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106th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     106-646

======================================================================



 
 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 
                                  2001

                                _______
                                

  June 1, 2000.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Regula, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 4578]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001. The 
bill provides regular annual appropriations for the Department 
of the Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation) and for 
other related agencies, including the Forest Service, the 
Department of Energy, the Indian Health Service, the 
Smithsonian Institution, and the National Foundation on the 
Arts and the Humanities.

                                CONTENTS

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Department of the Interior:
        Bureau of Land Management..........................     2
                                                                      7
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.....................    10
                                                                     18
        National Park Service..............................    15
                                                                     28
        U.S. Geological Survey.............................    20
                                                                     44
        Minerals Management Service........................    22
                                                                     48
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
            Enforcement....................................    24
                                                                     50
        Bureau of Indian Affairs...........................    27
                                                                     54
        Departmental Offices...............................    35
                                                                     63
        General Provisions.................................    42
                                                                     71
Related Agencies:
        Forest Service, USDA...............................    52
                                                                     72
        Department of Energy...............................    66
                                                                     96
        Clean Coal Technology..............................    66
                                                                     96
        Energy Conservation................................    67
                                                                     97
        Fossil Energy Research and Development.............    67
                                                                     97
        Alternative Fuels Production.......................    68
                                                                    104
        Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves.............    68
                                                                    105
        Economic Regulation................................    69
                                                                    107
        Strategic Petroleum Reserve........................    69
                                                                    107
        Energy Information Administration..................    69
                                                                    108
Indian Health Service, DHHS................................    71
                                                                    108
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation................    78
                                                                    114
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and 
    Arts Development.......................................      
                                                                    115
Smithsonian Institution....................................    79
                                                                    115
National Gallery of Art....................................    82
                                                                    118
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.............    84
                                                                    121
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars...........    84
                                                                    121
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.........    85
                                                                    122
Institute of Museum and Library Services...................    86
                                                                    127
Commission of Fine Arts....................................    87
                                                                    129
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..................    87
                                                                    130
National Capital Planning Commission.......................    88
                                                                    130
United States Holocaust Memorial Council...................    88
                                                                    130
Presidio Trust.............................................    88
                                                                    131
Title III--General Provisions..............................    89
                                                                    131

                   Comparison With Budget Resolution

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, requires that the report accompanying a bill providing 
new budget authority contain a Statement detailing how the 
authority compares with the reports submitted under section 302 
of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This information 
follows:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                           Sec. 302(b)*                    This bill--*
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   Discretionary     Mandatory     Discretionary     Mandatory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget authority................................         $14,742              59         $14,742              58
Outlays.........................................          15,262              70          15,322              70

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Includes House-passed supplemental appropriations.
Note.--The outlays in this bill are technically in excess of the subcommittee section 302(b) suballocation.
  However, pursuant to section 314 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended, increases to the
  Committee's section 302(a) allocation are authorized for funding designated as emergency requirements. After
  the bill is reported to the House, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget will provide an increased
  section 302(a) allocation consistent with the funding provided in the bill. That new allocation wil eliminate
  the technical difference prior to floor consideration.

                          Summary of the Bill

    The Committee has conducted extensive hearings on the 
programs and projects provided for in the Interior and Related 
Agencies Appropriations bill for 2001. The hearings are 
contained in 11 published volumes totaling nearly 11,000 pages.
    During the course of the hearings, testimony was taken at 
23 hearings on 21 days from more than 500 witnesses, not only 
from agencies which come under the jurisdiction of the Interior 
Subcommittee, but also from Members of Congress, State and 
local government officials, and private citizens.
    The bill that is recommended for fiscal year 2001 has been 
developed after careful consideration of all the facts and 
details available to the Committee.

                                  BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                 Committee bill
                        Activity                         Budget estimates,   Committee bill,     Compared with
                                                          fiscal year 2001   fiscal year 2001   budget estimates
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior: New Budget             $8,405,904,000     $7,263,152,000    -$1,142,752,000
 (obligational) authority..............................
Title II, related agencies: New Budget (obligational)        7,913,868,000      7,346,268,000       -567,600,000
 authority.............................................
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total, New Budget (obligational) authority.     16,319,772,000     14,609,420,000     -1,710,352,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Total Appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
                                Agencies

    In addition to the amounts in the accompanying bill, which 
are reflected in the table above, permanent legislation 
authorizes the continuation of certain government activities 
without consideration by the Congress during the annual 
appropriations process.
    Details of these activities are listed in tables at the end 
of this report. In fiscal year 2000, these activities are 
estimated to total 2,861,378,000. The estimate for fiscal year 
2001 is $2,777,202,000.
    The following table reflects the total budget 
(obligational) authority contained both in this bill and in 
permanent appropriations for fiscal years 2000 and 2001.

        DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES TOTAL BUDGET AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEARS 2000-2001
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Item                            Fiscal year 2000   Fiscal year 2001        Change
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Interior and related agencies appropriations bill......    $14,911,650,000    $14,609,420,000      -$302,230,000
Permanent appropriations, Federal funds................      2,215,134,000      2,158,004,000        -57,130,000
Permanent appropriations, trust funds..................        646,244,000        619,198,000        -27,046,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total budget authority...........................     17,773,028,000     17,386,622,000       -386,406,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Revenue Generated by Agencies in Bill

    The following tabulation indicates total new obligational 
authority to date for fiscal years 1999 and 2000, and the 
amount recommended in the bill for fiscal year 2001. It 
compares receipts generated by activities in this bill on an 
actual basis for fiscal year 1999 and on an estimated basis for 
fiscal years 2000 and 2001. The programs in this bill are 
estimated to generate $8.5 billion in revenues for the Federal 
Government in fiscal year 2001. Therefore, the expenditures in 
this bill will contribute to economic stability rather than 
inflation.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                              Fiscal year--
                          Item                          --------------------------------------------------------
                                                                1999               2000               2001
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
New obligational authority.............................   $14,297,803,0000    $14,911,650,000    $14,609,420,000
Receipts:
    Department of the Interior.........................      6,138,188,000      6,509,697,000      7,898,558,000
    Forest Service.....................................        588,094,000        648,608,000        626,382,000
    Naval Petroleum Reserves...........................          5,236,000          4,432,000          3,976,000
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total receipts...................................      6,731,518,000      7,162,737,000      8,528,908,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   Application of General Reductions

    The level at which sequestration reductions shall be taken 
pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, if such reductions are required in fiscal year 
2001, is defined by the Committee as follows:
    As provided for by section 256(l)(2) of Public Law 99-177, 
as amended, and for the purpose of a Presidential Order issued 
pursuant to section 254 of said Act, the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' for items under the jurisdiction of the 
Appropriations Subcommittees on the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate is defined as (1) any item specifically identified in 
tables or written material set forth in the Interior and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, or accompanying committee 
reports or the conference report and accompanying joint 
explanatory Statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference; (2) any Government-owned or Government-operated 
facility; and (3) management units, such as National parks, 
National forests, fish hatcheries, wildlife refuges, research 
units, regional, State and other administrative units and the 
like, for which funds are provided in fiscal year 2001.
    The Committee emphasizes that any item for which a specific 
dollar amount is mentioned in any accompanying report, 
including all increases over the budget estimate approved by 
the Committee, shall be subject to a percentage reduction no 
greater or less than the percentage reduction applied to all 
domestic discretionary accounts.

                    Land and Water Conservation Fund

    Following is a comparison of the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund by agency. More specific information can be 
found in each agency's land acquisition account.

                                        LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                   Estimated
                                                                Enacted fiscal    fiscal year      Recommended
                                                                  year 2000           2001
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Assistance to States:
    Matching grants..........................................          $20,000         $145,000          $20,000
    Administrative expenses..................................            1,000            5,000            1,000
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, assistance to States.........................           21,000          150,000           21,000
Federal programs:
    Bureau of Land Management................................           15,500           60,900           19,000
    Fish and Wildlife Service................................           50,513          111,632           30,000
    National Park Service....................................           99,700          147,468           44,000
    Forest Service...........................................           79,835          130,265           50,000
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal programs.............................          245,548          350,265          143,000
                                                              ==================================================
      Total LWCF.............................................          265,548          500,265          164,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has included $164,000,000 to cover the land 
acquisition needs of the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and the Forest 
Service.

                            Indian Programs

    Spending for Indian services by the Federal Government in 
total is included in the following table:

                                       FEDERAL FUNDING OF INDIAN PROGRAMS
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                    Fiscal year
                        Budget authority                            Fiscal year     Fiscal year    2001, budget
                                                                    1999 actual    2000, enacted     estimate
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Agriculture.......................................        $196,905        $197,512        $229,105
Department of Commerce..........................................           6,651           5,796          54,146
Department of Defense...........................................          16,000          16,000          16,000
Department of Justice...........................................         181,928         194,686         278,563
Department of Education.........................................       1,530,000       1,576,932       1,702,665
Department of HHS...............................................       2,543,818       2,744,400       3,050,070
Department of HUD...............................................         693,000         693,000         725,000
Department of Veterans Affairs..................................             515             520             532
Department of the Interior......................................       2,013,981       2,195,343       2,549,274
Department of Labor.............................................          88,655          68,815          80,337
Department of Transportation....................................         283,902         250,089         375,089
Environmental Protection Agency.................................         158,884         170,109         187,859
Small Business Administration...................................               0               0           5,750
Smithsonian Institution.........................................          25,000          32,000          41,000
Army Corps of Engineers.........................................          21,940          19,460          20,343
Department of Treasury..........................................               0               0           5,000
Other Independent Agencies......................................          44,937          36,741          59,043
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total.....................................................       7,806,116       8,201,403       9,379,776
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                        Constitutional Authority

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the House of Representatives 
states that:
    Each report of a committee on a bill or joint resolution of 
a public character, shall include a statement citing the 
specific powers granted to the Congress in the Constitution to 
enact the law proposed by the bill or joint resolution.
    The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to 
report this legislation from Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States of America which 
states: ``No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
consequence of Appropriations made by law. . . .''
    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

              Allocating Congressional Funding Priorities

    The Committee is concerned that the agencies funded by this 
Act are not following a standard methodology for allocating 
appropriated funds to the field where Congressional funding 
priorities are concerned. When Congressional instructions are 
provided, the Committee expects these instructions to be 
closely monitored and followed. In the future, the Committee 
directs that earmarks for Congressional funding priorities be 
first allocated to the receiving units, and then all remaining 
funds should be allocated to the field based on established 
procedures. Field units or programs should not have their 
allocations reduced because of earmarks for Congressional 
priorities without direction from or advance approval of the 
Committee.

                     Recreation on the Public Lands

    Public participation in recreation programs funded in this 
bill is an important and growing aspect of the land management 
agencies under the jurisdiction of this Committee. These 
agencies are responsible for the National Parks managed by the 
National Park Service, the National Wildlife Refuge System 
managed by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the 
Nation's public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management, 
and our National Forests and Grasslands managed by the Forest 
Service. It is a little known fact that recreation in the 
National Forests exceeds that of the National Parks. The Forest 
Service manages 192 million acres, has over 850 million 
visitors a year, and attracts 93 thousand volunteers. By 
contrast the National Park Service manages 78 million acres, 
has about 284 million visitors, and attracts 115 thousand 
volunteers. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages 93 
million acres, has 35 million visitors annually and attracts 29 
thousand volunteers. The Bureau of Land Management has the 
largest land base of the land management agencies with 264 
million acres. BLM has about 65 million visitors annually and 
attracts 17 thousand volunteers. The Committee continues to 
place a high priority on maintaining these recreation programs, 
ensuring that the American public has safe and uplifting 
experiences on the Nation's public lands. The Committee is 
grateful to all the volunteers who are helping to make the 
public lands better places for the visiting public and for 
generations to come.

         Invasive Species Control and the Use of Native Plants

    In several hearings this year, the land management agencies 
testified regarding the widespread and very serious problem of 
invasive exotic species. Many individuals and non-governmental 
organizations echoed those concerns in public witness 
testimony. In addition, numerous members of Congress voiced 
their support for increased efforts to control invasive 
species. Although a funding allocation lower than the fiscal 
year 2000 enacted level precludes the Committee from 
recommending expensive new initiatives, the Committee does 
recognize that controlling invasive exotics is important for 
natural resources management throughout the country.
    The Committee is pleased with the efforts of the Bureau of 
Land Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the 
National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the 
Forest Service to address the issues of invasive non-native 
plants in their strategic plans and to eradicate or control 
these species. The Committee urges the land managing bureaus to 
be pro-active in providing their field managers and the public 
with information on acceptable native alternatives to non-
native plant material, to increase public awareness of these 
issues, and to emphasize partnerships in the eradication of 
invasive non-native plants. Successful efforts to manage lands 
to protect native fauna should likewise be continued and 
expanded where possible. The Committee also urges all other 
entities that receive funding for facilities under this bill to 
increase their use of native plants in landscaping.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management is responsible for the 
multiple use management, protection, and development of a full 
range of natural resources, including minerals, timber, 
rangeland, fish and wildlife habitat, and wilderness on about 
264 million acres of the Nation's public lands and for 
management of 300 million additional acres of Federally-owned 
subsurface mineral rights. The Bureau is the second largest 
supplier of public outdoor recreation in the Western United 
States, with an estimated 62 million visits totaling 788 
million visitor hours of recreation use on the public lands 
under the Bureau's management.
    Under the multiple-use and ecosystem management concept the 
Bureau administers the grazing of approximately 4.3 million 
head of livestock on some 164 million acres of public land 
ranges, and manages over 47,000 wild horses and burros, some 
264 million acres of wildlife habitat, and over 150,000 miles 
of fisheries habitat. Grazing receipts are estimated to be 
about $14.2 million in fiscal year 2001, compared to an 
estimated $14.2 million in fiscal year 2000 and actual receipts 
of $14 million in fiscal year 1999. The Bureau also administers 
about 4 million acres of commercial forest lands through the 
``Management of lands and resources'' and ``Oregon and 
California grant lands'' appropriations. Timber receipts 
(including salvage) are estimated to be $83.9 million in fiscal 
year 2001 compared to estimated receipts of $58.5 million in 
fiscal year 2000 and actual receipts of $65.5 million in fiscal 
year 1999. The Bureau has an active program of soil and 
watershed management on 175 million acres in the lower 48 
States and 92 million acres in Alaska. Practices such as 
revegetation, protective fencing, and water developments are 
designed to conserve, enhance, and develop public land, soil, 
and watershed resources. The Bureau is also responsible for 
fire protection on the public lands and on all Department of 
the Interior managed lands in Alaska, and for the suppression 
of wildfires on the public lands in Alaska and the western 
States.

                   management of lands and resources




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $644,134,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       715,191,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       674,571,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +30,437,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -40,620,000


    The Committee recommends $674,571,000 for management of 
lands and resources, an increase of $30,437,000 from the fiscal 
year 2000 enacted level and a decrease of $40,620,000 from the 
budget request.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    Land resources.--The Committee recommends $173,622,000 for 
land resources a decrease of $16,830,000 from the budget 
request and an increase of $11,882,000 above the 2000 enacted 
level, including increases above the 2000 level of $4,632,000 
for fixed costs, $9,000,000 for wild horse and burro 
management, and $1,000,000 for the San Pedro Partnership 
initiative in Cochise County, Arizona, and decreases of 
$500,000 from the Montana State University weed program, 
$750,000 from the Idaho weed program, $500,000 from the Pacific 
Northwest lab, and $1,000,000 from the Colorado plateau.
    Wildlife and fisheries.--The Committee recommends 
$36,469,000 for wildlife and fisheries, a decrease of 
$4,243,000 from the budget request and an increase of $96,000 
above the 2000 enacted level, including increases above the 
2000 level of $996,000 for fixed costs and a decrease of 
$900,000 for Yukon river salmon.
    Threatened and endangered species.--The Committee 
recommends $19,352,000 for threatened and endangered species, a 
decrease of $4,320,000 from the budget request and an increase 
of $541,000 above the 2000 enacted level for fixed costs.
    The Committee understands that the Bureau is anticipating 
significant impacts to its ability to complete land health and 
watershed improvements and to respond to public land use 
authorization requests as a result of additional species 
listings under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), particularly 
in the sagebrush and prairie ecosystems managed by the Bureau. 
For example, recent and potential species listings including 
those of the Canada lynx, black-tailed prairie dog, sage 
grouse, mountain plover, lesser prairie chicken, and swift fox, 
will affect all activities in sagebrush and grassland habitats 
on BLM public lands. The Bureau anticipates that these new 
listings will result in the need to revise or complete 
additional land use plans, complete more consultations with the 
Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries 
Service, result in an increased level of litigation, result in 
the Bureau being less responsive to the permitting process, and 
increase overall Bureau costs.
    The Committee expects the Bureau to submit as part of its 
fiscal year 2002 budget request the results of its ongoing 
analysis and review of the impacts of ESA listings on the 
ability of the Bureau to accomplish its mission while at the 
same time responding to the growing demand for use 
authorization requests. The Committee expects the Bureau to 
provide a detailed roadmap of how it intends to address these 
impacts, including the level of funds and other resources that 
would be required to address these problem areas.
    Recreation management.--The Committee recommends 
$53,239,000 for recreation management, a decrease of $9,280,000 
from the budget request and an increase of $2,086,000 above the 
2000 enacted level, including increases above the 2000 level of 
$1,486,000 for fixed costs and $600,000 for desert rangers.
    The Committee understands that no funds were requested by 
the Bureau of Land Management for wilderness reinventory 
activities in its fiscal year 2001 budget request to the 
Congress. The Committee further understands that the Bureau has 
completed all of its wilderness reinventory activities begun in 
prior years. The Committee directs that, should the Department 
or the Bureau decide that additional wilderness reinventory 
activities are warranted, it must first notify the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations through the normal 
reprogramming process.
    Energy and minerals.--The Committee recommends $78,587,000 
for energy and minerals including Alaska minerals. This is a 
decrease of $3,500,000 from the budget request and an increase 
of $2,135,000 above the 2000 enacted level for fixed costs.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Bureau is 
introducing new burdensome and questionable requirements on 
domestic oil and gas applications for permits to drill, and 
directs the Bureau to cease requiring companies to apply paint 
to ground that will be disturbed by drilling activities.
    Realty and ownership management.--The Committee recommends 
$76,603,000 for realty and ownership management, a decrease of 
$3,392,000 from the budget request and a decrease of $1,091,000 
below the 2000 enacted level, including an increase above the 
2000 level of $1,309,000 for fixed costs and a decrease of 
$2,400,000 from the Alaska conveyance program.
    Resource protection and maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $42,860,000 for resources protection and 
maintenance, an increase of $3,985,000 above the budget request 
and $9,229,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including 
increases above the 2000 level of $979,000 for fixed costs, and 
$9,000,000 for land management planning, and a decrease of 
$750,000 from the Coeur d'Alene Basin Commission.
    The Committee is very concerned about the increased 
litigation the Bureau now faces because they have not kept pace 
in updating their land management plans. Therefore, the 
Committee has provided an additional $9,000,000 for planning 
activities and directs that the Bureau reallocate these funds 
to the highest-priority land management plans based on the 
Bureau's planning priority list.
    Transportation and facilities maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $47,353,000 for transportation and facilities 
maintenance, a decrease of $3,040,000 from the budget request 
and an increase of $1,402,000 above the 2000 enacted level for 
fixed costs.
    Land and resource information systems.--The Committee 
recommends $19,586,000 for land resource information systems, 
the same as the budget request and an increase of $549,000 
above the 2000 enacted level for fixed costs.
    Mining law administration.--The Committee recommends 
$33,366,000 for mining law administration. This activity is 
supported by offsetting fees equal to the amount made 
available.
    The Committee directs that no later than January 31, 2001 
the Bureau provide a report regarding underground mines on 
public lands in New Mexico and what can be done to provide a 
safer experience for visitors to the public lands where mines 
present a safety problem.
    Workforce and organizational support.--The Committee 
recommends $126,900,000 for workforce and organizational 
support, the same as the budget request and an increase of 
$3,608,000 above the 2000 enacted level for fixed costs.
    The Committee understands that dramatic population and 
community growth throughout the west, and major advances in 
technology, are having the effect of increasing the number of 
authorizations the Bureau is issuing for uses on public lands 
including rights-of-way, oil, gas, and coalbed methane 
drilling. Authorizing these and other uses of the public lands 
creates long-term commitments on the part of the Bureau to 
conduct environmental monitoring, inspections, and compliance 
reviews to ensure sustainable public land health and resource 
availability. The Committee expects the Bureau to balance 
appropriately the need to issue public land use authorizations 
and to conduct required monitoring, inspection, and compliance 
reviews within available funding.
    The Committee once again commends the Bureau's efforts to 
leverage its funds with non-Federal partners through its 
challenge cost share (CCS) program. The Committee concurs with 
BLM's current policy of not using CCS funds for purposes other 
than establishing joint activities with tribal, State, and 
private partners. Because each Federal dollar available for 
cost sharing results in two or more dollars available for on-
the-ground activities, the Committee directs that a cap of 10 
percent be placed on allowable BLM internal charges against CCS 
funds. As a result, at least 90 percent of the funds 
appropriated for CCS shall be available for matching partners 
at the field level.
    Bill language has been included under title III General 
Provisions to allow the Bureau and the Forest Service to pilot 
test their Service First initiative as a means of improving 
customer service and efficiency.

                        wildland fire management




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $290,957,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       297,197,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       292,197,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +1,240,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -5,000,000


    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $292,197,000 
for wildland fire management, which is a decrease of $5,000,000 
below the budget request and an increase of $1,240,000 above 
the 2000 enacted level.
    The appropriation includes $182,090,000 for preparedness 
and fire use, the same as the budget request and an increase of 
$6,240,000 above the 2000 enacted level for fixed costs. The 
Committee has provided $110,107,000 for suppression and 
operations, a decrease of $5,000,000 from both the budget 
request and the 2000 enacted level. Within the funds provided 
for wildland fire management $9,300,000 is available for 
renovation or construction of fire facilities.
    The Committee has included an additional $200,000,000 for 
emergency wildland fire management under Title IV--Fiscal Year 
2000 Emergency Supplemental Appropriations.
    The Committee remains very concerned about the hazardous 
fuel conditions on Federal lands and the potential impact these 
conditions can have on neighboring State and private lands. The 
Committee continues to support the interagency fire science and 
management program, created by this Committee three years ago, 
which has developed nation-wide fuel loading maps and maps 
indicating areas having high risk of catastrophic fire. The 
Committee directs the Forest Service and the Department of the 
Interior to keep these maps up-to-date and publicly available. 
The Committee also directs the Secretaries to make these maps 
available to States and counties which contain areas of high 
risk of catastrophic fires.

                    central hazardous materials fund




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $9,955,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        10,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................           +45,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Central Hazardous Materials Fund was established to 
include funding for remedial investigations/feasibility studies 
and cleanup of hazardous waste sites for which the Department 
of the Interior is liable pursuant to the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act and 
includes sums recovered from or paid by a party as 
reimbursement for remedial action or response activities.
    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the central 
hazardous materials fund, which is the same as the budget 
request and an increase of $45,000 above the 2000 enacted 
level.

                              construction




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $11,196,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        11,200,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         5,300,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -5,896,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -5,900,000


    The Committee recommends $5,300,000 for construction, which 
is a decrease of $5,900,000 from the budget request and 
$5,896,000 below the 2000 enacted level. The Committee has 
provided $5,300,000 for the construction of the Grand 
Staircase-Escalante National Monument science center.

                       payments in lieu of taxes




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $134,385,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       135,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       134,385,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -615,000


    Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) provides for payments to 
local units of government containing certain Federally owned 
lands. These payments are designed to supplement other Federal 
land receipt sharing payments local governments may be 
receiving. Payments received may be used by the recipients for 
any governmental purpose.
    The Committee recommends $134,385,000 for PILT, a decrease 
of $615,000 from the budget request and the same as the 2000 
enacted level.

                            land acquisition




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $15,500,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        60,900,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        19,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +3,500,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -41,900,000


    The Committee recommends $19,000,000, an increase of 
$3,500,000 above the enacted level and a decrease of 
$41,900,000 below the budget request. This amount includes 
$15,000,000 for line item projects, $1,000,000 for emergencies 
and hardships and $3,000,000 for acquisition management.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

                                                               Committee
        Area and State                                    recommendation
Cerbat Foothills (AZ)...................................        $750,000
Gunnison Basin (CO).....................................       2,000,000
North Platte River (WY).................................         250,000
Organ Mtns. (NM)........................................       2,000,000
Otay Mountain/Kuchamaa HCP (CA).........................       1,000,000
San Pedro Ecosystem (easements only) (AZ)...............       3,000,000
Santa Rosa Mtns. NSA (CA)...............................       1,000,000
Upper Crab Creek (WA)...................................       2,000,000
Upper Missouri WSR (Lewis & Clark) (Multi)..............       3,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................      15,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
Emergency/hardship/inholding............................       1,000,000
Acquisition management..................................       3,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      19,000,000

    The funds provided for the San Pedro Ecosystem in Arizona 
are for easements only.

                   oregon and california grant lands




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $98,775,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       104,267,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       100,467,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +1,692,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -3,800,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $100,467,000 for the Oregon and 
California grant lands, a decrease of $3,800,000 from the 
budget request and an increase of $1,692,000 above the 2000 
enacted level for fixed costs. These funds are provided for 
construction and acquisition, operation and maintenance, and 
management activities on the revested lands in the 18 Oregon 
and California land grant counties of western Oregon.

                           range improvements




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        10,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of not 
less than $10,000,000 to be derived from public lands receipts 
and Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act lands grazing receipts. 
Receipts are used for construction, purchase, and maintenance 
of range improvements, such as seeding, fence construction, 
weed control, water development, fish and wildlife habitat 
improvement, and planning and design of these projects.

               service charges, deposits, and forfeitures




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $8,800,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         7,500,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         7,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -1,300,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $7,500,000, the budget request, for service 
charges, deposits, and forfeitures. This account uses the 
revenues collected under specified sections of the Federal Land 
Policy and Management Act of 1976 and other Acts to pay for 
reasonable administrative and other costs in connection with 
rights-of-way applications from the private sector, 
miscellaneous cost-recoverable realty cases, timber contract 
expenses, repair of damaged lands, the adopt-a-horse program, 
and the provision of copies of official public land documents.

                       miscellaneous trust funds




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $7,700,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         7,700,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         7,700,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation 
estimated to be $7,700,000, the budget request, for 
miscellaneous trust funds. The Federal Land Policy and 
Management Act of 1976 provides for the receipt and expenditure 
of moneys received as donations or gifts (section 307). Funds 
in this trust fund are derived from the administrative and 
survey costs paid by applicants for conveyance of omitted lands 
(lands fraudulently or erroneously omitted from original 
cadastral surveys), from advances for other types of surveys 
requested by individuals, and from contributions made by users 
of Federal rangelands. Amounts received from the sale of Alaska 
town lots are also available for expenses of sale and 
maintenance of townsites. Revenue from unsurveyed lands, and 
surveys of omitted lands, administrative costs of conveyance, 
and gifts and donations must be appropriated before it can be 
used.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    The mission of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is to 
conserve, protect and enhance fish and wildlife and their 
habitats for the continuing benefit of people. The Service has 
responsibility for migratory birds, threatened and endangered 
species, certain marine mammals, and land under Service 
control.
    The Service manages nearly 93 million acres across the 
United States, encompassing a 521-unit National Wildlife Refuge 
System, additional wildlife and wetlands areas, and 66 National 
Fish Hatcheries. A network of law enforcement agents and port 
inspectors enforce Federal laws for the protection of fish and 
wildlife.

                          resource management




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $714,543,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       761,938,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       731,400,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +16,857,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -30,538,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $731,400,000 for resource 
management, an increase of $16,857,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 level and $30,538,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee has provided full funding for fixed cost increases 
and has continued to provide increases above current year 
levels to address the Service's large operations and 
maintenance backlogs. The changes discussed below are all 
compared with the enacted budget for fiscal year 2000 as 
adjusted for the 0.38% government-wide reduction. Unless 
provided to the contrary herein, projects funded in fiscal year 
2000 are funded at the same level for 2001. For example, 
because it is not addressed to the contrary below, the 
Committee recommendation includes $996,000 for the Sonoran 
Desert Conservation Plan in candidate conservation, which is 
the same amount the project received in fiscal year 2000, and 
$1,096,000, the 2000 level for bull trout conservation in 
Washington State, is continued under the Committee 
recommendation for 2001, as part of the Partners for Fish and 
Wildlife program in habitat conservation.
    Ecological services.--The Committee recommends $197,422,000 
for ecological services, an increase of $7,683,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 level.
    Changes recommended for endangered species programs amount 
to a net increase of $4,106,000. In candidate conservation 
programs there is an increase of $195,000 for fixed costs and 
decreases of $40,000 for borderlands and $399,000 for the 
Alabama sturgeon program, now that the species has been listed. 
For listing activities there is an increase of $195,000 for 
fixed costs and a decrease of $8,000 for an internal transfer. 
For consultation programs there are increases of $6,600,000 for 
HCP and other consultations and $796,000 for fixed costs, and 
decreases of $53,000 for an internal transfer, $299,000 for the 
cold water fish HCP in Montana, $100,000 for the Broughton 
Ranch HCP and $80,000 for borderlands. For recovery programs 
there are increases of $1,047,000 for fixed costs, $500,000 for 
Florida manatee protection and $399,000 as a general increase, 
and decreases of $108,000 for an internal transfer, $3,842,000 
for Washington State salmon and steelhead recovery, $298,000 
for the Concho water snake, $200,000 for borderlands and 
$199,000 for the Walker River/Weber Dam project.
    Changes recommended for habitat conservation programs 
amount to a net increase of $3,269,000. For the Partners for 
Fish and Wildlife program there are increases of $456,000 for 
fixed costs, $2,000,000 for invasive species, $500,000 for fish 
habitat and passage restoration, and $500,000 for the Columbia 
River Estuary Research program, and decreases of $747,000 for 
Washington State salmon enhancement, $249,000 for Hawaii ESA 
conservation plans, and $146,000 for the Reno, Nevada 
biodiversity program. For project planning there is an increase 
of $670,000 for fixed costs and a decrease of $100,000 for 
borderlands. For coastal programs there are increases of 
$187,000 for fixed costs and $400,000 for the establishment of 
a field office in the Tampa Bay area and a field office in the 
Florida Panhandle, and a decrease of $291,000 for the Long Live 
the Kings program. There is also an increase of $89,000 for the 
National Wetlands Inventory for fixed costs.
    An increase of $308,000 for fixed costs is recommended for 
the environmental contaminants program.
    Refuges and wildlife.--The Committee recommends 
$345,130,000 for refuges and wildlife, an increase of 
$21,872,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level.
    Changes recommended for refuge operations and maintenance 
include increases of $10,766,000 for fixed costs, $5,000,000 
for the operations backlog/minimum staffing needs, and 
$5,000,000 for the maintenance backlog, and a decrease of 
$274,000 for internal transfers. For migratory bird management 
there are increases of $398,000 for fixed costs and $200,000 
for joint ventures, and decreases of $71,000 for an internal 
transfer and $74,000 for borderlands. For law enforcement 
activities there is an increase of $993,000 for fixed costs and 
a decrease of $66,000 for an internal transfer.
    A total of $996,000, the budget request, is recommended to 
continue the Salton Sea recovery program at the 2000 level, 
contingent on matching funds from the State of California.
    Fisheries.--The Committee recommends $69,786,000 for 
fisheries, a decrease of $15,485,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
level.
    Changes recommended for hatchery operations and maintenance 
include increases of $41,000 for an internal transfer, $974,000 
for fixed costs, $324,000 for Lower Mississippi River 
restoration, and $500,000 for the maintenance backlog, and 
decreases of $199,000 for the White Sulpher Springs hatchery in 
West Virginia and $3,586,000 for Washington State hatchery 
improvements.
    There is a decrease of $11,656,000 for the Lower Snake 
River Compensation Plan, consistent with the Memorandum of 
Agreement between the Service and the Bonneville Power 
Administration.
    For fish and wildlife management there is an increase of 
$532,000 for fixed costs and decreases of $27,000 for an 
internal transfer, $598,000 for the Washington State fish 
marking machine purchase, $1,014,000 for Kennebec River 
restoration in Maine, $367,000 for the Juniata Valley school 
district in Pennsylvania, $200,000 for Yukon River management 
studies, $100,000 for Yukon River salmon treaty education, and 
$109,000 for Caribou Creek fish passage in Alaska.
    General administration.--The Committee recommends 
$119,062,000 for general administration, an increase of 
$2,787,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level.
    Changes include fixed cost increases of $534,000 for 
central office operations, $768,000 for regional office 
operations, $416,000 for service-wide support, $257,000 for the 
training center, and $183,000 for international affairs. There 
is also an increase of $629,000 in service-wide support for an 
internal transfer.
    Other.--The Committee notes that $3,400,000 has been 
recommended in the U.S. Geological Survey, specifically to 
provide additional research support to the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Administration should submit a legislative 
reauthorization proposal for the Endangered Species Act, which 
realistically addresses needed reforms.
    2. The Service should consider the concerns of the 
Resources Committee in the House of Representatives when 
determining the distribution of ESA funding.
    3. The Service should continue to support the recovery 
initiative for the black-capped vireo in Texas.
    4. Fixed cost increases and proposed internal transfers are 
included in full in the Committee's recommendations.
    5. The Service should continue funding, at least at the 
fiscal year 2000 level, for the Upper Colorado River Basin 
program and the Peregrine Fund.
    6. The Service should perform a thorough review of, and 
develop a long-term strategy for, the fisheries program in 
coordination with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and 
other outside independent groups. The Committee believes 
strongly that the focus of the program should be habitat based 
rather than hatchery based and that mitigation work at 
hatcheries should be performed on a cost reimbursable basis. 
This direction was provided in last year's report and the 
Committee urges the Service to expedite the review and planning 
process and institute much needed reforms.
    7. The Committee supports the efforts in New Mexico to 
enhance the habitat of the endangered silvery minnow and the 
blunt nosed shiner. The Service should use existing Federal 
water allocations in New Mexico to the maximum extent possible 
and work with the Bureau of Reclamation and the Army Corps of 
Engineers to enhance the habitat of these two species in 
compliance with the Endangered Species Act.
    8. The Committee continues to receive many expressions of 
concern with respect to goose population problems, including 
problems with resident Canada geese. These problems involve the 
over-population of snow geese, the problem with dusky Canada 
geese in the Pacific Northwest, and overabundance/nuisance 
problems with Canada geese in various areas of the country. The 
Committee has just received the Service's strategic plan for 
dealing with these problems and urges the Department to 
incorporate funding for this important initiative in the 2002 
budget request.
    9. The Committee continues to be concerned about predation 
by Caspian Terns on outbound migrating juvenile salmon smolt in 
the Columbia River. The Committee understands that current 
efforts to address the problem have been stopped because of a 
legal challenge. The Service should keep the Committee apprised 
of the status of this program on a semi-annual basis.
    10. The increase of $500,000 for manatee protection 
provides a total of $1,000,000 for this program in 2001.
    11. The Service has yet to issue the contract to obtain the 
necessary data on the Concho water snake. This delay is 
unacceptable and the Service should accelerate its efforts in 
order to move as quickly as possible on a delisting decision.
    12. Joint ventures have been one of the greatest successes 
for the Service. Federal funds in this program are leveraged to 
a greater extent than all other Service programs combined. The 
Service should emphasize joint venture efforts in future 
budgets.
    13. Klamath River flow study funding will be considered 
after the participants have identified funding commitments and 
responsibility for each participating organization.
    14. The Service should develop an environmental impact 
statement prior to proceeding with the establishment of the 
Little Darby NWR, OH.
    15. The Service should use funding for hatchery facility 
and program reform projects that are necessary to comply with 
Biological Opinions and are consistent with the ``Review of 
Artificial Production of Anadromous and Resident Fish in the 
Columbia River Basin'' report to Congress by the Northwest 
Power Planning Council.
    16. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the Little Pend 
Oreille National Wildlife Refuge, located in Washington State, 
appears to be inconsistent with Public Law 105-57, Section 
5(4)(L) of the Refuge Improvement Act of 1997. The Service 
should continue to facilitate the use of its lands for military 
preparedness operations conducted by the Fairchild Air Force 
Base Survival School, consistent with current permit 
parameters.
    17. The Service should report to the Committee on why it 
continues to expend money on the endangered jaguar in 
southwestern New Mexico when none exist in the area. The report 
should outline for the Committee the number of meetings, 
publications, involvement of personnel, number of agencies 
involved, and full cost of the program including the portion of 
the salary of Service employees involved with the jaguar.
    18. The Department should report on the current status of 
the Southwest Willow Flycatcher including a comparison of 
numbers, and population trends since intervention by Federal 
agencies took place. The report should include the cost of the 
program to FWS, the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land 
Management as well as the number of cattle that have been 
impacted by the program. The report should also include a 
timetable on when the population is expected to recover based 
on the removal of cattle.
    19. The Committee understands that the Fish and Wildlife 
Service considers levee repairs in certain parts of the country 
as subject to the requirements of the Endangered Species Act 
since such repairs may cause an incidental taking of an 
endangered or threatened species. The Committee is concerned 
that levees throughout the country that are in imminent danger 
of failure are not being repaired in a timely manner. The 
Service is encouraged to recognize that manmade levees are 
constructed to enhance public safety and that any habitat that 
may be provided thereon may be secondary to the greater public 
good. The Committee recommends that the Service exercise 
greater discretion in providing expedited review of projects 
that are designed to restore manmade levees to structural 
soundness. The Committee suggests that the loss of habitat due 
to timely repair of a levee in imminent danger of failure is 
less important than the loss of life and habitat due to 
catastrophic failure of a levee.
    Bill language.--The Committee has included bill language, 
as requested by the Administration, capping the amount of 
funding available for certain endangered species listing 
programs. The amount for fiscal year 2001 is $6,395,000. Bill 
language also is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, renaming a trail at the Mason Neck NWR, VA; 
and limiting the use of funds to establish an NWR in the Yolo 
Bypass of California.

                              construction




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $53,528,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        44,231,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        48,395,000
Comparison:
  Appropriation, 2000.................................        -5,133,000
  Budget estimate, 2001...............................        +4,164,000


    The Committee recommends $48,395,000 for construction, a 
decrease of $5,133,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$4,164,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
funds:

                                                  CONSTRUCTION
                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                         Budget      Committee
                      Project                                   Description             request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alchesay/Williams Creek NFH, AZ....................  Environmental Pollution Control--       927           927
                                                      Phase II (c).
Anahuac NWR, TX....................................  Bridge Rehab/Replacement--Phase         673           673
                                                      I (p/d/ic).
Bear River NWR, UT.................................  Education Center (c)............          0         3,600
Bear River NWR, UT.................................  Water management facilities (c).          0           500
Blackwater NWR, MD.................................  Carpentry/Auto Shop.............        300           300
Bozeman FTC, MT....................................  Laboratory/Administration             1,600         1,600
                                                      Building--Phase II (c).
Bridge Safety Inspection...........................  ................................        495           495
Cabo Rojo NWR, PR..................................  Replace Office Building                 500           500
                                                      (Seismic)--Phase I (p/d).
Chincoteague NWR, VA...............................  Headquarters & Visitor Center--       3,500         3,500
                                                      Phase II (c).
Coleman NFH, CA....................................  Seismic Safety Rehab of 3               301           301
                                                      buildings--Phase I (p/d).
Dam Safety Inspection..............................  ................................        570           570
Ennis NFH, MT......................................  Raceway Enclosure--Phase II (c).      1,000         1,000
Hagerman NWR, TX...................................  Bridge Rehabilitation--Phase I          368           368
                                                      (p/d).
Innoko NWR, AK.....................................  Hangar--McGrath--Phase I (p/d)..        129             0
Jackson NFH, WY....................................  Seismic Safety Rehab of 2               373           373
                                                      Buildings--Phase I (p/d).
Lake Thibadeau NWR, MT.............................  Lake Thibadeau Diversion Dam--          450           450
                                                      Phase II (c).
Leavenworth NFH, WA................................  Nada Dam--Phase II SEED Study...        300           300
Mason Neck NWR, VA.................................  ADA accessibility (c)...........          0           130
National Repository, CO............................  Relocation of National Eagle            400           400
                                                      Repository--Phase II (d/c).
National Repository, CO............................  Renovation of National Wildlife         950           950
                                                      Property Repository--Phase II
                                                      (d/c).
NCTC, WV...........................................  Fourth Dormitory (p/d/c)........      7,500         7,500
NFW Forensics Lab, OR..............................  Forensics Laboratory Expansion--      1,838         1,838
                                                      Phase II (d/ic).
Nowitna NWR, AK....................................  Hangar--Galena--Phase I (p).....        106             0
Parker River NWR, MA...............................  Headquarters Complex (c)........      1,230         1,230
Pelican Island NWR, FL.............................  Interpretive Center and Admin.          831             0
                                                      Facility--Phase I (p/d).
San Pablo Bay NWR, CA..............................  Renovate Office--Phase I (p/d)..        275           275
Six NFHs...........................................  Water Treatment Improvement--         2,500         2,500
                                                      Phase II (c).
Sonny Bono Salton Sea NWR, CA......................  Seismic Safety Rehab of 1                55            55
                                                      Building--Phase I (p/d).
Tern Island NWR, HI................................  Rehabilitate Seawall--Phase III       8,600         8,600
                                                      (c).
Tishomingo NFH, OK.................................  Pennington Creek Foot Bridge--          229           229
                                                      Phase II (c).
                                                                                      --------------------------
    Subtotal: Line item Construction...............  ................................     36,000        39,164
Nationwide Engineering Services:
    Demolition Fund................................  ................................        389         1,389
    Environmental Compliance.......................  ................................      1,860         1,860
    Other Engineering Services.....................  ................................      5,782         5,782
    Seismic Safety Program.........................  ................................        200           200
                                                                                      --------------------------
      Subtotal: Engineering Services...............  ................................      8,231         9,231
                                                                                      ==========================
      Grand Totals.................................  ................................     44,231        48,395
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The funding provided for the Bear River NWR, UT is 
contingent on a 50 percent non-Federal cost share for the 
visitor center portion of the project. The Service should 
notify the Committee of the total required cost share prior to 
initiating construction.
    2. Funding for the Tern Island Seawall will complete this 
project.

                            land acquisition




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $50,513,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       111,632,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -20,513,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -81,632,000


    The Committee recommends $30,000,000, a decrease of 
$20,513,000 below the enacted level and $81,632,000 below the 
budget request. This amount includes $21,750,000 for line item 
acquisition, $250,000 for emergencies and hardships, $500,000 
for exchanges, and $7,500,000 for acquisition management.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

                                                               Committee
        Area and State                                    recommendation
Archie Carr NWR (FL)....................................      $2,000,000
Atchafalaya NWR (LA)....................................         750,000
Bon Secour NWR (AL).....................................       1,000,000
Buenos Aires NWR (AZ)...................................       1,000,000
Canann Valley NWR (WV)..................................         500,000
Edwin B. Forsythe NWR (NJ)..............................       1,000,000
Great Meadows Complex (MA)..............................       1,000,000
Great Swamp NWR (NJ)....................................         500,000
Lake Umbagog NWR (NH)...................................       1,000,000
Leslie Canyon NWR (AZ)..................................       2,000,000
Louisiana Black Bear NWR (LA)...........................       1,000,000
Minnesota Valley NWR, (MN)..............................         500,000
Rappahannock River NWR (VA).............................       1,000,000
San Diego NWR (CA)......................................       3,000,000
Silvio O. Conte NWR (CT/MA/NH/VT).......................       1,000,000
Stewart B. McKinney NWR (CT)............................       1,000,000
Walkill River NWR (NJ)..................................       1,000,000
Whittlesey Creek NWR (WI)...............................         500,000
Willapa NWR (WA)........................................       2,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................      21,750,000
Emergencies/Hardships...................................         250,000
Exchanges...............................................         500,000
Acquisition Management..................................       7,500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      30,000,000

    The Committee recognizes the sensitivities of the local 
community pertaining to the creation of the Teche Black Bear 
Refuge. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service shall continue to 
acquire timberlands within the Bailey property contingent on a 
mutually-acceptable land swap agreement between current 
property users within the refuge and the Service.

            cooperative endangered species conservation fund

    Eighty percent of the habitat for more than half of the 
listed endangered and threatened species is on private land. 
The Cooperative Endangered Species Conservation Fund provides 
grants to States and Territories for endangered species 
recovery actions on non-Federal lands and provides funds for 
non-Federal land acquisition to facilitate habitat protection. 
Individual States and Territories provide 25 percent of grant 
project costs. Cost sharing is reduced to 10 percent when two 
or more States or Territories are involved in a project.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $23,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        65,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        23,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -42,000,000


    The Committee recommends $23,000,000 for the cooperative 
endangered species conservation fund, which is equal to the 
fiscal year 2000 level and a decrease of $42,000,000 below the 
budget request.

                     national wildlife refuge fund

    Through this program the Service makes payments to counties 
in which Service lands are located based on their fair market 
value. Payments to counties are estimated to be $16,377,000 in 
fiscal year 2001 with $10,439,000 derived from this 
appropriation and $5,938,000 from net refuge receipts estimated 
to be collected in fiscal year 2000.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $10,739,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        10,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        10,439,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................          -300,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          +439,000


    The Committee recommends $10,439,000 for the National 
wildlife refuge fund, an increase of $439,000 above the budget 
request and $300,000 below the fiscal year 2000 funding level.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
priorities of the Service with respect to how they relate to 
meeting its obligations under the National wildlife refuge 
fund. In particular, the Committee questions why the Service 
continues to acquire more land but does not request additional 
funding for the National wildlife refuge fund.

               north american wetlands conservation fund

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, through the North 
American Wetlands Conservation Fund, leverages partner 
contributions for wetlands conservation. Projects to date have 
been in 46 States, 10 Canadian provinces and 17 Mexican states. 
In addition to this appropriation, the Service receives funding 
from receipts in the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration 
account from taxes on firearms, ammunition, archery equipment, 
pistols and revolvers, and from the Sport Fish Restoration 
account from taxes on fishing tackle and equipment, electric 
trolling motors and fish finders and certain marine gasoline 
taxes. By law, sport fish restoration receipts are used for 
coastal wetlands in States bordering the Pacific and Atlantic 
Oceans, States bordering the Great Lakes, Puerto Rico, the 
Virgin Islands, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana 
Islands, the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands and 
American Samoa.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $14,957,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        30,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        15,499,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................          +542,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -14,501,000


    The Committee recommends $15,499,000 for the North American 
wetlands conservation fund, an increase of $542,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 level and $14,501,000 below the budget 
request. Increases include $500,000 for wetlands conservation 
and $42,000 for administration.

              wildlife conservation and appreciation fund

    The Wildlife Conservation and Appreciation Fund provides 
grants to States for inventory and population determinations of 
fish and wildlife species, for identification of fish and 
wildlife habitat and associated problems, and for actions to 
conserve and restore habitat and to provide public use 
opportunities.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................          $797,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................           800,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................           797,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................            -3,000


    The Committee recommends $797,000 for the wildlife 
conservation and appreciation fund, which is equal to the 
fiscal year 2000 level and $3,000 below the budget request.

                multinational species conservation fund

    This account combines funding for programs under the former 
rewards and operations (African elephant) account, the former 
rhinoceros and tiger conservation account, and the Asian 
elephant program.
    The African Elephant Act of 1988 established a fund for 
assisting nations and organizations involved with conservation 
of African elephants. The Service provides grants to African 
Nations and to qualified organizations and individuals to 
protect and manage critical populations of these elephants.
    The Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Act of 1994 
authorized programs to enhance compliance with the Convention 
on International Trade in Endangered Species and U.S. or 
foreign laws prohibiting the taking or trade of rhinoceros, 
tigers or their habitat.
    The Asian Elephant Conservation Act of 1997 authorized a 
grant program, similar to the African elephant program, to 
enable cooperators from regional and range country agencies and 
organizations to address Asian elephant conservation problems. 
The world's surviving populations of wild Asian elephants are 
found in 13 south and southeastern Asian countries.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $2,391,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         3,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         2,391,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -609,000


    The Committee recommends $2,391,000 for the multinational 
species conservation fund, equal to the fiscal year 2000 level 
and $609,000 below the budget request. The recommended funding 
includes $996,000 for African elephant conservation, $697,000 
for rhinoceros and tiger conservation and $698,000 for Asian 
elephant conservation. The Committee expects these funds to be 
matched by non-Federal funding to leverage private 
contributions to the maximum extent possible.

                         National Park Service

    The mission of the National Park Service is to preserve 
unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the 
national park system for the enjoyment, education, and 
inspiration of this and future generations. The National Park 
Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of 
natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor 
recreation throughout this country and the world.
    The National Park Service, established in 1916, has 
stewardship responsibilities for the protection and 
preservation of the heritage resources of the National Park 
System. The system, consisting of 379 separate and distinct 
units, is recognized globally as a leader in park management 
and resource preservation. The national park system represents 
much of the finest the Nation has to offer in terms of scenery, 
historical and archeological relics, and cultural heritage. 
Through its varied sites, the National Park Service attempts to 
explain America's history, interpret its culture, preserve 
examples of its natural ecosystems, and provide recreational 
and educational opportunities for U.S. citizens and visitors 
from all over the world. In addition, the National Park Service 
provides support to tribal, local, and State governments to 
preserve culturally significant, ecologically important, and 
public recreational lands.

                 operation of the National park system




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................    $1,363,764,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................     1,454,098,000
Recommended, 2001                                          1,425,617,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +61,853,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -28,481,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $1,425,617,000 for operation of 
the National park system for fiscal year 2001, an increase of 
$61,853,000 above the enacted level and a decrease of 
$28,481,000 below the Administration's request. The Committee 
has focused on the highest Service priorities and has included 
funds for park base operations and the core elements of the 
Service's Natural Resource Challenge initiative. While the Park 
Service has done an excellent job in outlining the need to 
continue a planned, multi-faceted approach to addressing 
natural resource management concerns, the budget allowance 
provided to this Subcommittee has allowed only a portion of the 
funds requested for the Challenge initiative to be approved. In 
addition, the recommended level also provides for fixed costs, 
as requested in the President's budget.
    The bill provides a total increase of $24,050,000 for park 
base operations, as requested in the President's budget. This 
increase continues the Subcommittee's commitment to the day-to-
day operation of our National parks and allows accomplishment 
of the Service's mission of protecting resources and providing 
for visitor enjoyment.
    The Committee has approved funds for fixed costs totaling a 
net $28,410,000, as requested in the President's budget. Base 
increases totaling $33,116,000 have been approved for funding, 
and the Subcommittee has accepted base reductions totaling 
$4,706,000 as requested in the budget. Technical adjustments to 
reflect the establishment of a new subactivity for the United 
States Park Police are accepted and result in no net change to 
overall funding.
    The Committee has included a total of $9,393,000 to 
continue the Natural Resource Initiative begun last year. This 
critical work aimed at identifying, monitoring and preserving 
the natural resources within the parks focuses on programs such 
as, controlling and eradicating evasive species, basic 
inventory and monitoring of resources and recovery plans for 
threatened and endangered species.
    Resource Stewardship.--The Committee recommends 
$275,124,000 for resource stewardship, an increase of 
$21,121,000 above the fiscal year 2000 enacted level and a 
reduction of $12,696,000 from the President's request. Included 
in this amount are increases of $7,466,000 for park base 
operations and $9,393,000 to allow partial funding of the 
Service's Natural Resource Challenge. Approved within the 
amount for the Natural Resource Challenge are increases for the 
following components: $2,293,000 for Invasive Species Control/
Threatened and Endangered Species Recovery in park bases, 
$4,200,000 for the inventory and monitoring program-Vital Signs 
Monitoring, $200,000 to improve air quality at parks, 
$1,100,000 for natural resource data management and 
distribution, and $1,600,000 for Cooperative Ecosystem Study 
Units. A net base increase of $4,262,000 is approved as 
requested in the President's budget.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends $278,636,000 
for visitor services, a decrease of $40,000,000 from the fiscal 
year 2000 enacted level and a reduction of $1,957,000 from the 
President's request. Included in this amount are an increase of 
$7,661,000 for park base operations and a net base decrease of 
$47,661,000 reflecting technical adjustments and fixed costs as 
requested in the President's budget. Of the approved base 
decrease, a transfer of $54,401,000 would allow establishment 
of a new subactivity for the United States Park Police by 
shifting funds for Park Police operations to the new 
subactivity. There is a net base increase of $6,740,000 for 
additional fixed costs.
    United States Park Police.--The Committee recommends 
$75,641,000 for the new subactivity, United States Park Police, 
an increase of $75,641,000 from the fiscal year 2000 enacted 
level and a reduction of $800,000 from the President's request. 
Approved are an increase of $1,474,000 for park base operations 
and a net increase of $2,062,000 for additional fixed costs. 
The technical adjustments /transfers totaling $72,105,000 are 
approved.
    Facility Operations and Maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $446,661,000 for facility operations and 
maintenance, an increase of $14,105,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 enacted level and a reduction of $3,085,000 from the 
President's request. Included in this amount are an increase of 
$5,198,000 for park base operations and a net increase of 
$8,907,000 for fixed costs.
    Park Support.--The Committee recommends $254,628,000 for 
park support, an increase of $7,129,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 enacted level and a reduction of $7,227,000 from the 
President's request. Included in this amount is an increase of 
$2,251,000, for park base operations and a net increase of 
$4,878,000 for additional fixed costs.
    External Administrative Costs.--The Committee recommends 
$94,927,000 for external administrative costs, a decrease of 
$16,143,000 from the fiscal year 2000 enacted level and a 
reduction of $2,716,000 from the President's request. Approved 
reductions include $1,522,000 for unemployment compensation 
payments and $17,704,000 for a technical adjustment to allow 
establishment of a new subactivity for the United States Park 
Police by shifting funds for Park Police pension payments to 
the new subactivity. These are offset by approved increases of 
$651,000 for Workers Compensation Payments, $1,489,000 for the 
Working Capital Fund, and $943,000 for GSA space rental rate 
increases.
    GPRA.--The Committee recognizes the progress the Service 
has made towards making performance management its business 
system and strongly supports that progress. The Committee 
believes that achieving measurable outcomes should be the basis 
for Service decision-making and priority setting.
    The Committee is concerned that management is still not 
fully committed to the Government Performance and Results Act, 
that systems for project funding, operating increase requests 
and Strategic Plan goals are not adequately integrated, and 
that data quality needs continued improvement. The Committee 
expects these issues to be resolved.
    Housing.--The Committee has agreed to release the 
$20,000,000 in previously appropriated funds for park housing 
rehabilitation and trailer replacement, as well as providing 
$5,000,000 in new funding for fiscal year 2001. These funds are 
only to be used for those 3700 specific housing projects listed 
in the National Park Service Housing report dated January, 
2000. These projects have been agreed to by the Service and 
verified by the contracted housing needs assessment report.
    While there is general agreement between the contractor and 
the Service on 80 percent of the housing stock, the fate of the 
remaining 20 percent of housing is unresolved due to several 
policy issues including emergency response times and the staff 
needed to fulfill this need and the inclusion of housing stock 
for cooperators and volunteers. These are important issues that 
need to be tackled head-on by the leadership of the Service. 
The Committee expects a progress report by June 2001 which 
outlines a specific timetable for resolution of these and other 
issues so that the Committee can appropriately deal with the 
Park Service housing problem.
    Other.--The Committee expects the Service to continue to 
provide $65,000 to the Claude Moore Colonial Farm along the 
George Washington Memorial Parkway in Virginia to support 
educational programs which foster public understanding and 
appreciation of the importance of agriculture in the 
development of American society.
    The Committee again emphasizes the great value of 
Cumberland Island's rich and diverse historic, cultural, and 
natural resources and expects that all of these resources be 
preserved in perpetuity. The Committee also expects that the 
park's resource management plan reflects the formal agreement 
signed in 1999 after many collaborative island stakeholder 
meetings. The Committee endorses this agreement and directs the 
Service to continue to implement both the letter and the spirit 
of the agreement, which specifically calls for preservation of 
the historic resources and providing public access.
    The Committee provided $1.4 million last year for the 
restoration of Plum Orchard mansion on Cumberland Island. The 
Committee is concerned by reports of delays as well as 
increased costs for this project. The Service is directed to 
proceed with this work as quickly as possible within the funds 
provided. In addition, the Service is reminded of their goal to 
issue an RFP for occupancy of this structure. The Committee 
expects a written report on the progress of this project by 
December 1, 2000.
    Although no additional funding has been provided at this 
time, the Committee supports the Service's proposal to improve 
the management of partnerships and business practices by 
adjusting its organizational structure and redirecting existing 
resources. The Committee will continue to keep this priority in 
mind as the bill progresses through the fiscal year 2001 
process.
    The Committee is aware of the problem of an overpopulation 
of white tailed deer at the Valley Forge National Historical 
Park. Within available funds, the Service is directed to begin 
work on cultural landscape research, and flora and fauna 
inventories. The Service should also develop a landscape 
management plan which includes objectives for deer impacts on 
vegetation, complete an environmental assessment and, if 
appropriate, an environmental impact statement which addresses 
deer management at Valley Forge in the context of the cultural 
landscape.
    The Committee has provided over $9,000,000 in increases for 
the Service's Natural Resource Challenge Initiative in this 
budget. This program can meet some of the needs of this 
project, and other servicewide funds are available to address 
the balance of the requirements, such as the EIS planning fund 
in the construction account. Because this project will require 
several years to complete, the Committee urges the Service to 
either provide the required base increase to Valley Forge NHP 
in the fiscal years 2002 and beyond to complete this task or 
provide funds from the Natural Challenge or other appropriate 
servicewide programs. In any event, funds should be made 
available in fiscal year 2001 to begin the task. The Committee 
expects a report by June 30, 2001 which sets a timetable for 
completing the project.
    South Florida Restoration.--The Committee continues its 
long-standing commitment to the environmental restoration of 
the Everglades and other natural areas in South Florida. 
Included in this bill is $70,237,000 contained in the budget 
for four Department of the Interior bureaus to continue funding 
the operations, science, construction and land acquisition 
needs of the initiative.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about reductions to 
the science budget and the new emphasis on land acquisition 
needs of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Of the $30,000,000 
requested for seven refuges in Florida, only three refuges for 
a total of $6,700,000 are considered to be within the South 
Florida ecosystem. This leads the Committee to conclude that 
the other four refuges were only included to raise the Federal 
contribution for the initiative.
    The Committee has included bill language in the land 
acquisition account that further addresses the Secretary's 
responsibilities under this initiative.
    The Committee expects the Service to continue providing 
increases for the Global Information System map network for the 
eight National Scenic Trails, and to report to the Committee by 
January 30, 2001 on the progress made to date and future needs. 
The Committee expects the Service's fiscal year 2002 budget 
request to include increases for this project.
    The Committee encourages the National Park Service to work 
with local and State agencies in vector control efforts which 
affect Federal park lands.
    The Committee requests a report from the National Park 
Service on the status of the negotiations for leasing the 
Haslett Warehouse, an historic property within the boundary of 
the San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park. In 1998, the 
Pacific Western Regional Office announced a list of potential 
lessors with which it proposed negotiating a lease for the 
three-story brick structure for conversion to a hotel. The 
report should include the status of the negotiations and the 
current plans for the warehouse and projected costs and income 
for maintenance of the historic ships. The report is due to the 
Committee by November 15, 2000.

                  National recreation and preservation

    The National recreation and preservation appropriation 
provides for the outdoor recreation planning, preservation of 
cultural and National heritage resources, technical assistance 
to Federal, State and local agencies, administration of 
Historic Preservation Fund grants and statutory and contractual 
aid.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $53,399,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        68,648,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        49,956,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -3,443,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -18,692,000


    The Committee recommends $49,956,000 for National 
recreation and preservation, a decrease of $3,443,000 below the 
fiscal year 2000 level and $18,692,000 below the budget 
request.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    Recreation programs.--The Committee recommends $542,000, 
the same as the budget request and $14,000 above the enacted 
level. The increase is provided for fixed costs.
    Natural programs.--The Committee recommends $11,205,000, 
the same as the budget request and $1,212,000 above the enacted 
level. This includes fixed cost increases, $500,000 for 
hydropower recreation assistance and $500,000 for the Rivers, 
Trails and Conservation program.
    Cultural programs.--The Committee recommends $19,853,000, 
the same as the budget request and $428,000 above the enacted 
level. This includes fixed costs and $400,000 for NAGPRA 
implementation. The Committee accepts the $250,000 reduction 
for the Revolutionary War Study.
    International park affairs.--The Committee recommends 
$1,706,000, the same as the budget request and $23,000 above 
the enacted level. The increase is for fixed costs.
    Environmental and compliance review.--The Committee 
recommends $393,000, the same as the budget request and $24,000 
above the enacted level. The increase is for fixed costs.
    Grant administration.--The Committee recommends $1,557,000, 
the same as the budget request and a decrease of $244,000 below 
the enacted level. The Committee has provided fixed costs and 
has accepted the $304,000 decrease for UPARR administration.
    Urban parks and recreation fund.--The Committee has not 
provided the $18,000,000 increase for the Urban parks programs. 
The Committee has continued the $2,000,000 enacted level 
funding.
    Statutory or contractual aid.--The Committee has provided 
$3,280,000, $7,500,000 below the enacted level and $1,192,000 
below the request.
    Heritage partnership program.--The Committee has provided 
$9,420,000, an increase of $2,600,000 above the enacted level 
and $500,000 above the budget request. The Committee has 
provided $17,000 for fixed costs, $100,000 for administrative 
overhead and $9,303,000 for the individual heritage areas.
    The Committee has combined the technical assistance funds 
requested in the budget into the account for Commissions and 
Grants. These funds have been allocated by the Committee to the 
individual heritage areas, which are in a better position to 
decide their needs. These funds are for technical assistance to 
local governments and partner organizations to help implement 
locally supported projects consistent with the overall plans 
for these designated areas. These funds may be used to contract 
for government or private sector services to respond to local 
requests for assistance. The Committee strongly encourages the 
individual heritage areas to work closely with regional park 
service offices.
    In addition, heritage area leaders and Service staff are 
reminded that there are existing Federal technical assistance 
programs, such as the Rivers, Trails, and Conservation program, 
that are also available to Congressionally designated heritage 
areas.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
America's Agricultural Heritage Partnership (Silos and 
    Smokestacks)........................................        $150,000
Augusta Canal National Heritage Area....................         700,000
Automobile National Heritage Area.......................         338,000
Cache La Poudre River Corridor..........................          50,000
Cane River National Heritage Area.......................         100,000
Delaware and Lehigh National Heritage Corridor..........         600,000
Essex National Heritage Area............................       1,100,000
Hudson River Valley National Heritage Area..............       1,100,000
Illinois and Michigan Canal National Heritage Corridor..         240,000
John H. Chafee Blackstone River Valley National Heritage 
    Center..............................................         600,000
National Coal Heritage..................................         250,000
Ohio and Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor..........       1,100,000
Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage 
    Center..............................................         275,000
Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area..................       1,100,000
Lackawanna Heritage Area................................         500,000
Shenandoah Valley Battlefields National Historic 
    District............................................         300,000
South Carolina National Heritage Corridor...............         800,000
Tennessee Civil War Heritage Area.......................              --
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Project total.....................................       9,303,000

                       historic preservation fund

    The Historic Preservation Fund supports the State historic 
preservation offices to perform a variety of functions, 
including: State management and administration of existing 
grant obligations, review and advice on Federal projects and 
actions, determinations, and nominations to the National 
Register, Tax Act certifications, and technical preservation 
services. The States also review properties within States to 
develop data for planning use.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $74,793,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        72,071,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        41,347,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -33,446,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -30,724,000


    The Committee recommends $41,347,000, which is $33,446,000 
below the enacted level and $30,724,000 below the budget 
request.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The total amount provides $31,598,000 for state historic 
preservation offices, $2,572,000 for tribal grants, and 
$7,177,000 for historically black colleges and universities. 
This amount completes the 12 ongoing projects and meets the 
$29,000,000 authorized level.
    Because the financial difficulties being experienced by 
Selma University make it unable at present to contribute the 
non-Federal matching share required for these grants, the 
Committee is redirecting $750,000 of the $1,550,000 authorized 
for Selma University under section 507 of P.L. 104-333. It is 
the Committee's intent that the Service should make this 
$750,000 available in fiscal year 2001 to repair historic 
buildings on the campuses of historically black colleges and 
universities.

                              construction




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $221,191,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       180,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       150,004,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -71,187,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -29,996,000


    The Committee recommends $150,004,000, which is $29,996,000 
below the budget request and $71,187,000 below the enacted 
level. The Committee has funded all the Park Service's priority 
projects, especially the health and safety projects.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

        Project                                                   Amount
Antietam NB, MD (stabilization).........................        $500,000
Apostle Islands NL, WI (erosion)........................       1,360,000
Big Bend NP, TX (replace water system)..................       2,124,000
Canaveral NS (Seminole Rest)............................         600,000
Cape Cod NS, MA (rehabilitation)........................       2,753,000
Castillo de San Marcos NM, FL (stabilization)...........         828,000
Chiricahua NM, AZ (replace water system)................       1,128,000
Colonial NHP, VA (erosion)..............................       3,064,000
Cuyahoga Valley NRA, OH (rehabilitation)................       3,000,000
Dayton Aviation NHP, OH (west exhibits).................         950,000
Delaware Water Gap NRA, DE (Depew site).................         776,000
Everglades NP, FL (replace water system)................       9,000,000
Fire Island NS, NY (rehabilitation).....................       1,933,000
Fort Stanwix NM, NY (rehabilitation)....................        1,500,00
George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA (Belle Haven)....         100,000
George Washington Memorial Parkway, VA (Mt Vernon Trail)         300,000
George Washington Memorial Parkway, MD (rehabilitate 
    utilities)..........................................       2,000,000
Gettysburg NMP, PA (fire suppression)...................       1,323,000
Glacier NP, MT (rehabilitate water/sewer)...............       4,544,000
Hot Springs NP, AR (rehabilitation).....................       1,000,000
Maggie Walker NHS, VA (stabilization)...................       1,867,000
Mammoth Cave NP, KY (replace electrical)................       3,650,000
Manzanar NHS, CA........................................       4,179,000
Minute Man NHP, MA (road safety)........................         818,000
NCP--Central, DC (Jefferson Memorial)...................         936,000
North Cascades NP, WA (stabilization)...................       2,370,000
Olympic NP, WA (restore Elwha)..........................       7,500,000
Petersburg NB, VA (stabilization).......................         666,000
Redwood NP, CA (remove failing roads)...................         713,000
St Croix NSR, WI (rehabilitation).......................         914,000
Salem Maritime NHS, MA (rehabilitation).................       1,002,000
Santa Monica Mountains NRA, CA (rehabilitation).........       1,345,000
Sequoia & Kings Canyon NP, CA (restoration).............       8,381,000
Southwest Pennsylvania Heritage, PA (rehabilitation)....       3,000,000
Wilson's Creek NB, MO (complete library)................          38,000
Yellowstone NP, WY (waste-water treatment facility).....       5,077,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Project total.....................................      81,239,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Emergency/unscheduled...................................       3,500,000
Housing.................................................       5,000,000
Equipment Replacement...................................      18,000,000
Construction Planning...................................       8,000,000
General Management Plans................................      11,225,000
Line Item Construction..................................      81,239,000
Pre-Planning & Supp Services............................       4,500,000
Construction Program Management.........................      17,100,000
Dam Safety..............................................       1,440,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Construction................................     150,004,000

    Within the total for General Management Plans, the 
Committee has not provided the $500,000 increase for GMP's or 
the $1,250,000 increase for special resource studies
    Also included is $3,000,000 for continued rehabilitation 
work at Cuyahoga NRA; $950,000 for the west exhibits at Dayton 
Aviation NHP; $3,000,000 for the Southwest Pennsylvania 
Heritage Commission; $300,000 for the George Washington 
Memorial Parkway, Mount Vernon Trail and $100,000 for work at 
the Belle Haven Marina; $1,500,000 to complete the 
rehabilitation work at Fort Stanwix NM; $776,000 to complete 
work at the Depew site in the Delaware Water Gap NRA; 
$1,000,000 for rehabilitation work at Hot Springs NP; $38,000 
to complete the library at Wilson's Creek NB; $600,000 for 
Seminole Rest; $914,000 for rehabilitation work at St Croix NSR 
and $1,360,000 for stabilization work at Apostle Island NL.
    In fiscal year 2000, the Committee placed a limitation on 
Federal funds that could be used to construct the educational/
library facility at Wilson Creek National Battlefield This 
restriction applies only to funds appropriated to the National 
Park Service. Given the significance and magnitude of 
commemorating the 400th anniversary of Jamestown, the first 
English colony in the United States, the Committee directs that 
$400,000 be allocated for planning and data collection. These 
funds are to be matched with non-Federal funds. Within the 
amount permitted for planning, $275,000 is for work at Cuyahoga 
N.R.A.
    The Committee encourages the Department of the Interior to 
pursue a cooperative arrangement with the Department of 
Agriculture to provide, administratively, the appropriate 
timber for the purpose of restoring the C.A. Thayer, an 
historic ship housed at the San Francisco Maritime National 
Historical Park. In fiscal year 1999, the Committee requested a 
report from the Department on the status of repairing the C.A. 
Thayer and, subsequent to the report, the Department included a 
request for funding in the President's Budget for fiscal year 
2000. Given the serious funding limitations over these last two 
cycles, the Committee urges the Departments to initiate steps 
to secure the necessary timber to begin restoration of the C.A. 
Thayer.

                    Land and Water Conservation Fund

                              (Rescission)




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      -$30,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       -30,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       -30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends the rescission of $30,000,000 in 
annual contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 460L-10a. This 
authority has not been used in years, and there are no plans to 
use it in fiscal year 2001.

                 land acquisition and state assistance




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $120,700,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       297,468,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        65,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -55,700,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................      -232,468,000


    The Committee recommends $65,000,000, a decrease of 
$55,700,000 below the enacted level and a reduction of 
$232,468,000 below the budget request. This amount includes 
$34,500,000 for line item projects, $3,000,000 for emergencies 
and hardships, $4,500,000 for acquisition management, 
$2,000,000 for inholdings, and $21,000,000 for the Stateside 
program of which $1,000,000 is for administrative expenses.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

                                                               Committee
        Area and State                                    recommendation
Acadia NP (ME)..........................................        $600,000
Apostle Islands NL (WI).................................         200,000
Big Cypress NP (FL).....................................       3,000,000
Black Canyon of the Gunnison NP (CO)....................         700,000
Brandywine Battlefield (PA).............................         750,000
Cape Cod NS (MA)........................................         500,000
Chickamauga/Chattanooga NMP (TN)........................       1,200,000
Cuyahoga Valley NRA (OH)................................       1,500,000
Delaware Water Gap NRA (PA).............................       1,000,000
Ebey's Landing NHP (WA).................................         250,000
Everglades--Grant to the State of Florida...............      10,000,000
Fredericksburg/Spotsylvania NMP (VA)....................       1,500,000
Gettysburg NMP (PA).....................................       2,000,000
Home of FDR NHS (NY)....................................       2,600,000
Indiana Dunes NL (IN)...................................       1,000,000
Manassas NB (VA)........................................       1,000,000
Petroglyphs NM (NM).....................................       1,000,000
Saguaro NP (AZ).........................................       2,200,000
Santa Monica Mts. NRA (CA)..............................       2,000,000
Stones River NB (TN)....................................       1,500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................      34,500,000
Emergency & Hardship....................................       3,000,000
Inholdings & Exchanges..................................       2,000,000
Acquisition Management..................................       4,500,000
Stateside Grants........................................      20,000,000
Administrative Assistance to States.....................       1,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      65,000,000

    The Committee continues to believe that Federal funding for 
land acquisition at Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation 
Area should be matched by a non-Federal effort. Simply put, 
this means new land or new dollars dedicated to the protection 
of parklands within the recreation area's boundaries. The 
Federal portion in the current appropriation will be available 
for immediate expenditure to maximize the ability to pursue an 
orderly acquisition program. As of June 30, 2000, and each year 
thereafter, the Service shall certify the level of non-Federal 
contributions to land acquisition at Santa Monica Mountains. It 
is the Committee's intent that land acquisition funds that may 
be provided in subsequent appropriations will not exceed the 
value of the non-Federal effort for the prior certification 
period. The National Park Service is encouraged to review non-
Federal appraisals wherever possible in certifying the non-
Federal contribution.
    The Committee has been concerned about the slow obligation 
rate for Fredericksburg-Spotsylvania NMP, Gettysburg NMP and 
Stones River NB. The Committee has provided additional funds in 
this bill for these three areas but the Committee strongly 
encourages these areas to obligate prior year funds in a more 
expeditious manner. The demands on the Committee are high to 
provide additional dollars to other National Park units that 
have similar land acquisition needs.
    The Committee is supportive of the efforts of the Eastern 
Band of Cherokee Indians to enter into a land exchange with the 
Great Smoky Mountains National Park for property known as Floyd 
Bottoms in Swain County, North Carolina. The Tribe will use the 
site to build a new school complex using their funds. The 
Committee urges the cooperation of the National Park Service to 
ensure the exchange with the Tribe takes place expeditiously. 
The Floyd Bottoms offers the only suitable site on which the 
Tribe can build their schools, and the exchange will serve to 
consolidate the reservation, which is presently divided by 
Floyd Bottoms.
    Bill Language.--Bill language is recommended requiring that 
State grants be used solely for land acquisition.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about several 
critical aspects of the South Florida Restoration Initiative. 
The primary concern is that, under current plans, when the 
restoration project is complete, the Secretary of the Interior 
will have no binding authority over how and when water is 
distributed to the Everglades ecosystem. Related to that 
concern is the issue of adequate water quality and quantity. 
The Committee has recommended bill language to address these 
problems as explained below.
    The Secretary of the Interior, as the primary Federal 
official responsible for protecting and preserving the South 
Florida ecosystem, must play a key role in restoring and 
maintaining the Everglades. The Committee's recommended bill 
language requires the concurrence of the Secretary of the 
Interior in developing, implementing and revising any 
regulations to allocate water made available from the Central 
and Southern Florida Project, including modifications to the 
project as proposed in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration 
Plan. This language is consistent with the Administration's 
proposal to authorize the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration 
Plan. That proposal requires the concurrence of the Secretary 
of the Interior in the programmatic regulations that provide 
for a process to identify the amount of water that is to be set 
aside, as a matter of Federal law, for the needs of the natural 
system. The regulations allocating the water are key to 
ensuring that all project features that are implemented over 
the next 20-30 years will achieve the goals of the 
Comprehensive Plan. The result must be a restored and healthy 
ecosystem, which includes Federal parks and refuges in the 
region. The Secretary of the Interior is the critical Federal 
official responsible for ensuring that the negative impacts on 
the ecosystem, caused by the operation of the Central and 
Southern Florida Project over the last 50 years, are corrected.

                    United States Geological Survey

    The United States Geological Survey was established by an 
act of Congress on March 3, 1879 to provide a permanent Federal 
agency to conduct the systematic and scientific 
``classification of the public lands, and examination of the 
geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the 
National domain''. The USGS is the Federal Government's largest 
earth-science research agency, the Nation's largest civilian 
mapmaking agency, and the primary source of data on the 
Nation's surface and ground water resources. Its activities 
include conducting detailed assessments of the energy and 
mineral potential of the Nation's land and offshore areas; 
investigating and issuing warnings of earthquakes, volcanic 
eruptions, landslides, and other geologic and hydrologic 
hazards; research on the geologic structure of the Nation; 
studies of the geologic features, structure, processes, and 
history of other planets of our solar system; topographic 
surveys of the Nation and preparation of topographic and 
thematic maps and related cartographic products; development 
and production of digital cartographic data bases and products; 
collection on a routine basis of data on the quantity, quality, 
and use of surface and ground water; research in hydraulics and 
hydrology; the coordination of all Federal water data 
acquisition; the scientific understanding and technologies 
needed to support the sound management and conservation of our 
Nation's biological resources; and the application of remotely 
sensed data to the development of new cartographic, geologic, 
and hydrologic research techniques for natural resources 
planning and management.

                 surveys, investigations, and research




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $813,376,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       895,379,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       816,676,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +3,300,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -78,703,000


    The Committee recommends $816,676,000 for surveys, 
investigations, and research, a decrease of $78,703,000 from 
the budget request and an increase of $3,300,000 above the 2000 
enacted level.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    National mapping program.--The Committee recommends 
$122,817,000 for the national mapping program, a decrease of 
$32,465,000 from the budget request and $3,900,000 below the 
2000 enacted level including $3,400,000 from the Hazard Support 
System and $500,000 resulting from a transfer to the geologic 
landscape activity.
    The Committee has maintained the Gateway to the Earth--Ohio 
pilot at the enacted level. However, within the funds provided 
for the Gateway to the Earth project the Committee directs that 
$200,000 be allocated to the Texas Natural Resources 
Information System, $150,000 to the Mississippi Space Commerce 
Initiative, $200,000 to the California Land Science Information 
Partnership, and $200,000 to the National Interagency Fire 
Center. With the inclusion of these groups, the Survey is 
taking the first steps in transforming the gateway to the earth 
from a pilot project into a national program.
    The Committee has also maintained funding for hyperspectral 
remote sensing at the 2000 enacted level to continue ongoing 
research in and around Yellowstone National Park.
    The Committee recommends a decrease of $3,400,000 from 
Hazard Support System and directs instead that this funding be 
used to address urgent research needs identified by the U.S. 
Fish and Wildlife Service
    The Committee is extremely concerned that the Survey, 
specifically the National Mapping Division, entered into a new 
contract for the continued development of the Hazard Support 
System without Committee knowledge and at the expense of 
existing programs and contracts. This type of action will not 
be tolerated. The Survey is expected to use the normal 
reprogramming procedures like all other bureaus. Further, the 
Survey is directed to report back to the Committee as soon as 
possible detailing what actions they have taken to meet fully 
their fiscal year 2000 commitments.
    In the development of this new Hazard Support System, the 
Survey is directed to work in close cooperation with Bureau of 
Land Management and Forest Service fire program managers. 
Before the Committee allocates any future funds for development 
or deployment of this new system, the Survey will, at a 
minimum, need to demonstrate that: (1) this is a cost-effective 
program; (2) it provides additional coverage above and beyond 
what is currently being provided by the fire program; and (3) 
the system is capable of reducing long-term wildland fire 
expenditures. Finally, the National Academy of Sciences should 
review this new program before any deployment decisions are 
made.
    Geologic hazards, resources and processes.--The Committee 
recommends $211,272,000 for geologic hazards, resources, and 
processes a decrease of $13,537,000 from the budget request and 
an increase of $50,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including 
increases above the 2000 level of $1,000,000 for earthquake 
hazards and $500,000 for volcano hazards as part of the real 
time hazards initiative, $500,000 for the cooperative geologic 
mapping program, $1,000,000 for a new coastal pilot program, 
and a $500,000 transfer from mapping, and decreases of $250,000 
from the Hawaiian volcano program, $2,000,000 from the minerals 
at risk program, and $1,200,000 from the Nevada gold study.
    The Committee has maintained funding for light distancing 
and ranging (LIDAR) technology at the 2000 enacted level to 
assist with the listing of Chinook Salmon and Summer Chum 
Salmon under the Endangered Species Act. These funds should be 
used in the Puget Sound region to contract for the continued 
mapping of drainage systems, stream systems, and to identify 
potentially unstable slopes.
    The Committee has provided an increase of $1,000,000 above 
the enacted level for the Coastal and Marine Geology program to 
begin the process of developing a comprehensive multi-
disciplinary coastal program within the Survey. As population 
growth expands along U.S. coasts, coastal ecosystems are 
impacted by urban, industrial, and agricultural development. 
These impacts have resulted in the degradation of Everglades 
coastal wetlands and Florida Bay, coral die-off, hypoxia and 
fish kills in the Gulf of Mexico, and imperiled marine mammals 
and sea turtle populations to name a few. The Committee directs 
that the Survey develop a coastal pilot program beginning with 
the Southeast region with a research agenda designed to address 
the most critical issues facing this region. The Committee 
recommends that this work be conducted towards the goals and 
objectives consistent with the discussion of ``Future Program 
Emphasis'' contained in the recently released National Academy 
review of the Survey's Coastal and Marine Geology program. The 
Survey should report back to the Committee as soon as possible 
detailing how it would allocate these funds among the growing 
list of coastal problems. In addition, the Committee also 
directs the Survey to develop a comprehensive national coastal 
program as part of the fiscal year 2002 budget.
    As was the case last year, the Committee continues to 
believe that the Survey's highest hazards-related priority 
should be to continue to upgrade its various hazards monitoring 
networks, to acquire quality hazards information, and to engage 
in quality research. Therefore, the Committee has provided 
funding for the Survey's ``Real Time Hazards'' initiative.
    The Committee encourages further collaborative research 
between the Survey and the University of Arizona in Tucson, 
concerning surficial geological processes.
    Water resources investigations.--The Committee recommends 
$187,949,000 for water resources assessments and research a 
decrease of $9,627,000 from the budget request and an increase 
of $2,130,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including increases 
above the 2000 level of $1,730,000 for the Real Time Hazards 
initiative, and $400,000 for the water resources research 
institutes.
    Biological research.--The Committee recommends $140,416,000 
for biological research a decrease of $18,365,000 from the 
budget request and an increase of $3,520,000 above the 2000 
enacted level, including increases from the 2000 level of 
$500,000 for the GAP program, $500,000 for amphibian research, 
$3,400,000 for high-priority research for the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service and $300,000 for the cooperative research 
units, and decreases of $180,000 from the Yukon salmon study, 
and $1,000,000 as a transfer to the facilities account.
    The Committee has provided an additional $3,400,000 to 
conduct mission-critical science support for the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service. The Fish and Wildlife Service has identified 
critical research needs in areas such as species at risk, 
invasive species, inventory and monitoring protocols, and 
fisheries and aquatic resources. Combined with $550,000 in the 
Survey's base for the quick response program, this will 
establish a program parallel with the Natural Resources 
Preservation program that addresses the National Park Service's 
urgent science needs.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the work being 
accomplished through the National Gap Analysis program, and 
directs the Survey to allocate this funding increase towards 
the goal of expanding mapping coverage to the entire Unites 
States as quickly as possible.
    Science support.--The Committee recommends $67,104,000 for 
science support, a decrease of $3,791,000 from the budget 
request and the same as the 2000 enacted level.
    Facilities.--The Committee recommends $87,118,000 for 
facilities, a decrease of $918,000 from the budget request and 
$1,500,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including increases 
above the 2000 level of $1,000,000 as a transfer from 
biological research and monitoring and $500,000 to address the 
deteriorating conditions at the Wellsboro lab.

                      Minerals Management Service

    The Minerals Management Service is responsible for 
collecting, distributing, accounting and auditing revenues from 
mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands. In fiscal year 
2001, MMS expects to collect and distribute about $6.2 billion 
from more than 80,000 active Federal and Indian leases.
    The MMS also manages the offshore energy and mineral 
resources on the Nation's Outer Continental Shelf. To date, the 
OCS program has been focused primarily on oil and gas leasing. 
Over the past few years, MMS has begun exploring the possible 
development of other marine mineral resources, especially sand 
and gravel.
    With the passage of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, MMS 
assumed increased responsibility for oil spill research, 
including the promotion of increased oil spill response 
capabilities, and for oil spill financial responsibility 
certifications of offshore platforms and pipelines.

                royalty and offshore minerals management




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $110,200,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       134,128,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       127,200,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +17,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -6,928,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $127,200,000 for royalty and 
offshore minerals management, a decrease of $6,928,000 from the 
budget request and an increase of $17,000,000 above the 2000 
enacted level. The Committee recommendation includes an overall 
increase in appropriated funds due to a decline of $17,000,000 
in excess receipts in the OCS lands activity.
    The Committee has included bill language to enable the 
Department to proceed with its royalty-in-kind pilot programs. 
The Committee understands that it is the Department's intent 
that the Treasury shall continue to receive at least as much 
royalty income from the pilot programs as they would otherwise 
receive from a royalty-in-value program.

                           Oil Spill Research




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $6,118,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         6,118,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         6,118,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $6,118,000, to be derived from the 
Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, to conduct oil spill research 
and financial responsibility and inspection activities 
associated with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, Public Law 101-
380. The Committee recommendation is equal to both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2000 level.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
(OSM), through its regulation and technology account, regulates 
surface coal mining operations to ensure that the environment 
is protected during those operations and that the land is 
adequately reclaimed once mining is completed. The OSM 
accomplishes this mission by providing grants to those States 
that maintain their own regulatory and reclamation programs and 
by conducting oversight of State programs. Further, the OSM 
administers the regulatory programs in the States that do not 
have their own programs and on Federal and tribal lands.
    Through its abandoned mine land (AML) reclamation fund 
account, the OSM provides environmental restoration at 
abandoned coal mines using tonnage-based fees collected from 
current coal production operations. In their unreclaimed 
condition these abandoned sites may endanger public health and 
safety or prevent the beneficial use of land and water 
resources.

                       regulation and technology




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        95,585,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        97,801,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        97,478,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +1,893,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -323,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $97,753,000 for Regulation and 
technology, including the use of $275,000 in civil penalty 
collections, which is $323,000 below the request and $1,893,000 
above the 2000 level. The increased funding will cover the OSM 
fixed cost increases and help the States with their fixed cost 
increases.

                    abandoned mine reclamation fund




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $195,873,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       211,158,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       197,873,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +2,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -13,285,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $197,873,000 for the Abandoned 
mine reclamation fund, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 2000 
funding level and $13,285,000 below the request. The Committee 
recognizes the great amount of reclamation work that remains to 
be done and has maintained the funding increase for this 
program which was provided last year. The Committee has 
continued the authority for the Appalachian Clean Streams 
Initiative at a total of $8,000,000 and the minimum State 
funding level at $1,500,000. The Committee has not approved the 
Administration's request to insert bill language altering the 
formula for distributing the increased funding provided for AML 
activities. The Committee recognizes that the anthracite coal 
producing region has been disproportionately affected by the 
adverse effects of past coal mining practices and that acid 
mine drainage has damaged the Susquehanna River which flows 
into the Chesapeake Bay. The Committee also notes that 
additional funding beyond the normal Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania basic abandoned mine land grant is needed to make 
a significant impact on this problem. The Committee has 
therefore provided an additional $2,000,000 to the Commonwealth 
to address reclamation and remediation needs in the anthracite 
region.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs was created in 1824; its 
mission is founded on a government-to-government relationship 
and trust responsibility that results from treaties with Native 
groups. The Bureau delivers services to over one million Native 
Americans through 12 regional offices and 83 agency offices. In 
addition, the Bureau provides education programs to Native 
Americans through the operation of 115 day schools, 56 boarding 
schools, and 14 dormitories. Lastly, the Bureau administers 
more than 43 million acres of tribally owned land, and 11 
million acres of individually owned land.

                      operation of indian programs




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................    $1,639,535,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................     1,795,010,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................     1,657,446,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +17,911,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................      -137,564,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $1,657,446,000 for the operation 
of Indian programs, a decrease of $137,564,000 from the budget 
request and an increase of $17,911,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 enacted level. The Committee agrees to all internal 
transfers by the BIA in the budget request. The Committee has 
provided increases above the enacted level to continue to fund 
the Administration's request to fix the long standing problems 
associated with management of the Indian trust funds.
    Once again the Committee has not provided any funds for the 
Administration's Indian school bonding initiative. The 
Administration needs to seek enactment of the tax credit 
portion of this initiative through the legislative Committees 
of jurisdiction in House and Senate. Without the tax 
provisions, tribes have no authority to issue these types of 
school bonds. At such time as the tax provisions are enacted 
into law, the Committee will reconsider its decision not to 
provide funding for the school bonding initiative.
    The Committee directs the Bureau of Indian Affairs to 
report on the delivery of services in Maverick County, Texas to 
the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma and the Kickapoo Traditional 
Tribe of Texas. The report should include the current level of 
services provided, the mechanisms by which the services are 
provided and any recommendations for improving delivery of 
services. The Committee expects the report to be completed by 
March 1, 2001.
    Indian Gaming Commission.--The Committee is concerned that 
some Indian tribes may have violated the spirit of their trust 
relationships by locating Indian gambling facilities on 
property far removed from their reservation which they have 
acquired or hope to acquire through the land-in-trust process 
in areas where local communities do not support such gambling 
enterprises. Under the land-in-trust process Indians may 
acquire land and have it placed in trust by the Secretary and 
have it treated as ``sovereign'' Indian lands exempt from 
certain local regulations and laws. While the approval of the 
State governor is required before the Secretary can approve a 
land-in-trust proposal, no formal approval of local governments 
is required. The Committee is concerned by this situation and 
requests that the Secretary be sensitive to local concerns when 
considering such land-in-trust applications in the future. The 
views of all local government authorities directly affected by 
the application should be considered before an application is 
approved. Local authorities include the executive authority and 
legislative bodies of counties, towns and municipalities in 
which such gambling facilities are proposed to be located. The 
Committee notes that this concern is not about the right of 
Indian tribes to conduct such activities on traditional Indian 
reservation lands. Further, the Committee directs the Secretary 
of the Interior to conduct a review of the after-acquired, non-
contiguous, land-in-trust process as it relates to gambling 
including all applications which have been considered or are 
being considered at this time, and report back with 
recommendations to deal with this problem.
    Tribal priority allocations.--The Committee recommends 
$702,207,000 for tribal priority allocations, a decrease of 
$58,973,000 from the budget request and an increase of 
$1,484,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including increases 
from the 2000 level of $57,942,000 resulting from internal 
transfers, $3,500,000 for real estate services, $1,100,000 for 
real estate appraisals, and $3,000,000 to address the probate 
backlog, and decreases of 57,058,000 resulting from internal 
transfers, and $7,000,000 from the housing improvement program.
    The Committee finds itself in a position of being unable to 
fund all of the programs available to Indian Country through 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This occurs at a time when it is 
clear that the Bureau is in desperate need of additional 
funding for trust-related programs. There is no other agency in 
government that holds these trust land responsibilities. There 
are, however, other agencies that have legislative authority to 
provide services to Indian country. Therefore, the Committee 
has reduced the housing improvement program (HIP) by $7,000,000 
with the understanding the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development has the responsibility to provide new homes while 
the funds remaining in the HIP program should be used for 
repairs and rehabilitation of housing only. No funds may be 
used for new housing construction.
    The Committee once again directs that real estate services 
and real estate appraisal funds within Tribal Priority 
Allocations are not to be reprogrammed without Committee 
approval. Further, probate backlog reduction funds within Non-
recurring Programs and land records improvement funds within 
Regional Office Operations are not available for transfer into 
the base budget of any tribe.
    Within the road maintenance budget the Bureau should 
continue to fund the Inchelium Public Ferry on the Colville 
reservation.
    Other recurring programs.--The Committee recommends 
$547,128,000 for other recurring programs, a decrease of 
$34,829,000 from the budget request and an increase of 
$5,082,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including increases 
from the 2000 level of $5,000,000 for school operation ISEP 
formula funds, and $1,000,000 for tribally controlled community 
colleges, and a decrease of $918,000 resulting from internal 
transfers.
    Non-recurring programs.--The Committee recommends 
$65,650,000 for non-recurring programs, a decrease of 
$5,755,000 from the budget request and an increase of 
$1,419,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including increases 
above the 2000 level of $2,000,000 for real estate services and 
$8,000 resulting from transfers, and a decrease of $589,000 
from the Gila River Farms project.
    Within the $3,000,000 provided for the ``jobs in the 
woods'' initiative, $400,000 should continue to be used by the 
Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission for the Wildstock 
Restoration Initiative.
    Central office operations.--The Committee recommends 
$56,637,000 for central office operations, a decrease of 
$1,227,000 from the budget request and an increase of 
$4,000,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including increases 
above the 2000 level of $4,000,000 for Bureau reorganization 
efforts as recommended by the National Academy of Public 
Administration, and $1,144,000 associated with internal 
transfers, and a decrease of $1,144,000 associated with 
internal transfers.
    Regional office operations.--The Committee recommends 
$48,095,000 for regional office operations, a decrease of 
$8,699,000 from the budget request and an increase of 
$5,854,000 above the 2000 level, including increases from the 
2000 level of $2,500,000 for real estate services, $2,400,000 
for the land title records office, $1,000,000 for land records 
improvements, and $3,422,000 resulting from internal transfers, 
and a decrease of $3,468,000 resulting from internal transfers.
    Special programs and pooled overhead.--The Committee 
recommends $237,729,000 for special programs and pooled 
overhead, a decrease of $28,081,000 from the budget request and 
an increase of $72,000 above the 2000 enacted level, including 
increases from the 2000 level of $91,000 resulting from 
internal transfers, and a decrease of $19,000 resulting from 
internal transfers.
    In fiscal year 2001, the Bureau should continue to pay for 
and provide for current levels of service to the Office of 
Special Trustee (OST) for Information Resource Management 
systems and other contractual costs to support existing 
mainframe computers, licenses, and other costs similar to 2000. 
The Committee recognizes that BIA's IRM resources are limited 
and that system enhancements may be needed by both BIA and OST 
trust systems. The Committee expects that investments in 
information technology will be implemented in a coordinated and 
cost effective manner that ensures no duplication of resources 
between BIA and OST, particularly in the area of 
telecommunications.

                              construction




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $197,404,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       365,912,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       184,404,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -13,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................      -181,508,000


    The Committee recommends $184,404,000 for construction, a 
decrease of $13,000,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$181,508,000 below the budget request.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    Education.--The Committee recommends $120,199,000 for 
education construction a decrease of $180,300,000 from the 
budget request and $13,000,000 below the 2000 enacted level. 
Replacement school construction is funded at $49,859,000 which 
is sufficient to phase in construction of the Tuba City 
Boarding School, AZ; the Second Mesa Day School, AZ; the Zia 
Day School, NM; Baca Thoreau Consolidated Community School, NM; 
Lummi Tribal School, WA; and Wingate Elementary School, NM. 
Within the education construction activity, employee housing 
and facilities improvement and repair are funded at the 2000 
enacted level.
    The Committee has continued the bill language related to 
implementing the process to award grants for construction of 
new schools or facilities improvement and repair projects in 
excess of $100,000. The language ensures that the Department 
can continue to implement the grant process while the permanent 
implementation process is under development in fiscal year 
2001. The Committee expects the Department and the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs to continue to work cooperatively with the 
tribes in the development of a final implementation process. 
Given that the language is clear concerning negotiating the 
schedule of payments, the Committee has not continued the 
language limiting payments to two per year.
    Public safety and justice.--The Committee recommends 
$5,537,000 for public safety and justice, the same as the 2000 
enacted level and $4,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee directs that no later than January 31, 2001 
the Bureau submit a comprehensive assessment of the need to 
construct a juvenile detention facility for native American 
youth in the Pacific Northwest. The Bureau should include the 
merits and drawbacks of each potential location studied and an 
attempt to estimate inmate population by location.
    Resources management.--The Committee recommends $50,573,000 
for resources management, a decrease of $72,000 from the budget 
request and the same as the 2000 enacted level.
    General administration and construction management.--The 
Committee recommends $8,095,000 for general administration and 
construction management, a decrease of $1,132,000 from the 
budget request and the same as the 2000 enacted level.

 indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
                                indians




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $27,128,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        34,026,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        34,026,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +6,898,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $34,026,000 for Indian land and 
water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to Indians, 
the same as the budget request and an increase of $6,898,000 
above the 2000 enacted level, including $626,000 for White 
Earth, $251,000 for Hoopa-Yurok, $24,883,000 for the Ute 
settlement, $142,000 for Pyramid Lake, $8,000,000 for Rocky 
Boys, and $124,000 for Walker River.

                 indian guaranteed loan program account




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $4,985,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         6,008,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         4,985,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -1,023,000


    The Committee recommends $4,985,000 for the Indian 
guaranteed loan program account a decrease of $1,023,000 from 
the budget request and the same as the 2000 enacted level.

                          Departmental Offices


                            Insular Affairs


                       assistance to territories

    The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) was established on 
August 4, 1995 through Secretarial Order No. 3191 which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. The OIA has important responsibilities to help the 
United States government fulfill its responsibilities to the 
four U.S. territories of Guam, American Samoa, U.S. Virgin 
Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands 
(CNMI) and also the three freely associated States: the 
Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the 
Marshall Islands (RMI) and the Republic of Palau. The permanent 
and trust fund payments to the territories and the compact 
nations provide substantial financial resources to these 
governments.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $70,171,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        73,891,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        69,471,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................          -700,000
    Budget estimate, 2000.............................        -4,420,000


    The Committee recommends $69,471,000 for assistance to 
territories, $700,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$4,420,000 below the budget request.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    Territorial Assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$18,697,000, $1,000,000 above the request and $700,000 below 
the 2000 level. The Committee continues to feel that the small, 
focused grants awarded through the technical assistance program 
are some of the most cost-effective ways of helping the 
territories and freely associated states. The Committee 
disagrees with the Administration's proposal to guide increased 
technical assistance funding solely to the Virgin Islands. 
Increased technical assistance funding should be used for 
priority efforts which stress financial management and control 
for any of the territories or the freely associated States. The 
Committee has provided $700,000 within the technical assistance 
funding as a direct payment to the Prior Service Trust Fund 
which provides benefits owed to former individuals who worked 
for the Department of Navy, the Department of the Interior and 
the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands Government during 
the period 1944 through 1968. These Prior Service Trust Funds 
may not be used for administrative purposes.
    The Committee provides up to $300,000 within territorial 
assistance to assist the Virgin Islands to repay previous 
emergency loans. Under the terms of the Federal Credit Reform 
Act of 1990, as amended, discretionary agency action to forgive 
a portion of a borrower's obligation to make principal or 
interest payments on a direct loan constitutes a modification 
of such direct loan, and requires an appropriation to cover the 
cost of such modification. Of the amounts made available for 
technical assistance, up to $300,000 may be transferred to the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to cover the cost of 
FEMA's forgiveness of a portion of the interest which accrues 
on Community Disaster Loan Program Account 841 during the 
period of FEMA's forbearance on the collection of periodic 
payments from the Government of the Virgin Islands on such 
Account.
    The Committee is encouraged by work on the brown tree 
snake, and has maintained the increases previously provided. 
The Committee encourages the Department to work diligently with 
the Marine Resources Pacific Consortium coordinated by the 
University of Guam to enhance management and preservation of 
coral reefs among the Pacific Islands of the CNMI, Guam, 
American Samoa, the Federated States of Micronesia, the 
Republic of Palau and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.
    American Samoa.--The Committee recommends $23,054,000, 
which is equal to the request and the 2000 level for operations 
grants. The Committee is still very concerned about continuing 
fiscal problems in American Samoa. The Committee encourages the 
American Samoa government to take decisive action to control 
its costs and payroll, and enhance its revenues in accordance 
with the previous recommendations and any new financial 
recovery plan that may be developed as a result of the tobacco 
loan program provided last year. The Committee expects the 
Governor of American Samoa and the Secretary of the Interior to 
complete an MOU, which clearly stipulates fiscal and 
operational reforms and cost reductions with clear benchmarks. 
If this is not completed and implemented by the time the 
Committee considers the fiscal year 2002 Interior 
appropriations bill, the Committee will seriously consider 
reducing the next American Samoa government operations 
appropriation. The Committee also notes the continued mandatory 
Covenant grant funding of $10,140,000 for American Samoa 
capital construction. The Committee directs the OIA to see that 
the American Samoa government provides the Committee with a 
comprehensive report describing its capital construction 
efforts when the Department submits its next budget 
justification.
    Northern Mariana Islands/Covenant grants.--The Committee 
recommends $27,720,000 for CNMI covenant grants, which is equal 
to the 2000 level and $5,420,000 below the request. The 
Committee is not able to fund the Administration's request to 
provide $10,000,000 to Guam for Compact impact aid. The 
Committee defers any changes to mandatory expenditures pending 
further analysis of the Administration's request. The Committee 
is encouraged by the recent accomplishments of the CNMI in 
implementing its capital improvement program. The Committee 
encourages the CNMI to enhance efforts to provide fair 
treatment of guest workers and to continue its labor and 
immigration initiative in earnest.
    Guam.--The Committee notes the $4,580,000 payment to Guam 
using Covenant grant funds is to address the impact resulting 
from the implementation of the Compact of Free Association. The 
Committee strongly encourages the government of Guam to work 
closely with its legislature in allocating these impact funds. 
The OIA should report to the Committee by March 31, 2001 on the 
use of Compact impact aid by the Guam government and discuss 
the merits of making the use of future Compact impact payments 
to Guam subject to the approval of the Guam legislature. The 
Committee is concerned about the results of recent Inspector 
General audits which demonstrate poor financial practices by 
the government of Guam. The Committee requests that the OIA 
obtain thorough reports from the government of Guam on how it 
expects to comply with recent OIG audits, such as the misuse of 
Department of Defense contract funds by the Guam Department of 
Education.

                      compact of free association




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $20,311,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        20,545,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        20,745,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................          +434,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          +200,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $20,745,000 for the compact of 
free association, $200,000 above the request and $434,000 above 
the 2000 level. The Committee has provided a $200,000 increase 
to the Enewetak support payment to offset partially the 
reduction in buying power which has occurred over the past 
several years. The Committee is encouraged by the agricultural 
program at Enewetak atoll but realizes more time is needed 
before substantial food is produced on restored farmland. The 
OIA and the State Department negotiators are encouraged to 
provide the Committee semi-annual updates on the status of 
Compact negotiations with the Federated States of Micronesia 
and the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

                        Departmental Management


                         salaries and expenses




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $62,706,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        64,469,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        62,406,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................          -300,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -2,063,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $62,406,000 for salaries and 
expenses, a reduction of $300,000 below the enacted level, and 
$2,063,000 below the budget request.

                        Office of the Solicitor


                         salaries and expenses




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $40,196,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        43,952,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        40,196,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -3,756,000


    The Committee recommends $40,196,000, the same as the 
enacted level and $3,756,000 below the budget request.

                      Office of Inspector General


                         salaries and expenses




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $26,086,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        28,859,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        26,086,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -2,773,000


    The Committee recommends $26,086,000, the same as the 
enacted level and a reduction of $2,773,000 below the budget 
request.

             Office of Special Trustee for American Indians


                         federal trust programs




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $90,025,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        82,628,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        82,428,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -7,597,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -200,000


    The Committee recommends $82,428,000 for the office of the 
special trustee for American Indians a decrease of $7,597,000 
from the 2000 enacted level and $200,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee has provided $1,992,000 for executive 
direction and $80,436,000 for program operations, support and 
improvements.

                       indian land consolidation




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $5,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        12,501,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -7,501,000


    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for Indian land 
consolidation, the same as the 2000 enacted level and 
$7,501,000 below the budget request.

           Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration


                natural resource damage assessment fund

    The purpose of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund 
is to provide the basis for claims against responsible parties 
for the restoration of injured natural resources. Assessments 
ultimately will lead to the restoration of injured resources 
and reimbursement for reasonable assessment costs from 
responsible parties through negotiated settlements or other 
legal actions. Operating on a ``polluter pays'' principle, the 
program anticipates recovering over $43 million in receipts in 
fiscal year 2001, with the vast majority to be used for the 
restoration of injured resources. The program works to restore 
sites ranging in size from small town landfills to the Exxon 
Valdez oil spill of 1989 in Alaska.
    This account, prior to fiscal year 1999, was included under 
the United States Fish and Wildlife Service appropriation. The 
account was moved to the Departmental Offices appropriation 
because its functions relate to several different bureaus 
within the Department of the Interior.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $5,374,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         5,403,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         5,374,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................           -29,000


    The Committee recommends $5,374,000 for the natural 
resource damage assessment fund, which is equal to the fiscal 
year 2000 level and $29,000 below the budget request.

             GENERAL PROVISIONS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    The Committee recommends continuing several provisions 
carried in previous bills as follows. Sections 101 and 102 
provide for emergency transfer authority with the approval of 
the Secretary. Section 103 provides for warehouse and garage 
operations and for reimbursement for those services. Section 
104 provides for vehicle and other services. Section 105 
provides for uniform allowances. Section 106 provides for 
twelve-month contracts. Sections 107 through 110 prohibit the 
expenditure of funds for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leasing 
activities in certain areas. These OCS provisions are addressed 
under the Minerals Management Service in this report. Section 
111 limits the investment of Federal funds by tribes and tribal 
organizations to obligations of the United States or 
obligations insured by the United States. Section 112 prohibits 
the National Park Service from reducing recreation fees for 
non-local travel through any park unit.
    Section 113 makes permanent a provision carried last year 
permitting the retention of rebates from credit card services 
for deposit to the Departmental Working Capital Fund.
    Section 114 continues a provision permitting the transfer 
of funds between the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Office of 
Special Trustee for American Indians for the Trust Management 
Improvement Project High Level Implementation Plan.
    Section 115 makes permanent a provision carried last year 
permitting the retention of proceeds from agreements and leases 
at the Fort Baker, Golden Gate National Recreation Area for 
preservation, restoration, operation, maintenance, 
interpretation and related activities.
    Section 116 requires the renewal of grazing permits and 
leases by the Bureau of Land Management until the Secretary 
completes processing of the permit or lease application.
    Section 117 continues a provision allowing the hiring of 
administrative law judges to address the Indian probate 
backlog.
    Section 118 permits the redistribution of tribal priority 
allocation and tribal base funds to alleviate funding 
inequities.
    Section 119 continues a provision carried last year, under 
Title III placing a limitation on establishment of a Kankakee 
National Wildlife Refuge in Indiana and Illinois that is 
inconsistent with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers' efforts to 
control flooding and siltation in that area.
    Section 120 renames the Great Marsh Trail at the Mason Neck 
National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia as the ``Joseph V. 
Gartlan, Jr. Great Marsh Trail''.
    Section 121 continues a provision carried last year 
requiring the allocation of Bureau of Indian Affairs 
postsecondary schools funds consistent with unmet needs.
    Section 122 prohibits the use of funds by the Fish and 
Wildlife Service to establish a National Wildlife Refuge in the 
Yolo Bypass of California.

                       TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES


                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service manages 192 million acres of public 
lands for multiple use Nationwide, including lands in 44 
States, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The Forest Service 
administers a wide variety of programs, including forest and 
rangeland research, State and private forestry assistance, 
wildfire suppression and fuels reduction, cooperative forest 
health programs, and human resource programs. The National 
Forest System (NFS) includes 155 National forests, 20 National 
grasslands, 20 National recreation areas, a National tallgrass 
prairie, 4 National monuments, and 9 land utilization projects. 
The NFS is managed for multiple use, including timber 
production, recreation, wilderness, minerals, grazing, fish and 
wildlife habitat management, and soil and water conservation.
    The Committee has made several changes to enhance 
accountability and increase Congressional involvement with 
Forest Service management of funds. In addition, the Committee 
has developed, following extensive consultation, a new budget 
structure for the national forest system and the capital 
improvement and maintenance accounts. The details of these 
changes are discussed below under the individual account 
headings. The Committee remains very concerned that too much 
funding is taken off-the-top for various headquarters-driven 
initiatives and special projects, all to the detriment of vital 
on-the-ground conservation and public service activities. The 
Forest Service needs to evaluate carefully its allocation of 
funds to the various levels of the organization. The Committee 
expects reforms that would link budget formulation and 
allocation to local forest plan derived programs of work. 
Further, the Committee is seriously concerned that the present 
allocation process results in remixing and reprioritizing funds 
before ultimately reaching the national forest level for 
accomplishment of work intended by the Congress. As discussed 
in detail by the GAO and the National Academy of Public 
Administration (NAPA), a missing link is strong and effective 
performance measurement and evaluation.
    The Committee has included two significant budgetary 
changes that it expects will facilitate the Administration's 
promise to improve overall agency accountability and facilitate 
Congressional oversight. These changes have a direct effect on 
the Committee display of the fiscal year 2000 enacted amount. 
First, the Committee concurs with the Administration's proposed 
adjustments for ``Primary Purpose'' and fully expects the 
agency to deliver on its promise to improve agency 
accountability by providing for consistent expenditure of funds 
based on national standards which result in charging 
expenditures to a single budget line item based on an 
activity's ``primary purpose.'' The Committee directs that 
these accounting changes are in fact work neutral as promised 
by the Forest Service, so that all fiscal year 2000 timber and 
recreation targets directed by the Congress are achieved. 
Second, the Committee agrees to the proposal to eliminate the 
general administration funding activity. As discussed in 
previous Senate and House Committee reports and the NAPA 
report, this activity code was not useful for cost containment 
or accountability. The Committee has agreed to this change and 
directs the agency to provide detailed explanations and 
displays of indirect costs, and adhere consistently to standard 
accounting definitions determined by the Federal Accounting 
Standards Advisory Board.
    The following table displays the effects of implementing 
the primary purpose accounting principle and the appropriate 
general administration adjustments. The adjusted fiscal year 
2000 levels are used as the basis for all comparisons in this 
Committee report. The table also displays the fixed cost 
increases, essentially the impact of inflation, by budget 
activity.

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                   FY 2000      FY 2000    Adjusted FY
                                    Original FY    primary      general        2000       FY 2001       Budget
             Activity                   2000       purpose       admin.     enacted to  fixed costs    request
                                      enacted      adjust.      adjust.        date
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Research..........................      202,510       -2,363       17,547      217,694        7,272      231,008
                                   =============================================================================
State and Private Forestry:
    Forest Health Federal Lands...       38,782         -709        2,230       40,303        1,080       41,724
    Forest Health Cooperative            21,850         -181          103       21,772          139       21,118
     Lands........................
    Forest Resource Info &          ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........            0
     Analysis.....................
    State Fire Assistance.........       24,733         -911          107       23,929          113       30,006
    Volunteer Fire Assistance.....        3,250          -11            1        3,240            0        2,498
    Forest Stewardship............       29,398         -937        1,372       29,833          621       29,407
    Stewardship Incentives........            0            0            0            0            0        3,250
    Forest Legacy Program.........       24,972          -64           25       24,933           47       59,768
    Urban and Community Forestry..       31,265         -527          158       30,896          125       39,471
    Economic Action Programs......       20,104         -192          286       20,198           67       17,267
    Pacific Northwest Assistance..        7,991         -373          238        7,856           54        6,822
    International Forestry........       (3500)  ...........  ...........       (3500)            0       10,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total--State and Private          202,345       -3,905        4,520      202,960        2,246      261,331
       Forestry...................
                                   =============================================================================
National Forest System:
    Land Management Planning......       39,738        5,365        5,064       50,167        2,021       77,957
    Inventory and Monitoring......       87,771       39,459       11,096      138,326        3,525      193,002
    Vegetation & watershed mgmt...      155,942       -7,454       17,514      166,002        4,582      171,379
    Wildlife & Fish habitat Mgmt..      108,211       -6,752       13,398      114,857        3,971      135,542
    Recreation, Heritage &              197,562      -20,930       27,232      203,864        8,318      249,348
     wilderness...................
    Forest Products...............      223,029      -21,757       36,619      237,891        7,253      230,417
    Grazing Management............       28,792         -916        4,955       32,831        1,025       32,892
    Landownership Mgmt............       62,609       12,218        7,738       82,565        1,433       73,297
    Minerals and Geology Mgmt.....       36,956        4,154        5,062       46,172        1,273       49,899
    Law Enforcement Operations....       66,847        1,039        2,025       69,911        1,847       72,838
    General Administration........      248,362       -4,517     -243,845            0        7,109            0
    Land between the Lakes NRA....        5,365            0            0        5,365            0            0
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total--National Forest          1,261,184          -91     -113,142    1,147,951       42,357    1,286,571
       System.....................
                                   =============================================================================
Wildland Fire Management:
    Preparedness..................      359,840        3,085       45,843      408,768        8,409      404,343
    Fire Operations...............      200,687          482        7,719      208,888        3,019      216,029
    Land between the Lakes NRA....          300            0            0          300            0            0
    Emergency Conting. (non-add)..       90,000            0       90,000       90,000            0      150,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total--Wildland Fire              560,827        3,567      143,562      617,956       11,428      620,372
       Management.................
                                   =============================================================================
Capital Improvement & Maintenance:
    Facilities....................      134,075       12,429        7,144      153,648        1,477      144,797
    Roads.........................      211,778      -12,592       20,448      219,634        3,551      217,853
    Trails........................       49,841        3,718        8,802       62,361        1,270       62,264
    Land Between the Lakes NRA....        1,200            0            0        1,200            0            0
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total--Cap. Improv. & Maint.      396,894        3,555       36,394      436,843        6,298      424,914
                                   =============================================================================
Land Acquisition:
    Acquisitions..................       67,510  ...........  ...........       67,510            0      118,000
    Acquisition Management........        8,492         -786        1,119        8,825          301        8,265
    Cash equalization.............        1,500  ...........  ...........        1,500  ...........        1,500
    Emergency acquisition.........        1,500  ...........  ...........        1,500  ...........        1,500
    Wilderness protection.........          500  ...........  ...........          500  ...........        1,000
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total--Land Acquisition.....       79,502         -786        1,119       79,835          301      130,265
                                   =============================================================================
Other Appropriations:
    Land Acquisition--Special Acts        1,069           -1            0        1,068            0            0
    Land Acquisition--Exchanges...          210           24            0          234            0            0
    Range Betterment Fund.........        3,300            0            0        3,300            0            0
    Gifts, Donations & Bequests...           92            0            0           92            0           92
    Southeast AK Assistance Fund..       22,000            0            0       22,000            0            0
    Subsistence Uses--Alaska......            0            0            0            0            0        5,500
                                   -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total--Other Appropriations.       26,671           23            0       26,694            0        5,592
                                   =============================================================================
      Total--Discretionary            2,729,933            0            0    2,729,933       69,902    2,960,053
       Appropriations without
       emergency..................
      Total with Emergency........    2,819,933            0            0    2,819,933       69,902    3,110,053
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     forest and rangeland research

    Research and development sponsors basic and applied 
scientific research. This research should provide both credible 
and relevant knowledge about forests and rangelands and new 
technologies that can be used to sustain the health, 
productivity, and diversity of private and public lands to meet 
the needs of present and future generations. Research is 
conducted across the U.S. through six research stations, the 
Forest Products Laboratory, and the International Institute of 
Tropical Forestry in Puerto Rico as well as cooperative 
research efforts with many of the Nation's universities. The 
Committee stresses that this research and development should 
support all of the Nation's forests and rangelands and that 
technology transfer and practical applications are vital.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $217,694,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       231,008,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       224,966,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +7,272,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -6,042,000


    The Committee recommends $224,966,000 for forest and 
rangeland research, $6,042,000 below the budget request and 
$7,272,000 above the 2000 funding level. The Committee held an 
oversight hearing this year on the effectiveness and mission of 
Forest Service research and development. The Committee stresses 
the need for collaborative research with land managing 
agencies, private and public forest managers, and especially, 
universities. The funding allocation covers the 2000 research 
program and provides an increase for uncontrolled cost 
increases. This funding maintains the forest inventory and 
analysis (FIA) funding at the 2000 level plus fixed cost 
increases. The State and private forestry appropriation 
includes $5,000,000 in new funds for a cost-share program to 
accelerate the FIA program in those states providing matching 
funds or in-kind services. The Committee continues the ``CROP'' 
project on the Colville National Forest at the $200,000 level. 
The Coweeta ecological research site funding should be no less 
than the previous year's funding level, plus fixed costs.
    The Committee remains concerned about the cost and 
efficiency of the consolidation of the former Intermountain 
Research Station with the Rocky Mountain Research Station in 
Fort Collins, Colorado, as well as the impact on scientific 
research on the ground. The Committee is concerned that at the 
same time that research projects are being cut throughout the 
former Intermountain Station, requests are being made of the 
Congress to provide additional funding for costs associated 
with the new buildings for the Rocky Mountain Headquarters in 
Fort Collins. The Committee is concerned that four NFS regions 
may be too large of an area for one station to effectively 
manage or to give proper attention to local research 
requirements. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Agriculture to re-examine the consolidation of the 
Intermountain and Rocky Mountain Research Stations and report 
back to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations 
within nine months of enactment on options to de-consolidate 
the station back into two separate research units. The report 
should include specific comparisons of the fixed overhead costs 
prior to consolidation, what those costs are now, and what they 
might be with de-consolidation. This should include a direct 
comparison between administrative staffs that were formerly 
shared with Region 4 and what those same Rocky Mountain Station 
staffs cost now, as well as the percent of appropriated funds 
spent on overhead costs for the past 5 years, to include the 2 
years prior to consolidation (1996-1997) and the 3 years since 
(1998-2000). In addition, the report should include impacts to 
specific research projects and dollars spent on those research 
projects over the same 5-year period within the current Rocky 
Mountain Station area and consider the benefits of collocating 
research units with NFS regional offices in Ogden, UT and 
Lakewood, CO.

                       state and private forestry

    Through cooperative programs with State and local 
governments, forest industry, conservation organizations, and 
private landowners, the Forest Service supports the protection 
and management of the nearly 500 million acres of non-federal 
forests in the country. Technical and financial assistance is 
offered to improve fire management; control insects and 
disease; improve harvesting, processing and monitoring of 
forest products; and stimulate stewardship of private forests 
through planning, reforestation and timber stand improvement. 
The Forest Service provides special expertise and disease 
suppression for all Federal and tribal lands, as well as 
cooperative assistance with the States for State and private 
lands.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $202,960,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       261,331,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       197,337,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -5,623,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -63,994,000


    The Committee recommends $197,337,000 for State and private 
forestry, $63,994,000 below the budget request and $5,623,000 
below the 2000 funding level.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    Forest health management.--The Committee recommends 
$63,794,000 for forest health management, $952,000 above the 
request and $1,719,000 above the 2000 funding level for these 
activities. The Committee reiterates its concern with forest 
health in the broad sense; the funding level for Federal lands 
forest health management maintains previous funding increases 
and fully funds fixed cost increases as well as requested 
program increases. It is vital that the Forest Service provide 
all Federal land managers with quality, timely insect and 
disease expertise, inventories, and where needed, control so as 
to protect Federal lands and investments and also protect 
neighboring private, tribal or State lands. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to keep insect and disease risk maps 
up-to-date and provide the Congress with updated maps at least 
on a semi-annual basis.
    The Committee recommends $22,411,000 for cooperative lands 
forest health management, $1,293,000 above the request and 
$639,000 above the 2000 funding level. Funding for the 
cooperative lands forest health management activity should 
fully fund the Slow-the-spread gypsy moth program and provides 
a $500,000 additional allocation for work to control and manage 
the Asian long-horned beetle.
    Cooperative fire protection.--The Committee recommends 
$30,000,000 for cooperative fire protection, $2,831,000 above 
the 2000 funding level and $2,504,000 below the budget request 
for these activities. The Committee recommends an increase of 
$1,071,000 for State fire assistance above the 2000 funding 
level. The Committee recognizes and applauds the successful 
partnership of the Forest Service and the States at wildfire 
management. The Committee has more than doubled the 
administration's requested allocation to the volunteer fire 
assistance program to a funding level of $5,000,000. Volunteers 
not only provide vital assistance to their home districts, but 
it is in the Federal interest to have these firefighters 
equipped with compatible gear so they can be effective members 
of multi-agency wildfire teams during emergencies.
    Cooperative forestry.--The Committee recommends $99,043,000 
for cooperative forestry, $56,942,000 below the budget request 
and $14,673,000 below the 2000 funding level. The Committee 
recommends $31,454,000 for forest stewardship, $1,621,000 above 
the 2000 funding level and $2,047,000 above the request. This 
provides full funding for fixed cost increases, the budget 
request, and an increase above the request of $500,000 for 
activities in the New York City watershed and maintains the 
Chesapeake Bay watershed program at $500,000. The Committee has 
inadequate resources to fund the stewardship incentives program 
at this time. The Committee does not have the resources 
available to expand greatly the forest legacy program as has 
been requested. The forest legacy program is allocated 
$10,000,000, a substantial increase to the 1999 and earlier 
year funding levels. The Committee directs the Forest Service 
to allocate forest legacy funding to those projects which 
enhance Federal lands, Federal investments or complement past 
Federal assistance efforts. States should be prepared to 
explain and justify projects before Federal funding is 
provided. The Committee recommends $31,521,000 for the urban 
and community forestry activity, $625,000 above the 2000 
funding level and $7,950,000 below the request. This 
recommendation includes $250,000 to support the Northeastern 
Pennsylvania community forestry program. The Committee is 
concerned about the Inspector General's recent report 
documenting questionable practices, fraud, waste and abuse in 
the urban resources partnership program. The Committee has 
included bill language implementing a one-year moratorium on 
the use of any funds for this program in a similar manner to 
that proposed by the House agriculture appropriations 
subcommittee.
    The Committee is aware of the 1993 U.S. Forest Service 
study on the Highlands region in New Jersey. The Committee is 
encouraged by this initial effort and urges the Forest Service 
to work with the States of New Jersey and New York to update 
this study to include a multi-state approach to preserving the 
Highlands region.
    The Committee has provided $5,000,000 within the 
Cooperative forestry account for a new effort, Forest resource 
information and analysis. These funds should be used to 
implement a cost-share effort in partnership with the State 
foresters and others to enhance the forest inventory and 
analysis program, which is managed within the forest research 
and development branch. This funding increase should help 
implement a recently signed MOU between the Forest Service and 
the National Association of State Foresters. The funds should 
be used to accelerate the inventory cycle time and should be 
used in those States which can provide cost-shares of funds or 
in-kind services.
    The Committee recommends $14,246,000 for economic action 
programs, $3,021,000 below the request and $5,952,000 below the 
2000 level. The Committee has been provided no clear 
explanation for the request to transfer $6,000,000 from the 
economic action program to the USDA Rural Business Cooperative 
Service. Once again, the Committee reiterates that requests of 
this nature should be referred to the proper appropriations 
subcommittee.
    Within the economic action program the Committee recommends 
the following distribution of funds:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          2001 request    2001 Committee
           Program component                 ($000)       recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Economic recovery base program........            3,642            3,642
    4 Corners forestry................              250              500
    Graham County, NC econ. plan......                0               10
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal econ recov.............            3,892            4,152
Rural development base program........            2,192            2,192
    NE & Midwest allocation...........              381            2,000
    4 Corners forestry................              250              500
    Hawaii training...................              100                0
    NY City watershed.................              150              300
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal rural dev..............            3,073            4,992
Forest products conservation and
 recycling:
    FPCR base.........................            1,080            1,080
    Wood Educ. & Res. Center, WV......            2,300                0
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal forest prod cons. &                3,380            1,080
       recy...........................
Wood in transportation................              922              922
Smart growth loans....................            6,000                0
                                       ---------------------------------
      Programs subtotal...............           17,267           11,146
Special projects:
    NY City watershed.................                0              500
    Brevard College, NC Cradle of                     0              300
     Forestry envir. ed...............
    Columbia River Gorge NSA Mosier                   0              500
     Beach facilities.................
    Lake Tahoe erosion grants.........                0            1,500
    Univ. WA landscape ecology........                0              300
                                       ---------------------------------
      Subtotal special projects.......                0            3,100
      Total Economic Action...........           17,267           14,246
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee recommends $6,822,000 for the Pacific 
Northwest Assistance programs as requested, a decrease of 
$1,034,000 from the 2000 level. This funding includes $500,000 
to continue the University of Washington and Washington State 
University technology transfer extension activities begun last 
year. The Committee encourages the Forest Service to consider 
funding grant requests for economic development coming from 
communities adversely impacted by the recent Presidential 
declaration of a Giant Sequoia National Monument in California.
    International forestry.--The Committee has provided 
specific funding for international forestry program activities 
as requested in order to depict clearly the budgetary 
implications of this activity. International forestry is 
provided $4,500,000, $5,500,000 below the request and 
$1,000,000 above the funding level which was allowed in fiscal 
year 2000. The Committee is encouraged by the successful 
partnerships in the international program and expects the 
increased funding to be allocated to invasive species control 
and management and migratory species habitat conservation. 
These international forestry program activities should focus on 
efforts which have end results that include benefits to 
domestic forest conditions and the American public.

                         National Forest System

    Within the National Forest System, which covers 192 million 
acres, there are 51 Congressionally designated areas, including 
20 National recreation areas, and 7 National scenic areas. The 
NFS includes a substantial amount of the Nation's softwood 
inventory. More than 9,000 farmers and ranchers pay for permits 
to graze cattle, horses, sheep and goats on 74 million acres of 
grassland, open forests, and other forage-producing acres of 
the National forest system. Recreational use of National forest 
land amounted to approximately 859 million visits in 1997. The 
NFS includes over 133,087 miles of trails and 23,000 developed 
facilities, including 4,389 campgrounds, 58 major visitor 
centers, and about one-half of the Nation's ski-lift capacity. 
Wilderness areas cover 35 million acres, nearly two-thirds of 
the wilderness in the contiguous 48 States. The Forest Service 
also has major habitat management responsibilities for more 
than 3,000 species of wildlife and fish, and 10,000 plant 
species and provides important habitat and open space for over 
300 threatened or endangered species. Half of the Nation's big 
game and coldwater fish habitat, including salmon and 
steelhead, is located on National forest system lands and 
waters. In addition, in the 16 western States, where the water 
supply is sometimes critically short, about 55 percent of the 
total annual yield of water is from National forest system 
lands.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................    $1,147,951,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................     1,286,571,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................     1,207,545,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +59,594,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -79,026,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $1,207,545,000 for the National 
forest system, $79,026,000 below the budget request and 
$59,594,000 above the 2000 funding level. The Committee has 
presented a new budget structure for the National forest system 
activities. This is the result of extensive consultation and 
deliberation with the Senate, the GAO, the National Academy of 
Public Administration and other knowledgeable bodies. The 
Committee previously requested a detailed study by the NAPA on 
Forest Service efforts to implement new accounting systems and 
to achieve managerial accountability. The GAO has also 
conducted a series of very useful evaluations of agency 
decision making, accounting, and program implementation. The 
Committee investigative staff also evaluated the agency's 
ability to conduct integrated programs and found that reforms 
were needed. The NAPA study presented four main findings: that 
a simplified budget structure would aid integrated land 
management and increase accounting efficiency; that 
organizational change was needed along with substantive reforms 
to budget formulation and allocation methods; that performance 
measurement and executive leadership were inadequate; and that 
financial system reforms being implemented may be on the right 
track, but that the immediate office organization for the Chief 
Financial Officer was excessive. The Committee finds the NAPA 
report to be extremely useful and expects it to be carefully 
evaluated by the Forest Service. The budget structure for the 
National forest system recommended by the NAPA, and presented 
by the Forest Service in its 2001 request, called for a 
dramatic reduction of funding categories from 20 to just three. 
The Committee is not prepared, nor does it feel that the Forest 
Service is prepared, to implement such a dramatic change. The 
Committee has developed a new budget structure which increases 
integrated management of vegetation and watersheds, but retains 
important, recognizable programs for major Forest Service 
responsibilities, such as forest products, recreation, wildlife 
and fish habitat, and law enforcement. The following table 
explains the relationship between the previous and the 
recommended budget structure:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Former
   Previous budget structure:     Recommended budget     subactivities
                                       structure           included
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Land mgmt Planning..............  Land management     ..................
                                   planning.
Inventory and Monitoring........  Inventory and       ..................
                                   monitoring.
Minerals and Geology Mgmt.......  Minerals and        ..................
                                   geology mgmt.
Law Enforcement Operations......  Law enforcement     ..................
                                   operations.
Recreation mgmt.................  Recreation,         Recreation mgmt.
                                   heritage &
                                   wilderness
Wilderness mgmt.................  ..................  Wilderness mgmt.
Heritage Resources..............  ..................  Heritage
                                                       Resources.
Wildlife habitat mgmt...........  Wildlife &          Wildlife habitat
                                   fisheries habitat   mgmt.
                                   mgmt.
Inland Fisheries habitat mgmt...  ..................  Inland Fisheries
                                                       habitat mgmt.
Anad. Fish habitat mgmt.........  ..................  Anad. Fish habitat
                                                       mgmt.
TE&S; species habitat mgmt.......  ..................  TE&S; species
                                                       habitat mgmt.
Real Estate mgmt................  Landownership       Real Estate mgmt.
                                   management.
Land Line Location..............  ..................  Land Line
                                                       Location.
Timber Sales mgmt...............  Forest products...  Timber Sales mgmt.
Forest Vegetation mgmt.                               ..................
Grazing management..............  Grazing management  Grazing
                                                       management.
Range Vegetation mgmt.                                ..................
Soil, Water & Air Operations....  Vegetation &        Forest Vegetation
                                   watershed mgmt.     mgmt.
Watershed Improvements..........  ..................  Range Vegetation
                                                       mgmt.
                                                      Watershed
                                                       Improvements.
                                                      Soil, Water & Air
                                                       Operations.
General Administration..........      (none, indirect costs limited by
                                   legislative language, funds spread to
                                               all accounts).
    Total: 20 activities or       10 activities.....
     subactivities.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:

                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               FY 2000 enacted                      Committee
                           Activity                                to date       Budget request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
National Forest System:
    Land Management Planning.................................           50,167           77,957           52,188
    Inventory and Monitoring.................................          138,326          193,002          141,851
    Vegetation & watershed mgmt..............................          166,002          171,379          176,984
    Wildlife & Fish habitat Mgmt.............................          114,857          135,542          120,828
    Recreation, Heritage & wilderness........................          203,864          249,348          229,282
    Forest Products..........................................          237,891          230,417          245,144
    Grazing Management.......................................           32,831           32,892           33,856
    Landownership Mgmt.......................................           82,565           73,297           86,609
    Minerals and Geology Mgmt................................           46,172           49,899           47,445
    Law Enforcement Operations...............................           69,911           72,838           73,358
    Land between the Lakes NRA...............................            5,365                0                0
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Total--National Forest System..........................        1,147,951        1,286,571        1,207,545
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Land management planning.--The Committee recommends 
$52,188,000 for land management planning, $2,021,000 above the 
2000 level and $25,769,000 below the request. This funding is 
provided for National forest and grassland planning, including 
plan amendments, revisions, and updates. The Committee is 
retaining this as a separate activity because this offers the 
best means of achieving some cost accountability and control 
for the endless planning efforts engaged in by the Forest 
Service. The Forest Service must limit planning activities to 
these funds and not use other funds to support the land 
management planning activity.
    Inventory and monitoring.--The Committee recommends 
$141,851,000 for inventory and monitoring, $51,151,000 below 
the request and $3,525,000 above the 2000 level.
    Recreation, heritage and wilderness.--The Committee 
recommends $229,282,000 for recreation heritage and wilderness, 
$20,066,000 below the budget request and $25,418,000 above the 
2000 level. The Committee disapproves the Administration 
request to transfer recreation funds to the construction 
activity for tourism. The Committee has monitored closely the 
Forest Service implementation of the recreation fee 
demonstration program. Although there have been some 
difficulties, the agency is congratulated for its flexibility 
and innovation. The Committee stresses that recreation fees 
should never be used to replace appropriated funds; the fees 
should be used for direct improvements on-site that enhance the 
recreation experience. The Committee has provided a substantial 
funding increase that should be used to enhance service to the 
public and protect National forest system lands and waters as 
well as heritage sites and activities. The challenge cost share 
(CCS) program funding for recreation use should be no less than 
the 2000 level. The Committee recognizes the National 
significance of the Pacific Crest, Continental Divide, and 
Florida National Scenic Trails and the Nez Perce National 
Historic Trail and directs that funding for their management be 
no less than the 2000 level. Similarly, funding should be 
maintained at least at the 2000 level for those parts of the 
Appalachian, North Country and Ice Age National Scenic Trails 
and the Lewis & Clark, Santa Fe, Iditarod, Oregon, California, 
and Pony Express and Overmountain Victory National Historic 
trails managed by the Forest Service. The Committee has also 
added $100,000 to the recreation allocation for the Forest 
Service to hire a full time Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) manager, 
who should report to all three regional foresters responsible 
for portions of the PCT, and who should coordinate the 
activities all along the trail's two dozen national forests, 
six national parks, four BLM management areas, five State parks 
and more than 200 private land holdings.
    Wildlife and fish habitat management.--The Committee 
recommends $120,828,000 for wildlife and fish habitat 
management, $14,714,000 below the request and $5,971,000 above 
the 2000 level. The increase above the 2000 level is to offset 
fixed cost increases. The Committee expects that these funds 
will be used to implement effective habitat conservation and 
restoration efforts and not be used as support for other 
business. The CCS program funding should be at least at the 
2000 levels and should not be subordinated to other internal 
overhead or program management uses. The Forest Service should 
collaborate with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and 
other partners to see that effective conservation projects are 
implemented on the ground.
    Grazing management.--The Committee recommends $33,856,000 
for grazing management, $964,000 above the budget request and 
$1,025,000 above the 2000 funding level. The increased funding 
over 2000 is provided for fixed cost increases. The Committee 
has moved the former rangeland vegetation management 
subactivity to the new vegetation and watershed management 
activity to enhance integrated landscape and site treatments. 
The Region 5 grazing monitoring cooperative program should be 
maintained at the 2000 funding level. The Committee encourages 
the Forest Service to ensure that decisions affecting the 
establishment of AUM's on grazing allotments in the Lincoln NF, 
NM, are based on field review and not just on the basis of 
computer models.
    Forest products.--The Committee recommends $245,144,000 for 
forest products, $14,727,000 above the budget request and 
$7,253,000 above the 2000 funding level. This activity includes 
the program supported by the former timber sales management 
subactivity. The Committee has moved the former forestland 
vegetation management subactivity to the new vegetation and 
watershed management activity to enhance integrated landscape 
and site treatments. The Committee is very concerned about the 
health of forests on National forest system lands and 
accordingly has provided a variety of mechanisms to enhance 
vegetation management activities. The Forest Service allocation 
of timber sales and vegetation management funds should include 
a mechanism to provide substantially more resources to those 
areas of the Nation that are at risk to insect, disease or 
wildfire loss. The Committee has provided adequate funding to 
implement the end-result stewardship pilot projects. The 
Committee urges the Forest Service to speed-up implementation 
of the botanical forest products pilot program enacted last 
year.
    The Committee notes that the fuelwood and special forest 
products programs, as well as stewardship timber sales, are 
cost effective ways of servicing public needs and improving 
forest stand conditions even though these programs cause the 
overall timber sales program to have a higher cost than 
monetary return. The Committee understands that these programs 
are providing substantial public benefits, so the Nation is 
well served with appropriated funds going for these purposes. 
The Committee has funded the timber sales program to produce 
the same total sale offer as should have been accomplished in 
fiscal years 1999 and 2000, about 3.6 billion board feet (BBF), 
consisting of 2.6 BBF of green sales. The remainder of the 
expected timber sales consists of the administration-requested 
level for the salvage sales program. The Committee notes that 
this harvest level is greatly reduced from recent times and 
that local economies cannot withstand further reductions to 
this program. The Committee is discouraged by the failure of 
the Forest Service to perform even up to this reduced level.
    To ensure that Congress is adequately informed and notified 
of progress or delays in implementing the fiscal year 2001 
program, the Committee requests that the agency continue its 
regular, quarterly reporting of timber sale preparation, offer, 
sale and harvest accomplishments--including a region-by-region 
status report. The Committee expects the reports to include 
detailed information on the status of the timber sales pipeline 
and an identification of the volumes offered, sold, and 
harvested categorized as net merchantable sawtimber. Timber 
program accomplishments should report timber actually sold and 
transferred to purchasers, and the volume offered. The reports 
are to be as comprehensive as possible and provide information 
on both green and salvage sales. Any additional salvage 
opportunities that may arise during fiscal year 2001 should not 
impact green sale targets.
    Vegetation and watershed management.--The Committee 
recommends $176,984,000 for vegetation and watershed 
management, $5,605,000 above the budget request for these 
activities and $10,982,000 above the 2000 funding level. In 
order to enhance watershed and vegetation management in an 
integrated fashion, the Committee has moved the former 
forestland and rangeland vegetation management subactivities to 
be joined with the former soil, water and air operations and 
watershed improvements subactivities. This should provide 
greater flexibility to treat priority forest and rangelands 
that need enhancement or restoration, and provide for more on-
the-ground work due to the decrease in administration and 
accounting previously required. The Committee directs that 
future budget justifications will display an integrated 
approach which includes priority work in those areas of the 
Nation with greater needs. The displays should also clearly 
depict the role of other habitat and restoration funds, such as 
wildlife and fish habitat, the KV fund, the reforestation fund, 
and the road and trail fund. The Forest Service should 
implement a CCS program for these activities that is no less 
than the 2000 level, and a strong effort should be made to 
increase this CCS effort in 2002 and thereafter. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to use the reforestation fund, as 
authorized, in conjunction with other vegetation management 
funds to provide an integrated, effective means of treating 
forests in need of forest health restoration. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by March 1, 2001 on the specific 
use of the reforestation fund for 2001 and provide a plan for 
using these funds in an integrated fashion to help reduce the 
great backlog of forests in poor conditions. The Committee has 
included $300,000 to continue the CROP program to treat 
stagnated stands on the Colville NF, $1,000,000 to continue the 
priority acid mine watershed restoration work on the Wayne NF, 
and $360,000 for the Rubio Canyon water line project on the 
Angeles NF.
    Minerals and geology management.--The Committee recommends 
$47,445,000 for minerals and geology management, $2,454,000 
below the budget request and $1,273,000 above the 2000 funding 
level. The Committee recommended funding level should cover 
fixed cost increases.
    Land ownership management.--The Committee recommends 
$86,609,000 for land ownership management, $13,312,000 above 
the request and $4,044,000 above the 2000 funding level. The 
Committee directs the Forest Service to report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations by March 31, 2001 on its 
progress at using new authority to recover the costs of permit 
administration as well as its progress at working with the FERC 
on funding necessary environmental analysis for hydropower dam 
relicensing. The Committee has included $250,000 to support a 
full time lands team to work on the Pacific Crest Trail project 
and focus on those trail segments where access and public 
service needs are greatest.
    Law enforcement operations.--The Committee recommends 
$73,358,000 for law enforcement operations, $520,000 above the 
budget request and $3,447,000 above the 2000 funding level. The 
Committee remains concerned about special law enforcement 
problems associated with marijuana eradication in the Daniel 
Boone National Forest and therefore has added $500,000 for 
these efforts. These funds are to be provided for this activity 
without reducing base services within the Region 8 law 
enforcement program. The Committee encourages the Forest 
Service and the Secretary of the Interior to work more closely 
with the Immigration and Naturalization Service and the EPA in 
southeastern Arizona to develop a plan to coordinate activities 
addressing illegal immigration crossing through Federal lands, 
and additionally, to provide the Committee by October 1, 2001, 
a plan coordinated with the EPA to mitigate environmental 
damage caused by illegal immigrant crossings through these 
Federal lands.
    Land Between the Lakes NRA.--The Committee notes that the 
Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area (LBL) (KY and 
TN), was transferred to Forest Service management from the 
Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Accordingly, the Committee 
has included $8,000,000 this year to provide for management of 
the LBL by the Forest Service. The Committee has not selected 
specific accounts but directs the Forest Service to report to 
the Committee by March 1, 2001 on the funding mix used, by 
appropriation account and activity. The Committee is generally 
pleased with the transition as it is being accomplished by the 
TVA and the Forest Service. The Committee expects that there 
will not be a diminution of public service and conservation now 
that the transfer has occurred. The Committee recognizes that 
this transition will be difficult and take some time, and 
accordingly, has included an administrative provision which 
allows the Forest Service to use, for a two year transition 
period, procurement authorities similar to those used in the 
recent past by the TVA. The Committee expects the Forest 
Service to resume revenue generating management programs, as 
appropriate, in an expeditious manner.
    General.--The Committee remains concerned about 
accountability for funds. As discussed in last year's Committee 
report, the Forest Service is to maintain all specific 
Congressional designations, in any amount, or to submit a 
reprogramming request if any such designation is proposed for a 
change. The Committee is also concerned about ``National 
commitments'' and ``Washington Office external'' charges. These 
items should be clearly displayed and explained in the budget 
justification and efforts should be made to reduce these 
expenses. The Committee directs that no funds be used for the 
natural resource conservation center without advance approval 
by the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. The 
Committee is disappointed that the Forest Service leaders have 
rejected the National Academy of Public Administration's 
recommendations concerning the staffing of the Chief Financial 
Officer's immediate office. Accordingly, the Committee directs 
the Forest Service to limit the immediate office of the CFO to 
6 employees as recommended by NAPA, and follow the 
recommendations for the financial reports and analysis staff 
(maximum staff of 10 employees) and for the financial 
management staff (maximum staff of 35). The Committee notes 
that none of these limits were exceeded at the time of this 
report, so these limits should easily be followed.
    Administrative provisions.--The Committee has included 
language enhancing procurement flexibility at the Land Between 
the Lakes National Recreation Area for a period of two years as 
the transition from TVA management is institutionalized. The 
Committee includes language allowing the Forest Service to 
transfer up to $1,250,000 of available funds to the National 
Forest Foundation, including up to $200,000 for administration, 
and transfers $2,650,000, the same as during 2000, to the 
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation. These funds are to be 
used for matching funds as authorized, thereby leveraging 
additional private funding and furthering the multiple use and 
public service mission of the Forest Service.
    The Committee is continuing its comprehensive approach to 
guarantee accountability and efficiency for the Forest Service 
Knutson-Vandenberg reforestation trust fund (KV fund), the 
salvage sale fund and the brush disposal fund. The Committee 
and the public remain concerned and watchful concerning the 
expenditure and use of these funds. The Committee notes that 
there is widespread agreement that the reforestation, watershed 
improvement and wildlife habitat restoration work supported by 
the KV fund are all vital to the management of the National 
forest system. The Committee notes that the Administration has 
yet to provide legislative language for their so-called 
``HIRE'' fund that was purported to replace these existing 
funds. The Committee also notes that sufficient legislative 
authority already exists to use these funds to enhance 
employment of local workers on contracts which complete needed 
conservation and enhancement activities. The Committee agrees 
to the following:
  (1) Maintain the limitation on administrative costs, limiting 
the use of indirect funds from the KV salvage sale, and brush 
disposal funds to 20% of expenditures.
  (2) National forest system funds shall not be used to 
supplement administration of the KV, salvage sale or brush 
disposal funds.
  (3) The Forest Service is directed to submit a detailed plan 
of operations regarding these three funds to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations within 90 days of 
enactment. The Committee requires that this plan provide 
sufficient detail to explain and justify the program of work 
and expected accomplishments at each National forest unit using 
KV funds.
  (4) The plan of work should include understandable 
performance measurements; monitoring of KV fund activities 
should be an essential component of implementation; and 
projected and actual unit costs should be clearly depicted.
  (5) The Committee stresses that the work funded by the KV 
fund shall only include those activities that are authorized by 
law, such as reforestation, and improving the future 
productivity of the renewable resources in the timber sale 
area. This allows work on watershed improvements and fish, 
wildlife, and plant habitat improvements as well as maintenance 
and construction related to authorized activities.
  (6) The Committee expects that the Forest Service will not 
use the three trust funds at the regional or Washington office 
level except for activities strictly related to program 
management and oversight, fiscal management, and policy 
development that relates directly to implementing activities 
authorized by these funds.
  (7) These trust funds shall not be used for Department of 
Agriculture general assessments or for general assessments or 
National commitments within the Forest Service.
  (8) The Committee is discouraged that a National automated 
system is not yet in place, and therefore the Forest Service is 
directed to implement, by June 30, 2001, an automated process 
for KV fund management, including all phases of KV fund 
activities from planning to project implementation and project 
monitoring. This system must be fully compatible with other 
agency accounting systems.
  (9) The Committee directs the Forest Service to include a 
detailed display in all future budget justifications of the 
anticipated program of work for these funds in the upcoming 
year. This display should also provide a clearly understandable 
presentation of how the forest and habitat improvement 
activities supported by these funds relate to activities funded 
with discretionary appropriations. This display should indicate 
relative priorities and present an integrated approach to 
forest management.

                        wildland fire management




Appropriation enacted, 2000 (excluding emergency).....      $617,956,000
Contingent emergency enacted, 2000....................        90,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001 (excluding emergency)...........       620,372,000
Budget estimate, 2001 contingent emergency............       150,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       614,343,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation (excluding emergency), 2000                 -3,613,000
    Budget estimate, 2001 (excluding emergency).......        -6,029,000


    The Committee recommends $614,343,000 for wildland fire 
management, $6,029,000 below the budget request and $3,613,000 
below the 2000 funding level for the non-emergency program. The 
Committee has not included the requested emergency contingent 
funds for fire operations but notes that such funds were 
included in the House-passed fiscal year 2000 supplemental 
appropriations act. The Committee has continued bill language 
which transfers half of the remaining unobligated funds at the 
end of the fiscal year, excepting hazardous fuels funding, from 
this account to pay back previously advanced sums. The 
Committee maintains the interdepartmental fire science program 
at the 2000 funding level.
    The Committee recommendation includes $404,343,000 for 
preparedness and fire use, the same as the budget request and 
$4,425,000 below the 2000 funding level. This funding provides 
about 70% of the most efficient level, as determined by Forest 
Service models. Additional funding in this activity, were it 
available, would provide much more than a dollar for dollar 
savings in subsequent wildfire suppression operations and loss 
of valuable resources. The Committee recommends $210,000,000 
for fire operations, $6,029,000 below the request and 
$1,112,000 above the 2000 level. The Committee directs that 
about $70,000,000 be reserved for hazardous fuels operations; 
this is $5,000,000 below the request and is equal to the 2000 
funding level. The Committee has also provided $150,000,000 for 
emergency contingent wildfire operations under Title IV--Fiscal 
Year 2000 Emergency Supplemental Appropriations. The Committee 
directs the Forest Service to report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by March 1, 2001, on agency 
efforts to manage large fire incidents and indicate clearly the 
status of agency action on the recent policy study on 
implications of large fire management.
    The Committee is concerned about the condition of forests 
and hazardous fuels on National forest system lands, especially 
in the more arid portions of the west. The Committee is also 
concerned that the Administration has not been able or willing 
to provide a strategic and tactical approach to dealing with 
this problem. The Committee directs the Forest Service to 
provide to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by 
March 1, 2001 a description of the hazardous fuels situation on 
NFS lands; the priorities, by National forest for their 
treatment; the means for integrating this work with other 
forest and habitat management goals and collaboration with the 
Department of the Interior; performance measures and 
anticipated accomplishments. The Committee encourages use of 
fuels reduction funds in the wildland-urban interface and 
expects that mechanical treatments will frequently be employed, 
including the capture of commercial value of trees thinned for 
fuels reduction and forestry purposes. The Committee is 
encouraged by increased integration of the fuels program into 
National forest system management, but there still is a need to 
incorporate fuels work into a larger vision of habitat and 
forest and rangeland desired future conditions. The Committee's 
reorganization of National forest system vegetation and 
watershed improvement funds should further facilitate the 
coordination between those activities and the hazardous fuels 
program. The use of these funds, and others, such as wildlife 
and fish habitat funds, the reforestation fund, and the road 
and trail fund should maximize multiple benefits to society by 
reducing fire danger, improving watershed and habitat 
conditions, and increasing forest health. The Committee directs 
the Forest Service, in its future budget justifications, to 
display the integrated use of these funding categories and to 
indicate how these program goals and accomplishments can be 
integrated into the overall agency mission, and its performance 
measured.
    The Committee remains very concerned about the hazardous 
fuel conditions on Federal lands and the potenital impact these 
conditions can have on neighboring State and private lands. The 
Committee continues to support the interagency fire science and 
management program, created by this Committee three years ago, 
which has developed nation-wide fuel loading maps and maps 
indicating areas having high risk of catastrophic fire. The 
Committee directs the Forest Service and the Department of the 
Interior to keep these maps up-to-date and publicly available. 
The Committee also directs the Secretaries to make these maps 
available to States and counties which contain areas of high 
risk of catastrophic fires.

                  capital improvement and maintenance




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $436,843,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       424,914,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       424,466,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -12,377,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -448,000


    The Committee recommends $424,466,000 for capital 
improvement and maintenance, a reconfiguration of the former 
reconstruction and maintenance account. The Committee has 
consolidated the maintenance and capital improvement funding 
for facilities, roads, and trails. This will make it easier for 
managers and the public to track funding and progress at 
maintaining the infrastructure which supports Forest Service 
activities. The Committee supports the Forest Service use of 
the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board policy to 
define annual and deferred maintenance and capital improvement. 
The ``maintenance'' entries in the detail table below represent 
annual maintenance as well as minor deferred maintenance 
projects. The ``capital improvement'' entries include both new 
construction and reconstruction, as well as major deferred 
maintenance projects. The Committee appreciates the project 
detail provided in the budget justification and expects this 
practice to continue.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
funds:

                                            [In thousands of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               FY 2000 enacted                      Committee
                     Activity or project                           to date       Budget request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Facilities:
    Maintenance..............................................           72,192           70,262           70,262
    Capital improvement......................................           65,599           74,535           74,535
    Congressional priorities:
        Allegheny NF visitor services, PA....................  ...............  ...............              500
        Allegheny NF Marienville RS, PA......................  ...............  ...............            1,000
        Coweeta research rehab, NC...........................  ...............  ...............              110
        Cradle of Forestry projects, NC......................  ...............  ...............              380
        Grey Towers NHS site rehab, PA.......................  ...............  ...............              500
        Nantahala NF Fontana Lake, NC........................  ...............  ...............              600
        Ouachita NF Camp Clearfork, AR.......................  ...............  ...............              400
        Ouachita NF Albert rec area, AR......................  ...............  ...............              600
        Uwharrie NF Kings Mtn Pt., NC........................  ...............  ...............              900
        Waldo Lake rehab, OR.................................  ...............  ...............              500
        Uwharrie NF Badin Lake, NC...........................  ...............  ...............              400
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Congressional priorities......................           15,857  ...............            5,890
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Facilities....................................          153,648          144,797          150,687
                                                              ==================================================
Roads:
    Maintenance..............................................          116,882          129,549          120,000
    Capital improvement......................................           98,568           88,304           88,304
      Congressional priorities...............................            4,184  ...............  ...............
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Roads.........................................          219,634          217,853          208,304
                                                              ==================================================
Trails:
    Maintenance..............................................           30,119           28,239           31,000
    Capital improvement......................................           29,998           34,025           34,025
    Congressional priorities:
        FL National scenic trail.............................  ...............  ...............              250
        Virginia Creeper trail repair........................  ...............  ...............              200
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Congressional priorities......................            2,244  ...............              450
                                                              --------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal Trails........................................           62,361           62,264           65,475
                                                              ==================================================
Land between the Lakes NRA...................................            1,200                0                0
                                                              ==================================================
      Total..................................................          436,843          424,914          424,466
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Facilities.--The Committee recommends $150,687,000 for 
facilities maintenance and capital improvement, $2,961,000 
below the enacted and $5,890,000 above the request. The 
Committee has fully funded the requested funds for facility 
maintenance and capital improvement. The Committee has provided 
no funding for the tourism initiative described in the budget 
justification. The Committee directs that the funds for the 
Grey Towers National Historic Site rehabilitation be contingent 
upon receiving at least equal matching funds from the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania or other sources. The Cradle of 
Forestry funding is for volunteer campsite construction, trail 
improvements, and rehabilitation at the nearby Davidson 
campground.
    Roads.--The Committee recommends $208,304,000 for road 
maintenance and capital improvement, $11,330,000 below the 
enacted level and $9,549,000 below the request. As provided in 
fiscal year 1999, the timber purchaser road credit program is 
eliminated. The Committee recommendation includes no 
appropriated funds to improve or construct timber access roads. 
Timber purchasers will reconstruct access roads if needed; 
funds recommended by the Committee provide needed design and 
National Environmental Policy Act mandated environmental 
review, public involvement and disclosure. The Committee has 
maintained the road decommissioning authority at $15,000,000 
but notes that the Forest Service has never approached this 
cap. The Committee directs that the road funding allocation is 
sufficient to provide needed road support to maintain the 
timber sales and salvage program at the fiscal year 2000 target 
level. The Committee expects the Forest Service transportation 
policy to focus on local needs as determined at the forest 
planning level. Although there are insufficient resources 
available to the Committee to provide a more substantive 
approach to the large road treatment backlog, the Committee 
does note the substantial funds available from the road and 
trail fund to accomplish needed road, trail and bridge repair. 
The Committee expects to continue to receive regular reports 
and briefings on progress attacking the huge backlog of 
deferred maintenance and repair, especially as it relates to 
the activities funded through the road and trails fund.
    Trails.--The Committee recommends $65,475,000 for trails 
maintenance and capital improvement, $3,114,000 above the 
enacted level and $3,211,000 above the request. This fully 
funds the administration request for trails capital 
improvement. The Committee expects that the National scenic and 
historic trails will have priority in funding allocations. 
Under the National forest system account specific provisions 
are included for National scenic and historic trails 
management, with special emphasis on the Pacific Crest Trail.

                            land acquisition




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $79,835,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       103,265,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        50,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -29,835,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -80,265,000


    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $29,835,000 below the enacted level and 
$80,265,000 below the budget request. This amount includes 
$38,000,000 for line item acquisition, $8,500,000 for 
acquisition management, $1,500,000 for cash equalization, 
$1,500,000 for emergencies and $500,000 for wilderness 
protection.
    The Committee recommends the following distribution of 
funds:

Area and State:
    Angeles NF (CA).....................................      $2,000,000
    Arapaho NF (Beaver Brook) (CO)......................       2,000,000
    Bar T Bar Ranch (Coconino NF) (AZ)..................       3,200,000
    Big Sur Ecosystem (Los Padres NF) (CA)..............       3,000,000
    Bonneville Shoreline Trail (UT).....................       2,500,000
    Chattooga WSR (GA/NC/SC)............................       2,000,000
    Daniel Boone NF (KY)................................       2,000,000
    Hoosier NF Unique Areas (IN)........................       1,000,000
    Lake Tahoe Ecosystem (CA/NV)........................       2,000,000
    Lewis and Clark Historic Trail (ID/MT)..............       2,000,000
    Pacific Crest Trail (CA/OR/WA)......................       3,000,000
    Rye Creek (MT)......................................       2,800,000
    San Bernardino NF (CA)..............................       2,500,000
    Sawtooth NRA (ID)...................................       2,000,000
    Sedona Red Rock (Coconino NF) (AZ)..................       3,000,000
    Wayne NF (OH).......................................       1,000,000
    White Mtn. NF (NH)..................................       2,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal............................................      38,000,000
    Emergency Acquisitions..............................       1,500,000
    Wilderness Protection...............................         500,000
    Cash Equalization...................................       1,500,000
    Acquisition Mgt.....................................       8,500,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      50,000,000

    The Committee considers the Pacific Crest National Scenic 
Trail, which extends through California, Oregon and Washington, 
to be a high priority and has included $3,000,000 for land 
purchases.
    The Committee encourages the Pacific Crest Trail 
Association to continue raising significant non-federal 
matching funds to ensure that the most critical sections 
threatened by development are protected. A continued, strong, 
public/private partnership on this project will have an impact 
on the future level of Federal support.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Agriculture, who has 
overall responsibility for administration of this trail, to 
work in close consultation with the Secretary of the Interior 
and the Pacific Crest Trail Association to identify, assess and 
prioritize the needs of the trail, including the preparation of 
segment maps as quickly as possible.
    The Committee directs both Secretaries to submit joint 
progress reports to the Committee no later than May 30, 2001, 
which outline the progress made to date and any outstanding 
conflicts which may be hampering the effort.
    The amount provided for acquisition of the Bar-T-Bar Ranch 
completes the purchase.

         acquisition of lands for National forests special acts




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $1,068,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................                 0
Recommended, 2001.....................................         1,068,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       +1,068,0000


    The Committee recommends $1,068,000 for acquisition of 
lands for National forests, special acts, which is equal to the 
fiscal year 2000 level. These funds are used pursuant to 
several special acts which authorize appropriations from the 
receipts of specified National forests for the purchase of 
lands to minimize erosion and flood damage to critical 
watersheds needing soil stabilization and vegetative cover. The 
Committee has not accepted the Administration's request to 
blend these funds into the land acquisition account, funded 
from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, because these funds 
come from other sources and should be used for the authorized 
purposes.

            acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................          $234,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................                 0
Recommended, 2001.....................................           234,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          +234,000


    The Committee recommends $234,000 for acquisition of lands 
to complete land exchanges under the Act of December 4, 1967 
(16 U.S.C. 484a). Under the Act, deposits made by public school 
districts or public school authorities to provide for cash 
equalization of certain land exchanges can be appropriated to 
acquire similar lands suitable for National forest system 
purposes in the same State as the National forest lands 
conveyed in the exchanges. The Committee has not accepted the 
Administration request to abolish this account and blend its 
funds into the land acquisition account because these funds 
come from other sources and should be tracked and used 
according to the authorized purposes.

                         range betterment fund




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $3,300,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................                 0
Recommended, 2001.....................................         3,300,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
  Budget estimate, 2001...............................        +3,300,000


    The Committee recommends $3,300,000, the same as in 2000, 
for the range betterment fund, to be derived from grazing 
receipts from the National forests (Public Law 94-579, as 
amended) and to be used for range rehabilitation, protection, 
and improvements including seeding, reseeding, fence 
construction, weed control, water development, and fish and 
wildlife habitat enhancement in 16 western States. The 
Committee has rejected the Administration request to abolish 
this account. The Committee notes that the Administration has 
yet to provide legislative language for their ``HIRE'' program, 
which they claimed would replace the range betterment fund and 
other conservation funds that utilize fees from National forest 
system land users. The range betterment fund is a small but 
effective means of enhancing rangeland habitats.

    gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................           $92,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................            92,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................            92,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $92,000, the budget estimate, for 
gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland 
research. Authority for the program is contained in Public Law 
95-307 (16 U.S.C. 1643, section 4(b)). Amounts appropriated and 
not needed for current operations may be invested in public 
debt securities. Both the principal and earnings from the 
receipts are available to the Forest Service.

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY


                         Clean Coal Technology

                               (Deferral)

    The Committee recommends deferral of $67,000,000 in 
previously appropriated Clean Coal Technology budget authority 
until fiscal year 2002 instead of a $221 million deferral and a 
rescission of $105 million as proposed by the Administration. 
To the extent funds are not needed because of premature project 
terminations, the Committee will continue its practice of 
rescinding excess funds. The Committee believes more 
substantial deferrals or rescissions are not warranted at this 
time.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
  1. Up to $14 million may be used for administration of the 
clean coal technology program in fiscal year 2001.
  2. The Committee does not object to the continued support of 
the U.S./China Energy and Environmental Center, which promotes 
the use of American energy technology that will greatly reduce 
emissions and improve energy efficiency.

                 energy resource, supply and efficiency

                     (including transfer of funds)

    The energy resource, supply and efficiency programs of the 
Department of Energy make prudent investments in long-range 
research and development that help protect the environment 
through higher efficiency power generation, advanced 
technologies and improved compliance and stewardship 
operations. These activities safeguard our domestic energy 
security. This country will continue to rely on traditional 
fuels for the majority of its energy requirements for the 
foreseeable future, and the activities funded through this 
account ensure that energy technologies continue to improve 
with respect to emissions reduction and control and energy 
efficiency.
    Fossil fuels, especially coal, are this country's most 
abundant and lowest cost fuels for electric power generation. 
They are why this country enjoys the lowest cost electricity of 
any industrialized economy. The prospects for technology 
advances for coal and other fossil fuels are just as bright as 
those for alternative energy sources such as solar, wind and 
geothermal. Power generation technology research programs 
funded under this account are working toward the goal of 
developing virtually pollution-free power plants within the 
next 15 or 20 years and doubling the amount of electricity 
produced from the same amount of fuel. Sector-specific programs 
funded under this account focus on efficiency and emissions 
reduction improvements for smaller but equally important 
applications for residential and commercial buildings, 
transportation (especially automobiles and trucks), and major 
energy-consuming industries.
    This account combines the programs formerly funded under 
the fossil energy research and development account and the 
energy conservation account. All of these programs focus on the 
efficient use of traditional fuel sources and novel approaches 
to alternative fuel sources. These programs do not focus on 
solar and renewable energy research or nuclear energy research, 
which are under the jurisdiction of the Energy and Water 
Appropriations Subcommittee.
    The United States accounts for 25% of world energy 
consumption. Efforts to improve energy efficiency in this 
country have slowed the rate of growth in energy consumption 
but the total amount of energy used continues to grow. In 1998 
fossil energy (coal, oil and natural gas) accounted for 85% of 
U.S. energy consumption. In 2020 fossil fuels are expected to 
account for nearly 90% of U.S. energy consumption, as reliance 
on nuclear power declines.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................    $1,113,675,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................     1,224,070,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................     1,139,611,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +25,936,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -84,459,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $1,139,611,000 for energy 
resource, supply and efficiency, an increase of $25,936,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 level and $84,459,000 below the 
budget request.
    Power Generation and Large-Scale Technologies.--For power 
generation and large-scale technologies, recommended changes to 
the fiscal year 2000 level are as follows.
    In central systems there is an increase of $2,000,000 for 
materials research in the innovations for existing plants 
activity and a decrease of $500,000 for super clean systems in 
that same activity. There are also decreases of $2,000,000 for 
low emissions boiler systems and $18,188,000 for advanced 
turbine systems, which reflect the completion of those 
programs.
    In distributed generation/fuel cells there are increases of 
$1,600,000 for advanced research, $9,864,000 for Vision 21/
Hybrids, and $3,500,000 for innovative concepts, and a decrease 
of $15,263,000 for systems development.
    In sequestration research and development there are 
increases of $6,600,000 for greenhouse gas control and 
$2,970,000 for the Center of Excellence at the National Energy 
Technology Laboratory.
    In advanced coal research/technology crosscut there is an 
increase of $2,970,000 for the Center of Excellence at the 
National Energy Technology Laboratory.
    In natural gas programs changes include increases of 
$2,178,000 for storage technology and $4,950,000 for 
infrastructure technology, both in the infrastructure activity, 
and a decrease of $597,000 for effective environmental 
protection.
    In petroleum programs there is an increase of $10,000,000 
for the ultra clean fuels initiative and a decrease of 
$3,330,000 in emerging processing technology for the 
biodesulfurization of diesel fuel.
    Other changes include a decrease of $13,500,000, which 
reflects the transfer of the black liquor gasification program 
to the industry sector activity, an increase of $127,000 for 
the import/export authorization program, a decrease of $600,000 
for general plant projects, and an increase of $225,000 for 
advanced metallurgical processes.
    Sector-Specific Programs.--Unless provided to the contrary 
herein, projects funded in fiscal year 2000 are funded at the 
same level for 2001. For sector-specific programs, recommended 
changes to the fiscal year 2000 level are as follows.
    In the buildings sector there is a net decrease of 
$15,962,000. Changes for buildings research and standards 
include an increase of $500,000 for competitive research and 
development and a decrease of $762,000 for roadmapping, both in 
the technology roadmaps/competitive R&D; activity, and a 
decrease of $200,000 for urban heat islands in the equipment, 
materials and tools activity. For building technology 
assistance there are decreases of $15,000,000 for the 
weatherization assistance program and $500,000 for the energy 
star program. The Committee notes that the decrease for 
weatherization is more than offset by the $19,000,000 advance 
appropriation in the House passed fiscal year 2000 supplemental 
appropriations bill, making a total of $139,000,000 available 
in 2001 for weatherization, a $4,000,000 increase above 2000.
    For the Federal energy management program there is an 
increase of $500,000 for program direction. This increase is 
necessary to pay the full year costs of employees hired in 
fiscal year 2000. The Committee urges the Department to 
continue to increase regional support office involvement in 
this program.
    In the industry sector there is a net increase of 
$5,492,000. Changes for industries of the future (specific) 
include increases of $1,000,000 for petroleum, $500,000 for 
mining, and $1,000,000 for agriculture, and decreases of 
$178,000 for aluminum and $30,000 for glass. In industries of 
the future (crosscutting) there are increases in enabling 
technologies of $13,500,000 for industrial gasification, which 
reflects the transfer of the black liquor gasification program 
from the power generation and large-scale technologies 
activity, and $2,000,000 to continue the controlled thermo-
mechanical processing project, and decreases of $12,000,000 for 
distributed generation and $300,000 for technical assistance.
    In the transportation sector there is a net decrease of 
$5,100,000. Changes in vehicle technology research and 
development include increases of $500,000 for natural gas 
health impacts analysis in the advanced combustion engine 
activity and $1,500,000 for heavy vehicle systems optimization, 
and decreases of $1,000,000 for light vehicle propulsion, 
$1,600,000 for fuel cell components, $1,000,000 for hybrids in 
the advanced combustion engine activity, and $1,600,000 for 
cooperative automotive research for advanced technologies. In 
fuels utilization changes include increases of $1,000,000 for 
advanced petroleum based fuels and $500,000 for natural gas 
toxicity testing in the alternative fuels activity, and a 
decrease of $500,000 for light trucks in the alternative fuels 
activity. There is also a decrease of $2,900,000 for the High 
Temperature Materials Laboratory in the materials program.
    There is an increase of $1,000,000 for policy and 
management at regional support offices.
    For the overall account there is an increase of 
$47,000,000, which is related to the use of $49,000,000 in 
biomass funds as an offset to fiscal year 2000 requirements. 
Only $2,000,000 in offset funds are available for fiscal year 
2001.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
  1. The funding provided for continuing the steelmaking 
feedstock program is contingent on at least a dollar-for-dollar 
cost share with industry partners.
  2. The multi-layer fuel cells program is continued under the 
innovative concepts activity.
  3. The Department should report to the Committee by December 
15, 2000, on potential R&D; and/or financial incentives which 
could contribute significantly to reducing emissions from 
existing coal-fired powerplants in the U.S. and improve their 
generation efficiency. The report should discuss how these 
measures relate to existing and anticipated environmental 
regulatory measures, and identify any regulatory barriers to 
improved environmental performance at such plants. The report 
should also estimate the magnitude and duration of specific R&D; 
and incentive proposals.
  4. The $2,000,000 provided for materials research in the 
innovations for existing plants activity are to be used for 
highly cost-shared applied materials R&D; programs, applicable 
to both existing and Vision 21 plants, to address critical 
materials related problems.
  5. The Department should consider the Pennsylvania State 
program to develop sonication technology for oil recovery, 
minimizing drilling and production wastes and remediating 
contaminated sites.
  6. The Committee is aware of the Department's ongoing 
collaboration with industry on the development of a low-cost, 
energy efficient prototype, which applies well-established 
ramjet technology principles from the aerospace industry to 
electric generation technology. The Committee commends the 
Department for committing funding to this project in the past 
and for its ongoing support for this new generation technology. 
The Committee understands that a total of $10 million would be 
needed to design and build a ramjet prototype engine that would 
be sited at a coal mine and would burn coalbed methane as fuel. 
The Committee encourages the Department to consider continuing 
this program.
  7. The NETL should continue to be actively involved in the 
management of the black liquor gasification program and should 
be actively involved in the mining industries of the future 
program management. The petroleum industries of the future 
program should be closely coordinated with the other oil 
research and development programs funded under this account.
  8. Crosscutting programs--cooperative programs with States 
and the energy efficiency science initiative--are continued at 
the fiscal year 2000 level. These projects should be 
coordinated closely between the two Assistant Secretaries 
funded under this appropriation. This same direction applies to 
the reciprocating engines programs.
  9. None of the funds provided herein are for the million 
solar roofs initiative. This program is under the purview of 
the Energy and Water Appropriations Subcommittee.
  10. No funds are provided for the international initiative or 
to increase biofuels programs.
  11. Funding for the weatherization assistance program in this 
bill, in combination with the $19,000,000 provided as an 
advance appropriation in the House passed fiscal year 
supplemental appropriations bill, results in an increase of $4 
million for the program in fiscal year 2001
  12. The Northwest Alliance for Transportation Technologies 
should be funded at least at the $3,000,000 level in fiscal 
year 2001.
  13. No funds are provided for the electric vehicle program 
with the Postal Service. The Postal Service and the 
participating States should fund this program.

                      alternative fuels production

                              (rescission)




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................                $0
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        -1,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        -1,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends the rescission of $1,000,000 in 
unobligated balances from this account.

                 naval petroleum and oil shale reserves

    The Committee recommends no new funding for the operation 
of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves and agrees with 
the Administration's proposal to fund this program through the 
use of available prior year funds as shown in the following 
table:


                      elk hills school lands fund




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $36,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        36,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        36,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $36,000,000 for the Elk Hills 
school lands fund, which is equal to both the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2000 level. This represents the third of 
seven payments to the fund, which was established as a part of 
the sale of the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve in 
California, in order to settle school lands claims by the 
State. These funds will become available on October 1, 2001.

                          economic regulation

    The economic regulation account funds the independent 
Office of Hearings and Appeals which is responsible for all of 
the Department's adjudication processes except those that are 
the responsibility of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 
The amount funded by this Committee is for those activities 
specific to this bill: mainly those related to petroleum 
overcharge cases. All other activities are funded on a 
reimbursable basis from the other elements of the Department of 
Energy. Prior to fiscal year 1997, this account also funded the 
Economic Regulatory Administration.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $1,992,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         2,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         1,992,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................            -8,000


    The Committee recommends $1,992,000 for economic 
regulation, equal to the fiscal year 2000 level and $8,000 
below the budget request.

                      strategic petroleum reserve

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve was created by the Energy 
Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 to provide the United 
States with adequate strategic and economic protection against 
disruptions in oil supplies. The SPR program was established as 
a 750 million-barrel capacity crude oil reserve with storage in 
large underground salt caverns at five sites in the Gulf Coast 
area, connected to major private sector distribution systems, 
and maintained to achieve full drawdown rate capability within 
fifteen days of notice to proceed. Storage capacity development 
was completed in September 1991 providing the capability to 
store 750 million barrels of crude oil in underground caverns 
and to be ready to deploy at the President's direction in the 
event of an emergency. As a result of the decommissioning of 
the Weeks Island site in 1999, the Reserve lost 70 millions 
barrels of capacity. However, the Department has reassessed the 
capacities of the remaining storage sites and estimates those 
sites are currently capable of storing 700 million barrels. 
During 1998, an inventory of 561 million barrels provided 60 
days of net import protection. By 2001, this is projected to 
decline to 53 days. The decline rate is the result of the 
projected growth of U.S. requirements for imported crude oil 
and the reduction in U.S. domestic oil production.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $158,396,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       158,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       157,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -1,396,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -1,000,000


    The Committee recommends $157,000,000 for operation of the 
Strategic Petroleum Reserve, a decrease of $1,396,000 below the 
fiscal year 2000 level and $1,000,000 below the budget request. 
Of the funds provided $141,000,000 is for storage facilities 
development and operations and $16,000,000 is for management.

                   energy information administration

    The Energy Information Administration is a quasi-
independent agency within the Department of Energy established 
to provide timely, objective, and accurate energy-related 
information to the Congress, executive branch, State 
governments, industry, and the public. The information and 
analysis prepared by the EIA is widely disseminated and the 
agency is recognized as an unbiased source of energy 
information by government organizations, industry, professional 
statistical organizations and the public.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $72,368,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        75,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        72,368,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -2,632,000


    The Committee recommends $72,368,000, for the Energy 
Information Administration, which is equal to the fiscal year 
2000 level and $2,632,000 below the budget request.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


                         Indian Health Service


                         indian health services

    The provision of Federal health services to Indians is 
based on a special relationship between Indian tribes and the 
U.S. Government first set forth in the 1830s by the U.S. 
Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall. Numerous 
treaties, statutes, constitutional provisions, and 
international law have reconfirmed this relationship. Principal 
among these is the Snyder Act of 1921 which provides the basic 
authority for most Indian health services provided by the 
Federal Government to American Indians and Alaska Natives. The 
Indian Health Service (IHS) provides direct health care 
services in 37 hospitals, 58 health centers, 4 school health 
centers, and 44 health stations. Tribes and tribal groups, 
through contracts with the IHS, operate 12 hospitals, 160 
health centers, 3 school health centers, and 236 health 
stations (including 160 Alaska village clinics). The IHS, 
tribes and tribal groups also operate 7 regional youth 
substance abuse treatment centers and more than 2,200 units of 
staff quarters.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................    $2,074,173,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................     2,271,055,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................     2,084,178,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +10,005,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................      -186,877,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $2,084,178,000 for Indian health 
services, an increase of $10,005,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
level and $186,877,000 below the budget request. The increase 
above the 2000 funding level is for staffing of new facilities.
    The Committee agrees to the following:
    1. The Service should continue to work with the tribes to 
develop level of need calculations for health care services.
    2. The Committee is concerned about the Service's lack of 
response to direction in last year's Committee report requiring 
the development of a meaningful plan of action to augment and 
strengthen its podiatry care program and address the shortage 
of commissioned officers in the podiatry field.
    3. The Committee continues to be concerned about the infant 
mortality crisis in the Shoalwater Bay Tribe and expects the 
Service to continue to work closely with the tribe, the State, 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other 
agencies to identify the causes of and potential solutions for 
infant mortality. Funding for this program is continued at the 
fiscal year 2000 level.
    4. Funding for the Joslin diabetes program is continued at 
the fiscal year 2000 level.
    5. Funds provided in 2000 for the pharmacy residency 
program remain in the base for fiscal year 2001.
    6. The Committee directs the Indian Health Service to 
report on the delivery of services in Maverick County, Texas to 
the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma and the Kickapoo Traditional 
Tribe of Texas. The report should include the current level of 
services provided, the mechanisms by which the services are 
provided and any recommendations for improving delivery of 
services. The Committee expects the report to be completed by 
March 1, 2001.
    Bill language is included under Title III, General 
Provisions placing a moratorium on new and expanded self-
determination contracts and self-governance compacts because no 
additional funds are available for contract support costs.

                        indian health facilities

    The need for new Indian health care facilities has not been 
fully quantified but it is safe to say that many billions of 
dollars would be required to renovate existing facilities and 
construct all the needed new hospitals and clinics. The IHS 
estimates that as many as 21 hospitals and 52 health centers 
should be considered for replacement; renovations should be 
considered for 16 hospitals, 82 health centers, and 284 health 
stations; and 15 new health centers and 21 new health stations 
should be considered. Safe and sanitary water and sewer systems 
for existing homes and solid waste disposal needs currently are 
estimated to amount to over $770 million for those projects 
that are considered to be economically feasible.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $316,555,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       349,374,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       336,423,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +19,868,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -12,951,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $336,423,000 for Indian health 
facilities, an increase of $19,868,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 level and $12,951,000 below the budget request. There is 
an increase of $1,665,000 for staffing of new facilities. The 
balance of the increase above the 2000 funding level is for 
hospital and clinic construction.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of 
hospital and clinic construction funds:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee
                Project                  Budget request   recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fort Defiance, AZ hospital............      $40,115,000      $40,115,000
Winnebago, NE hospital................       12,286,000       12,286,000
Parker, AZ clinic.....................        7,578,000        8,210,000
Pawnee, OK clinic.....................        1,745,000        1,745,000
Hopi, AZ staff quarters...............                0          240,000
Dental Units..........................        1,000,000        1,000,000
Small Ambulatory grants...............        2,513,000        5,000,000
                                       ---------------------------------
      Totals..........................       65,237,000       68,596,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee agrees to the following:
  1. Funding to complete quarters construction associated with 
the new Hopi clinic is provided to ensure that this project can 
be completed successfully. The Committee notes that the 
majority of the funding for the quarters construction is being 
borne by the tribe.
  2. The Service should consider a new, consistent approach to 
constructing staff quarters that involves cost sharing by the 
tribes to the extent possible and tribal operation of the 
completed quarters. Funding for quarters construction needs to 
be treated consistently for each project. Currently there are 
quarters projects that have never been built although the 
related hospital or clinic was built; projects that incorporate 
the cost of quarters in with the total cost of the facility 
construction (with no tribal cost share); and projects that are 
left to an individual tribe to fund.
  3. The methodology used to distribute facilities funding 
should address the fluctuating annual workload and maintain 
parity among IHS areas and tribes as the workload shifts.
  4. Funds for sanitation facilities for new and renovated 
housing should be used to serve housing provided by the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs Housing Improvement Program, new homes and 
homes renovated to like-new condition. Onsite sanitation 
facilities may also be provided for homes occupied by the 
disabled or sick who have physician referrals indicating an 
immediate medical need for adequate sanitation facilities at 
home.
  5. Sanitation funds should not be used to provide sanitation 
facilities for new homes funded by the housing programs of the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development. The HUD should 
provide any needed funds to the IHS for that purpose.
  6. The IHS may use up to $5,000,000 in sanitation funding for 
projects to clean up and replace open dumps on Indian lands 
pursuant to the Indian Lands Open Dump Cleanup Act of 1994.
  7. The IHS should continue to support tribes in identifying 
and implementing alternative and innovative approaches to 
funding construction and repair and replacement of health care 
facilities throughout Indian country, including cost-sharing 
arrangements and the enhanced use of third-party collections 
for improving aging facilities. These alternative approaches 
should not result in increased operational funding requirements 
for IHS.
    Bill Language.--Bill Language is included to assist the 
Hopi Tribe with the debt associated with the construction of 
staff quarters that is being financed with tribal funds. 
Several other provisions are continued from last year to ensure 
the facilities program is able to take advantage of purchase 
opportunities from other agencies.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES


              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation


                         salaries and expenses

    The dispute between the Hopi and Navajo tribes is 
centuries-old. The Hopi were the original occupants of the land 
with their origin tracing back to the Anasazi race whose 
presence is recorded back to 1150 A.D. Later in the 16th 
century the Navajo tribe began settling in this area. The 
continuous occupation of this land by the Navajo led to the 
isolation of the Hopi Reservation as an island within the area 
occupied by the Navajo. In 1882, President Arthur issued an 
Executive Order which granted the Hopi a 2.5 million acre 
reservation to be occupied by the Hopi and such other Indians 
as the Secretary of the Interior saw fit to resettle there. 
Intertribal problems arose between the larger Navajo tribe and 
the smaller Hopi tribe revolving around the question of the 
ownership of the land as well as cultural differences between 
the two tribes. Efforts to resolve these conflicts were not 
successful and led Congress to pass legislation in 1958 which 
authorized a lawsuit to determine ownership of the land. When 
attempts at mediation of the dispute as specified in an Act 
passed in 1974 failed, the district court in Arizona 
partitioned the Joint Use Area equally between the Navajo and 
Hopi tribes under a decree that has required the relocation of 
members of both tribes. Most of those to be relocated are 
Navajo living on the Hopi Partitioned Land.
    At this time approximately 410 households remain be 
relocated, of which 71 are full-time residents on the Hopi 
Partitioned Land. A total of 3,116 families have been relocated 
from the Hopi Partitioned Land.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $8,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        15,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         8,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -7,000,000


    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, 
the same as the 2000 enacted level and a decrease of $7,000,000 
below the budget request.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development


                        payment to the institute




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $2,125,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         4,250,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        -2,125,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -4,250,000


    The Committee recommends zero funding for the Institute of 
American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development. 
It was the understanding of the House that fiscal year 2000 
would be the last year Federal funding would be provided.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    The Smithsonian Institution is unique in the Federal 
establishment. Established by the Congress in 1846 to carry out 
the trust included in James Smithson's will, it has been 
engaged for over 150 years in the ``increase and diffusion of 
knowledge among men'' in accordance with the donor's 
instructions. For some years, it used only the funds made 
available by the trust. Then, before the turn of the century, 
it began to receive Federal appropriations to conduct some of 
its activities. With the expenditure of both private and 
Federal funds over the years, it has grown into one of the 
world's great scientific, cultural, and intellectual 
organizations. It operates magnificent museums, outstanding art 
galleries, and important research centers. Its collections are 
among the best in the world. Its traveling exhibits bring 
beauty and information throughout the country.
    It attracted approximately 30,000,000 visitors in 1998 to 
its museums, galleries, and zoological park. Additional 
millions also view Smithsonian traveling exhibitions, which 
appear across the United States and abroad, and the annual 
Folklife Festival. As custodian of the National Collections, 
the Smithsonian is responsible for more than 140 million art 
objects, natural history specimens, and artifacts. These 
collections are displayed for the enjoyment and education of 
visitors and are available for research by the staff of the 
Institution and by hundreds of visiting students, scientists, 
and historians each year. Other significant study efforts draw 
their data and results directly from terrestrial, marine, and 
astrophysical observations at various Smithsonian 
installations.
    The Smithsonian complex presently consists of 15 exhibition 
buildings in Washington, DC and New York City in the fields of 
science, history, technology and art; a zoological park in 
Washington, DC and an animal conservation and research center 
in Front Royal, Virginia; the Anacostia Museum, which performs 
research and exhibit activities in the District of Columbia; a 
preservation, storage and air and spacecraft display facility 
in Suitland, Maryland; a natural preserve in Panama and one on 
the Chesapeake Bay; an oceanographic research facility in Fort 
Pierce, Florida; astrophysical stations in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts and Mt. Hopkins, Arizona and elsewhere; and 
supporting administrative, laboratory, and storage areas.

                         salaries and expenses




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $371,230,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       396,800,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       375,230,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +4,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -21,570,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $375,230,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Smithsonian Institution, an increase of 
$4,000,000 above the enacted level and a decrease of 
$21,570,000 below the budget request. The Committee has 
provided an additional $2,000,000 for the National Museum of 
the American Indian collections move and $2,000,000 to the Air 
and Space Museum for preparation of the collections move from 
the Garber Facility to the new Dulles Museum.

            repair, restoration and alteration of facilities




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $47,900,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        62,200,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        47,900,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -14,300,000


    The Committee recommends $47,900,000, the same as the 
enacted level and $14,300,000 below the budget request. This 
amount is consistent with the amount recommended by the 
Smithsonian to deal with the most critical backlog maintenance 
needs. Some of these areas include replacement of utilities, 
security systems, heating and air conditioning, roofs and major 
structural repairs. Because these essential items alone total 
more than $300,000,000, the Smithsonian should either delay 
additional non-essential ``beautification'' work or raise 
private dollars for such projects until the critical repairs 
can be completed.

                              construction




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $19,000,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         4,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -19,000,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -4,000,000


    The Committee recommends no funding for construction.

                        National Gallery of Art

    The National Gallery of Art is one of the world's great 
galleries. Its magnificent works of art are displayed for the 
benefit of millions of visitors from across this Nation and 
from other nations. The National Gallery of Art serves as an 
example of a successful cooperative endeavor between private 
individuals and institutions and the Federal Government. The 
many special exhibitions shown in the Gallery and then 
throughout the country bring great art treasures to Washington 
and the Nation. In 1999, the Gallery opened a sculpture garden 
which provides a wonderful opportunity for the public to have 
an outdoor artistic experience in a lovely, contemplative 
setting.

                         salaries and expenses




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $61,279,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        64,848,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        61,279,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -3,569,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $61,279,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the National Gallery of Art. This amount is equal 
to the fiscal year 2000 level and $3,569,000 below the budget 
request.

            repair, restoration and renovation of buildings




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $6,311,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        14,101,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         8,903,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................        +2,592,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -5,198,000


    The Committee recommends $8,903,000 for repair, restoration 
and renovation of buildings at the National Gallery of Art, an 
increase of $2,592,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$5,198,000 below the budget request. The increase above the 
2000 level is to implement the Gallery's long-term facilities 
improvement plan. The Committee commends the Gallery's efforts 
to identify and plan for addressing its critical backlog 
maintenance needs.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is a 
living memorial to the late President Kennedy and the National 
Center for the Performing Arts. The Center consists of over 1.5 
million square feet of usable floor space with visitation 
averaging 10,000 on a daily basis.

                       operations and maintenance




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $13,947,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        14,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        13,947,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................           -53,000


    The Committee recommends $13,947,000 for operations and 
maintenance, the same as the enacted level and $53,000 below 
the budget request.

                              construction




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $19,924,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        20,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        19,924,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................           -76,000


    The Committee recommends $19,924,000 for construction, the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level and $76,000 below the 
request.
    The Committee commends the leadership of the Center for its 
effectiveness and efficiency in operating the Center and 
managing its construction projects.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars


                         salaries and expenses

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is a 
unique institution with a special mission to serve as a living 
memorial to President Woodrow Wilson. The Center performs this 
mandate through its role as an international institute for 
advanced study as well as a facilitator for discussions among 
scholars, public officials, journalists and business leaders 
from across the country on major long-term issues facing 
America and the world.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $6,763,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         7,310,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         6,763,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -547,000


    The Committee recommends $6,763,000 for salaries and 
expenses, the same as the enacted level and $547,000 below the 
budget request.
    The Committee is extremely pleased with the progress the 
Center has made under its new leadership in implementing the 
recommendations of the National Academy of Public 
Administration. Of particular importance is ensuring that the 
programs of the Center have relevance to current public policy 
issues and that the Center increases its public outreach 
programs.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities


                    National Endowment for the Arts


                       grants and administration




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $84,677,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       150,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        98,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       +13,323,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -52,000,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with 
estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $98,000,000 for grants and 
administration, which is equal to the 2000 funding level for 
the NEA before the government-wide reduction was applied. The 
recommended amount for the NEA is $52,000,000 below the request 
and $372,000 above the final fiscal year 2000 funding level for 
the agency. The Committee has agreed to place all grant funds 
in the grants and administration account and has provided no 
funding in the matching grant account. The addition of the 
matching grants funds into this account explains the increased 
funding in this appropriation account. The Committee expects 
the NEA to use these grants to enhance outreach efforts to more 
of the Nation, especially for underserved rural and urban areas 
which have not had substantial NEA granting activity in the 
recent past. The Committee has not provided funding for an 
office move, so the Committee expects to see a supplemental 
budget request if the General Services Administration proceeds 
with such an action. The Committee is generally pleased with 
the implementation of the Congressional reforms to the NEA and 
therefore the Committee encourages the NEA to pay careful 
attention to the letter and spirit of these recent reforms in 
order that previous granting problems do not reoccur.
    Bill language in Title III retains provisions in last 
year's bill regarding restrictions on individual grants, 
subgranting, and seasonal support (Sec. 318); authority to 
solicit and invest funds (Sec. 319); priority for rural and 
underserved communities, priority for grants that encourage 
public knowledge, education, understanding, and appreciation of 
the arts, designation of a category for grants of national 
significance, and a 15-percent cap on the total amount of grant 
funds directed to any one State (Sec. 320).

                            matching grants




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $12,951,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................                 0
Recommended, 2001.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -12,951,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends no funding for matching grants, as 
requested. Rather, the Committee has added the matching grant 
funds into the grants and administration account as discussed 
above in order to increase outreach efforts for small 
institutions in underserved rural and urban areas.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

    The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) was created 
in 1965 to encourage and support National progress in the 
humanities. The NEH provides, through a merit-based review 
process, grants in support of education, research, document and 
artifact preservation, and public service in the humanities.

                       grants and administration




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................      $100,604,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................       129,470,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................       100,604,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................       -28,866,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $100,604,000 for grants and 
administration, which is equal to the 2000 level and 
$28,866,000 below the request. The Committee has not provided 
funding for an office move, so the Committee expects to see a 
supplemental budget request if the General Services 
Administration proceeds with such an action.

                            matching grants




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $14,656,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        20,530,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        14,656,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -5,874,000


    The Committee recommends $14,656,000 for matching grants, 
equal to the 2000 funding level and $5,874,000 below the 
request.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services


                       Office of Museum Services


                       grants and administration

    The Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS) was 
created in the Museum and Library Services Act of 1996 (Public 
Law 104-208) which merged library services functions of the 
Department of Education into the Institute of Museum Services. 
These functions now come under the Office of Museum Services 
(OMS) portion of the IMLS. The OMS appropriation remains in the 
Interior and related agencies bill and the Office of Library 
Services appropriation remains in the Labor, Health and Human 
Services appropriations bill. The OMS provides operating 
support, conservation support and professional services to 
assist museums. General operating support is competitively 
awarded to assist museums with essential operating 
expenditures.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $24,307,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        33,378,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        24,307,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -9,071,000


    The amounts recommended by the Committee compared with the 
budget estimates by activity are shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $24,307,000 for the Office of 
Museum Services, which is $9,071,000 below the request and 
equal to the 2000 level. The Committee has not provided funding 
for an office move, so the Committee expects to see a 
supplemental budget request if the General Services 
Administration proceeds with such an action.

                        Commission of Fine Arts

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to meet 
the need for a permanent body to advise the government on 
matters pertaining to the arts, and particularly, to guide the 
architectural development of Washington, DC. Over the years the 
Commission's scope has been expanded to include advice on areas 
such as plans for parks, public buildings, location of National 
monuments and development of public squares. As a result, the 
Commission annually reviews approximately 500 projects. In 
fiscal year 1988 the Commission was given responsibility for 
the National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program.

                         salaries and expenses




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $1,021,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         1,078,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         1,021,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................           -57,000


    The Committee recommends $1,021,000 for the Commission of 
Fine Arts, which is $57,000 below the request and equal to the 
2000 funding level. The Committee continues legislative 
language added last year which allows the Commission to charge 
fees for its publications and to credit such fees to this 
account to be expended without further appropriation.

               National capital arts and cultural affairs




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $6,973,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         7,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         6,973,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................           -27,000


    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established in Public Law 99-190 to support artistic and 
cultural programs in the Nation's Capital. The Committee 
recommends $6,973,000 for this program, which is equal to the 
2000 level and $27,000 below the request.

               District of Columbia Arts Education Grants




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................                 0
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         1,000,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................                 0
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -1,000,000


    The Committee rejects the Administration proposal to 
provide a special appropriation for arts education for the 
District of Columbia to be managed by the Commission of Fine 
Arts.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation


                         salaries and expenses

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. The Advisory 
Council was reauthorized as part of the Omnibus Parks and 
Public Lands Management Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-333). The 
Council's mandate is to further the National policy of 
preserving historic and cultural resources for the benefit of 
present and future generations. The Council advises the 
President and Congress on preservation matters and provides 
consultation on historic properties threatened by Federal 
action.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $2,989,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         3,189,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         2,989,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................          -200,000


    The Committee recommends $2,989,000 for the Advisory 
Council on Historic Preservation, equal to the 2000 level and 
$200,000 below the request. The Committee has not provided 
funding for an office move, so the Committee expects to see a 
supplemental budget request if the General Services 
Administration proceeds with such an action.

                  National Capital Planning Commission


                         salaries and expenses

    The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated the 
National Capital Planning Commission as the central planning 
agency for the Federal government in the National Capital 
Region. The three major functions of the Commission are to 
prepare and adopt the Federal elements of the National Capital 
Comprehensive Plan, prepare an annual report on a five-year 
projection of the Federal Capital Improvement Program, and 
review plans and proposals submitted to the Commission.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................        $6,288,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................         6,198,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................         6,288,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................           +90,000


    The Committee recommends $6,288,000, which is equal to the 
2000 level and $90,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
has included bill language as requested providing authority for 
appointed members of the Commission to be compensated in a 
manner similar to that which is used for similar boards and 
commissions in the Federal government, however the Committee 
has not made this authority permanent as was requested.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Council


                       holocaust memorial council

    In 1980 Congress passed legislation creating a 65 member 
Holocaust Memorial Council with the mandate to create and 
oversee a living memorial/museum to victims of holocausts. The 
museum opened in April 1993. Construction costs for the museum 
have come solely from donated funds raised by the U.S. 
Holocaust Memorial Museum Campaign and appropriated funds have 
been used for planning and development of programmatic 
components, overall administrative support and annual 
commemorative observances. Since the opening of the museum, 
appropriated funds have been provided to pay for the ongoing 
operating costs of the museum as authorized by Public Law 102-
529.




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $33,161,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        34,564,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        33,161,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................                 0
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................        -1,403,000


    The Committee recommends $33,161,000, the same as the 
enacted level and $1,403,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee commends the leadership of the Museum as well 
as the Council for acting expeditiously to implement the NAPA 
recommendations. The Museum should provide an annual report on 
the progress of this effort.

                             Presidio Trust


                          presidio trust fund




Appropriation enacted, 2000...........................       $44,300,000
Budget estimate, 2001.................................        33,400,000
Recommended, 2001.....................................        33,400,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 2000...............................       -10,900,000
    Budget estimate, 2001.............................                 0


    The Committee recommends $33,400,000, a reduction of 
$10,900,000 below the enacted level and the same as the budget 
request. This amount includes $23,400,000 for operations and 
$10,000,000 in loan authority.

                     TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Section 301 provides for public availability of information 
on consulting services contracts.
    Section 302 limits funding for oil and gas leasing in the 
Shawnee National Forest, IL.
    Section 303 prohibits activities to promote public support 
or opposition to legislative proposals.
    Section 304 provides for annual appropriations unless 
expressly provided otherwise in this Act.
    Section 305 limits the use of personal cooks, chauffeurs or 
servants.
    Section 306 limits assessments against programs without 
Committee approval.
    Section 307 contains Buy American procedures and 
requirements.
    Section 308 limits the sale of giant sequoia trees by the 
Forest Service.
    Section 309 prohibits the use of funds by the National Park 
Service to enter into a contract requiring the removal of the 
underground lunchroom at Carlsbad Caverns NP, NM.
    Section 310 provides that no funds can be used for 
Americorps unless it is funded in the VA, HUD and Independent 
Agencies fiscal year 2001 appropriations, and makes use of such 
funds subject to reprogramming.
    Section 311 continues a limitation of funding relating to a 
pedestrian bridge between New Jersey and Ellis Island.
    Section 312 continues a limitation on accepting and 
processing applications for patents and on the patenting of 
Federal lands; permits processing of grandfathered 
applications; and permits third-party contractors to process 
grandfathered applications.
    Section 313 limits payments for contract support costs in 
past years to the funds available in law and accompanying 
report language in those years for the Bureau of Indian Affairs 
and the Indian Health Service.
    Section 314 concerns the Jobs in the Woods program and 
timber dependent areas in Washington, Oregon, Alaska and 
northern California.
    Section 315 prohibits the use of recreational demonstration 
program fees in excess of $500,000 for the construction of any 
permanent structure without advance Committee approval.
    Section 316 makes permanent a provision carried last year 
exempting properties administered by the Presidio Trust from 
certain taxes and special assessments.
    Section 317 prohibits the use of funds for posting clothing 
optional signs at Canaveral NS, FL.
    Section 318 contains reforms and limitations dealing with 
the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Section 319 permits the collection and use of private funds 
by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National 
Endowment for the Humanities.
    Section 320 continues direction to the National Endowment 
for the Arts on funding distribution.
    Section 321 limits the use of funds for new or revised 
National forest land management plans with certain exceptions.
    Section 322 limits funding for completing the 5-year 
program under the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources 
Planning Act.
    Section 323 prohibits the use of funds to support 
government-wide administrative functions unless they are 
justified in the budget process and approved by the House and 
Senate Appropriations Committees.
    Section 324 prohibits the use of funds for GSA 
Telecommunication Centers or the President's Council on 
Sustainable Development.
    Section 325 prohibits the use of funds to make improvements 
to Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House without 
Committee approval.
    Section 326 continues a provision which permits the Forest 
Service to use the roads and trails fund for backlog 
maintenance and priority forest health treatments.
    Section 327 prevents funds available to the agencies and 
offices funded in this bill from being used to support the 
Council on Environmental Quality or other Executive Office of 
the President functions for purposes related to the American 
Heritage Rivers program. The Committee is concerned that scarce 
agency funds may be diverted to bureaucratic functions that 
should be supported by other appropriations acts if they have 
merit.
    Section 328 limits the use of answering machines during 
core business hours except in case of emergency and requires an 
option of talking to a person. The American taxpayer deserves 
to receive personal attention from public servants.
    Section 329 continues a provision carried last year 
regulating the export of Western red cedar from National forest 
system lands in Alaska.
    Section 330 prohibits the use of funds to propose or issue 
rules, regulations, decrees or orders for implementing the 
Kyoto Protocol prior to Senate ratification.
    Section 331 prohibits new or expanded Indian self-
determination contracts and self-governance compacts using 
funds in this Act.
    Section 332 includes language that allows the BLM and 
Forest Service to pilot test their Service First initiative. 
The Committee continues to support and encourage the land 
management agencies to work with each other to consolidate 
activities at the field level as a means of achieving savings 
and providing improved services to the public. In the past the 
Committee has applauded the efforts of the BLM and Forest 
Service to test just such a program. This language allows the 
Secretaries of the Interior and Agriculture to make reciprocal 
delegations of authority, duties, and responsibilities to 
promote customer service and efficiency, with the understanding 
that nothing will change the applicability of any public law or 
regulation to lands administered by the BLM or Forest Service, 
except for testing the feasibility of issuing and processing 
unified permits, applications, and leases. As part of their 
annual budget justification to the Congress, the BLM and Forest 
are directed to provide an annual report on the effectiveness 
of the Service First pilot.
    Section 333 establishes a four-year program between the 
State of Colorado and the Forest Service that provides for 
cooperative watershed restoration and protection in Colorado. 
This program allows the State of Colorado to work with the 
Forest Service when it is conducting watershed restoration and 
protection services on State or private lands near or adjacent 
to national forest system lands. This includes treatments of 
insect infected trees, reduction of hazardous fuels, and other 
activities to restore or improve watersheds or fish and 
wildlife habitat across ownership boundaries. The State and the 
Forest Service should coordinate annual activities as early as 
possible during the fiscal year.
    Section 334 limits the use of funds for issuing a record of 
decision or policy implementing the Interior Columbia Basin 
Ecosystem Management Project. This provision addresses the 
concern by the Committee that the Forest Service and the Bureau 
of Land Management do not intend to comply with the Small 
Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act by completing a 
regulatory flexibility analysis with respect to the preferred 
alternative contained in the Draft Supplemental Environmental 
Impact Statement for the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem 
Management Project (ICBEMP). The GAO General Counsel wrote in a 
July 3, 1997 letter to Congress that a National Forest Land and 
Resource Management Plan generally was considered a ``rule'' 
for the purposes of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement 
Fairness Act. Since ICBEMP proposes to amend 62 individual land 
use plans on 32 Forest Service and BLM administrative units in 
the project area and replace three interim management 
strategies, the Committee is concerned that the Project will 
expose itself to litigation by not complying with existing law 
prior to implementation.
    Section 335 includes bill language, which would prevent the 
Secretary of the Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture from 
using any funds for the purposes of designing, planning or 
management of Federal lands as national monuments which were 
designated since 1999. Nothing in this language prevents either 
Secretary from managing these Federal lands under their 
previous management plans. The Committee encourages the 
Secretaries to continue previous management scenarios until 
such time as Congress ratifies the monument declarations which 
occurred after 1999.

    TITLE IV--FISCAL YEAR 2000 EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS


                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR


                       Bureau of Land Management


                        wildland fire management

    The Committee recommends an additional $200,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2000 for wildland fire management. This amount is 
contingent upon receipt of a budget request that includes a 
Presidential designation of the amount requested as an 
emergency requirement as defined in the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.
    The Committee recognizes the severity of the 1999 fire 
season in the Great Basin and the ecological effects these 
fires had on lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management. 
The Committee supports current efforts that are underway to 
secure the funds necessary to restore damaged resources and 
infrastructure in order to prevent declines in important fish 
and wildlife habitat. Accordingly, the Committee supports 
restoration activities, including but not limited to fence 
replacement, wild horse removal, tree and shrub replacement, 
and cheatgrass control. The Committee also recognizes the 
severity of the grasshopper and Mormon cricket infestation in 
The Great Basin and supports efforts to secure funding to 
protect vital native vegetative resources on Federal lands, 
adjacent farm and ranch lands, and newly planted fire 
rehabilitation projects from further infestations. Should funds 
become available for these high-priority activities, the 
Committee expects coordination with State, local and other 
Federal entities in addressing these efforts.

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE


                             Forest Service


                        wildland fire management

    The Committee recommends an additional $150,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2000 for wildland fire management. This amount is 
contingent upon receipt of a budget request that includes a 
Presidential designation of the amount requested as an 
emergency requirement as defined in the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.

                              Rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill:

                   rescission recommended in the bill



                                                             Amounts
                Department and activity                  recommended for
                                                           rescission

Department of the Interior: Land and Water                   $30,000,000
 Conservation Fund (contract authority)...............
Department of Energy: Alternative Fuels Production....         1,000,000


                           Transfer of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying 
bill.
    The table shows the appropriations affected by such 
transfers.

                                 APPROPRIATION TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Account to which transfer is to
   Account from which transfer is to be made        Amount                   be made                   Amount
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     Department of Energy, Biomass Energy           $2,000,000  Department of Energy, Energy          $2,000,000
                  Development                                    Resource, Supply and Efficiency.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Changes in Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3, rule XIII of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, the following Statements are submitted 
describing the effect of provisions in the accompanying bill 
which directly or indirectly change the application of existing 
law. In most instances these provisions have been included in 
prior appropriations Acts.
    The bill provides that certain appropriations items remain 
available until expended or extends the availability of funds 
beyond the fiscal year where programs or projects are 
continuing in nature under the provisions of authorizing 
legislation but for which that legislation does not 
specifically authorize such extended availability. Most of 
these items have been carried in previous appropriations Acts. 
This authority tends to result in savings by preventing the 
practice of committing funds at the end of the fiscal year.
    The bill includes, in certain instances, limitations on the 
obligation of funds for particular functions or programs. These 
limitations include restrictions on the obligation of funds for 
administrative expenses, travel expenses, the use of 
consultants, and programmatic areas within the overall 
jurisdiction of a particular agency.
    The Committee has included limitations for official 
entertainment or reception and representation expenses for 
selected agencies in the bill.
    Language is included in the various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities of those Federal agencies, which 
require annual authorization or additional legislation which to 
date, has not been enacted.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Management of lands and resources, permitting the use of 
receipts from the Land and Water Conservation Act of 1965; 
providing funds to the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
under certain conditions; permitting the use of fees from 
communication site rentals; limiting the use of funds for 
destroying wild horses and burros; and permitting the 
collection of fees for processing mining applications and for 
certain public land uses, and permitting the use of these fees 
for program operations.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Wildland fire management, to permit the use of funds from other 
accounts for firefighting; to permit the use of funds for 
lodging and subsistence of firefighters; and to permit the 
acceptance and use of funds for firefighting.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Central hazardous materials fund, providing that sums received 
from a party for remedial actions shall be credited to the 
account, and defining non-monetary payments.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Payments in lieu of taxes, to exclude any payment that is less 
than $100.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Forest ecosystems health and recovery fund permitting the use 
of salvage timber receipts.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Service charges, deposits, and forfeitures, to allow use of 
funds on any damaged public lands.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Administrative provisions, permitting the payment of rewards 
for information on violations of law on Bureau lands; and 
providing for cost-sharing arrangements for printing services.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Resource management, allowing for the maintenance of 
the herd of long-horned cattle on the Wichita Mountains 
Wildlife Refuge. Without this language, the long-horned cattle 
would have to be removed from the refuge. Language also is 
included, providing for the Natural Communities Conservation 
Planning program and for a Youth Conservation Corps; limiting 
funding for certain Endangered Species Act listing programs; 
permitting payment for information or rewards in the law 
enforcement program; and earmarking funds for contaminant 
analysis.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Multinational species conservation fund, exempting 
these programs from certain sanctions on a permanent basis.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Administrative provisions, providing for repair of 
damage to public roads; options for the purchase of land not to 
exceed $1; installation of certain recreation facilities; the 
maintenance and improvement of aquaria and other facilities; 
the acceptance of donated aircraft; cost-shared arrangements 
for printing services. Language also is included to limit the 
use of funds for establishing new refuges.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Operation 
of the National park system to allow road maintenance service 
to trucking permittees on a reimbursable basis. This provision 
has been included in annual appropriations Acts since 1954. 
Language also is included providing for a Youth Conservation 
Corps program; providing for the use of funds in support of 
Everglades land acquisition and permitting no-year availability 
for certain recreation fees associated with units not 
participating in the recreation fee demonstration program.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Land and 
water conservation fund, rescinding $30 million in contract 
authority.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Land 
acquisition and State assistance, to permit the use of funds to 
assist the State of Florida with Everglades restoration; making 
the use of funds for Everglades contingent on certain 
conditions; and limiting State assistance grants solely to land 
acquisition.
    Language is included under National Park Service, 
Administrative provisions, requiring the inclusion of 18 U.S.C. 
1913 in the text of grant and contract documents; preventing 
the implementation of an agreement for the redevelopment of the 
southern end of Ellis Island; limiting the use of funds for the 
United Nation's Biodiversity convention; and permitting the use 
of funds for workplace safety needs.
    Language is included under U.S. Geological Survey, Surveys, 
investigations and research, providing for two-year 
availability of funds for biological research and for the 
operations of cooperative research units; prohibiting the 
conduct of new surveys on private property without permission; 
and requiring cost sharing for cooperative topographic mapping 
and water resource data collection activities.
    Language is included under U.S. Geological Survey, 
Administrative provisions, permitting reimbursements to the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; permitting contracting for 
certain mapping and surveys; permitting construction of 
facilities; permitting acquisition of land for certain uses; 
allowing payment of expenses for the National Committee on 
Geology; permitting payments to interstate compact negotiators; 
and permitting the use of certain contracts, grants, and 
cooperative agreements.
    Language is included under Minerals Management Service, 
Royalty and offshore minerals management, permitting the use of 
excess receipts from Outer Continental Shelf leasing 
activities; providing for reasonable expenses related to 
volunteer beach and marine clean-up activities; providing for 
refunds for overpayments on Indian allottee leases; providing 
for collecting royalties and late payment interest on amounts 
received in settlements associated with Federal and Indian 
leases; and permitting the use of revenues from a royalty-in-
kind program.
    Language is included under Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, Regulation and Technology, 
permitting the use of moneys collected pursuant to assessment 
of civil penalties to reclaim lands affected by coal mining 
after August 3, 1977; permitting payment to State and tribal 
personnel for travel and per diem expenses for training.
    Language is included under Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, Abandoned mine reclamation fund, 
limiting the amounts in the account for acid mine drainage 
activities and for emergency reclamation projects; allowing the 
use of debt recovery to pay for debt collection; and allowing 
the use of funds for reclamation and acid mine drainage 
remediation in Pennsylvania.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Operation of Indian programs, limiting funds for contract 
support costs and for administrative cost grants for schools; 
permitting the use of tribal priority allocations for general 
assistance payments to individuals, for contract support costs, 
and for repair and replacement of schools; and providing for 
future availability of certain tribal forestry funds.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Operation of Indian programs, allowing reprogramming of Self-
Governance funds, allowing changes to certain eligibility 
criteria by tribal governments, allowing the transfer of 
certain forestry funds, providing for an Indian self-
determination fund.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Construction, providing that 6 percent of Federal Highway Trust 
Fund contract authority may be used for management costs; 
providing for the transfer of Navajo irrigation project funds 
to the Bureau of Reclamation; providing Safety of Dams funds on 
a non-reimbursable basis; requiring the use of administrative 
and cost accounting principles for certain school construction 
projects and exempting such projects from certain requirements; 
requiring conformance with building codes and health and safety 
standards; specifying the procedure for dispute resolution; and 
permitting the use of certain overpayments for school 
construction.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Administrative provisions, prohibiting funding of Alaska 
schools; limiting schools and the expansion of grade levels in 
individual schools; to limit the use of funds for contracts, 
grants and cooperative agreements and requiring an evaluation 
of certain Bureau schools.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Insular 
Affairs, Assistance to Territories, requiring audits of the 
financial transactions of the Territorial governments by the 
General Accounting Office; providing grant funding under 
certain terms of the Agreement of the Special Representatives 
on Future United States Financial Assistance for the Northern 
Mariana Islands; providing a payment to the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency for Virgin Islands obligations; providing a 
grant to the Close-Up foundation; and allowing appropriations 
for disaster assistance to be used as non-Federal matching 
funds for hazard mitigation grants; providing for payments to 
the Prior Service Benefits Trust Fund and limiting 
administrative expenses; and providing for capital 
infrastructure in various territories.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, 
Departmental management, salaries and expenses, permitting 
payments to former Bureau of Mines workers.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Office of 
Special Trustee for American Indians, specifying that the 
statute of limitations shall not commence on any claim 
resulting from trust funds losses; exempting quarterly 
statements for accounts less than $1; and requiring annual 
statements and records maintenance.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Indian 
land consolidation, permitting transfers of funds for 
administration; permitting cooperative agreements with tribes 
to acquire fractional interest; permitting a reservation-wide 
system for establishing fair market values; limiting and 
placing requirements on certain land acquisitions; making 
certain proceeds available for appropriation and allowing cost 
recovery and subsequent distribution to tribes.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, 
Administrative provisions, prohibiting the use of working 
capital or consolidated working funds to augment certain 
offices and allowing the acquisition of aircraft through 
various means and the sale of existing aircraft with proceeds 
used to offset the purchase price of replacement aircraft.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to allow transfer of funds in certain 
emergency situations and requiring replacement with a 
supplemental appropriation request; and designating certain 
transferred funds as ``emergency requirements'' under the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to permit the Department to consolidate 
services and receive reimbursement for said services. Language 
also is included providing for uniform allowances.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to allow for obligations in connection with 
contracts issued for services or rentals for periods not in 
excess of 12 months beginning at any time during the fiscal 
year.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, restricting various oil and gas preleasing, 
leasing, exploration and drilling activities within the Outer 
Continental Shelf in the Georges Bank-North Atlantic planning 
area, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning area, Eastern 
Gulf of Mexico planning area, North Aleutian Basin planning 
area, Northern, Southern and Central California planning areas, 
and Washington/Oregon planning area.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, limiting the investment of Federal funds by 
Indian tribes.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to limit the use of funds for contract support 
costs; and to prohibit fee exemptions for non-local traffic 
through National Parks.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, allowing, on a permanent basis, the use of 
rebates from credit cards; permitting on a permanent basis 
certain lease arrangements at Fort Baker; requiring lease and 
grazing permit renewals by the Bureau of Land Management under 
certain conditions; providing for administrative law judges to 
handle Indian issues; permitting the redistribution of certain 
Indian funds with limitation; limiting the establishment of a 
Kankakee National Wildlife Refuge; renaming the Great Marsh 
Trail at the Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, VA; directing 
allocation of funds for Bureau of Indian Affairs funded post-
secondary schools; and limiting the use of funds to establish a 
National Wildlife Refuge in the Yolo Bypass of California.
    Language is included under Forest Service, State and 
private forestry, prohibiting funding for urban resources 
partnership programs.
    Language is included under Forest Service, National forest 
system, allowing 50 percent of the fees collected under the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund Act to remain available until 
expended; and requiring the fiscal year 2002 budget 
justification to display unobligated balances available at the 
start of fiscal year 2001.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Wildland fire 
management, allowing the use of funds to repay advances from 
other accounts and requiring 50 percent of any unobligated 
balances remaining at the end of fiscal year 2000, excepting 
hazardous fuels funding, to be transferred to the Knutson-
Vandenberg fund as repayment for past advances; and permitting 
the use of funds for the Joint Fire Science program.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Capital 
improvement and maintenance, allowing funds to be used for road 
decommissioning; requiring that no road decommissioning be 
funded until notice and an opportunity for public comment has 
been provided; and merging unobligated balances from the 
National forest system account for facility and trail 
maintenance and unobligated balances from the reconstruction 
and construction account and the reconstruction and maintenance 
account.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Range betterment 
fund, providing that 6 percent of the funds may be used for 
administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, providing that proceeds from the sale of aircraft 
may be used to purchase replacement aircraft; limiting the 
availability of funds to change the boundaries of or abolish 
any region or to move or close any regional office; allowing 
any funds available to the Secretary of Agriculture to be used 
for advances for firefighting and emergency rehabilitation of 
damaged lands if and only if all previously appropriated 
emergency contingent wildfire funds have been released by the 
President and apportioned; allowing funds to be used through 
the Agency for International Development and the Foreign 
Agricultural Service for work in foreign countries, and to 
support other forestry activities outside of the United States.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, prohibiting the following without advance approval: 
(1) the transfer of funds under the Department of Agriculture 
transfer authority; (2) reprogramming of funds; and (3) 
transfer of funds to the working capital fund of the Department 
of Agriculture.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, providing for a Youth Conservation Corps program; 
allowing funds to be used for representation expenses by the 
Chief; providing for matching funds and administrative expenses 
for the National Forest Foundation and also matching funds for 
the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation; providing funds for 
sustainable rural development; permitting the transfer of 
certain funds to the State of Washington fish and wildlife 
department for planned projects; providing that funds shall be 
available for payment to counties within the Columbia River 
Gorge National Scenic Area; providing authority to the Pinchot 
Institute for activities at Grey Towers National Historic 
Landmark; allowing payments to Del Norte County, CA; limiting 
employee details; permitting limited reimbursements to the 
Office of General Counsel in USDA; restricting the use of 
administrative funds and requiring displays of such funds in 
budget justifications, including limitations on trust funds; 
allowing the use of fundings for law enforcement emergencies; 
and providing procurement authority for certain activities at 
the Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Clean Coal 
Technology deferring previously appropriated funds until fiscal 
year 2002.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, energy 
resource supply and efficiency, limiting the field testing of 
nuclear explosives for the recovery of oil and gas; providing 
for activities at the Albany Research Center, OR; and requiring 
the transfer of funds from the Biomass energy development 
account; and providing allocations of grants for weatherization 
and State energy conservation.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Naval 
Petroleum and oil shale reserves waiving sales requirements 
based on Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil purchases; and 
permitting the use of unobligated balances.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, 
Alternative fuels production, rescinding unobligated balances.
    Language is included under Administrative provisions, 
Department of Energy, providing for vehicle and guard services 
and uniform allowances; limiting programs of price supports and 
loan guarantees to what is provided in appropriations Acts; 
providing for the transfer of funds to other agencies of the 
Government; providing for retention of revenues by the 
Secretary of Energy on certain projects; requiring certain 
contracts be submitted to Congress prior to implementation; 
prohibiting issuance of procurement documents without 
appropriations; and permitting the use of contributions and 
fees for cooperative projects.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, Indian 
health services, providing that certain contracts and grants 
may be performed in two fiscal years; exempting certain tribal 
funding from fiscal year constraints; limiting funds for 
catastrophic care, loan repayment and certain contracts; 
capping contract support cost spending; and providing for use 
of collections under Title IV of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, Indian 
health facilities, providing that funds may be used to purchase 
land, modular buildings and trailers; providing a grant to the 
Hopi tribe for staff quarters; and providing for certain 
purchases from other agencies and for a demolition fund.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, providing for payments for telephone 
service in private residences in the field, purchase of 
reprints, and purchase and erection of portable buildings; and 
allowing deobligation and reobligation of funds applied to 
self-governance funding agreements.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, providing that health care may be 
extended to non-Indians at Indian Health Service facilities; 
and providing for expenditure of funds transferred to IHS from 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, to prevent the Indian Health Service 
from billing Indians in order to collect from third-party 
payers until Congress has agreed to implement a specific 
policy.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, allowing payment of expenses for 
meeting attendance; specifying that certain funds shall not be 
subject to certain travel limitations; prohibiting the 
expenditure of funds to implement new eligibility regulations; 
providing that funds be apportioned only in the appropriation 
structure in this Act; prohibiting changing the appropriations 
structure without approval of the Appropriations Committees; 
and permitting the sale of goods and services for fees and for 
the use of those fees.
    Language is included under Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian 
Relocation, salaries and expenses, defining eligible 
relocatees; prohibiting movement of any single Navajo or Navajo 
family unless a new or replacement home is available; limiting 
relocatees to one new or replacement home; and establishing a 
priority for relocation of Navajos to those certified eligible 
who have selected and received homesites on the Navajo 
reservation or selected a replacement residence off the Navajo 
reservation.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, 
Salaries and expenses, to allow for advance payments to 
independent contractors performing research services or 
participating in official Smithsonian presentations; providing 
that funds may be used to support American overseas research 
centers; and permitting the use of certain funds for the Victor 
Building.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, repair, 
restoration and alteration of facilities, permitting the 
Smithsonian Institution to select contractors for certain 
purposes on the basis of contractor qualifications as well as 
price; and permitting the merger of funds previously 
appropriated for zoo construction.
    Language is included under Administrative Provisions, 
Smithsonian Institution, limiting planning, design or expansion 
of facilities without Committee consultation; limiting the use 
of funds for the Holt House at the zoo; and limiting funds for 
construction of the National Museum of the American Indian.
    Language is included under National Gallery of Art, 
Salaries and expenses, allowing payment in advance for 
membership in library, museum, and art associations or 
societies; providing uniform allowances and for restoration and 
repair of works of art by contract without advertising; and 
providing no-year availability of funds for special 
exhibitions.
    Language is included under National Gallery of Art, Repair, 
restoration and renovation of buildings, permitting the Gallery 
to perform work by contract or otherwise and to select 
contractors for certain purposes on the basis of contractor 
qualifications as well as price.
    Language is included under National Endowment for the Arts, 
Grants and administration, permitting the merger and use of 
previously appropriated funds from the matching grants account.
    Language is included under National Foundation for the 
Humanities, Matching grants, allowing obligation of current and 
prior year funds of gifts, bequests, and devises of money for 
which equal amounts have not previously been appropriated.
    Language is included under National Foundation on the Arts 
and the Humanities, Administrative provisions, limiting the use 
of funds for reception expenses and permitting the use of non 
appropriated funds for such expenses.
    Language is included under Commission of Fine Arts, 
Salaries and expenses, permitting the charging and use of fees 
for its publications.
    Language is included under Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation to restrict hiring anyone at Executive Level V or 
higher.
    Language is included under National Capital Planning 
Commission, salaries and expenses, to provide for a pay level 
at the rate of Executive Level IV for all appointed members.
    Language is included under Holocaust Memorial Council, 
providing no year funding availability for repair and 
rehabilitation and museums exhibitions.
    Language is included under Presidio Trust Fund requiring 
that guaranteed loans be consistent with the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions 
prohibiting the use of funds to distribute literature either to 
promote or oppose legislative proposals on which Congressional 
action is incomplete; and prohibiting oil and gas leasing in 
the Shawnee National Forest.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
prohibiting the use of funds to provide personal cooks, 
chauffeurs or other personal servants to any office or 
employee; limiting use of consulting services; and specifying 
that funds are for one year unless provided otherwise.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
prohibiting assessments against programs funded in this bill; 
and providing Buy American requirements.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
prohibiting the sale of giant sequoia trees in a manner 
different from 1999.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
prohibiting the use of funds by the National Park Service to 
enter into a concession contract requiring the removal of the 
underground lunchroom at Carlsbad Caverns NP.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
limiting use of funds for the AmeriCorps program; and limiting 
use of funds relating to a bridge between New Jersey and Ellis 
Island.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
continuing a limitation on accepting and processing 
applications for patents and on the patenting of Federal lands; 
permitting processing of grandfathered applications; and 
permitting third-party contractors to process grandfathered 
applications.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
limiting the use of funds for contract support costs on Indian 
contracts.
    Language is included under Title III--General provisions, 
to permit limiting competition under the Jobs in the Woods 
program; requiring Committee approval prior to using 
recreational fees for constructing certain permanent buildings; 
exempting on a permanent basis, the Presidio Trust from certain 
taxes and special assessments; limiting funds for posting 
clothing optional signs at Cape Canaveral NS; making reforms in 
the National Endowment for the Arts, including funding 
distribution reforms; permitting the National Foundation on the 
Arts and the Humanities to collect, invest and use private 
donations; limiting the use of funds for forest land management 
plans until regulations have been published and for completing 
the 5-year program under the Forest and Rangeland Renewable 
Resources Planning Act; limiting funds for improvements to 
Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House without 
Committee approval; providing additional authority to the 
Secretary of Agriculture to use the ten percent roads and 
trails fund for additional purposes; limiting the use of funds 
for any government-wide administrative functions and for GSA 
telecommunications centers and the President's Council on 
Sustainable Development; prohibiting the use of funds for 
certain administrative functions of the American Heritage 
Rivers program; limiting the use of telephone answering 
machines; limiting the sale for export of Western redcedar in 
Alaska; limiting the use of funds relating to the Kyoto 
Protocol; placing a moratorium on new and expanded Indian self-
determination contracts and compacts; allowing a four year 
cooperative watershed restoration program between the State of 
Colorado and the Forest Service; limiting funds for the 
Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project; and 
limiting funds for designing, planning or managing Federal 
lands as National Monuments if so designated since 1999.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which, in whole or in 
part, are not authorized by law:

Department of the Interior:

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Resource Management
National Park Service, National Recreation and Preservation

Department of Energy:

Fossil Energy Research and Development
Energy Conservation
Economic Regulation
Strategic Petroleum Reserve
Energy Information Administration

Other Related Agencies:

National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities:
          National Endowment for the Arts
          National Endowment for the Humanities
    The Committee notes that authorizing legislation for many 
of these programs is in various stages of the legislative 
process and these authorizations are expected to be enacted 
into law later this year.

                  Compliance With Rule XIII--Clause 3

    In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):
    Section 551 of the Land Between the Lakes Protection Act of 
1998 (16 U.S.C. 460lll-61) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new subsection:
    (c) Transition.--Until September 30, 2002, the Secretary of 
Agriculture may expend amounts appropriated or otherwise made 
available to carry out this title in a manner consistent with 
the authorities exercised by the Tennessee Valley Authority, 
before the transfer of the Recreation Area to the 
administrative jurisdiction of the Secretary, regarding 
procurement of property, services, supplies, and equipment.

                    Five-Year Projection of Outlays

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:

                              [In millions]



Budget authority......................................            14,781
Outlays:
    Fiscal year 2001..................................             9,765
    Fiscal year 2002..................................             3,745
    Fiscal year 2003..................................               834
    Fiscal year 2004..................................               309
    Fiscal year 2005 and future years.................                49


               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:

                              [In millions]



New budget authority..................................             1,080
Fiscal year 2001 outlays resulting therefrom..........               556


                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                           ROLLCALL NUMBER: 1

    Date: May 25, 2000.
    Measure: Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, 
FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Dicks.
    Description of Motion: To increase funding for the National 
Endowment for the Arts by $27,000,000 and the National 
Endowment for the Humanities by $9,740,000 and to increase the 
deferral of previously appropriated Clean Coal Technology funds 
by $36,740,000.
    Results: Rejected 25 yeas to 33 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dicks                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. DeLay
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Dickey
Mr. Forbes                          Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Goode
Mr. Jackson                         Ms. Granger
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Hobson
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Istook
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lewis
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Nethercutt
Ms. Pelosi                          Mrs. Northup
Mr. Price                           Mr. Packard
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Peterson
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Porter
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Regula
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                           rollcall number: 2

    Date: May 25, 2000.
    Measure: Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, 
FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Dicks.
    Description of Motion: To increase funding for the National 
Endowment for the Arts by $17,260,000 and to increase the 
deferral of previously appropriated Clean Coal Technology funds 
by $17,260,000.
    Results: Rejected 27 yeas to 31 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dicks                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. DeLay
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Dickey
Mr. Forbes                          Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Frelinghuysen                   Mr. Goode
Mr. Hinchey                         Ms. Granger
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Hobson
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Istook
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Kingston
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kolbe
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Latham
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Lewis
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Miller
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Olver                           Mrs. Northup
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Packard
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Peterson
Mr. Porter                          Mr. Regula
Mr. Price                           Mr. Rogers
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Skeen
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Taylor
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Tiahrt
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                           rollcall number: 3

    Date: May 25, 2000.
    Measure: Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, 
FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Porter.
    Description of Motion: To report the bill, to authorize the 
Chairman to seek a rule for consideration of the bill, and to 
authorize the Chairman to move that the House disagree to the 
amendments of the Senate and agree to a conference requested by 
the Senate.
    Results: Adopted 31 yeas to 22 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Aderholt                        Mr. Boyd
Mr. Bonilla                         Mr. Cramer
Mr. Callahan                        Ms. DeLauro
Mr. Cunningham                      Mr. Dicks
Mr. Dickey                          Mr. Edwards
Mrs. Emerson                        Mr. Farr
Mr. Frelinghuysen                   Mr. Forbes
Mr. Goode                           Mr. Hinchey
Ms. Granger                         Mr. Hoyer
Mr. Hobson                          Ms. Kaptur
Mr. Istook                          Ms. Kilpatrick
Mr. Kingston                        Mrs. Lowey
Mr. Knollenberg                     Mrs. Meek
Mr. Kolbe                           Mr. Mollohan
Mr. Latham                          Mr. Obey
Mr. Miller                          Mr. Olver
Mr. Nethercutt                      Mr. Pastor
Mrs. Northup                        Mr. Price
Mr. Packard                         Ms. Roybal-Allard
Mr. Peterson                        Mr. Sabo
Mr. Porter                          Mr. Serrano
Mr. Regula                          Mr. Visclosky
Mr. Rogers
Mr. Skeen
Mr. Taylor
Mr. Tiahrt
Mr. Walsh
Mr. Wamp
Mr. Wicker
Mr. Wolf
Mr. Young



     DISSENTING VIEWS OF THE HONORABLE DAVID OBEY AND NORMAN DICKS

   the fy 2001 interior appropriations bill--a failure of stewardship

    The Congress, through the Interior appropriations bill, 
exercises its obligation as steward of America's lands and 
history to current and future generations. The American people 
look to the Congress through this bill to provide the fiscal 
means to ensure that the beauty and productivity of our parks, 
wildlife refuges, forests, and range lands are preserved and 
nurtured. They expect the resources to be provided for the 
preservation and display of the historic and cultural heritage 
that has made the United States a great nation. Beyond these 
national stewardship obligations, this bill finances this 
country's ``trust'' responsibilities to Native Americans, whose 
health, education and social service needs have assumed by the 
federal government as legal obligations through various 
treaties, statutes and other historic agreements. Meeting these 
multiple obligations is a major undertaking but also a 
fundamental responsibility of our government.
    Unfortunately, rather than honoring this stewardship 
obligation, the fiscal year 2001 Interior spending bill 
reported by the Committee fails fundamentally to meet these 
challenges. The reason for this failure does not, however, lie 
with the Appropriations Committee's leadership. The reason lies 
with the Majority party's insistence on cutting taxes by $170 
billion over the next five years and financing these cuts with 
totally unrealistic reductions in discretionary spending. The 
Majority maintains the fiction that the national debt can be 
eliminated while delivering unaffordable tax cuts without 
damaging programs that are important to the American people. 
This bill is an example of the damage that such a fiction can 
cause when imposed on the real world which relies on the 
services of critical domestic programs. The bill's flaws are 
especially acute in four areas.
    First, the bill ignores overwhelming evidence of the 
critical health, education and law enforcement needs of Native 
Americans by reducing the Administration's budget requests for 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service by 
$520 million. The health status of Native Americans is one of 
the poorest of any group in this country. Indians suffer 
mortality rates three times the national average from diabetes, 
tuberculosis, alcoholism and accidents. Many Indian schools are 
in a deplorable state of disrepair and fail to meet minimum 
safety standards. Recruiting quality teachers to rural isolated 
schools is a constant challenge. Rates of violent crime on 
Indian reservations are more than twice the national average. 
In response to these challenges, this bill inexplicably fails 
to even fund cost-of-living increases for Indian programs. At 
the funding levels in this bill, the result will be layoffs of 
teacher and loss of accreditation at Indian schools and 
significant reductions in medical personnel at already 
chronically understaffed Indian hospitals and clinics. The 
suffering of the Indian peoples will increase.
    Second, despite very broad support within this Congress for 
efforts to acquire and preserve the vanishing open land spaces 
in this country, this bill reduces funding for land acquisition 
under the Land and Water Conservation Fund from $464 million in 
FY 2000 to $164 million for FY 2001. On May 11th the House 
passed and sent on to the Senate H.R. 701, the Conservation and 
Reinvestment Act (CARA), by a vote of 315 to 102. This vote 
clearly reflected the majority view in Congress that the public 
was broadly supportive of efforts to acquire and preserve for 
posterity the vanishing land treasures which, if left in 
private hands, would surely be developed and become unavailable 
for our children and their grandchildren. It is difficult to 
understand how anyone who supports the expansion of federal 
land acquisition programs, which CARA envisions, can vote for 
the current version of the Interior Appropriations bill with 
its 65 percent reduction in funding for land acquisition.
    Third, this bill fails to provide adequately for 
maintenance of the lands and historic treasures for which the 
federal government already has ownership and responsibility. 
The Chairman of the Interior Subcommittee has frequently 
pointed out the need to adequately take care of the lands which 
the government already owns and has called for the land 
management agencies to prepare five-year plans for meeting 
critical maintenance backlogs. The Minority agrees that dealing 
with this maintenance backlog must be a priority and cannot, 
therefor, understand why the Congress should support this bill 
which reduces funding for maintenance and construction at the 
Department of the Interior by $80 million compared to last year 
and by $217 million below the level requested by the president.
    Finally, the Majority has failed yet again in this bill to 
restore some of the unwise cuts made five years ago in funding 
for those agencies responsible for this country's small but 
critically important arts and humanities education and 
preservation efforts. This bill funds the National Endowment 
for the Arts (NEA) at $98 million, a level 40 percent below the 
1995 funding level. The National Endowment for the Humanities 
(NEH) is funded at $115 million, 33 percent below the level in 
1995. These funding levels fundamentally ignore the successful 
efforts by both NEA and NEH to broaden the reach of their 
programs and eliminate controversial programming, the two 
``reforms'' requested by the Majority when they reduced funding 
in 1995. It is time to recognize the success of these reforms 
and give our premier culture the resources they need to meet 
this critical need. Unfortunately, the amendment offered by 
Democrats in Committee to raise funding for both agencies to 
$125 million was defeated.
    As noted earlier, in criticizing this bill, the Minority 
does not mean to criticize the Committee or the Subcommittee 
Chairman for its failings. Indeed, the efforts of the Chairman 
to meet critical program needs, despite inadequate resources, 
is obvious in a number of places. We applaud the effort to 
provide enough funds to the land management agencies with 
responsibility for the parks, refuges and forests to cover 
mandatory costs and avoid park closings or service cutbacks. 
The effort to provide a portion of the funds necessary to 
replace the six most urgently needed Indian schools is an 
imaginative way to deal with a critical problem. However, 
despite a professional and responsible approach by the 
Chairman, the budget allocation provided to the Committee as a 
whole and to the Interior Subcommittee in particular is not 
sufficient to adequately meet the needs which are covered by 
this bill. A Subcommittee allocation which is $302 million 
below last year and $1.7 billion below the amount requested by 
the president is just not enough to do the job.
    In summary, if this bill were to be enacted in its current 
form, it is the view of the Minority that the preservation of 
our lands, our history and our culture would suffer substantial 
damage. Conditions in Indian country, already a national 
disgrace, would further deteriorate. The president has made it 
clear that he will not sign a bill which so fails to meet our 
fundamental stewardship responsibilities. A copy of the letter 
from the Director of the Office of Management and Budget 
indicating the president's objections to the bill follows this 
statement. Each Member of the House should review these issues 
carefully and insist that additional funds be added to the bill 
to address the key shortcomings that have been cited. If 
substantial funds are not added, this bill should be rejected 
with resounding ``No'' vote on final passage.
    The Statement of Administration Policy from the Director of 
OMB dated May 25, 2000 follows:

                 Executive Office of the President,
                           Office of Management and Budget,
                                      Washington, DC, May 25, 2000.
Hon. David R. Obey,
Committee on Appropriations, House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Representative Obey: The purpose of this letter is to 
provide the Administration's views on the Department of the 
Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001, as 
approved by the House Subcommittee. As the Committee develops 
its version of the bill, your consideration of the 
Administration's views would be appreciated.
    The President's FY 2001 Budget is based on a balanced 
approach that maintains fiscal discipline, eliminates the 
national debt, extends the solvency of Social Security and 
Medicare, provides for an appropriately sized tax cut, 
establishes a new voluntary Medicare prescription drug benefit 
in the context of broader reforms, expands health care coverage 
to more families, and funds critical investments for our 
future. An essential element of this approach is ensuring 
adequate funding for discretionary programs. To this end, the 
President has proposed discretionary spending limits at levels 
that we believe are necessary to serve the American people.
    Unfortunately, the FY 2001 congressional budget resolution 
provides inadequate resources for discretionary investments. We 
need realistic levels of funding for critical government 
functions that the American people expect their government to 
perform well, including education, national security, law 
enforcement, environmental protection, natural resource 
conservation, preservation of our global leadership, air 
safety, food safety, economic assistance for the less 
fortunate, research and technology, and the administration of 
Social Security and Medicare. Based on the inadequate budget 
resolution, this bill fails to address critical needs of the 
American people.
    The Administration appreciates the efforts by the 
Subcommittee to accommodate a part of the President's 
priorities within the 302(b) allocation, such as increased 
funding over the FY 2000 enacted levels for national park and 
land management operations. However, the allocation is simply 
insufficient to make the necessary investments in programs 
funded by this bill. As a result, the bill severely underfunds 
the President's Lands Legacy Initiative, the Clean Water Action 
Plan, clean energy, the Native American Initiative, and other 
critical programs discussed below. The bill also includes 
several legislative riders that are highly objectionable to the 
Administration, such as provisions concerning the Interior 
Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project and the prohibition 
of funding for the management plans of national monuments 
designated by the President. The Subcommittee's failure to fund 
key programs sufficiently and its inclusion of damaging riders 
would lead the President's senior advisors to recommend a veto 
if the bill were presented to the President in its current 
form.
    Below is a discussion of our specific concerns with the 
Subcommittee mark-up. We look forward to working with the 
Committee to resolve these concerns as the bill moves forward.

                    objectionable legislative riders

    The Administration strongly opposes the environmental and 
other authorization provisions in the Subcommittee bill, which 
are inappropriate for inclusion in an appropriations act. Such 
riders rarely receive the level of congressional and public 
review required of authorization language, and they often 
override existing environmental and natural resource 
protections.
    The Administration believes that the following are among 
the most objectionable provisions. (The list is preliminary, 
pending a full review of the report and bill text):
          National Monument Designation (Sec. 335). This rider 
        would undermine longstanding Presidential authority by 
        denying funds for any national monuments designated 
        after 1999. It represents a back-door attempt to 
        nullify five recent designations, which the American 
        public has strongly endorsed, and to prevent the 
        President from moving decisively in the future to 
        protect and preserve other sites for future 
        generations.
          Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project 
        (ICBEMP) (Sec. 334). This provision would unnecessarily 
        block ICBEMP completion, after seven years of work and 
        approximately $50 million invested in analyses and 
        public hearings. The rider would halt the improvement 
        in Federal land management and agency environmental 
        management in the Columbia River Basin to protect 
        forestland, wildlife, and fish habitat.
          American Heritage Rivers (Sec. 327). The provision 
        would diminish opportunities for inter-agency 
        coordination and cooperation, thereby preventing the 
        participating Federal agencies funded in this bill from 
        offering the most effective assistance to river 
        communities throughout the country.
          Kyoto Protocol (Sec. 330). This section purports to 
        prohibit Federal agencies funded in this bill from 
        implementing the Kyoto Protocol. It is unnecessary, as 
        the Administration has no intent to implement the 
        Protocol prior to congressional ratification. To the 
        extent this provision could be read to prevent these 
        agencies from assisting the President in carrying out 
        his Constitutional authority to conduct international 
        negotiations, it would be disruptive to those efforts 
        and may well be unconstitutional.
          Prohibit Establishment of Two National Wildlife 
        Refuges (Secs. 119 and 122). By preventing the use of 
        funds to establish new National Wildlife Refuges on the 
        Kankakee River in Illinois and Indiana, and in the Yolo 
        Bypass of the San Francisco Bay in California, this 
        provision would infringe on the Interior Department's 
        ability under current law to protect and preserve 
        migratory birds and endangered species. The Fish and 
        Wildlife Service is coordinating on both of these 
        proposals with the Army Corps of Engineers and many 
        State and local groups.
          Tribal Contract Moratorium (Sec. 331). The House 
        would again place a one-year moratorium on the Bureau 
        of Indian Affairs and the Indian Health Service from 
        entering into new or expanded self-determination 
        contracts, grants, or compacts with Tribes. This 
        provision would interfere with the long-standing 
        objective of tribal self-determination and self-
        governance and would be contrary to the government-to-
        government policy the Federal Government has with 
        Tribes. A moratorium provision was introduced in the 
        Senate in FY 2000, but later dropped during final 
        negotiations.
          Grazing Permits (Sec. 116). This rider would 
        automatically extend for up to 10 years any permit to 
        graze livestock on public lands that expires FY 2001, 
        unless the Interior Secretary has completed all 
        processing requirements. There is no demonstrated need 
        for this provision, because the Bureau of Land 
        Management (BLM) will complete in FY 2001 the 
        processing of all permits scheduled to expire in that 
        fiscal year. This provision would give an incentive for 
        grazing operations with a poor environmental record to 
        delay processing National Environmental Policy Act 
        compliance in hopes of winning an automatic renewal.
    The Administration urges the Committee to report a clean 
bill that does not attempt to roll back environmental 
protections or tribal policies, benefit special interests, or 
circumvent authorization or administrative procedures by 
attaching riders to appropriations bills.

    lands legacy initiative/Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF)

    The Administration strongly opposes the Subcommittee 
decisions not to fund major portions of the President's Lands 
Legacy Initiative. Such reductions are unacceptable. Congress 
has placed these important conservation programs in jeopardy by 
rejecting Administration's request for a dedicated funding 
stream. The Subcommittee has followed with a insufficient 
overall funding level for the initiative that represents a 75-
percent cut to the Administration's request and a 56-percent 
reduction from the FY 2000 enacted level. These reductions 
wouldundermine Federal land conservation efforts to protect 
national treasures, such as the Everglades, Lewis and Clark National 
Historic Trail, California Desert, Lake Tahoe Basin, Giant Sequoia 
groves, Colorado Sand Dunes, and various Civil War Battlefields. State 
and community conservation efforts would also suffer due to inadequate 
Federal support for State and local programs to acquire and protect 
lands, enhance forests and wildlife habitat, promote urban forests and 
outdoor recreation, and address sprawl. These reductions would 
foreclose opportunities to protect those priority locations, such as 
the Great Northern Forest, that are vulnerable to development 
pressures. It would be short-sighted not to provide adequate support 
for the important Lands Legacy Initiative, given the bipartisan 
recognition of the need for the Federal Government, the States, and the 
private sector to protect open spaces and preserve America's great 
places.

                        native american programs

    The Administration appreciates the Subcommittee's continued 
support for Indian trust funds management improvements but is 
concerned over the Subcommittee's limited allocations for 
critical Native American programs. Although the Subcommittee 
provides a modest $18 million increase over the FY 2000 enacted 
level for the operations of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), 
this level is simply inadequate to fund the current level of 
services, much less the Administration's Government-wide Native 
American Programs Initiative. Just as serious is the 
Subcommittee's decision to reduce funding for BIA construction 
$13 million below the FY 2000 enacted level. Furthermore, funds 
provided would not allow BIA to monitor and improve school 
accountability and performance through implementation of the 
school statistics program. The Subcommittee's funding reduction 
would seriously undercut BIA's ongoing efforts to maintain safe 
schools, provide enhanced educational opportunities for nearly 
50,000 Indian children, strengthen tribal college operations, 
improve public safety throughout Indian Country, and assist in 
improving quality of life on reservations through the housing 
improvement and road maintenance programs. The Administration 
urges the Committee to support the Native American Programs 
Initiative.

                       land management operations

    The Administration commends the Subcommittee for taking 
steps to address some operational and maintenance needs of land 
management agencies in the Department of the Interior and the 
Forest Service in the Department of Agriculture. The funding 
levels provided, however, still fail to address adequately many 
priority maintenance and operational needs identified in the 
President's budget, including the Forest Service recreation and 
tourism initiative, the National Park Service's Natural 
Resource Challenge, Fish and Wildlife Service law enforcement, 
and BLM management of the Headwaters Forest and other special 
areas.
    In addition, by failing to include the requested funds for 
forest planning, the bill would effectively block 
implementation of new planning regulations to improve forest 
management significantly. Species inventory and monitoring 
funding, the subject of a Senate rider in FY 2000, would be 
reduced by 27 percent from the President's budget, which would 
limit the Forest Service from adequately supporting activities 
across the national forests. Furthermore, funding for survey 
and management, a requirement for most projects in the Pacific 
Northwest, has not been incorporated in the bill.

                        clean water action plan

    The Administration is concerned with reductions to other 
key programs, including Clean Water Action Plan (CWAP). Such 
reductions would halt the substantial progress made to date in 
improving water quality and watershed health. Efforts to 
improve or restore over 11,000 miles of stream corridor by FY 
2005, accelerate range allotment planning, and clean up miles 
of polluted streams caused by past coal mining practices under 
the Administration's Appalachian Clean Stream Initiative would 
be in jeopardy. Further, the reductions in science assistance 
to Federal, State, and local agencies would hinder efforts to 
assess water quality and meet responsibilities for water 
quality protection. Similarly, the decrease in Forest Service 
CWAP funding would dramatically affect road maintenance and 
decommissioning, rangeland vegetation management, fish habitat 
and wildlife inventory and monitoring activities, watershed 
improvements, and the Stewardship Incentive Program.

           millennium initiative to save america's treasures

    The Administration objects to the Subcommittee decision not 
to fund the $30 million Presidential initiative to commemorate 
the Millennium by preserving the Nation's historic sites and 
cultural artifacts that are America's treasures. We urge the 
Committee to restore funding for this highly successful 
program.

     indian health service--department of health and human services

    The Administration is very concerned that the Subcommittee 
has significantly underfunded health care services to Native 
Americans and Alaska Natives. Native Americans continue to 
experience health disparities--mortality rates for alcoholism, 
tuberculosis, diabetes, and accidents are all more than three 
times higher for Indian people than they are for all Americans. 
The Indian Health Service (IHS) finances access to health care 
for 1.5 million Native Americans. The Subcommittee has included 
only $30 million of the $230 million increase requested to 
improve access to health care for Native Americans. The 
President's FY 2001 Budget proposes to support an additional 
1,460 hospitals days and 57,200 additional visits to doctors 
and dentists purchased from the private sector through Contract 
Health Services. The budget also seeks increased support for 
tribally-operated facilities and services for diabetes, cancer, 
heart diseases, emergency medical services, and dental and 
mental health. The Subcommittee allocation would force IHS to 
absorb anticipated cost increases in FY 2001 and cause a 
further reduction in health services.

             National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities

    The Administration strongly objects to the Subcommittee-
proposed funding levels for the National Endowment for the Arts 
(NEA), the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), and the 
Institute for Museum and Library Services (IMLS). The 
Subcommittee freezes these important cultural programs at their 
FY 2000 enacted level. This level would prevent NEA from moving 
forward with its Challenge America program to support, directly 
or in partnership with States, arts education and access to the 
arts in thousands of underserved communities throughout the 
country. NEH would not be able to expand its summer seminar 
series to provide professional development opportunities to our 
Nation's teachers, nor broaden the reach of its Rediscover 
America initiative to bring the humanities to more communities 
nationwide. IMLS would be precluded from moving forward or 
digitization efforts, and from expanding after-school programs 
in museums and on-line access to museums. We urge the Committee 
to provide the Administration's request for these important 
cultural, educational, and artistic programs for communities 
across America. The Administration supports an amendment 
expected to be offered to increase funding for NEA and NEH.

                          Department of Energy

    The Administration opposes reductions totaling $120 million 
made by the Subcommittee to the President's high priority 
energy conservation programs--cuts that would seriously damaged 
R&D; programs designed to improve the Nation's energy 
efficiency, reduce dependence on oil, and reduce greenhouse gas 
emissions. These reductions would prevent the continuation of 
some contracts in the Partnership for a New Generation of 
Vehicles and would eliminate new R&D; awards for industrial 
energy efficiency and for more efficient trucks and SUVs. The 
Administration also urges the Committee to fully fund the 
Administration's $154 million request for home weatherization 
assistance to help reduce energy bills for low-income 
households.
    In the past several years, the Subcommittee has repeatedly 
attempted to mask dramatic cuts below the Administration's 
budget for energy conservation by moving programs between the 
Fossil Energy R&D; and Energy Conservation accounts. This year, 
the Committee is proposing to merge those two accounts 
completely. Such a merger would make budgeting and financial 
management more difficult and appears primarily intended to 
mask once again severe cuts to the Energy Conservation request. 
The Administration opposes the merger of these accounts.

                Smithsonian and Other Cultural Agencies

    The Subcommittee's $423 million overall funding level for 
the Smithsonian, which is $40 million less than the 
Administration's request and $15 million below the FY 2000 
enacted level, would prevent the Institution from addressing 
critical repair and restoration needs. The National Gallery of 
Art and the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum have similar 
maintenance needs and should be funded at the President's 
requested levels. The Administration seeks to preserve and 
protect our Nation's treasures, as well as to provide safe and 
continued access to the public, and will work with the 
Committee to fund these important programs.
    The Administration is concerned that the Subcommittee 
provides no funding for continued operation of the Institute of 
American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and cuts nearly 
in half the $15 million requests for the Office of Navajo and 
Hopi Indian Relocation. We urge the Committee to fund the new 
$1 million District of Columbia Arts and Education Grants 
program within the Commission of Fine Arts, which is a 
community-based arts education program that will provide 
training and exposure in the arts to under-served young people 
and reinforce the importance of the arts as basic to education.
    We look forward to working with the Committee to address 
our mutual concerns.
            Sincerely,
                                   Jacob J. Lew,
                                           Director.

                                   David Obey.
                                   Norman Dicks.