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106th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 1st Session                                                     106-91
_______________________________________________________________________


 
        CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000

                                _______
                                

   April 14 (legislative day, April 13), 1999.--Ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


 Mr. Kasich, from the Committee of Conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                     [To accompany H. Con. Res. 68]

    The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the 
two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the concurrent 
resolution (H. Con. Res. 68), establishing the congressional 
budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2000 
and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for each of 
fiscal years 2001 through 2009, do pass with the following, 
having met, after full and free conference, have agreed to 
recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses as 
follows:
    That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate to the text of the resolution and agree 
to the same with an amendment as follows:
    In lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by the Senate 
amendment, insert the following:

SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000.

    (a) Declaration.--Congress determines and declares that 
this resolution is the concurrent resolution on the budget for 
fiscal year 2000 including the appropriate budgetary levels for 
fiscal years 2001 through 2009 as authorized by section 301 of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2000.

                       TITLE I--LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 102. Social security.
Sec. 103. Major functional categories.
Sec. 104. Reconciliation of revenue reductions in the Senate.
Sec. 105. Reconciliation of revenue reductions in the House of 
          Representatives.

              TITLE II--BUDGETARY RESTRAINTS AND RULEMAKING

Sec. 201. Safe deposit box for social security surpluses.
Sec. 202. Reserve fund for retirement security.
Sec. 203. Reserve fund for medicare.
Sec. 204. Reserve fund for agriculture.
Sec. 205. Tax reduction reserve fund in the Senate.
Sec. 206. Emergency designation point of order in the Senate.
Sec. 207. Pay-as-you-go point of order in the Senate.
Sec. 208. Application and effect of changes in allocations and 
          aggregates.
Sec. 209. Establishment of levels for fiscal year 1999.
Sec. 210. Deficit-neutral reserve fund to foster the employment and 
          independence of individuals with disabilities in the Senate.
Sec. 211. Reserve fund for fiscal year 2000 surplus.
Sec. 212. Reserve fund for education in the Senate.
Sec. 213. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

       TITLE III--SENSE OF CONGRESS, HOUSE, AND SENATE PROVISIONS

                Subtitle A--Sense of Congress Provisions

Sec. 301. Sense of Congress on the protection of the social security 
          surpluses.
Sec. 302. Sense of Congress on providing additional dollars to the 
          classroom.
Sec. 303. Sense of Congress on asset-building for the working poor.
Sec. 304. Sense of Congress on child nutrition.
Sec. 305. Sense of Congress concerning funding for special education.

                Subtitle B--Sense of the House Provisions

Sec. 311. Sense of the House on the Commission on International 
          Religious Freedom.
Sec. 312. Sense of the House on assessment of welfare-to-work programs.

               Subtitle C--Sense of the Senate Provisions

Sec. 321. Sense of the Senate that the Federal Government should not 
          invest the social security trust funds in private financial 
          markets.
Sec. 322. Sense of the Senate regarding the modernization and 
          improvement of the medicare program.
Sec. 323. Sense of the Senate on education.
Sec. 324. Sense of the Senate on providing tax relief to Americans by 
          returning the non-social security surplus to taxpayers.
Sec. 325. Sense of the Senate on access to medicare services.
Sec. 326. Sense of the Senate on law enforcement.
Sec. 327. Sense of the Senate on improving security for United States 
          diplomatic missions.
Sec. 328. Sense of the Senate on increased funding for the National 
          Institutes of Health.
Sec. 329. Sense of the Senate on funding for Kyoto protocol 
          implementation prior to Senate ratification.
Sec. 330. Sense of the Senate on TEA-21 funding and the States.
Sec. 331. Sense of the Senate that the one hundred sixth Congress, first 
          session should reauthorize funds for the farmland protection 
          program.
Sec. 332. Sense of the Senate on the importance of social security for 
          individuals who become disabled.
Sec. 333. Sense of the Senate on reporting of on-budget trust fund 
          levels.
Sec. 334. Sense of the Senate regarding South Korea's international 
          trade practices on pork and beef.
Sec. 335. Sense of the Senate on funding for natural disasters.

                      TITLE I--LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

SEC. 101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

    The following budgetary levels are appropriate for the 
fiscal years 2000 through 2009:
            (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution--
                    (A) The recommended levels of Federal 
                revenues are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2000: $1,408,082,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001: $1,434,837,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002: $1,454,757,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003: $1,531,512,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004: $1,584,969,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005: $1,648,259,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $1,681,438,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $1,735,646,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $1,805,517,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $1,868,515,000,000.
                    (B) The amounts by which the aggregate 
                levels of Federal revenues should be changed 
                are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2000: $0.
                    Fiscal year 2001: -$7,810,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002: -$53,519,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003: -$31,806,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004: -$49,180,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005: -$62,637,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: -$109,275,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: -$135,754,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: -$150,692,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: -$177,195,000,000.
            (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total new budget authority are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2000: $1,426,720,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001: $1,455,785,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002: $1,486,875,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003: $1,559,079,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004: $1,612,910,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005: $1,666,657,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $1,698,214,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $1,753,326,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $1,814,537,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $1,874,778,000,000.
            (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels 
        of total budget outlays are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2000: $1,408,082,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001: $1,434,837,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002: $1,454,757,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003: $1,531,512,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004: $1,583,753,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005: $1,639,568,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $1,667,838,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $1,717,042,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $1,781,865,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $1,841,858,000,000.
            (4) Deficits or surpluses.--For purposes of the 
        enforcement of this resolution, the amounts of the 
        deficits or surpluses are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2000: $0.
                    Fiscal year 2001: $0.
                    Fiscal year 2002: $0.
                    Fiscal year 2003: $0.
                    Fiscal year 2004: $1,216,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005: $8,691,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $13,600,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $18,604,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $23,652,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $26,657,000,000.
            (5) Public debt.--The appropriate levels of the 
        public debt are as follows:
                    Fiscal year 2000: $5,628,400,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001: $5,708,500,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002: $5,793,500,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003: $5,877,400,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004: $5,956,300,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005: $6,024,600,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006: $6,084,600,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007: $6,136,500,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008: $6,173,900,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009: $6,203,400,000,000.

SEC. 102. SOCIAL SECURITY.

    (a) Social Security Revenues.--For purposes of Senate 
enforcement under sections 302, and 311 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of revenues of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2000: $468,020,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $487,744,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $506,293,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2003: $527,326,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2004: $549,876,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2005: $576,840,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006: $601,834,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007: $628,277,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008: $654,422,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009: $681,313,000,000.
    (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of Senate 
enforcement under sections 302, and 311 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the amounts of outlays of the Federal Old-
Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as follows:
            Fiscal year 2000: $327,256,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2001: $339,789,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2002: $350,127,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2003: $362,197,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2004: $375,253,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2005: $389,485,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2006: $404,596,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2007: $420,616,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2008: $438,132,000,000.
            Fiscal year 2009: $459,496,000,000.

SEC. 103. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

    Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
levels of new budget authority and budget outlays for fiscal 
years 2000 through 2009 for each major functional category are:
            (1) National Defense (050):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $288,812,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $276,567,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $303,616,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $285,949,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $308,175,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $291,714,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $318,277,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $303,642,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $327,166,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $313,460,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $328,370,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $316,675,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $329,600,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $315,110,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $330,869,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $313,686,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $332,175,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $317,102,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $333,451,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $318,040,000,000.
            (2) International Affairs (150):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,511,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $14,850,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,679,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $15,212,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,885,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $14,581,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,590,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,977,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,994,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,716,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,151,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,352,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,352,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,069,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,429,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,886,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,498,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,701,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,462,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,560,000,000.
            (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,955,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $18,214,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,946,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,907,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,880,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,784,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,772,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,768,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,768,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000
                            (B) Outlays, $17,768,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,768,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,912,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,768,000,000.
            (4) Energy (270):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $49,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$650,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$1,435,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$3,136,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$163,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,138,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$84,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,243,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$319,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,381,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$447,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,452,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$452,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,453,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$506,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,431,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$208,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,137,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$76,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$1,067,000,000.
            (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,820,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,644,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,833,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $21,879,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,597,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $21,223,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,479,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,579,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,992,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,003,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,036,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,929,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,066,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,966,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,167,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,925,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,158,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,861,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,541,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $23,238,000,000.
            (6) Agriculture (350):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,331,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,160,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,519,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,279,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,788,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,036,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,955,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,252,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,072,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,526,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,553,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,882,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,609,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,083,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,711,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,145,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,763,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,162,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,853,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,223,000,000.
            (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $9,664,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $4,270,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $10,620,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $5,754,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,450,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,188,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,529,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,875,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,859,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,439,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,660,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,437,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,635,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $9,130,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,666,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $8,879,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,642,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $8,450,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,415,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $8,824,000,000.
            (8) Transportation (400):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $51,825,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $45,833,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,996,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $47,711,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $50,845,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $47,265,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,255,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,769,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,285,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,255,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,314,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,071,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,345,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,039,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,378,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,039,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,412,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,056,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $52,447,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,082,000,000.
            (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $6,369,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $10,462,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $4,011,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $8,298,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,608,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $5,857,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,851,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $4,536,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,828,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $3,812,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,819,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $3,012,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,816,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $2,732,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,810,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $2,606,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,811,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $2,522,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $3,808,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $2,483,000,000.
            (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social 
        Services (500):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $66,347,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $63,806,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $66,030,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $64,574,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $66,476,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $64,847,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $70,963,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $67,460,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $73,277,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $70,162,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $74,093,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $72,672,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $74,858,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $73,843,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $75,762,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $74,748,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $76,773,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $75,738,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $76,680,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $75,688,000,000.
            (11) Health (550):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $156,181,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $152,986,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $164,089,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $162,357,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $173,330,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $173,767,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $184,679,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $185,330,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $197,893,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $198,499,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $212,821,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $212,637,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $228,379,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $228,323,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $246,348,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $245,472,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $265,160,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $264,420,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $285,541,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $284,941,000,000.
            (12) Medicare (570):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $208,652,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $208,698,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $222,104,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $222,252,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $230,593,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $230,222,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $250,743,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $250,871,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $268,558,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $268,738,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $295,574,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $295,188,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $306,772,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $306,929,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $337,566,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $337,761,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $365,642,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $365,225,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $394,078,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $394,249,000,000.
            (13) Income Security (600):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $244,390,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $248,088,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $250,473,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $257,033,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $262,970,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $266,577,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $276,386,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $276,176,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $286,076,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $285,533,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $298,442,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $298,424,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $304,655,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $305,093,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $310,547,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $311,448,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $323,815,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $325,266,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $334,062,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $335,604,000,000.
            (14) Social Security (650):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $14,239,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $14,348,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $13,768,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,750,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $15,573,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $15,555,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $16,299,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $16,281,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,087,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,069,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $17,961,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $17,943,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $18,895,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $18,877,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $19,907,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $19,889,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $21,033,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $21,015,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $22,233,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $22,215,000,000.
            (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $45,424,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $45,564,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $44,255,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $44,980,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $44,728,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $45,117,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $45,897,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,385,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $46,248,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,713,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $48,789,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $49,292,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $47,266,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $47,812,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $47,805,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $46,231,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $48,451,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $48,997,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $49,099,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $49,671,000,000.
            (16) Administration of Justice (750):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $23,434,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $25,349,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,656,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $25,117,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,657,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $24,932,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $24,561,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $24,425,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,195,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,084,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,334,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,221,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,370,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,249,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,403,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,285,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,450,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,346,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $26,481,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $26,368,000,000.
            (17) General Government (800):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,339,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $13,476,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $11,916,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,605,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,060,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,282,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,083,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,150,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,099,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,186,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,112,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,906,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,134,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,839,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,150,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,873,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,169,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $12,064,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $12,178,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $11,931,000,000.
            (18) Net Interest (900):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $275,486,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $275,486,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $271,071,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $271,071,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $267,482,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $267,482,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $265,200,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $265,200,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $263,498,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $263,498,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $261,143,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $261,143,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $258,985,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $258,985,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $257,468,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $257,468,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $255,085,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $255,085,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        $252,968,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, $252,968,000,000.
            (19) Allowances (920):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$9,833,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$10,794,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$8,481,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$12,874,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$6,437,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$19,976,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$4,394,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$4,835,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$4,481,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$5,002,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$4,515,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$5,067,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$4,619,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$5,192,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$5,210,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$5,780,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$5,279,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$5,851,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$5,316,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$5,889,000,000.
            (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
                    Fiscal year 2000:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$34,275,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$34,275,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2001:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$36,881,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$36,881,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2002:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$43,654,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$43,654,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2003:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$37,102,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$37,102,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2004:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$37,329,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$37,329,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2005:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$38,465,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$38,465,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2006:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$39,364,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$39,364,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2007:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$40,856,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$40,856,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2008:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$41,925,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$41,925,000,000.
                    Fiscal year 2009:
                            (A) New budget authority, 
                        -$43,039,000,000.
                            (B) Outlays, -$43,039,000,000.

SEC. 104. RECONCILIATION OF REVENUE REDUCTIONS IN THE SENATE.

    Not later than July 23, 1999, the Senate Committee on 
Finance shall report to the Senate a reconciliation bill 
proposing changes in laws within its jurisdiction necessary to 
reduce revenues by not more than $0 in fiscal year 2000, 
$142,315,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2000 through 
2004, and $777,868,000 for the period of fiscal years 2000 
through 2009.

SEC. 105. RECONCILIATION OF REVENUE REDUCTIONS IN THE HOUSE OF 
                    REPRESENTATIVES.

    Not later than July 16, 1999, the Committee on Ways and 
Means shall report to the House of Representatives a 
reconciliation bill proposing changes in laws within its 
jurisdiction necessary to reduce revenues by not more than $0 
in fiscal year 2000, $142,315,000,000 for the period of fiscal 
years 2000 through 2004, and $777,868,000,000 for the period of 
fiscal years 2000 through 2009.

             TITLE II--BUDGETARY RESTRAINTS AND RULEMAKING

SEC. 201. SAFE DEPOSIT BOX FOR SOCIAL SECURITY SURPLUSES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
            (1) under the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, the 
        social security trust funds are off-budget for purposes 
        of the President's budget submission and the concurrent 
        resolution on the budget;
            (2) the social security trust funds have been 
        running surpluses for 17 years;
            (3) these surpluses have been used to implicitly 
        finance the general operations of the Federal 
        Government;
            (4) in fiscal year 2000, the social security 
        surplus will exceed $137 billion;
            (5) for the first time, a concurrent resolution on 
        the budget balances the Federal budget without counting 
        the social security surpluses;
            (6) the only way to ensure that social security 
        surpluses are not diverted for other purposes is to 
        balance the budget exclusive of such surpluses; and
            (7) Congress and the President should take such 
        steps as are necessary to ensure that future budgets 
        are balanced excluding the surpluses generated by the 
        social security trust funds.
    (b) Point of Order.--
            (1) In general.--It shall not be in order in the 
        House of Representatives or the Senate to consider any 
        revision to this resolution or a concurrent resolution 
        on the budget for fiscal year 2001, or any amendment 
        thereto or conference report thereon, that sets forth a 
        deficit for any fiscal year.
            (2) Deficit levels.--For purposes of this 
        subsection--
                    (A) a deficit shall be the level (if any) 
                set forth in the most recently agreed to 
                concurrent resolution on the budget for that 
                fiscal year pursuant to section 301(a)(3) of 
                the Congressional Budget Act of 1974; and
                    (B) in setting forth the deficit level 
                pursuant to section 301(a)(3) of the 
                Congressional Budget Act of 1974, that level 
                shall not include any adjustments in aggregates 
                that would be made pursuant to any reserve fund 
                that provides for adjustments in allocations 
                and aggregates for legislation that enhances 
                retirement security through structural 
                programmatic reform.
            (3) Exception.--Paragraph (1) shall not apply if 
        the deficit for a fiscal year results solely from 
        legislation enacted pursuant to section 202.
            (4) Budget committee determinations.--For purposes 
        of this subsection, the levels of new budget authority, 
        outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, 
        revenues, deficits, and surpluses for a fiscal year 
        shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by 
        the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
        Representatives or the Senate, as applicable.

SEC. 202. RESERVE FUND FOR RETIREMENT SECURITY.

    Whenever the Committee on Ways and Means of the House or 
the Committee on Finance of the Senate reports a bill, or an 
amendment thereto is offered, or a conference report thereon is 
submitted that enhances retirement security through structural 
programmatic reform, the appropriate chairman of the Committee 
on the Budget may--
            (1) increase the appropriate allocations and 
        aggregates of new budget authority and outlays by the 
        amount of new budget authority provided by such measure 
        (and outlays flowing therefrom) for that purpose;
            (2) in the Senate, adjust the levels used for 
        determining compliance with the pay-as-you-go 
        requirements of section 207; and
            (3) reduce the revenue aggregates by the amount of 
        the revenue loss resulting from that measure for that 
        purpose.

SEC. 203. RESERVE FUND FOR MEDICARE.

    (a) In General.--Whenever the Committee on Ways and Means 
of the House or the Committee on Finance of the Senate reports 
a bill, or an amendment thereto is offered (in the House), or a 
conference report thereon is submitted that implements 
structural medicare reform and significantly extends the 
solvency of the Medicare Hospital Insurance Trust Fund without 
the use of transfers of new subsidies from the general fund, 
the appropriate chairman of the Committee on the Budget may 
change committee allocations and spending aggregates if such 
legislation will not cause an on-budget deficit for--
            (1) fiscal year 2000;
            (2) the period of fiscal years 2000 through 2004; 
        or
            (3) the period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
    (b) Prescription Drug Benefit.--The adjustments made 
pursuant to subsection (a) may be made to address the cost of 
the prescription drug benefit.

SEC. 204. RESERVE FUND FOR AGRICULTURE.

    (a) Adjustment.--
            (1) In general.--Whenever the Committee on 
        Agriculture of the House or the Committee on 
        Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the Senate 
        reports a bill, or an amendment thereto is offered (in 
        the House), or a conference report thereon is submitted 
        that provides risk management or income assistance for 
        agriculture producers that complies with paragraph (2), 
        the appropriate Chairman of the Committee on the Budget 
        shall increase the allocation of budget authority and 
        outlays to that committee by the amount of budget 
        authority (and the outlays resulting therefrom) 
        provided by that legislation for such purpose in 
        accordance with subsection (b).
            (2) Condition.--Legislation complies with this 
        paragraph if it does not cause a net increase in budget 
        authority or outlays for fiscal year 2000 and does not 
        cause a net increase in budget authority that is 
        greater than $2,000,000,000 for any of fiscal years 
        2001 through 2004.
    (b) Limitations.--The adjustments to the allocations 
required by subsection (a) shall not exceed--
            (1) $6,000,000,000 in budget authority (and the 
        outlays resulting therefrom) for the period of fiscal 
        years 2000 through 2004; and
            (2) $6,000,000,000 in budget authority and outlays 
        for the period of fiscal years 2000 through 2009.

SEC. 205. TAX REDUCTION RESERVE FUND IN THE SENATE.

    In the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget 
may reduce the spending and revenue aggregates and may revise 
committee allocations for legislation that reduces revenues if 
such legislation will not increase the deficit or decrease the 
surplus for--
            (1) fiscal year 2000;
            (2) the period of fiscal years 2000 through 2004; 
        or
            (3) the period of fiscal years 2000 through 2009.

SEC. 206. EMERGENCY DESIGNATION POINT OF ORDER IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Designations.--
            (1) Guidance.--In making a designation of a 
        provision of legislation as an emergency requirement 
        under section 251(b)(2)(A) or 252(e) of the Balanced 
        Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, the 
        committee report and any statement of managers 
        accompanying that legislation shall analyze whether a 
        proposed emergency requirement meets all the criteria 
        in paragraph (2).
            (2) Criteria.--
                    (A) In general.--The criteria to be 
                considered in determining whether a proposed 
                expenditure or tax change is an emergency 
                requirement are whether it is--
                            (i) necessary, essential, or vital 
                        (not merely useful or beneficial);
                            (ii) sudden, quickly coming into 
                        being, and not building up over time;
                            (iii) an urgent, pressing, and 
                        compelling need requiring immediate 
                        action;
                            (iv) subject to subparagraph (B), 
                        unforeseen, unpredictable, and 
                        unanticipated; and
                            (v) not permanent, temporary in 
                        nature.
                    (B) Unforeseen.--An emergency that is part 
                of an aggregate level of anticipated 
                emergencies, particularly when normally 
                estimated in advance, is not unforeseen.
            (3) Justification for failure to meet criteria.--If 
        the proposed emergency requirement does not meet all 
        the criteria set forth in paragraph (2), the committee 
        report or the statement of managers, as the case may 
        be, shall provide a written justification of why the 
        requirement should be accorded emergency status.
    (b) Point of Order.--When the Senate is considering a bill, 
resolution, amendment, motion, or conference report, a point of 
order may be made by a Senator against an emergency designation 
in that measure and if the Presiding Officer sustains that 
point of order, that provision making such a designation shall 
be stricken from the measure and may not be offered as an 
amendment from the floor.
    (c) Waiver and Appeal.--This section may be waived or 
suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-
fifths of the members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative 
vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen 
and sworn, shall be required in the Senate to sustain an appeal 
of the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under 
this section.
    (d) Definition of an Emergency Requirement.--A provision 
shall be considered an emergency designation if it designates 
any item an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A) or 252(e) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    (e) Form of the Point of Order.--A point of order under 
this subsection may be raised by a Senator as provided in 
section 313(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    (f) Conference Reports.--If a point of order is sustained 
under this section against a conference report the report shall 
be disposed of as provided in section 313(d) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
    (g) Exception for Defense Spending.--Subsection (b) shall 
not apply against an emergency designation for a provision 
making discretionary appropriations in the defense category.
    (h) Sunset.--This section shall expire on the adoption of 
the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2001.

SEC. 207. PAY-AS-YOU-GO POINT OF ORDER IN THE SENATE.

    (a) Purpose.--The Senate declares that it is essential to--
            (1) ensure continued compliance with the balanced 
        budget plan set forth in this resolution; and
            (2) continue the pay-as-you-go enforcement system.
    (b) Point of Order.--
            (1) In general.--It shall not be in order in the 
        Senate to consider any direct spending or revenue 
        legislation that would increase the on-budget deficit 
        or cause an on-budget deficit for any one of the three 
        applicable time periods as measured in paragraphs (5) 
        and (6).
            (2) Applicable time periods.--For purposes of this 
        subsection the term ``applicable time period'' means 
        any one of the three following periods:
                    (A) The first year covered by the most 
                recently adopted concurrent resolution on the 
                budget.
                    (B) The period of the first five fiscal 
                years covered by the most recently adopted 
                concurrent resolution on the budget.
                    (C) The period of the five fiscal years 
                following the first five fiscal years covered 
                in the most recently adopted concurrent 
                resolution on the budget.
            (3) Direct-spending legislation.--For purposes of 
        this subsection and except as provided in paragraph 
        (4), the term ``direct-spending legislation'' means any 
        bill, joint resolution, amendment, motion, or 
        conference report that affects direct spending as that 
        term is defined by and interpreted for purposes of the 
        Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
        1985.
            (4) Exclusion.--For purposes of this subsection, 
        the terms ``direct-spending legislation'' and ``revenue 
        legislation'' do not include--
                    (A) any concurrent resolution on the 
                budget; or
                    (B) any provision of legislation that 
                affects the full funding of, and continuation 
                of, the deposit insurance guarantee commitment 
                in effect on the date of enactment of the 
                Budget Enforcement Act of 1990.
            (5) Baseline.--Estimates prepared pursuant to this 
        section shall--
                    (A) use the baseline used for the most 
                recently adopted concurrent resolution on the 
                budget; and
                    (B) be calculated under the requirements of 
                subsections (b) through (d) of section 257 of 
                the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
                Control Act of 1985 for fiscal years beyond 
                those covered by that concurrent resolution on 
                the budget.
            (6) Prior surplus.--If direct spending or revenue 
        legislation increases the on-budget deficit or causes 
        an on-budget deficit when taken individually, then it 
        must also increase the on-budget deficit or cause an 
        on-budget deficit when taken together with all direct 
        spending and revenue legislation enacted since the 
        beginning of the calendar year not accounted for in the 
        baseline under paragraph (5)(A).
    (c) Waiver.--This section may be waived or suspended in the 
Senate only by the affirmative vote of three-fifths of the 
Members, duly chosen and sworn.
    (d) Appeals.--Appeals in the Senate from the decisions of 
the Chair relating to any provision of this section shall be 
limited to 1 hour, to be equally divided between, and 
controlled by, the appellant and the manager of the bill or 
joint resolution, as the case may be. An affirmative vote of 
three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly chosen and 
sworn, shall be required in the Senate to sustain an appeal of 
the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under this 
section.
    (e) Determination of Budget Levels.--For purposes of this 
section, the levels of new budget authority, outlays, and 
revenues for a fiscal year shall be determined on the basis of 
estimates made by the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.
    (f) Conforming Amendment.--Section 202 of House Concurrent 
Resolution 67 (104th Congress) is repealed.
    (g) Sunset.--Subsections (a) through (e) of this section 
shall expire September 30, 2002.

SEC. 208. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS AND 
                    AGGREGATES.

    (a) Application.--Any adjustments of allocations and 
aggregates made pursuant to this resolution for any measure 
shall--
            (1) apply while that measure is under 
        consideration;
            (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; 
        and
            (3) be published in the Congressional Record as 
        soon as practicable.
    (b) Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates.--Revised 
allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments 
shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 as allocations and aggregates contained in 
this resolution.
    (c) Enforcement in the House.--In the House, for the 
purpose of enforcing this resolution, sections 302(f) and 
311(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 shall apply to 
fiscal year 2000 and the total for fiscal year 2000 and the 4 
ensuing fiscal years.

SEC. 209. ESTABLISHMENT OF LEVELS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1999.

    The levels submitted pursuant to H. Res. 5 of the 106th 
Congress or S. Res. 312 of the 105th Congress, and any 
revisions authorized by such resolutions, shall be considered 
to be the levels and revisions of the concurrent resolution on 
the budget for fiscal year 1999.

SEC. 210. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND TO FOSTER THE EMPLOYMENT AND 
                    INDEPENDENCE OF INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES IN 
                    THE SENATE.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate, revenue and spending 
aggregates and other appropriate budgetary levels and limits 
may be adjusted and allocations may be revised for legislation 
that finances disability programs designed to allow individuals 
with disabilities to become employed and remain independent if, 
to the extent that this concurrent resolution on the budget 
does not include the costs of that legislation, the enactment 
of that legislation will not increase the deficit or decrease 
the surplus in this resolution for--
            (1) fiscal year 2000;
            (2) the period of fiscal years 2000 through 2004; 
        or
            (3) the period of fiscal years 2005 through 2009.
    (b) Revised Allocations.--
            (1) Adjustments for legislation.--Upon the 
        consideration of legislation pursuant to subsection 
        (a), the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
        Senate may file with the Senate appropriately-revised 
        allocations under section 302(a) of the Congressional 
        Budget Act of 1974 and revised functional levels and 
        aggregates to carry out this section.
            (2) Adjustments for amendments.--If the chairman of 
        the Committee on the Budget of the Senate submits an 
        adjustment under this section for legislation in 
        furtherance of the purpose described in subsection (a), 
        upon the offering of an amendment to that legislation 
        that would necessitate such submission, the Chairman 
        shall submit to the Senate appropriately-revised 
        allocations under section 302(a) of the Congressional 
        Budget Act of 1974 and revised functional levels and 
        aggregates to carry out this section.

SEC. 211. RESERVE FUND FOR A FISCAL YEAR 2000 SURPLUS.

    (a) Congressional Budget Office Updated Budget Forecast for 
Fiscal Year 2000.--Pursuant to section 202(e)(2) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Congressional Budget 
Office shall update its economic and budget forecast for fiscal 
year 2000 by July 1, 1999.
    (b) Reporting a Surplus.--If the report provided pursuant 
to subsection (a) estimates an on-budget surplus for fiscal 
year 2000, the appropriate Chairman of the Committee on the 
Budget may make the adjustments as provided in subsection (c).
    (c) Adjustments.--The appropriate Chairman of the Committee 
on the Budget may make the following adjustments in an amount 
equal to the on-budget surplus for fiscal year 2000 as 
estimated in the report submitted pursuant to subsection (a)--
            (1) reduce the on-budget revenue aggregate by that 
        amount for fiscal year 2000;
            (2) increase the on-budget surplus levels used for 
        determining compliance with the pay-as-you-go 
        requirements of section 207; and
            (3) adjust the instruction in sections 104 and 105 
        of this resolution to--
                    (A) reduce revenues by that amount for 
                fiscal year 2000; and
                    (B) increase the reduction in revenues for 
                the period of fiscal years 2000 through 2004 
                and for the period of fiscal years 2000 through 
                2009 by that amount.

SEC. 212. RESERVE FUND FOR EDUCATION IN THE SENATE.

    (a) In General.--In the Senate, upon reporting of a bill, 
the offering of an amendment thereto, or the submission of a 
conference report thereon that allows local educational 
agencies to use appropriated funds to carry out activities 
under part B of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 
that complies with subsection (b), the Chairman of the 
Committee on the Budget of the Senate may--
            (1) increase the outlay aggregate and allocation 
        for fiscal year 2000 by not more than $360,000,000; and
            (2) adjust the levels used for determining 
        compliance with the pay-as-you-go requirements of 
        section 207.
    (b) Condition.--Legislation complies with this subsection 
if it does not cause a net increase in budget authority or 
outlays for the periods of fiscal years 2000 through 2004 and 
2000 through 2009.

SEC. 213. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

    Congress adopts the provisions of this title--
            (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the 
        Senate and the House of Representatives, respectively, 
        and as such they shall be considered as part of the 
        rules of each House, or of that House to which they 
        specifically apply, and such rules shall supersede 
        other rules only to the extent that they are 
        inconsistent therewith; and
            (2) with full recognition of the constitutional 
        right of either House to change those rules (so far as 
        they relate to that House) at any time, in the same 
        manner, and to the same extent as in the case of any 
        other rule of that House.

       TITLE III--SENSE OF CONGRESS, HOUSE, AND SENATE PROVISIONS

                Subtitle A--Sense of Congress Provisions

SEC. 301. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE PROTECTION OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY 
                    SURPLUSES.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
            (1) Congress and the President should balance the 
        budget excluding the surpluses generated by the social 
        security trust funds;
            (2) reducing the Federal debt held by the public is 
        a top national priority, strongly supported on a 
        bipartisan basis, as evidenced by Federal Reserve 
        Chairman Alan Greenspan's comment that debt reduction 
        ``is a very important element in sustaining economic 
        growth'', as well as President Clinton's comments that 
        it ``is very, very important that we get the Government 
        debt down'' when referencing his own plans to use the 
        budget surplus to reduce Federal debt held by the 
        public;
            (3) according to the Congressional Budget Office, 
        balancing the budget excluding the surpluses generated 
        by the social security trust funds will reduce debt 
        held by the public by a total of $1,723,000,000,000 by 
        the end of fiscal year 2009, $417,000,000,000, or 32 
        percent, more than it would be reduced under the 
        President's fiscal year 2000 budget submission;
            (4) further, according to the Congressional Budget 
        Office, that the President's budget would actually 
        spend $40,000,000,000 of the social security surpluses 
        in fiscal year 2000 on new spending programs, and spend 
        $158,000,000,000 of the social security surpluses on 
        new spending programs from fiscal year 2000 through 
        2004; and
            (5) social security surpluses should be used for 
        social security reform, retirement security, or to 
        reduce the debt held by the public and should not be 
        used for other purposes.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
the functional totals in this concurrent resolution on the 
budget assume that Congress shall pass legislation which--
            (1) reaffirms the provisions of section 13301 of 
        the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990 that 
        provides that the receipts and disbursements of the 
        social security trust funds shall not be counted for 
        the purposes of the budget submitted by the President, 
        the congressional budget, or the Balanced Budget and 
        Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, and provides for 
        a point of order within the Senate against any 
        concurrent resolution on the budget, an amendment 
        thereto, or a conference report thereon that violates 
        that section;
            (2) mandates that the social security surpluses are 
        used only for the payment of social security benefits, 
        retirement security, social security reform, or to 
        reduce the Federal debt held by the public and such 
        mandate shall be implemented by establishing a 
        supermajority point of order in the Senate against 
        limits established on the level of debt held by the 
        public;
            (3) provides for a Senate super-majority point of 
        order against any bill, resolution, amendment, motion 
        or conference report that would use social security 
        surpluses on anything other than the payment of social 
        security benefits, social security reform, retirement 
        security, or the reduction of the Federal debt held by 
        the public;
            (4) ensures that all social security benefits are 
        paid on time; and
            (5) accommodates social security reform 
        legislation.

SEC. 302. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON PROVIDING ADDITIONAL DOLLARS TO THE 
                    CLASSROOM.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
            (1) strengthening America's public schools while 
        respecting State and local control is critically 
        important to the future of our children and our Nation;
            (2) education is a local responsibility, a State 
        priority, and a national concern;
            (3) working with the Nation's governors, parents, 
        teachers, and principals must take place in order to 
        strengthen public schools and foster educational 
        excellence;
            (4) education initiatives should boost academic 
        achievement for all students; and excellence in 
        American classrooms means having high expectations for 
        all students, teachers, and administrators, and holding 
        schools accountable to the children and parents served 
        by such schools;
            (5) successful schools and school systems are 
        characterized by parental involvement in the education 
        of their children, local control, emphasis on basic 
        academics, emphasis on fundamental skills and 
        exceptional teachers in the classroom;
            (6) the one-size-fits-all approach to education 
        often creates barriers to innovation and reform 
        initiatives at the local level; America's rural schools 
        face challenges quite different from their urban 
        counterparts; and parents, teachers and State and local 
        officials should have the freedom to tailor their 
        education plans and reforms according to the unique 
        educational needs of their children;
            (7) the consolidation of various Federal education 
        programs will benefit our Nation's children, parents, 
        and teachers by sending more dollars directly to the 
        classroom; and
            (8) our Nation's children deserve an educational 
        system that will provide opportunities to excel.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) Congress should enact legislation that would 
        consolidate thirty-one Federal K-12 education programs;
            (2) the Department of Education, the States, and 
        local educational agencies should work together to 
        ensure that not less than 95 percent of all funds 
        appropriated for the purpose of carrying out elementary 
        and secondary education programs administered by the 
        Department of Education is spent for our children in 
        their classrooms;
            (3) increased funding for elementary and secondary 
        education should be directed to States and local school 
        districts; and
            (4) decision making authority should be placed in 
        the hands of States, localities, and families to 
        implement innovative solutions to local educational 
        challenges and to increase the performance of all 
        students, unencumbered by unnecessary Federal rules and 
        regulations.

SEC. 303. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON ASSET-BUILDING FOR THE WORKING POOR.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
            (1) 33 percent of all American households and 60 
        percent of African American households have no or 
        negative financial assets.
            (2) 46.9 percent of all children in America live in 
        households with no financial assets, including 40 
        percent of Caucasian children and 75 percent of African 
        American children.
            (3) In order to provide low-income families with 
        more tools for empowerment, incentives which encourage 
        asset-building should be established.
            (4) Across the Nation, numerous small public, 
        private, and public-private asset-building incentives, 
        including individual development accounts, are 
        demonstrating success at empowering low-income workers.
            (5) Middle and upper income Americans currently 
        benefit from tax incentives for building assets.
            (6) The Federal Government should utilize the 
        Federal tax code to provide low-income Americans with 
        incentives to work and build assets in order to escape 
        poverty permanently.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
the provisions of this resolution assume that Congress should 
modify the Federal tax law to include provisions which 
encourage low-income workers and their families to save for 
buying a first home, starting a business, obtaining an 
education, or taking other measures to prepare for the future.

SEC. 304. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON CHILD NUTRITION.

    (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
            (1) both Republicans and Democrats understand that 
        an adequate diet and proper nutrition are essential to 
        a child's general well-being;
            (2) the lack of an adequate diet and proper 
        nutrition may adversely affect a child's ability to 
        perform up to his or her ability in school;
            (3) the Government currently plays a role in 
        funding school nutrition programs; and
            (4) there is a bipartisan commitment to helping 
        children learn.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that in 
the House the Committee on Education and the Workforce and the 
Committee on Agriculture and in the Senate the Committee on 
Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry should examine our 
Nation's nutrition programs to determine if they can be 
improved, particularly with respect to services to low-income 
children.

SEC. 305. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING FUNDING FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION.

    (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) In the Individuals with Disabilities Education 
        Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.) (referred to in this 
        resolution as the ``Act''), Congress found that 
        improving educational results for children with 
        disabilities is an essential element of our national 
        policy of ensuring equality of opportunity, full 
        participation, independent living, and economic self-
        sufficiency for individuals with disabilities.
            (2) In the Act, the Secretary of Education is 
        instructed to make grants to States to assist them in 
        providing special education and related services to 
        children with disabilities.
            (3) The Act represents a commitment by the Federal 
        Government to fund 40 percent of the average per-pupil 
        expenditure in public elementary and secondary schools 
        in the United States.
            (4) The budget submitted by the President for 
        fiscal year 2000 ignores the commitment by the Federal 
        Government under the Act to fund special education and 
        instead proposes the creation of new programs that 
        limit the manner in which States may spend the limited 
        Federal education dollars received.
            (5) The budget submitted by the President for 
        fiscal year 2000 fails to increase funding for special 
        education, and leaves States and localities with an 
        enormous unfunded mandate to pay for growing special 
        education costs.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
the budgetary levels in this resolution assume that part B of 
the Individuals with Disabilities Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.) 
should be fully funded at the originally promised level before 
any funds are appropriated for new education programs.

               Subtitle B--Sense of the House Provisions

SEC. 311. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON THE COMMISSION ON INTERNATIONAL 
                    RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.

    (a) Findings.--The House finds that--
            (1) persecution of individuals on the sole ground 
        of their religious beliefs and practices occurs in 
        countries around the world and affects millions of 
        lives;
            (2) such persecution violates international norms 
        of human rights, including those established in the 
        Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 
        International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, 
        the Helsinki Accords, and the Declaration on the 
        Elimination of all Forms of Intolerance and 
        Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief;
            (3) such persecution is abhorrent to all Americans, 
        and our very Nation was founded on the principle of the 
        freedom to worship according to the dictates of our 
        conscience; and
            (4) in 1998 Congress unanimously passed, and 
        President Clinton signed into law, the International 
        Religious Freedom Act of 1998, which established the 
        United States Commission on International Religious 
        Freedom to monitor facts and circumstances of 
        violations of religious freedom and authorized 
        $3,000,000 to carry out the functions of the Commission 
        for each of fiscal years 1999 and 2000.
    (b) Sense of the House.--It is the sense of the House 
that--
            (1) this resolution assumes that $3,000,000 will be 
        appropriated within function 150 for fiscal year 2000 
        for the United States Commission on International 
        Religious Freedom to carry out its duties; and
            (2) the House Committee on Appropriations is 
        strongly urged to appropriate such amount for the 
        Commission.

SEC. 312. SENSE OF THE HOUSE ON ASSESSMENT OF WELFARE-TO-WORK PROGRAMS.

    (a) In General.--It is the sense of the House that, 
recognizing the need to maximize the benefit of the Welfare-to-
Work Program, the Secretary of Labor should prepare a report on 
Welfare-to-Work Programs pursuant to section 403(a)(5) of the 
Social Security Act. This report should include information on 
the following--
            (1) the extent to which the funds available under 
        such section have been used (including the number of 
        States that have not used any of such funds), the types 
        of programs that have received such funds, the number 
        of and characteristics of the recipients of assistance 
        under such programs, the goals of such programs, the 
        duration of such programs, the costs of such programs, 
        any evidence of the effects of such programs on such 
        recipients, and accounting of the total amount expended 
        by the States from such funds, and the rate at which 
        the Secretary expects such funds to be expended for 
        each of the fiscal years 2000, 2001, and 2002;
            (2) with regard to the unused funds allocated for 
        Welfare-to-Work for each of fiscal years 1998 and 1999, 
        identify areas of the Nation that have unmet needs for 
        Welfare-to-Work initiatives; and
            (3) identify possible Congressional action that may 
        be taken to reprogram Welfare-to-Work funds from States 
        that have not utilized previously allocated funds to 
        places of unmet need, including those States that have 
        rejected or otherwise not utilized prior funding.
    (b) Report.--It is the sense of the House that, not later 
than January 1, 2000, the Secretary of Labor should submit to 
the Committee on the Budget and the Committee on Ways and Means 
of the House and the Committee on Finance of the Senate, in 
writing, the report described in subsection (a).

               Subtitle C--Sense of the Senate Provisions

SEC. 321. SENSE OF THE SENATE THAT THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT SHOULD NOT 
                    INVEST THE SOCIAL SECURITY TRUST FUNDS IN PRIVATE 
                    FINANCIAL MARKETS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the assumptions 
underlying the functional totals in this resolution assume that 
the Federal Government should not directly invest contributions 
made to the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund 
and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund established 
under section 201 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 401) in 
private financial markets.

SEC. 322. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING THE MODERNIZATION AND 
                    IMPROVEMENT OF THE MEDICARE PROGRAM.

    (a) Findings.--The Senate finds the following:
            (1) The health insurance coverage provided under 
        the medicare program under title XVIII of the Social 
        Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1395 et seq.) is an integral 
        part of the financial security for retired and disabled 
        individuals, as such coverage protects those 
        individuals against the financially ruinous costs of a 
        major illness.
            (2) Expenditures under the medicare program for 
        hospital, physician, and other essential health care 
        services that are provided to nearly 39,000,000 retired 
        and disabled individuals will be $232,000,000,000 in 
        fiscal year 2000.
            (3) During the nearly 35 years since the medicare 
        program was established, the Nation's health care 
        delivery and financing system has undergone major 
        transformations. However, the medicare program has not 
        kept pace with such transformations.
            (4) Former Congressional Budget Office Director 
        Robert Reischauer has described the medicare program as 
        it exists today as failing on the following 4 key 
        dimensions (known as the ``Four I's''):
                    (A) The program is inefficient.
                    (B) The program is inequitable.
                    (C) The program is inadequate.
                    (D) The program is insolvent.
            (5) The President's budget framework does not 
        devote 15 percent of the budget surpluses to the 
        medicare program. The Federal budget process does not 
        provide a mechanism for setting aside current surpluses 
        for future obligations. As a result, the notion of 
        saving 15 percent of the surplus for the medicare 
        program cannot practically be carried out.
            (6) The President's budget framework would transfer 
        to the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund more than 
        $900,000,000,000 over 15 years in new IOUs that must be 
        redeemed later by raising taxes on American workers, 
        cutting benefits, or borrowing more from the public, 
        and these new IOUs would increase the gross debt of the 
        Federal Government by the amounts transferred.
            (7) The Congressional Budget Office has stated that 
        the transfers described in paragraph (6), which are 
        strictly intragovernmental, have no effect on the 
        unified budget surpluses or the on-budget surpluses and 
        therefore have no effect on the debt held by the 
        public.
            (8) The President's budget framework does not 
        provide access to, or financing for, prescription 
        drugs.
            (9) The Comptroller General of the United States 
        has stated that the President's medicare proposal does 
        not constitute reform of the program and ``is likely to 
        create a public misperception that something meaningful 
        is being done to reform the medicare program''.
            (10) The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 enacted 
        changes to the medicare program which strengthen and 
        extend the solvency of that program.
            (11) The Congressional Budget Office has stated 
        that without the changes made to the medicare program 
        by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, the depletion of 
        the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund would now be 
        imminent.
            (12) The President's budget proposes to cut 
        medicare program spending by $19,400,000,000 over 10 
        years, primarily through reductions in payments to 
        providers under that program.
            (13) The recommendations by Senator John Breaux and 
        Representative William Thomas received the bipartisan 
        support of a majority of members on the National 
        Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare.
            (14) The Breaux-Thomas recommendations provide for 
        new prescription drug coverage for the neediest 
        beneficiaries within a plan that substantially improves 
        the solvency of the medicare program without 
        transferring new IOUs to the Federal Hospital Insurance 
        Trust Fund that must be redeemed later by raising 
        taxes, cutting benefits, or borrowing more from the 
        public.
    (b) Sense of the Senate.--It is the sense of the Senate 
that the provisions contained in this budget resolution assume 
the following:
            (1) This resolution does not adopt the President's 
        proposals to reduce medicare program spending by 
        $19,400,000,000 over 10 years, nor does this resolution 
        adopt the President's proposal to spend $10,000,000,000 
        of medicare program funds on unrelated programs.
            (2) Congress will not transfer to the Federal 
        Hospital Insurance Trust Fund new IOUs that must be 
        redeemed later by raising taxes on American workers, 
        cutting benefits, or borrowing more from the public.
            (3) Congress should work in a bipartisan fashion to 
        extend the solvency of the medicare program and to 
        ensure that benefits under that program will be 
        available to beneficiaries in the future.
            (4) The American public will be well and fairly 
        served in this undertaking if the medicare program 
        reform proposals are considered within a framework that 
        is based on the following 5 key principles offered in 
        testimony to the Senate Committee on Finance by the 
        Comptroller General of the United States:
                    (A) Affordability.
                    (B) Equity.
                    (C) Adequacy.
                    (D) Feasibility.
                    (E) Public acceptance.
            (5) The recommendations by Senator Breaux and 
        Congressman Thomas provide for new prescription drug 
        coverage for the neediest beneficiaries within a plan 
        that substantially improves the solvency of the 
        medicare program without transferring to the Federal 
        Hospital Insurance Trust Fund new IOUs that must be 
        redeemed later by raising taxes, cutting benefits, or 
        borrowing more from the public.
            (6) Congress should move expeditiously to consider 
        the bipartisan recommendations of the Chairmen of the 
        National Bipartisan Commission on the Future of 
        Medicare.
            (7) Congress should continue to work with the 
        President as he develops and presents his plan to fix 
        the problems of the medicare program.

SEC. 323. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON EDUCATION.

    It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) the levels in this resolution assume that--
                    (A) increased Federal funding for 
                elementary and secondary education should be 
                directed to States and local school districts;
                    (B) the Individuals with Disabilities 
                Education Act (20 U.S.C. 1400 et seq.) should 
                be fully funded at the originally promised 
                level before any funds are appropriated for new 
                education programs;
                    (C) decisionmaking authority should be 
                placed in the hands of States, localities, and 
                families to implement innovative solutions to 
                local education challenges and to increase the 
                performance of all students, unencumbered by 
                unnecessary Federal rules and regulations; and
                    (D) the Department of Education, the 
                States, and local education agencies should 
                work together to ensure that not less than 95 
                percent of all funds appropriated for the 
                purpose of carrying out elementary and 
                secondary education programs administered by 
                the Department of Education is spent for our 
                children in their classrooms; and
            (2) within the discretionary allocation provided to 
        the Committees on Appropriations of the House and 
        Senate for function 500 that to the maximum extent 
        practicable--
                    (A) the Federal Pell Grant maximum award 
                should be increased;
                    (B) funding for the Federal Supplemental 
                Education Opportunity Grants Program should be 
                increased;
                    (C) funding for the Federal capital 
                contributions under the Federal Perkins Loan 
                Program should be increased;
                    (D) funding for the Leveraging Educational 
                Assistance Partnership Program should be 
                increased;
                    (E) funding for the Federal Work-Study 
                Program should be increased; and
                    (F) funding for the Federal TRIO Programs 
                should be increased.

SEC. 324. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON PROVIDING TAX RELIEF TO AMERICANS BY 
                    RETURNING THE NON-SOCIAL SECURITY SURPLUS TO 
                    TAXPAYERS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that--
            (1) the levels in this concurrent resolution assume 
        that the Senate not only puts a priority on protecting 
        social security and medicare and reducing the Federal 
        debt, but also on tax reductions for working families 
        in the form of family tax relief and incentives to 
        stimulate savings, investment, job creation and 
        economic growth;
            (2) such tax relief could include an expansion of 
        the 15-percent bracket, marginal rate reductions, a 
        significant reduction or elimination of the marriage 
        penalty, retirement savings incentives, estate tax 
        relief, an above-the-line income tax deduction for 
        social security payroll taxes, tax incentives for 
        education savings, parity between the self-employed and 
        corporations with respect to the tax treatment of 
        health insurance premiums, and capital gains tax 
        fairness for family farmers;
            (3) the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 needs 
        comprehensive reform, and Congress should move 
        expeditiously to consider comprehensive tax reform and 
        simplification proposals; and
            (4) Congress should reject the President's proposed 
        tax increase on investment income of associations as 
        defined under section 501(c)(6) of the Internal Revenue 
        Code of 1986.

SEC. 325. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON ACCESS TO MEDICARE SERVICES.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution assume Congress should review payment levels in the 
medicare program to ensure beneficiaries have a range of 
choices available under the Medicare+Choice program and have 
access to high quality skilled nursing services, home health 
care services, and inpatient and outpatient hospital services 
in rural areas.

SEC. 326. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON LAW ENFORCEMENT.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution assume that--
            (1) significant resources should be provided for 
        strong law enforcement and aggressive crimefighting 
        programs and that funding in fiscal year 2000 for 
        critical programs should be equal to or greater than 
        funding for these programs in 1999;
            (2) critical programs include--
                    (A) State and local law enforcement 
                assistance, especially with respect to the 
                development and integration of anticrime 
                technology systems and upgrading forensic 
                laboratories and the information and 
                communications infrastructures upon which they 
                rely;
                    (B) continuing efforts to reduce violent 
                crime; and
                    (C) significant expansion of intensive 
                Federal firearms prosecutions projects such as 
                the ongoing programs in Richmond and 
                Philadelphia into America's most crime plagued 
                cities; and
            (3) the existence of a strong Federal drug control 
        policy is essential in order to reduce the supplies of 
        illegal drugs internationally and to reduce the number 
        of children who are exposed to or addicted to illegal 
        drugs and this can be furthered by--
                    (A) investments in programs authorized in 
                the Western Hemisphere Drug Elimination Act and 
                the proposed Drug Free Century Act; and
                    (B) securing adequate resources and 
                authority for the United States Customs Service 
                in any legislation reauthorizing the Service.

SEC. 327. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON IMPROVING SECURITY FOR UNITED STATES 
                    DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution assume that--
            (1) there is an urgent and ongoing requirement to 
        improve security for United States diplomatic missions 
        and personnel abroad; and
            (2) additional budgetary resources should be 
        devoted to programs within function 150 to enable 
        successful international leadership by the United 
        States.

SEC. 328. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON INCREASED FUNDING FOR THE NATIONAL 
                    INSTITUTES OF HEALTH.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution and legislation enacted pursuant to this resolution 
assume that--
            (1) there shall be a continuation of the pattern of 
        budgetary increases for biomedical research; and
            (2) additional resources should be targeted towards 
        autism research.

SEC. 329. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON FUNDING FOR KYOTO PROTOCOL 
                    IMPLEMENTATION PRIOR TO SENATE RATIFICATION.

    It is the sense of Senate that the levels in this 
resolution assume that funds should not be provided to put into 
effect the Kyoto Protocol prior to its Senate ratification in 
compliance with the requirements of the Byrd-Hagel Resolution 
and consistent with previous Administration assurances to 
Congress.

SEC. 330. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON TEA-21 FUNDING AND THE STATES.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution and any legislation enacted pursuant to this 
resolution assume that the President's fiscal year 2000 budget 
proposal to change the manner in which any excess Federal 
gasoline tax revenues are distributed to the States will not be 
implemented, but rather any of these funds will be distributed 
to the States pursuant to section 1105 of TEA-21.

SEC. 331. SENSE OF THE SENATE THAT THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTH CONGRESS, 
                    FIRST SESSION SHOULD REAUTHORIZE FUNDS FOR THE 
                    FARMLAND PROTECTION PROGRAM.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the functional totals 
contained in this resolution assume that the One Hundred Sixth 
Congress, First Session will reauthorize funds for the Farmland 
Protection Program.

SEC. 332. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON THE IMPORTANCE OF SOCIAL SECURITY FOR 
                    INDIVIDUALS WHO BECOME DISABLED.

    It is the sense of the Senate that levels in the resolution 
assume that--
            (1) social security plays a vital role in providing 
        adequate income for individuals who become disabled; 
        and
            (2) Congress and the President should take this 
        fact into account when considering proposals to reform 
        the social security program.

SEC. 333. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON REPORTING OF ON-BUDGET TRUST FUND 
                    LEVELS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution assume, effective for fiscal year 2001, the 
President's budget and the budget report of CBO required under 
section 202(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 should 
include an itemization of the on-budget trust funds for the 
budget year, including receipts, outlays, and balances.

SEC. 334. SENSE OF THE SENATE REGARDING SOUTH KOREA'S INTERNATIONAL 
                    TRADE PRACTICES ON PORK AND BEEF.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the Senate--
            (1) believes strongly that while a stable global 
        marketplace is in the best interest of America's 
        farmers and ranchers, the United States should seek a 
        mutually beneficial relationship without hindering the 
        competitiveness of American agriculture;
            (2) calls on South Korea to abide by its trade 
        commitments;
            (3) calls on the Secretary of the Treasury to 
        instruct the United States Executive Director of the 
        International Monetary Fund to promote vigorously 
        policies that encourage the opening of markets for beef 
        and pork products by requiring South Korea to abide by 
        its existing international trade commitments and to 
        reduce trade barriers, tariffs, and export subsidies;
            (4) calls on the President and the Secretaries of 
        Treasury and Agriculture to monitor and report to 
        Congress that resources will not be used to stabilize 
        the South Korean market at the expense of United States 
        agricultural goods or services; and
            (5) requests the United States Trade Representative 
        and the United States Department of Agriculture to 
        pursue the settlement of disputes with the Government 
        of South Korea on its failure to abide by its 
        international trade commitments on beef market access, 
        to consider whether Korea's reported plans for 
        subsidizing its pork industry would violate any of its 
        international trade commitments, and to determine what 
        impact Korea's subsidy plans would have on United 
        States agricultural interests, especially in Japan.

SEC. 335. SENSE OF THE SENATE ON FUNDING FOR NATURAL DISASTERS.

    It is the sense of the Senate that the levels in this 
resolution assume that, given that emergency spending for 
natural disasters continues to have an unpredictable yet 
substantial impact on the Federal budget and that consequently 
budgeting for disasters remains difficult, the Administration 
and Congress should review procedures for funding emergencies, 
including natural disasters, in any budget process reform 
legislation that comes before the Congress.
    And the Senate agree to the same.

                From the Committee on the Budget:
                                   John R. Kasich,
                                   Saxby Chambliss,
                                   Christopher Shays,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Chuck Grassley,
                                   Don Nickles,
                                   Phil Gramm,
                                   Slade Gorton,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.
       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the Senate and the House at 
the conference on disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the 
amendment of the Senate to the concurrent resolution (House 
Concurrent Resolution 68), setting forth the congressional 
budget for the United States for fiscal years 2000, 2001, 2002, 
2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009, submit the 
following joint statement to the House and the Senate in 
explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon by the 
managers and recommend in the accompanying conference report:
      The Senate amendment struck all out of the House 
resolution after the resolving clause and inserted a substitute 
text.
      The House recedes from its disagreement to the amendment 
of the Senate with an amendment which is a substitute for the 
House resolution and the Senate amendment.

                          Displays and Amounts

      The contents of concurrent budget resolutions are set 
forth in section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974.
      House Resolution.--The House budget resolution includes 
all of the items required as part of a concurrent budget 
resolution under section 301(a) of the Congressional Budget Act 
other than the spending and revenue levels for Social Security 
(which is used to enforce a point of order applicable only in 
the Senate).
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment includes all of 
the items required under section 301(a) of the Congressional 
Budget Act. As permitted under section 301(b) of the 
Congressional Budget Act, Section 102 of the Senate amendment 
includes advisory levels on debt held by the public.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement includes 
all of the items required by section 301(a) of the 
Congressional Budget Act.

                     Aggregates and Function Levels


                          Economic Assumptions

      Section 301(g)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act 
requires that the joint explanatory statement accompanying a 
conference report on a budget resolution set forth the common 
economic assumptions upon which the joint statement and 
conference report are based. The conference agreement is built 
upon the economic forecasts developed by the Congressional 
Budget Office and presented in CBO's ``The Economic and Budget 
Outlook: Fiscal Years 2000-2009'' (January 1999). A 
modification was made to near-term real GDP growth, however, to 
reflect recent economic strength.
      House Resolution.--The House modified CBO's economic 
assumptions to reflect the near-term strength of economy which 
became evident after CBO completed its winter forecast. The 
assumption for 1999 real GDP growth was increased from 2.3 
percent to 2.4 percent, while the assumption for 2000 real GDP 
growth was boosted from 1.7 percent to 2.0 percent. In both 
cases, the modified GDP growth rate assumptions are well below 
Blue Chip's current forecasts. These changes boosted revenues 
slightly relative to the CBO baseline in 1999, 2000 and 2001.
      Senate Amendment.--CBO's economic assumptions were used.
      Conference Agreement.--House economic assumptions were 
used, with minor technical adjustments.

                          ECONOMIC ASSUMPTIONS
                           [By calendar years]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                 1999   2000   2001   2002   2003   2004
------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Percent change, year over
 year:
    Real GDP..................    2.4    2.0    2.2    2.4    2.4    2.4
    Consumer Price Index......    2.5    2.6    2.6    2.6    2.6    2.6
    GDP Price Index...........    1.7    2.0    2.1    2.1    2.1    2.1
  Percent, annual:
    Unemployment rate.........    4.6    5.1    5.4    5.6    5.7    5.7
    Three-month Treasury bill     4.5    4.5    4.5    4.5    4.5    4.5
     rate.....................
    Ten-Year Treasury bond        5.1    5.3    5.4    5.4    5.4    5.4
     rate.....................
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Functions and Revenues

                     function 050, national defense

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 050. National 
Defense, totals $270.7 billion in budget authority [BA] and 
$268.7 billion in outlays for 1999, excluding one time 
emergencies enacted inthe 105th Congress. This budget function 
includes funding for the Department of Defense (95 percent of function 
total), defense activities of the Department of Energy (5 percent), and 
small amounts expended by the Selective Service, the General Services 
Administration, the Departments of Transportation and Justice, and 
other federal agencies.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $288.8 
billion in BA and $276.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,546.1 billion in BA and $1,471.3 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $3,200.5 billion in BA and $3,051.9 
billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $288.8 
billion in BA and $274.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,546.0 billion in BA and $1,469.3 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $3,200.5 billion in BA and $3,050.0 
billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $288.8 billion in BA and $276.6 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $1,546.0 billion in BA and $1,471.3 billion 
in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $3,200.5 billion in BA and 
$3,051.9 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                  FUNCTION 150: INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 150, International 
Affairs, totals about $13.7 billion in BA and $14.4 billion in 
outlays for 1999, excluding emergencies and other one-time 
spending increases including contributions to the International 
Monetary Fund and arrears to international organizations. This 
function includes funding for operation of the foreign affairs 
establishment including embassies and other diplomatic missions 
abroad, foreign aid loan and technical assistance activities in 
developing countries, security assistance to foreign 
governments, activities of the Foreign Military Sales Trust 
Fund, U.S. contributions to international financial 
institutions, Export-Import Bank and other trade promotion 
activities, and refugee assistance.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $11.2 
billion in BA and $14.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$56.7 billion in BA and $70.8 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $126.1 billion in BA and $133.0 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $12.5 
billion in BA and $14.9 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$65.3 billion in BA and $73.5 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $139.7 billion in BA and $140.4 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $12.5 billion in BA and $14.9 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $61.7 billion in BA and $72.3 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $133.6 billion in BA and 
$136.9 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

          FUNCTION 250: GENERAL SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 250, General 
Science, Space & Technology, totals $18.8 billion in BA and 
$18.2 billion in outlays for 1999. This function includes the 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) civilian 
space program and basic research programs of the National 
Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE).
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $18.0 
billion in BA and $18.2 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$89.6 billion in BA and $89.6 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $179.2 billion in BA and $178.4 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $18.0 
billion in BA and $18.2 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$89.6 billion in BA and $89.6 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $179.2 billion in BA and $178.4 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Amendment.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $18.0 billion in BA and $18.2 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $89.6 billion in BA and $89.6 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $179.2 billion in BA and 
$178.4 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                          FUNCTION 270: ENERGY

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 270, Energy, totals 
about $1.1 billion in BA and $677 million in outlays for 1999. 
This function includes civilian activities of the Department of 
Energy, the Rural Utilities Service, the power programs of the 
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), and the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission (NRC). Mandatory spending in this function contains 
large levels of offsetting receipts, resulting in net mandatory 
spending of -$1.8 billion in BA and -$2.6 billion in outlays 
for 1999. Congress provided $3.0 billion in discretionary BA 
for 1999.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $0.0 
billion in BA and -$0.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
-$2.0 billion in BA and -$7.5 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and -$3.6 billion in BA and $14.1 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate resolution sets forth $0.0 
billion in BA and -$0.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
-$2.0 billion in BA and -$7.5 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and -$3.6 billion in BA and $14.1 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $49 million in BA and -$0.7 billion in outlays in fiscal 
year 2000; -$2.0 billion in BA and -$7.5 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and -$3.6 billion in BA and $14.1 billion 
in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

            Function 300: Natural Resources and Environment

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 300, Natural 
Resources and Environment, totals about $23.9 billion in BA and 
$23.3 billion in outlays for 1999, excluding emergency and 
other one-time spending items. This function includes funding 
for water resources, conservation and land management, 
recreation resources, and pollution control and abatement. 
Agencies with major program activities within the function 
include the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Army 
Corps of Engineers, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration (NOAA), the Forest Service (within the 
Department of Agriculture), and the Department of the Interior, 
including the National Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife 
Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Bureau of Land 
Management and the Bureau of Reclamation, among others.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $22.8 
billion in BA and $22.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$113.7 billion in BA and $112.2 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $232.2 billion in BA and $229.6 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $21.7 
billion in BA and $22.4 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$108.6 billion in BA and $110.3 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $222.1 billion in BA and $222.7 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $22.8 billion in BA and $22.6 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $111.7 billion in BA and $111.3 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $227.7 billion in BA and 
$226.2 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                       Function 350: Agriculture

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 350, Agriculture, 
totals about $16.8 billion in BA and $14.9 billion in outlays 
for 1999, excluding one-time emergency spending provided for 
natural disasters and export market losses. This function 
includes funding for federal programs intended to promote the 
economic stability of agriculture through direct assistance and 
loans to food and fiber producers, provide regulatory, 
inspection and reporting services for agricultural markets, and 
promote research and education in agriculture and nutrition.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $14.3 
billion in BA and $13.2 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$63.7 billion in BA and $55.3 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $117.2 billion in BA and $101.7 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $14.8 
billion in BA and $13.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$63.7 billion in BA and $55.3 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years: and $117.2 billion in BA and $101.7 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $14.3 billion in BA and $13.2 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $63.7 billion in BA and $55.3 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $117.2 billion in BA and 
$101.7 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

               function 370: commerce and housing credit

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 370, Commerce and 
Housing Credit, totals about $1.9 billion in BA and $0.8 
billion in outlays for 1999. This function includes funding for 
discretionary housing programs, such as subsidies for single 
and multifamily housing in rural areas and mortgage insurance 
provided by the Federal Housing Administration; net spending by 
the Postal Service; discretionary funding for commerce 
programs, such as international trade and exports, science and 
technology, the census, and small business; and mandatory 
spending for deposit insurance activities related to banks, 
savings and loans, and credit unions.
      House Resolution.--For on-budget amounts, the House 
resolution sets forth $9.9 billion in BA and $4.5 billion in 
outlays in fiscal year 2000; $63.3 billion in BA and $41.7 
billion in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $127.4 billion in 
BA and $86.4 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--For on-budget amounts, the Senate 
amendment sets forth $9.7 billion in BA and $4.3 billion in 
outlays in fiscal year 2000; $63.1 billion in BA and $41.5 
billion in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $127.1 billion in 
BA and $86.2 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years. For off-
budget amounts, the Senate amendment sets forth -$0.2 billion 
in BA and outlays in 2000; -$1.2 billion in BA and outlays over 
5 fiscal years; and -$1.2 billion in BA and outlays over 10 
fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.-- For on-budget amounts, the 
Conference Agreement sets forth $9.7 billion in BA and $4.3 
billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; $63.1 billion in BA and 
$41.5 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $127.1 
billion in BA and $86.2 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal 
years.

                      function 400: transportation

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 400, 
Transportation, totals $50.8 billion in BA and $43.8 billion in 
outlays for 1999, excluding one-time emergency spending 
provided for the Federal Aviation Administration and the Coast 
Guard. This function includes ground transportation programs, 
such as the federal-aid highway program, mass transit, and the 
National Rail Passenger Corporation (Amtrak); air 
transportation through the Federal Aviation Administration 
(FAA) airport improvement program, facilities and equipment 
program, and operation of the air traffic control system; water 
transportation through the Coast Guard and Maritime 
Administration; the Surface Transportation Board; the National 
Transportation Safety Board; and related transportation safety 
and support activities within the Department of Transportation.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $51.8 
billion in BA and $45.8 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$258.1 billion in BA and $233.8 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $520.0 billion in BA and $464.1 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $51.3 
billion in BA and $45.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$259.1 billion in BA and $233.7 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $522.4 billion in BA and $463.8 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $51.8 billion in BA and $45.8 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $258.2 billion in BA and $233.8 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $520.1 billion in BA and 
$464.1 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

            FUNCTION 450: COMMUNITY AND REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 450, Community and 
Regional Development, totals about $8.8 billion in BA and $11.7 
billion in outlays for 1999, excluding emergency funding and 
other one-time appropriations. This function includes funding 
for community and regional development and disaster relief. The 
function includes the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), 
non-power programs of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Economic 
Development Administration (EDA) within the Commerce 
Department, and portions of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Department 
of Agriculture.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $7.4 
billion in BA and $10.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$29.3 billion in BA and $38.4 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $57.3 billion in BA and $60.7 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $5.3 
billion in BA and $10.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$14.0 billion in BA and $27.5 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $24.1 billion in BA and $31.9 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $6.4 billion in BA and $10.5 billion in outlays in fiscal 
year 2000; $21.7 billion in BA and $33.0 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $40.7 billion in BA and $46.3 billion 
in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

   FUNCTION 500: EDUCATION, TRAINING, EMPLOYMENT, AND SOCIAL SERVICES

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 500, Education, 
Training, Employment and SocialServices totals about $61 
billion in BA and $59.8 billion in outlays for 1999, excluding one-time 
emergency spending items. This function includes funding for elementary 
and secondary, vocational, and higher education; job training; children 
and family services programs; adoption and foster care assistance; 
statistical analysis and research related to these areas; and funding 
for the arts and humanities.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $65.3 
billion in BA and $63.6 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$335.0 billion in BA and $325.3 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $696.3 billion in BA and $681.3 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendments sets forth $67.4 
billion in BA and $64.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$351.2 billion in BA and $336.4 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $746.2 billion in BA and $725.7 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $66.3 billion in BA and $63.8 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $343.1 billion in BA and $330.8 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $721.3 billion in BA and 
$703.5 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years. The Conference 
agreement provides that an additional $0.5 billion is available 
for funding the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for 
fiscal year 2000.

                          Function 550: Health

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 550, Health, totals 
about $147.3 billion in BA and $140.6 billion in outlays for 
1999, excluding one-time emergency spending. This function 
covers all health spending except that for Medicare, military 
health, and veterans' health. The major programs include 
Medicaid, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, health 
benefits for federal workers and retirees, the National 
Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the 
Health Resources and Services Administration, Indian Health 
Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and 
the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $156.2 
billion in BA and $153.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $876.2 billion in BA and $873.0 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $2,114.4 billion in BA and $2,108.7 billion 
in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $156.2 
billion in BA and $153.0 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $876.2 billion in BA and $872.9 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $2,114.4 billion in BA and $2,108.7 billion 
in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $156.2 billion in BA and $153.0 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $876.2 billion in BA and $872.9 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $2,114.4 billion in BA and 
$2,108.7 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                         function 570: medicare

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 570, Medicare, 
totals about $195.2 billion in BA and $194.6 billion in outlays 
for 1999.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $208.7 
billion in BA and $208.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,180.7 billion in BA and $1,180.8 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $2,880.3 billion in BA and $2,880.1 
billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $208.7 
billion in BA and $208.7 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,180.7 billion in BA and $1,180.8 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $2,880.3 billion in BA and $2,880.1 
billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $208.7 billion in BA and $208.7 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $1,180.7 billion in BA and $1,180.8 billion 
in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $2,880.3 billion in BA and 
$2,880.1 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                     function 600: income security

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 600, Income 
Security, totals $234.6 billion in BA and $237.8 billion in 
outlays for 1999, excluding spending which requires a cap 
adjustment or is for an emergency. This function contains: 1) 
major cash and in-kind means-tested entitlements; 2) general 
retirement, disability, and pension programs excluding Social 
Security and Veterans' compensation programs; 3) federal and 
military retirement programs; 4) unemployment compensation; 5) 
low-income housing programs; and 6) other low-income support 
programs. Function 600 is the third largest functional category 
after Social Security and defense. Mandatory programs account 
for 86 percent of total spending in this function.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $244.4 
billion in BA and $248.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,320.7 billion in BA and $1,335.3 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $2,892.8 billion in BA and $2,911.8 
billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $244.4 
billion in BA and $248.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,324.8 billion in BA and $1,336.8 billion in outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $2,902.4 billion in BA and $2,918.4 
billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $244.4 billion in BA and $248.1 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $1,320.3 billion in BA and $1,333.4 billion 
in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $2,891.8 billion in BA and 
$2,909.2 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years. The 
Conference Agreement assumes $3 billion in new mandatory 
spending for families with children to cover child care 
expenditures.

                     function 650: social security

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 650, Social 
Security, totals about $14.5 billion in BA and $14.7 billion in 
outlays for 1999 for on-budget activities. This function 
includes Social Security benefits and administrative expenses.
      House Resolution.--For on-budget amounts, the House 
resolution sets forth $14.2 billion in BA and $14.3 billion in 
outlays in fiscal year 2000; $77.0 billion in BA and $77.0 
billion in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $177.0 billion in 
BA and $177.0 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $14.2 
billion in BA and $14.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$77.0 billion in BA and $77.0 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $177.0 billion in BA and $176.9 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years. For off-budget amounts, the Senate 
amendment sets forth $393.0 billion in BA and outlays in 2000; 
$2,158.9 billion in BA and outlays over 5 fiscal years; and 
$4,915.7 billion in BA and outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $14.2 billion in BA and $14.3 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $77.0 billion in BA and $77.0 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $177.0 billion in BA and 
$176.9 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

             function 700: veterans' benefits and services

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 700, Veterans 
Benefits, totals $43.0 billion in BA and $42.9 billion in 
outlays for 1999. This budget function includes income security 
needs of disabled veterans, indigent veterans, and survivors of 
deceased veterans through compensation benefits, pensions, and 
life insurance programs. Major education, training, and 
rehabilitation and readjustment programs include the Montgomery 
GI Bill, the Veterans Educational Assistance Program, and the 
Vocational Rehabilitation and Counseling program. Veterans can 
also receive guarantees on home loans. Roughly half of all 
spending in this function is for the Veterans Health 
Administration, which is comprised of over 700 hospitals, 
nursing homes, domiciliaries, and outpatient clinics.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $44.7 
billion in BA and $45.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$225.9 billion in BA and $228.3 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $467.3 billion in BA and $470.3 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $46.7 
billion in BA and $47.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$227.1 billion in BA and $229.5 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $466.2 billion in BA and $469.2 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $45.4 billion in BA and $45.6 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $226.6 billion in BA and $228.8 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $468.0 billion in BA and 
$470.8 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                function 750: administration of justice

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 750, Administration 
of Justice, totals about $26.3 billion in BA and $24.8 billion 
in outlays for 1999. This function includes funding for federal 
law enforcement activities, including criminal investigations 
by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Drug 
Enforcement Administration (DEA), border enforcement and the 
control of illegal immigration by the Customs Service and 
Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), as well as 
funding for prison construction, drug treatment, crime 
prevention programs and the federal Judiciary.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $23.4 
billion in BA and $25.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$123.5 billion in BA and $125.9 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $255.5 billion in BA and $257.4 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $23.4 
billion in BA and $25.3 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$121.8 billion in BA and $124.2 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and $242.3 billion in BA and $244.1 billion in 
outlays over 10 years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $23.4 billion in BA and $25.3 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $123.5 billion in BA and $125.9 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $255.5 billion in BA and 
$257.4 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                    function 800: general government

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 800, General 
Government, totals $15.2 billion in BA and $14.8 billion in 
outlays for 1999, excluding spending which requires a cap 
adjustment or is for an emergency. This function consists of 
the activities of the Legislative Branch, the Executive Office 
of the President, U.S. Treasury fiscal operations (including 
the Internal Revenue Service), personnel and property 
management, and general purpose fiscal assistance to states, 
localities, and U.S. territories. Discretionary spending 
represents 93 percent of total spending in this function. The 
Internal Revenue Service accounts for 62 percent of the 
discretionary total.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth $12.3 
billion in BA and $13.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$60.5 billion in BA and $62.7 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $121.2 billion in BA and $122.3 billion in outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth $12.3 
billion in BA and $13.5 billion in outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
$60.5 billion in outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $121.2 
billion in BA and $122.3 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal 
years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth $12.3 billion in BA and $13.5 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; $60.5 billion in BA and $62.7 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and $121.2 billion in BA and 
$122.3 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

                       function 900: net interest

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 900, Net Interest, 
totals $229.4 billion in BA and outlays in 1999. Net interest 
is a mandatory payment; there are no discretionary programs in 
Function 900. Net interest includes interest on the public debt 
after deducting the interest income received by the federal 
government.
      House Resolution.--For on-budget amounts, the House 
resolution sets forth $275.5 in BA and outlays in fiscal year 
2000; $1,342.4 billion in BA and outlays over 5 fiscal years; 
and $2,626.5 billion in BA and outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--For on-budget amounts, the Senate 
amendment sets forth $275.7 billion in BA and outlays in fiscal 
year 2000; $1,344.4 billion in BA and outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and $2,630.8 billion in BA and outlays over 10 fiscal 
years.
      Conference Agreement.--For on-budget amounts, the 
Conference Agreement sets forth $275.5 billion in BA and 
outlays in fiscal year 2000; $1,342.7 billion in BA and outlays 
over 5 fiscal years; and $2,628.4 billion in BA and outlays 
over 10 fiscal years.

                              Debt Levels

      The following table compares the levels of debt held by 
the public and debt subject to limit associated with the 
Conference Agreement, the President's Budget and the baseline.
      Under the Conference Agreement, debt held by the public 
declines year by year, and by 2009 would be nearly $1.8 
trillion below its present level. Debt held by the public under 
the President's Budget would decline by about $1.3 trillion 
over the next ten years. After ten years, debt held by the 
public would be $465 billion lower under the Conference 
Agreement than under the President's Budget.
      The statutory debt limit, which now stands at $5.95 
trillion, would not have to be increased until the very end of 
2004 under the Conference Agreement. Under the President's 
Budget, the statutory debt limit would have to be raised 
sometime in 2001.
      Clause 3 of House rule XXIII requires that the joint 
explanatory statement of managers accompanying a budget 
resolution provide a statement of the effect of adoption of the 
concurrent resolution upon the statutory limit on the debt. 
This resolution will have no direct effect upon the statutory 
limit on the debt because the House resolution providng for the 
consideration of H. Con. Res. 68 suspended the automatic 
engrossment of an increase in the statutory limit upon the 
adoption of a conference report.

                                                             COMPARISON OF CONFERENCE AGREEMENT WITH PRESIDENT'S BUDGET AND BASELINE
                                                                                    [In billions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Debt                                 1999        2000        2001        2002        2003        2004        2005        2006        2007        2008        2009
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Conference agreement:
    Held by Public..........................................     3,627.1     3,502.4     3,370.1     3,229.3     3,080.6     2,920.1     2,738.2     2,540.6     2,326.7     2,098.3     1,861.1
    Subject to limit........................................     5,543.9     5,628.4     5,708.5     5,793.5     5,877.4     5,956.3     6,024.6     6,084.6     6,136.5     6,173.9     6,203.4
  President's Budget:
    Held by Public..........................................     3,629.5     3,564.9     3,491.0     3,395.8     3,302.4     3,188.5     3,055.4     2,891.1     2,709.7     2,522.1     2,323.6
    Subject to limit........................................     5,546.3     5,778.6     5,999.8     6,243.0     6,498.4     6,765.1     7,042.9     7,337.9     7,661.1     8.018.6     8,409.0
  Baseline:
    Held by Public..........................................     3,627.1     3,515.8     3,389.7     3,215.1     3,021.0     2,781.3     2,501.1     2,152.1     1,751.8     1,311.4       823.3
    Subject to limit........................................     5,543.9     5,641.7     5,728.1     5,779.2     5,817.8     5,817.6     5,787.5     5,696.1     5,561.6     5,387.0     5,165.7
  Conference agreement compared to:
    President's Budget:
    Held by Public..........................................        -2.4       -62.5      -120.9      -166.5      -221.8      -268.4      -317.2      -350.5      -383.0      -423.8      -462.5
    Subject to limit........................................        -2.4      -150.2      -291.3      -449.5      -621.0      -808.8    -1,018.3    -1,253.3    -1,524.6    -1,844.7    -2,205.6
  Baseline:
    Held by Public..........................................  ..........       -13.3       -19.6        14.3        59.6       138.8       237.1       388.5       574.9       786.9     1,037.8
    Subject to limit........................................  ..........       -13.3       -19.6        14.3        59.6       138.8       237.1       388.5       574.9       786.9     1,037.8
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        function 920: allowances

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 920, Allowances, 
usually displays the budgetary effects of proposals that cannot 
be easily distributed across other budget functions. In past 
years. Function 920 has included total savings or costs from 
proposals associated with emergency spending or proposals 
contingent on certain events that have uncertain chances of 
occurring, such as the President's proposal for increased 
discretionary spending from the Social Security Surplus 
contingent on Social Security reform.
      House Resolution.--The House resolution sets forth -$8.0 
billion in BA and -$10.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; -$31.8 billion in BA and -$52.8 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and -$56.8 billion in BA and -$80.6 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment sets forth -$10.0 
billion in BA and -$10.1 billion in outlays in fiscal year 
2000; -$33.8 billion in BA and -$52.8 billion in outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and -$58.8 billion in BA and -$80.6 billion in 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth -$9.8 billion in BA and -$10.8 billion in outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; -$33.6 billion in BA and -53.5 billion in 
outlays over 5 fiscal years; and -$58.6 billion in BA and 
-$81.3 billion in outlays over 10 fiscal years.

            function 950: undistributed offsetting receipts

      Major Programs in Function.--Function 950, Undistributed 
Offsetting Receipts, totals about $40.1 billion in receipts (BA 
and outlays) for 1999. This function records offsetting 
receipts (receipts, not federal revenues or taxes, that the 
budget shows as offsets to spending programs) that are too 
large to record in other budget functions. Such receipts are 
either intrabudgetary (a payment from one federal agency to 
another, such as agency payments to the retirement trust funds) 
or proprietary (a payment from the public for some type of 
business transaction with the government). The main types of 
receipts recorded as undistributed in this function are: the 
payments federal agencies make to retirement trust funds for 
their employees, payments made by companies for the right to 
explore and produce oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf, 
and payments by those who bid for the right to buy or use the 
public property or resources, such asthe electromagnetic 
spectrum.
      House Resolution.--For on-budget amounts, the House 
resolution sets forth -$34.3 billion in BA and outlays in 
fiscal year 2000; -$188.9 billion in BA and outlays over 5 
fiscal years; and -$388.4 billion in BA and outlays over 10 
fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.--For on-budget amounts, the Senate 
amendment sets forth -$34.3 billion in BA and outlays in fiscal 
year 2000; -$189.8 billion in BA and outlays over 5 fiscal 
years; and -$391.2 billion in BA and outlays over 10 fiscal 
years. For off-budget amounts, the Senate amendment sets forth 
-$8.0 billion in BA and outlays in 2000; -$45.8 billion in BA 
and outlays over 5 fiscal years; and -$110.2 billion in BA and 
outlays over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference Agreement sets 
forth -$34.3 billion in BA and outlays in fiscal year 2000; 
-$189.2 billion in BA and outlays over 5 fiscal years; and 
-$392.9 billion in BA and -$392.8 billion in outlays over 10 
fiscal years.

                                Revenues

      House Resolution.--For on-budget amounts, the House 
resolution sets forth $1,408.5 billion in revenues in fiscal 
year 2000; $7,416.9 billion over 5 fiscal years; and $16,155.8 
billion over 10 fiscal years.
      Senate Amendment.-- For on-budget amounts, the Senate 
amendment sets forth $1,402.0 billion in revenues in fiscal 
year 2000; $7,408.3 billion over 5 fiscal years; and $16,147.7 
billion over 10 fiscal years.
      Conference Agreement.--For on-budget amounts, the 
Conference Agreement set forth $1,408.1 billion in revenues in 
fiscal year 2000; $7,414.2 billion over 5 fiscal years; and 
$16,153.5 billion over 10 fiscal years. The conference 
agreement assumes that the tax relief provided by this 
resolution will include tax cuts to help cover the costs of 
raising a child. Tax cuts for families with children--child 
care credits--will be no less than $3 billion.

                             Reconciliation

      House Resolution.--Section 4 of the House resolution 
directs the Committee on Ways and Means to report by September 
30, 1999, a reconciliation bill that reduces revenues by $142.5 
billion for the total of fiscal year 2000 through 2005 and 
$768.5 billion for fiscal years 2000 through 2009. The House 
resolution does not reconcile a reduction in the statutory 
limit on the debt.
      Senate Amendment.--Section 104 of the Senate amendment 
directs the Senate Committee on Finance to report by June 18, 
1999, a reconciliation bill that reduced revenues by 
$138.485billion for the total of fiscal years 2000 through 2004 and 
$765.985 billion for the total of the fiscal years 2000 through 2009. 
The Senate amendment also instructs the Finance Committee to report a 
reduction in the statutory limit on the debt of $85 billion for fiscal 
year 2000 only. In anticipation that the budget resolution might be 
resolved by the adoption of amendments between the Houses, section 105 
of the Senate amendment includes reconciliation instructions for the 
House Committee on Ways and Means to report legislation by June 11, 
1999 that reduces revenues and the statutory limit on the debt by the 
same amounts set out in section 104.
      Conference Agreement.--The Conference agreement directs 
the Committees on Ways and Means and Finance to report by July 
16, 1999 and July 23, 1999 respectively, a reconciliation bill 
that reduces revenues by $0 for fiscal year 2000, $142.3 
billion for the total of fiscal years 2000 through 2004 and 
$777.9 billion for the total of fiscal years 2000 through 2009. 
The Conference agreement does not include an instruction to 
reconcile a reduction in the statutory limit on the debt.

                              Allocations

      As required in section 302 of the Budget Act, the joint 
statement of the managers includes an allocation, based upon 
the conference report, of the levels of total budget authority, 
total budget outlays among each of the appropriate House and 
Senate committees.
      The allocation for each House consist of a set of two 
tables for the House and the Senate. The first set of tables 
shows the allocation for the budget year, fiscal year 2000. The 
House allocates funding for each fiscal year covered by the 
budget resolution. The second set of tables shows the amount 
allocated for the totals of the first five years and the ten 
years covered by the budget resolution.
      The allocations are as follows:

          ALLOCATIONS OF SPENDING AUTHORITY TO HOUSE COMMITTEES
                        Appropriations Committee
                        [In millions of dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Budget
                 Fiscal year 2000                   authority   Outlays
------------------------------------------------------------------------
General Purpose \1\...............................    531,771    536,700
Violent Crime Reduction \1\.......................      4,500      5,554
Highways \1\......................................          0     24,574
Mass Transit \1\..................................          0      4,117
                                                   ---------------------
      Total Discretionary Action..................    536,271    570,945
Current Law Mandatory.............................    321,108    303,938
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Shown for display purposes only.



                  Rulemaking and Budgetary Procedures

      House Resolution.--Section 5(a) of the House resolution 
includes findings that Social Security is, by law, off-budget; 
that Social Security has been running surpluses; that these 
surpluses have been used to balance the Federal budget; that 
this resolution, for the first time, balances the budget 
without counting such surpluses, and that the only way to 
present the diversion of the surpluses for other purposes is to 
balance the budget exclusive of the surpluses, and both the 
Congress and the Administration should take the necessary steps 
to ensure that future budgets are balanced exclusive of the 
surpluses.
      Section 5(b) of the House resolution prohibits the 
consideration of any budget resolution that sets forth an on-
budget deficit. The intent of this provision is to prevent 
Congresses from considering future budget resolutions that 
implicitly use the Social Security surplus to finance other 
governmental operations. Section 5 is enforced by a point of 
order that, if sustained, precludes further consideration of 
the measure. In addition to any budget resolution reported by 
the Budget Committee, the point of order may be raised against 
amendments to the budget resolution and accompanying conference 
reports. Consistent with enforcement of key Budget Act 
requirements in the House and Senate, section 5 may be waived 
by a simple majority of those present in the House and three-
fifths of those Members voting in the Senate. An exception is 
provided for legislation enhancing retirement security or 
reforming Medicare pursuant to section 6 of the House 
resolution.
      Subsection (c)(1) provides a sense of the House that 
legislation should be enacted that excludes the outlays and 
receipts of the Social Security trust funds from official 
budgetary projections of the surplus or deficit. Subsection 
(c)(2) further provides that legislation should be considered 
that further safeguards the surpluses, such as modifying pay-
as-you-go requirements to permit the enactment of retirement 
security and Medicare legislation or establishing a statutory 
limit on debt held by the public that would be reduced by the 
amount of the Social Security surpluses.
      Section 6 of the House resolution establishes a reserve 
fund for retirement security and Medicare in the House. The 
Budget Committee chairman is permitted to increase the 
allocations and aggregates established in the budget resolution 
for legislation that either enhances retirement security or 
extends the solvency of the Medicare trust funds or reforms the 
Medicare benefits or payment structure. The adjustments may be 
made for bills, amendments, and conference reports.
      The sum of the adjustments for all measures considered 
under this section may not exceed an amount equal to an up-to-
date estimate of the Social Security surplus for fiscal year 
2000, the total for fiscal years 2000 through 2004, and 2000 
through 2009. Furthermore, the chairman is prohibited from 
making any adjustment if the measure, together with any other 
measure considered under this section, would exceed the 
estimated surplus for any of these periods.
      For purposes of this section, the projected Social 
Security surpluses are the levels assumed in the joint 
statement or the levels set forth in CBO's midsession report. 
In making this projection, CBO is directed to consult with the 
Social Security trustees.
      Section 7 of the House resolution establishes a reserve 
fund in the House for special education. The Budget Committee 
chairman is permitted to increase the budget aggregates 
andallocations to the Committee on Appropriations for legislation 
providing appropriations for special education. The adjustments may be 
made for bills, joint resolutions, amendments, and conference reports. 
Any adjustments must be made in the amount of BA provided by the 
measure for that purpose (and the resulting outlays) are subject to two 
limitations. First, the adjustments may not exceed an up-to-date 
estimate of the on-budget surplus. Second, the adjustments may not 
exceed the amount necessary to fully fund special education at its 
authorize levels.
      Section 8 of the House resolution provides that changes 
in the budgetary aggregates and committee allocations permitted 
by the resolution shall be made while the measure is pending 
and upon enactment and shall be published in the Congressional 
Record. The section also provides that the revised aggregates 
and allocations shall be, for the purposes of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, the aggregates and allocations in this 
resolution.
      Section 9 of the House resolution requires the Director 
of the Congressional Budget Office to update CBO's budgetary 
projections on a quarterly basis.
      Senate Amendment.--In addition to setting forth budgetary 
levels as called for in the Budget Act, title I of the Senate 
amendment contains two provisions--the first, to address the 
fact that Congress did not adopt a fiscal year 1999 budget 
resolution, and the second, to focus attention on debt held by 
the public levels. Section 1(a)(2) of the Senate amendment 
contains language that incorporates the levels in the deeming 
resolution passed by the Senate at the end of the 105th 
Congress as the fiscal year 1999 budget resolution. Section 
101(6) provides advisory debt held by the public levels in the 
budget resolution. These debt-held-by-the-public levels reflect 
the fact that the resolution devotes the entire Social Security 
surplus to the reduction of debt held by the public.
      Title II of the Senate amendment contains ten sections 
that either modify budget procedures for consideration of 
legislation or authorize the Chairman of the Budget Committee 
to alter the levels in the budget resolution to accommodate 
Senate consideration of certain legislation.
      Section 201 of the Senate amendment provides a reserve 
fund for Agriculture. The Senate amendment ensures that up to 
$6 billion is made available for legislation that addresses 
risk management and income assistance to agriculture producers 
through a reserve fund. If the Senate Agriculture Committee 
reports legislation that provides risk management and income 
assistance to agriculture producers, then the Chairman of the 
Budget Committee is authorized to increase the Agriculture 
Committee's allocation of budget authority and outlays to 
accommodate this additional spending. The reserve fund provides 
that this legislation cannot cause an on-budget deficit. The 
Senate amendment also permits $500 million (within the $6 
billion total) in agriculture spending in fiscal year 2000, but 
this additional spending must be offset by reductions in direct 
spending in other programs.
      Section 202 of the Senate amendment provides a tax 
reduction reserve fund which allows the Chairman of the Budget 
Committee to adjust the spending and revenue limits for 
legislation that reduces revenues as long as the legislation 
does not cause an on-budget deficit for the first fiscal year, 
the sum of the first five fiscal years covered by the budget 
resolution, and the sum of the ten fiscal years covered by the 
resolution.
      Section 203 of the Senate amendment contains a 
clarification of the Senate's pay-as-you-go rule make it clear 
that this rule still applies until the budget is balanced 
excluding the transactions of the Social Security trust fund. 
This change would prohibit the expenditure of Social Security 
surpluses, but would allow on-budget surpluses to be used to 
offset tax reductions or direct spending increases.
      Section 204 of the Senate amendment provides a majority 
point of order against emergency spending provisions. The 
Senate amendment would curb the abuse of spending the Social 
Security surplus on so-called emergencies. Under sections 
251(1)(b)(2)(A) and 252(e) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, if Congress and the President 
designate a provision of legislation an emergency, it is exempt 
from the statutory limits on appropriations legislation and the 
pay-as-you-go requirement for all other legislation. Under the 
Senate amendment, committee reports and any statement of 
managers accompanying legislation containing emergency spending 
must contain an analysis whether the proposed emergency 
spending satisfies all the criteria set out in the resolution. 
A point of order is available against any emergency spending 
provision regardless of whether the criteria are met. The 
Presiding Officer does not determine whether or not the 
criteria have been satisfied when ruling on the point of order. 
If a point of order was raised and sustained against an 
emergency spending provision then the language making the 
emergency designation and providing the spending would both be 
stricken from the measure by way of a procedure similar to the 
Byrd rule (see section 313 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974).
      Section 205 of the Senate amendment provides authority to 
the Budget Committee chairmen to provide committee allocations. 
Section 302 of the Budget Act requires the statement of 
managers accompanying a conference report on a budget 
resolution to include an allocation of spending authority to 
committees. At the time the Senate amendment was adapted there 
existed the possibility that this budget resolution would not 
go to conference. Therefore, the Senate amendment requires the 
Chairman of the Budget Committee to file allocations that are 
consistent with the budget resolution.
      Section 206 of the Senate amendment provides a reserve 
fund for use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) receipts. This 
section would allow committee allocations to be adjusted for 
legislation providing new or additional direct spending for 
historic preservation, recreation and land, water, fish, and 
wildlife conservation efforts to support coastal needs and 
activities. This reserve fund is intended to accommodate an 
increase in spending for these programs if the increases are 
offset by reductions in direct spending. It would not allow 
revenue increases to offset spending increases.
      Section 207 of the Senate amendment provides a reserve 
fund for Medicare managed care plans. This section permits 
committee allocations to be adjusted for legislation providing 
new or additional direct spending for Medicare managed care 
plans agreeing to serve elderly patients for at least 2 years 
and whose reimbursement was reduced because of risk management 
regulations. This reserve fund is intended to accommodate an 
increase in spending for these programs if they are offset by 
spending reductions. It would not allow revenue increases to 
offset spending increases.
      Section 208 of the Senate amendment provides a reserve 
fund for Medicare and prescription drugs. This section permits 
committee allocations and spending aggregates to be adjusted 
for legislation that significantly extends the solvency of the 
Medicare Hospital Insurance (HI) Trust Fund without the use of 
transfers of new subsidies from the general fund. This reserve 
fund is designed to accommodate legislation that reforms the 
Medicare program and extends the solvency of the HI trust fund. 
It would not allow revenue increases to offset spending 
increases. This reserve fund does allow committee allocations 
and spending aggregates to be adjusted to use an on-budget 
surplus to offset the additional cost of prescription drugs as 
part of legislation that reforms Medicare and significantly 
extends the solvency of the HI trust fund.
      Section 209 of the Senate amendment contains language 
regarding the rulemaking authority of each of the Houses of 
Congress.
      Section 210 of the Senate amendment provides a reserve 
fund to foster the employment and independence of individuals 
with disabilities so long as the legislation does not increase 
the deficit or reduce the surplus.
      Conference Agreement.--Title II of the Conference 
agreement includes the rules and procedures for implementing 
and enforcing the budget resolution.
      Section 201 of the Conference agreement creates a safe 
deposit box for Social Security surpluses and reflects the 
language in section 5 of the House resolution with 
modifications. The resolution contains the findings from 
section 5(a) and creates a majority point of order from section 
5(b) with modifications in the House and Senate against a 
budget resolution which sets forth an on-budget deficit unless 
the deficit results from legislation enacted pursuant to 
section 202 of this resolution. The Conference agreement does 
not contain the sense of Congress provisions set forth in 
section 5(c).
      Section 202 of the Conference agreement provides a 
reserve fund for retirement security and reflects the language 
of section 6 of the House resolution with modifications. The 
reserve fund for retirement security applies in both the House 
and Senate and permits the BudgetCommittee chairman to adjust 
the appropriate budgetary aggregates and allocations for legislation 
that enhances retirement security through structural programmatic 
reform. It is the conferees' intention that retirement security 
includes Medicare.
      Section 203 of the Conference agreement provides a 
reserve fund for Medicare legislation and reflects the language 
of section 208 of the Senate amendment with modifications. The 
Conference agreement applies the reserve fund to the House and 
Senate, requires the legislation to make structural reforms to 
Medicare and extend the solvency of the Medicare trust fund 
without the use of intragovernmental transfers, and provides 
that it may be used for legislation which includes a 
prescription drug benefit. The conferees do not intend for the 
reserve fund to encompass legislation making incremental 
changes to the Medicare system.
      Section 204 of the Conference agreement reflects the 
language of section 201 of the Senate amendment regarding a 
reserve fund which would increase the allocations by an 
additional $6 billion for agriculture with modifications. The 
Senate amendment only applied in the Senate. Although the House 
does not have a comparable provision, it includes $6 billion in 
mandatory spending over 5 years for function 350 (Agriculture), 
and in the allocation to the House Committee on Agriculture. 
The Conference agreement provides that the reserve fund applies 
in both the House and the Senate and may be triggered by 
legislation which provides risk management and/or income 
assistance to agricultural producers. For the purposes of this 
section, risk management includes crop insurance.
      Section 205 of the Conference agreement reflects the 
language of section 202 of the Senate amendment regarding a tax 
reduction reserve fund in the Senate. The House does not have a 
comparable provision. The House has standing authority under 
section 302(g) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 as 
amended by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 to consider 
legislation reducing taxes in excess of the levels in the 
budget resolution, if the revenue loss is offset by spending 
reductions. The Conference agreement retains the Senate 
language with modifications and only applies in the Senate.
      Section 206 of the Conference agreement reflects the 
language of section 204 of the Senate amendment regarding an 
emergency designation point of order with modifications. The 
House does not have a comparable provision. However, according 
to the Oversight Plan of the House Committee on the Budget, the 
Budget Committee will consider budget process reform during the 
spring of 1999 (which will include a codification of a 
definition of budgetary emergencies and establish a reserve 
fund for such emergencies). The Conference agreement provides a 
super-majority point of order in the Senate against language 
designating a provision as an emergency and includes an 
exemption for defense spending.
      Section 207 of the Conference agreement reflects the 
language of section 203 of the Senate amendment regarding the 
application of the Senate's pay-go point of order with a 
modification. The House does not have a comparable provision 
(the pay-go point of order is not applicable in the House of 
Representatives). The Conference agreement restates the entire 
pay-go point of order with modifications which permit on-budget 
surpluses to be used for the tax reductions or spending 
increases. The conferees intend that the on-budget surplus be 
placed on the Senate's pay-as-you-go scorecard. The baseline 
on-budget surpluses are shown in the table below:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                Fiscal year--
                                       ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------   5 yr.    10 yr.
                                          2000     2001     2002     2003     2004     2005     2006      2007      2008      2009
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------�RM132�
Baseline on                           
  Budget sur-
  pluses..............................  .......    8.510   54.930   33.301   52.100   72.459   123.375   154.858   174.844   204.332   148.841   878.709
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Section 208 of the Conference agreement reflects the 
language of section 8 of the House resolution regarding the 
application and effect of changes in allocations and aggregates 
made pursuant to the resolution with modifications. The Senate 
does not have a comparable provision. Subsections (a) and (b) 
of the Conference agreement would be applicable in both the 
House and Senate. Subsection (d) applies only in the House and 
provides that only the first fiscal year and the five fiscal 
year totals of the section 302 allocations will be enforced 
under section 302 and 311 of the Budget Act.
      Section 209 of the Conference agreement clarifies the 
status of the interim House and Senate levels for fiscal year 
1999. The House resolution does not have a comparable 
provision. However interim budget allocations and aggregates 
for the House were printed in the Congressional Record pursuant 
to H. Res. 5. Section 1(a)(2) of the Senate amendment contains 
language that incorporates the levels passed by the Senate at 
the end of the 105th Congress as the fiscal year 1999 budget 
resolution. The conference agreement reflects the Senate 
amendment with a modification which clarifies that the levels 
previously submitted by the House and the Senate constitute a 
concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 1999.
      Section 210 of the Conference agreement reflects the 
language of section 210 of the Senate amendment regarding a 
reserve fund in the Senate for legislation that finances 
certain programs to foster the employment and independence of 
individuals with disabilities with modifications. The House 
does not have a comparable provision. The Conference agreement 
adopts the Senate language with technical amendments which 
conform the reserve fund to the form of other reserve funds set 
out in the Conference agreement.
      Section 211 provides for a reserve fund for a fiscal year 
2000 surplus. The Conference agreement calls upon the 
Congressional Budget Office (CBO) to complete its update of the 
economic and budget forecast for the 2000 budget by July 1, 
1999. If CBO's revised projection shows an on-budget surplus 
for 2000, this reserve fund allows the Chairman of the 
BudgetCommittee to adjust the revenue aggregate, the pay-go balance, 
and the revenue reconciliation instructions by the amount of the on-
budget surplus for 2000.
      Section 212 provides for a reserve fund in the Senate for 
education for legislation that causes an increase in direct 
spending by virtue of a change in the purpose for which 
previously appropriated funds may be spent.
      Section 213 contains the boilerplate rulemaking authority 
of the House and the Senate.
      Section 7 of the House resolution provides a reserve fund 
for special education. The Senate amendment does not have a 
comparable provision. The House recedes to the Senate on this 
issue.
      Section 9 of the House resolution requires the 
Congressional Budget Office to provide quarterly updates of its 
projections. The Senate amendment does not have a comparable 
provision. The House recedes to the Senate on this issue.
      Section 205 of the Senate amendment contained authority 
for the Chairman of the Budget Committee in the Senate to 
provide committee allocations in the Congressional Record in 
the event that there was not a statement of managers 
accompanying a conference report on the budget resolution. The 
House resolution does not have a comparable provision. The 
Senate recedes to the House on this issue.
      Section 206 of the Senate amendment contained a reserve 
fund for the use of OCS receipts. The House resolution does not 
have a comparable provision. The Senate recedes to the House on 
this issue.
      Section 207 of the Senate amendment contained a reserve 
fund for managed care plans. The House resolution does not have 
a comparable provision. The Senate recedes to the House on this 
issue.
      Miscellaneous Provisions Regarding Budget Enforcement.--
Some interpret a surplus to be a negative deficit. The 
conferees intend that this interpretation not apply for the 
purposes of this resolution. More specifically, for the 
purposes of title II, a reduction in the on-budget surplus is 
not considered an increase in the on-budget deficit.
      Some 301 of the Conference agreement sets forth a sense 
of the Congress regarding the protection of the Social Security 
surpluses. The conferees strongly support this language--
particularly the language found in subsection (b)(1) and intend 
that legislation should be enacted that prevents the Social 
Security surpluses from being used for any purpose other than 
SocialSecurity, retirement security and the reduction of the 
federal debt.

             Sense of Congress, House and Senate Provisions

      House Resolution.--The House resolution included the 
following sense of the House or sense of Congress provisions:
            Sense of Congress on the commission on 
        international religious freedom.
            Sense of the House on providing additional dollars 
        to the classroom.
            Sense of Congress on asset-building for the working 
        poor.
            Sense of Congress on access to health insurance and 
        preserving home health services for all Medicare 
        beneficiaries.
            Sense of the House on medicare payment.
            Sense of the House on assessment of welfare-to-work 
        programs.
            Sense of Congress on providing honor guard services 
        for veterans' funerals.
            Sense of Congress on child nutrition.
      Senate Amendment.--The Senate amendment included the 
following sense of the Senate or sense of the Congress 
provisions:
            Sense of the Senate on marriage penalty.
            Sense of the Senate on improving security for 
        United States diplomatic missions.
            Sense of the Senate on access to Medicare home 
        health services.
            Sense of the Senate regarding the deductibility of 
        health insurance premiums of the self-employed.
            Sense of the Senate that tax reductions should go 
        to working families.
            Sense of the Senate on the National Guard.
            Sense of the Senate on effects of Social Security 
        reform on women.
            Sense of the Senate on increased funding for the 
        National Institutes of Health.
            Sense of Congress on funding for Kyoto protocol 
        implementation prior to Senate ratification.
            Sense of the Senate on Federal research and 
        development investment.
            Sense of the Senate on counter-narcotics funding.
            Sense of the Senate regarding tribal colleges.
            Sense of the Senate on the Social Security surplus.
            Sense of the Senate on need-based student financial 
        aid programs.
            Findings; sense of Congress on the protection of 
        the Social Security surpluses.
            Sense of the Senate on providing adequate funding 
        for United States international leadership.
            Sense of the Senate that the Federal Government 
        should not invest the Social Security Trust Funds in 
        private financial markets.
            Sense of the Senate concerning on-budget surplus.
            Sense of the Senate on TEA-21 funding and the 
        States.
            Sense of the Senate that agricultural risk 
        management programs should benefit livestock producers.
            Sense of the Senate regarding the modernization and 
        improvement of the medicare program.
            Sense of the Senate on providing tax relief to all 
        Americans by returning non-Social Security surplus to 
        taxpayers.
            Sense of the Senate regarding tax incentives for 
        education savings.
            Sense of the Senate that the One Hundred Sixth 
        Congress, First Session should reauthorize funds for 
        the Farmland Protection Program.
            Sense of the Senate on tax cuts for lower and 
        middle income taxpayers.
            Sense of the Senate regarding reform of the 
        Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
            Sense of the Senate regarding Davis-Bacon.
            Sense of the Senate regarding access to items and 
        services under medicare program.
            Sense of the Senate concerning autism.
            Sense of the Senate on women's access to obstetric 
        and gynecological services.
            Sense of the Senate on LIHEAP.
            Sense of the Senate on transportation firewalls.
            Sense of the Senate on funding existing, effective 
        public health programs before creating new programs.
            Sense of the Senate concerning funding for special 
        education.
            Sense of the Senate on the importance of Social 
        Security for individuals who become disabled.
            Sense of the Senate regarding funding for intensive 
        firearms prosecution programs. Honest reporting of the 
        deficit.
            Sense of the Senate concerning fostering the 
        employment and independence of individuals with 
        disabilities.
            Sense of the Senate regarding asset-building for 
        the working poor.
            Sense of the Senate that the provisions of this 
        resolution assume that it is the policy of the United 
        States to provide as soon as is technologically 
        possible an education for every American child that 
        will enable each child to effectively meet the 
        challenges of the twenty-first century.
            Sense of the Senate concerning exemption of 
        agricultural commodities and products, medicines, and 
        medical products from unilateral economic sanctions.
            Sense of the Senate regarding capital gains tax 
        fairness for family farmers. Budgeting for the Defense 
        Science and Technology Program.
            Sense of the Senate concerning funding for the 
        Urban Parks and Recreation Recovery(UPARR) program.
            Sense of the Senate on social promotion.
            Sense of the Senate on women and Social Security 
        reform.
            Sense of the Congress regarding South Korea's 
        international trade practices on pork and beef.
            Sense of the Senate regarding support for State and 
        local law enforcement.
            Sense of the Senate on merger enforcement by 
        Department of Justice.
            Sense of the Senate to create a task force to 
        pursue the creation of a natural disaster reserve fund.
            Sense of the Senate concerning Federal tax relief.
            Sense of the Senate on eliminating the marriage 
        penalty and across-the-board income tax rate cuts.
            Sense of the Senate on importance of funding for 
        embassy security.
            Sense of the Senate on funding for after school 
        education.
            Sense of the Senate concerning recovery of funds by 
        the Federal Government in tobacco-related litigation.
            Sense of the Senate on offsetting inappropriate 
        emergency spending.
            Findings; sense of Congress on the President's 
        fiscal year 2000 budget proposal to tax association 
        investment income.
            Sense of the Senate regarding funding for counter-
        narcotics initiatives.
            Sense of the Senate on modernizing America's 
        schools.
            Sense of the Senate concerning funding for the land 
        and water conservation fund.
            Sense of the Senate regarding support for Federal, 
        State and local law enforcement and for the Violent 
        Crime Reduction Trust Fund.
            Sense of the Senate regarding Social Security notch 
        babies.
      Conference Agreement.--Title III of the resolution 
contains the following non-binding language that expresses the 
will or intent of either or both Houses of the Congress:
      Subtitle A: The Sense of the Congress provisions are as 
follows:
            Sense of Congress on the protection of the Social 
        Security surpluses.
            Sense of Congress on providing additional dollars 
        to the classroom.
            Sense of Congress on asset-building for the working 
        poor.
            Sense of Congress on child nutrition.
            Sense of Congress concerning funding for special 
        education.
      Subtitle B: The Sense of the House provisions are as 
follows:
            Sense of the House on the commission on 
        international religious freedom.
            Sense of the House on assessment of welfare-to-work 
        programs.
      Subtitle C: The Sense of the Senate provisions are as 
follows:
            Sense of the Senate that the federal government 
        should not invest the Social Security trust funds in 
        private financial markets.
            Sense of the Senate regarding the modernization and 
        improvement of the Medicare program.
            Sense of the Senate on education.
            Sense of the Senate on providing tax relief to 
        Americans by returning the non-Social Security surplus 
        to taxpayers.
            Sense of the Senate on access to Medicare services.
            Sense of the Senate on law enforcement.
            Sense of the Senate on improving security for 
        United States diplomatic missions.
            Sense of the Senate on increased funding for the 
        National Institutes of Health.
            Sense of the Senate on funding for Kyoto protocol 
        implementation prior to Senate ratification.
            Sense of the Senate on TEA-21 funding and the 
        States.
            Sense of the Senate that the one hundred sixth 
        Congress, first session, should reauthorize funds for 
        the farmland protection program.
            Sense of the Senate on the importance of Social 
        Security for individuals who become disabled.
            Sense of the Senate on reporting of on-budget trust 
        fund levels.
            Sense of the Senate regarding South Korea's 
        international trade practices on pork and beef.
            Sense of the Senate on funding for natural 
        disasters.
                From the Committee on the Budget:
                                   John R. Kasich,
                                   Saxby Chambliss,
                                   Christopher Shays,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Chuck Grassley,
                                   Don Nickles,
                                   Phil Gramm,
                                   Slade Gorton,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.