to exceed $35,000,000 for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 1979; not to exceed $40,000,000 for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980; $26,600,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1981; $27,150,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1982; $25,000,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1983; $25,800,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1984; $28,665,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1985; $27,760,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1986; $29,009,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1987; $28,235,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1988; $31,634,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1989; $38,454,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1990. Of the amounts 
authorized for Engineering under section 101(d)(1)(B) of the 
National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988, 
$24,000,000 is authorized for carrying out this Act for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1991, and of the amounts 
authorized for Geosciences under section 101(d)1)(D) of the 
National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 1988, 
$13,000,000 is authorized for carrying out this Act for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1991. Of the amounts 
authorized for Research and Related Activities under section 
101(e)(1) of the National Science Foundation Authorization Act 
of 1988, $29,000,000 is authorized for engineering research 
under this Act, and $14,750,000 is authorized for geosciences 
research under this Act, for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1992. Of the amounts authorized for Research and Related 
Activities under section 101(f)(1) of the National Science 
Foundation Authorization Act of 1988, $34,500,000 is authorized 
for engineering research under this Act, and $17,500,000 is 
authorized for geosciences research under this Act, for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1993. There are authorized to 
be appropriated, out of funds otherwise authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation: (1) 
$16,200,000 for engineering research and $10,900,000 for 
geosciences research for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1995, (2) $16,686,000 for engineering research and $11,227,000 
for geosciences research for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1996, (3) $18,450,000 for engineering research and 
$11,920,000 for geosciences research for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, [1998, and] 1993, (4) $19,000,000 for engineering 
research and $12,280,000 for geosciences research for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, [1999] 1999, and (5) 
$19,000,000 for engineering research and $11,900,000 for 
geosciences research for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
2001. There are authorized to be appropriated to the National 
Science Foundation $20,045,000 for engineering research and 
$12,555,000 for geosciences research for fiscal year 2002 and 
$21,147,000 for engineering research and $13,246,000 for 
geosciences research for fiscal year 2003.
    (d) National Institute of Standards and Technology.--To 
enable the National Institute of Standards and Technology to 
carry out responsibilities that may be assigned to it under 
this Act, there are authorized to be appropriated $425,000 for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 1981; $425,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1982; $475,000 for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 1983; $475,000 for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 1984; $498,750 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1985; $499,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1986; $521,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1987; $525,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1988; $525,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1989; $2,525,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1990; $1,000,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1991; $3,000,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1992; and $4,750,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1993. There are authorized to be appropriated, 
out of funds otherwise authorized to be appropriated to the 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, $1,900,000 for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 1995, $1,957,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, $2,000,000 for the 
fiscal year ending September 30, [1998, and] 1998, $2,060,000 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, [1999] 1999, 
$2,332,000 for fiscal year 2001, $2,460,000 for fiscal year 
2002, and $2,595,300 for fiscal year 2003.
    [(e) Funds for Certain Required Adjustments.--For each of 
the fiscal years ending September 30, 1982, September 30, 1983, 
September 30, 1984, and September 30, 1985, there are 
authorized to be appropriated such further sums as may be 
necessary for adjustments required by law in salaries, pay, 
retirement, and employee benefits incurred in the conduct of 
activities for which funds are authorized by the preceding 
provisions of this section.
    [(f) Availability of Funds.--Funds appropriated for fiscal 
years 1991, 1992, and 1993 pursuant to this section shall 
remain available until expended.]

SEC. 13. ADVANCED NATIONAL SEISMIC RESEARCH MONITORING SYSTEM.

    (a) Establishment.--The Director of the United States 
Geological Survey shall establish and operate an Advanced 
National Seismic Research and Monitoring System. The purpose of 
such system shall be to organize, modernize, standardize, and 
stabilize the national, regional, and urban seismic monitoring 
systems in the United States, including sensors, recorders, and 
data analysis centers, into a coordinated system that will 
measure and record the full range of frequencies and amplitudes 
exhibited by seismic waves, in order to enhance earthquake 
research and warning capabilities.
    (b) Management Plan.--Not later than 90 days after the date 
of the enactment of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction 
Authorization Act of 2000, the Director of the United States 
Geological Survey shall transmit to the Congress a 5-year 
management plan for establishing and operating the Advanced 
National Seismic Research and Monitoring System. The plan shall 
include annual cost estimates for both modernization and 
operation, milestones, standards, and performance goals, as 
well as plans for securing the participation of all existing 
networks in the Advanced National Seismic Research and 
Monitoring System and for establishing new, or enhancing 
existing, partnerships to leverage resources.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) Expansion and modernization.--In addition to 
        amounts appropriated under section 12(b), there are 
        authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of the 
        Interior, to be used by the Director of the United 
        States Geological Survey to establish the Advanced 
        National Seismic Research and Monitoring System--
                  (A) $33,500,000 for fiscal year 2001;
                  (B) $33,700,000 for fiscal year 2002;
                  (C) $35,100,000 for fiscal year 2003;
                  (D) $35,000,000 for fiscal year 2004; and
                  (E) $33,500,000 for fiscal year 2005.
          (2) Operation.--In addition to amounts appropriated 
        under section 12(b), there are authorized to be 
        appropriated to the Secretary of the Interior, to be 
        used by the Director of the United States Geological 
        Survey to operate the Advanced National Seismic 
        Research and Monitoring System--
                  (A) $4,500,000 for fiscal year 2001; and
                  (B) $10,300,000 for fiscal year 2002.

SEC. 14. NETWORK FOR EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING SIMULATION.

    (a) Establishment.--The Director of the National Science 
Foundation shall establish a Network for Earthquake Engineering 
Simulation that will upgrade, link, and integrate a system of 
geographically distributed experimental facilities for 
earthquake engineering testing of full-sized structures and 
their components and partial-scale physical models. The system 
shall be integrated through networking software so that 
integrated models and databases can be used to create model-
based simulation, and the components of the system shall be 
interconnected with a computer network and allow for remote 
access, information sharing, and collaborative research.
    (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to 
amounts appropriated under section 12(c), there are authorized 
to be appropriated, out of funds otherwise authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation, $28,200,000 
for fiscal year 2001 for the Network for Earthquake Engineering 
Simulation. In addition to amounts appropriated under section 
12(c), there are authorized to be appropriated to the National 
Science Foundation for the Network for Earthquake Engineering 
Simulation--
          (1) $24,400,000 for fiscal year 2002;
          (2) $4,500,000 for fiscal year 2003; and
          (3) $17,000,000 for fiscal year 2004.