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106th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    106-133

======================================================================



 
             FIRE ADMINISTRATION AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 1999

                                _______
                                

  May 10, 1999.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______


    Mr. Sensenbrenner, from the Committee on Science, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1550]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 
1550) to authorize appropriations for the United States Fire 
Administration for fiscal years 2000 and 2001, and for other 
purposes, having considered the same, report favorably thereon 
with an amendment and recommend that the bill as amended do 
pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
   I. Amendment.......................................................2
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................4
 III. Background and Need for Legislation.............................5
  IV. Summary of Hearings.............................................5
   V. Committee Actions...............................................7
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................8
 VII. Section-By-Section Analysis....................................10
VIII. Committee Views................................................12
  IX. Committee Cost Estimate........................................17
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................18
  XI. Compliance with Public Law 104-4...............................20
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............20
XIII. Oversight Findings and Recommendations by the Committee on 
      Government Reform and Oversight................................20
 XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................20
  XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................20
 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act...............................20
XVII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, As Reported..........20
XVIII.Committee Recommendations......................................27

 XIX. Proceedings of Full Committee Markup...........................27

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert in lieu 
thereof the following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Fire Administration Authorization Act 
of 1999''.

SEC. 2. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  Section 17 of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 
U.S.C. 2216) is amended to read as follows:
                   ``authorization of appropriations
  ``Sec. 17. Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect to 
the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, there are 
authorized to be appropriated to carry out the purposes of this Act--
          ``(1) $30,554,000 for fiscal year 1999;
          ``(2) $46,130,000 for fiscal year 2000, of which $2,200,000 
        shall be used for research activities, and $250,000 shall be 
        used for contracts or grants to non-Federal entities for data 
        analysis, including general fire profiles and special fire 
        analyses and report projects, and of which $6,000,000 shall be 
        for anti-terrorism training, including associated curriculum 
        development, for fire and emergency services personnel; and
          ``(3) $49,500,000 for fiscal year 2001, of which $3,000,000 
        shall be used for research activities, and $250,000 shall be 
        used for contracts or grants to non-Federal entities for data 
        analysis, including general fire profiles and special fire 
        analyses and report projects, and of which $8,000,000 shall be 
        for anti-terrorism training, including associated curriculum 
        development, for fire and emergency services personnel.
None of the funds authorized by paragraph (3) may be obligated unless 
the Administrator has certified to the Committee on Science of the 
House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate that the obligation of funds is consistent 
with the strategic plan transmitted under section 3 of the Fire 
Administration Authorization Act of 1999.''.

SEC. 3. STRATEGIC PLAN.

  (a) Requirement.--Not later than April 30, 2000, the Administrator of 
the United States Fire Administration shall prepare and transmit to the 
Committee on Science of the House of Representatives and the Committee 
on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a 5-year 
strategic plan of program activities for the United States Fire 
Administration.
  (b) Contents of Plan.--The plan required by subsection (a) shall 
include--
          (1) a comprehensive mission statement covering the major 
        functions and operations of the United States Fire 
        Administration in the areas of training, research, data 
        collection and analysis, and public education;
          (2) general goals and objectives, including those related to 
        outcomes, for the major functions and operations of the United 
        States Fire Administration;
          (3) a description of how the goals and objectives identified 
        under paragraph (2) are to be achieved, including operational 
        processes, skills and technology, and the human, capital, 
        information, and other resources required to meet those goals 
        and objectives;
          (4) an identification of the fire-related activities of the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Department 
        of Defense, and other Federal agencies, and a discussion of how 
        those activities can be coordinated with and contribute to the 
        achievement of the goals and objectives identified under 
        paragraph (2);
          (5) a description of objective, quantifiable performance 
        goals needed to define the level of performance achieved by 
        program activities in training, research, data collection and 
        analysis, and public education, and how these performance goals 
        relate to the general goals and objectives in the strategic 
        plan;
          (6) an identification of key factors external to the United 
        States Fire Administration and beyond its control that could 
        affect significantly the achievement of the general goals and 
        objectives;
          (7) a description of program evaluations used in establishing 
        or revising general goals and objectives, with a schedule for 
        future program evaluations;
          (8) a plan for the timely distribution of information and 
        educational materials to State and local firefighting services, 
        including volunteer, career, and combination services 
        throughout the United States;
          (9) a description of how the strategic plan prepared under 
        this section will be incorporated into the strategic plan and 
        the performance plans and reports of the Federal Emergency 
        Management Agency; and
          (10)(A) a description of the current and planned use of the 
        Internet for the delivery of training courses by the National 
        Fire Academy, including a listing of the types of courses and 
        whether they provide real time interaction between instructor 
        and students, and including the number of students enrolled, 
        and the geographic distribution of students, for the most 
        recent fiscal year;
          (B) an assessment of the availability and actual use by the 
        National Fire Academy of Federal facilities suitable for 
        distance education applications, including facilities with 
        teleconferencing capabilities; and
          (C) an assessment of the benefits and problems associated 
        with delivery of instructional courses using the Internet, 
        including limitations due to network bandwidth at training 
        sites, the availability of suitable course materials, and the 
        effectiveness of such courses in terms of student performance.

SEC. 4. RESEARCH AGENDA.

  (a) Requirement.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the United States Fire 
Administration, in consultation with the Director of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, the Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, representatives of trade associations, State 
and local firefighting services, and other appropriate entities, shall 
prepare and transmit to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate a report describing the United States Fire 
Administration's research agenda and including a plan for implementing 
that agenda.
  (b) Contents of Report.--The report required by subsection (a) 
shall--
          (1) identify research priorities;
          (2) describe how the proposed research agenda will be 
        coordinated and integrated with the programs and capabilities 
        of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the 
        Department of Defense, and other Federal agencies;
          (3) identify potential roles of academic and other research 
        institutions in achieving the research agenda;
          (4) provide cost estimates, anticipated personnel needs, and 
        a schedule for completing the various elements of the research 
        agenda;
          (5) describe ways to leverage resources through partnerships, 
        cooperative agreements, and other means; and
          (6) discuss how the proposed research agenda will enhance 
        training, improve State and local firefighting services, impact 
        standards and codes, increase firefighter and public safety, 
        and advance firefighting techniques.
  (c) Use in Preparing Strategic Plan.--The research agenda prepared 
under this section shall be used in the preparation of the strategic 
plan required by section 3.

SEC. 5. SURPLUS AND EXCESS FEDERAL EQUIPMENT.

  The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 33. SURPLUS AND EXCESS FEDERAL EQUIPMENT.

  ``The Administrator shall make publicly available, including through 
the Internet, information on procedures for acquiring surplus and 
excess Federal fire, emergency, hazardous material, or other equipment 
or property that may be useful to State and local fire and emergency 
services.''.

SEC. 6. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH FEDERAL FACILITIES.

  The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 34. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH FEDERAL FACILITIES.

  ``The Administrator shall make publicly available, including through 
the Internet, information on procedures for establishing cooperative 
agreements between State and local fire and emergency services and 
Federal facilities in their region relating to the provision of fire 
and emergency services.''.

SEC. 7. MISCELLANEOUS REPEALS.

  The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended--
          (1) by repealing section 10(b) and redesignating subsection 
        (c) of that section as subsection (b);
          (2) by repealing section 23;
          (3) in section 24--
                  (A) by striking ``(a) The'' and inserting ``The''; 
                and
                  (B) by repealing subsection (b);
          (4) by repealing section 26; and
          (5) by repealing section 27.

SEC. 8. NEED FOR ADDITIONAL TRAINING IN COUNTERTERRORISM.

  (a) In General.--The Administrator of the United States Fire 
Administration shall conduct an assessment of the need for additional 
capabilities for Federal counterterrorism training of emergency 
response personnel.
  (b) Contents of Assessment.--The assessment conducted under this 
section shall include--
          (1) a review of the counterterrorism training programs 
        offered by the United States Fire Administration and other 
        Federal agencies;
          (2) an estimate of the number and types of emergency response 
        personnel that have, during the period between January 1, 1994, 
        and June 1, 1999, sought training described in paragraph (1), 
        but have been unable to receive that training as a result of 
        the oversubscription of the training capabilities; and
          (3) a recommendation on the need to provide additional 
        Federal counterterrorism training centers, including--
                  (A) an analysis of existing Federal facilities that 
                could be used as counterterrorism training facilities; 
                and
                  (B) a cost-benefit analysis of the establishment of 
                counterterrorism training facilities in regions where 
                many applicants for such training reside.
  (c) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Administrator shall prepare and submit to the Congress 
a report on the results of the assessment conducted under this section.

SEC. 9. NATIONAL FIRE ACADEMY CURRICULUM REVIEW.

  (a) In General.--The Administrator of the United States Fire 
Administration, in consultation with the Board of Visitors and 
representatives of trade and professional associations, State and local 
firefighting services, and other appropriate entities, shall conduct a 
review of the courses of instruction available at the National Fire 
Academy to ensure that they are up-to-date and complement, not 
duplicate, courses of instruction offered elsewhere. Not later than 180 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall 
prepare and submit a report to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate.
  (b) Contents of Report.--The report required by subsection (a) 
shall--
          (1) examine and assess the courses of instruction offered by 
        the National Fire Academy;
          (2) identify redundant and out-of-date courses of 
        instruction;
          (3) examine the current and future impact of information 
        technology on National Fire Academy curricula, methods of 
        instruction, and delivery of services; and
          (4) make recommendations for updating the curriculum, methods 
        of instruction, and delivery of services by the National Fire 
        Academy considering current and future needs, State-based 
        curricula, advances in information technologies, and other 
        relevant factors.

SEC. 10. INTERNET AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION.

  The Administrator of the United States Fire Administration shall make 
available through the Internet home page of the United States Fire 
Administration the abstracts relating to all research grants and awards 
made with funds authorized by the amendments made by this Act. Nothing 
in this section shall be construed to require or permit the release of 
any information prohibited by law or regulation from being released to 
the public.

SEC. 11. REPEAL OF EXCEPTION TO FIRE SAFETY REQUIREMENT.

  (a) Repeal.--Section 4 of Public Law 103-195 (107 Stat. 2298) is 
hereby repealed.
  (b) Effective Date.--Subsection (a) shall take effect 1 year after 
the date of the enactment of this section.

                        II. Purpose of the Bill

    The purpose of H.R. 1550 is to authorize appropriations for 
Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 for the United States Fire 
Administration (USFA) under the Federal Fire Prevention and 
Control Act of 1974. The bill authorizes appropriations of 
$95.63 million over Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001.

                III. Background and Need for Legislation

    USFA, which includes the National Fire Academy (NFA), is a 
directorate within the Federal Emergency Management Agency 
(FEMA). The goal of the agency is to reduce the loss of life 
and property due to fire. To achieve this goal, USFA supports 
activities in four areas: training, data collection and 
analysis, research, and public education.
    The formation of the USFA in 1974 was prompted by the 
seminal 1973 report, America Burning, of the National 
Commission on Fire Prevention and Control created by the Fire 
Research and Safety Act of 1968 (P.L. 90-259). The Commission's 
report recommended the establishment of a federal agency that 
would support State and local fire services and recommended the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development as the appropriate 
department to house the new agency.
    In 1974, Congress responded to the America Burning report 
by declaring a federal role in fire prevention. In 1974, it 
passed the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 
(P.L. 93-498), which created the National Fire Prevention and 
Control Administration and placed it in the Department of 
Commerce.
    In 1978, Congress changed the name of the agency to the 
United States Fire Administration (P.L. 95-422), and in 1979, 
President Jimmy Carter moved USFA to newly-created FEMA as part 
of Reorganization Plan No 3. The National Fire Academy also was 
opened in 1979 and began offering training and courses of 
instruction at its Emmitsburg Maryland campus.
    Since its passage, the Federal Fire Prevention and Control 
Act of 1974 has been amended many times. In 1990, the Hotel and 
Motel Fire Safety Act (P.L. 101-391) required the States to 
submit to USFA lists of public accommodations that meet federal 
safety guidelines, and the Firefighters' Safety Study Act (P.L. 
101-446) directed USFA to develop and distribute data on 
hazardous-materials identification, response, and incidents. 
The Fire Administration Authorization Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-
522) restricted the use of federal funds for building, leasing, 
or buying housing not equipped with sprinklers systems and 
smoke detectors. The Arson Prevention Act of 1994 (P.L. 103-
254) directed USFA to award grants to States for arson 
research, prevention, and control.
    The current authorization for USFA is the United States 
Fire Administration Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 1998 and 
1999 (P.L. 105-108), signed into law on November 20, 1997. It 
authorizes $29.664 million for Fiscal Year 1998 and $30.554 
million for Fiscal Year 1999 for the activities of USFA.

                        IV. Summary of Hearings

    The Subcommittee on Basic Research of the Committee on 
Science held a hearing on March 23, 1999 to hear testimony on 
the Administration's Fiscal Year 2000 budget request for USFA 
and to examine issues related to a two-year authorization for 
the agency. Appearing as witnesses before the Subcommittee 
were: The Honorable James Lee Witt, Director, FEMA, Dr. Karen 
Brown, Deputy Director, National Institute of Standards and 
Technology (NIST), on behalf of The Honorable Raymond Kammer, 
Director, Mr. Stephen Austin, Chair, Blue Ribbon Panel and 
External Affairs Representative, International Association of 
Arson Investigators, Inc.; Chief Luther Fincher, First Vice 
President, International Association of Fire Chiefs; Dr. John 
R. Hall, Assistant Vice President, Fire Analysis and Research, 
National Fire Protection Association; and Mr. Salvador Morales, 
Member, Blue Ribbon Panel and Driver Engineer, Dallas Fire 
Department.
    Director Witt opened his testimony by discussing the 
recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Panel. He then reviewed 
FEMA's blueprint for change within the Fire Administration, 
including increased funding requests for the data collection 
system, public education materials, and firefighter training 
activities. He added that FEMA and USFA will be working with 
national fire organizations on prevention and protection 
efforts and will recommission America Burning so the current 
state of fire dangers in the Nation can be determined. He 
closed his testimony by acknowledging challenges facing the 
agency, such as reaching those most vulnerable to fire losses.
    Deputy Director Brown, provided a review of NIST's 
responsibilities under the Fire Prevention and Control Act. 
These include serving as the nation's leading fire research 
laboratory and having responsibility for national fire safety 
policy and programs. She explained that NIST's strategy for 
meeting these obligations has been both to identify the most 
common situations that result in fire death and develop 
intervention strategies and technologies and to conduct 
fundamental fire research and develop fire safety materials, 
products, systems and facilities. These activities, along with 
cooperative efforts with other federal agencies, private sector 
organizations, and the fire services have led to: decreased 
fire death rates; new practices, standards, code provisions; 
and new technologies, such as residential smoke detectors. She 
concluded her testimony by emphasizing the recommendation of 
the Blue Ribbon Panel report that called for increasing fire 
research.
    Mr. Austin opened his testimony by reviewing the 
recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel report. He explained 
that the Panel does not want the USFA to assume added 
responsibilities, but to improve upon current responsibilities 
and that funding increases are necessary if USFA is to fulfill 
its responsibilities. Mr. Austin pointed to the benefits of 
residential smoke detectors and sprinkler systems as 
justification for continued investment in research, and he 
stressed the importance of improving the fire data collection 
is necessary to developing strategies for fire protection and 
public safety education. Finally, he noted that a lack of 
resources is inhibiting the National Fire Academy from reaching 
its capability.
    Chief Fincher began his statement by relaying to the 
Subcommittee the support of the Fire Service Leadership Summit 
participants for the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel 
and the Administration's Fiscal Year 2000 budget request. He 
highlighted four areas of particular importance: (1) 
organizational structure; (2) management and leadership; (3) 
data collection, particularly the National Fire Incident 
Reporting System (NFIRS); and (4) the research and development. 
He stated that organizational structure and management and 
leadership issues must be resolved before other problems can be 
addressed.
    Dr. Hall spoke about the importance of NFIRS as the core of 
the Nations' fire data system. He testified that continuous 
underfunding has inhibited NFIRS from fully being successful. 
Healso spoke of the benefits of fire research, especially that 
done at NIST, in developing fire protection technology. He suggested 
that the USFA partner with other fire researchers through long-term 
partnerships in order to increase the volume of fire research 
conducted. Finally, he recommended that the USFA leverage resources by 
partnering with national organizations in fire safety and prevention 
efforts.
    Mr. Morales discussed some of the recommendations of the 
Blue Ribbon Panel. Specifically, he advocated increasing 
funding for educational materials to be used in conjunction 
with federal, State, and local organizations and set a goal 
reducing the risk of loss of life and property from fire-
related hazards by 5 percent by the year 2000. Further, he 
reiterated the Panel's support for upgrading the NFIRS system 
and for increasing investment in fire research, arson research 
and prevention, and anti-terrorism training.

                          V. Committee Actions

    As summarized above, the Subcommittee on Basic Research of 
the Committee on Science heard testimony relevant to USFA at a 
hearing held on March 23, 1999.
    On April 26, 1999, Mr. Nick Smith (MI), Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Basic Research, joined by Ms. Johnson of (TX), 
Ranking Minority Member of the Subcommittee on Basic Research, 
introduced H.R. 1550, the Fire Administration Authorization Act 
of 1999, a bill to authorize appropriations for USFA for Fiscal 
Years 2000 and 2001.
    The Full Science Committee met to consider H.R. 1550 on 
Thursday, April 29, 1999, and entertained the following 
amendments and report language.
    Amendment 1.--At the suggestion of the Chairman, Mr. Udall 
(CO) offered Amendment 1 and Amendment 6 en bloc. The en bloc 
amendment (1) increased the authorizations in Fiscal Years 2000 
and 2001 by $1.0 million and $2.0 million, respectively and 
earmarked these increases for anti-terrorism training; and (2) 
required an assessment of federal counter-terrorism training 
for emergency responders. The en bloc amendment was adopted by 
voice vote.
    Amendment 2.--Mrs. Biggert (IL) offered an amendment to set 
aside from the sums authorized for each of Fiscal Year 2000 and 
2001 $250,000 for outsourcing data analysis. The amendment was 
adopted by voice vote.
    Amendment 3.--Mr. Weldon (PA) offered an amendment to 
require USFA to include in its strategic plan a plan for the 
timely distribution of information and education materials for 
State and local fire services. The amendment was adopted by 
voice vote.
    Amendment 4.--Mr. Larson (CT) offered an amendment to 
require USFA to include in its strategic plan an assessment of 
the delivery of course of instruction using the Internet. The 
amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    Amendment 5.--Mr. Lucas (OK) offered an amendment to 
require USFA to perform a review of the curriculum offered 
through NFA. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    Amendment 6.--Mr. Udall (CO) offered this amendment en bloc 
with Amendment 1, which was adopted by voice vote.
    Amendment 7.--Mr. Kuykendall (CA) offered an amendment to 
require USFA to post on the Internet abstracts of research 
funded by the agency. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    Amendment 8.--Mr. Weiner (NY) offered an amendment to 
repeal Section 4 of P.L. 103-195, which exempts federally-
funded housing constructed in New York City from federal 
sprinkler requirements. The amendment was adopted by voice 
vote.
    Amendment 9.--Ms. Johnson (TX) offered and withdrew an 
amendment that would have established a grant program at USFA 
for equipment, personnel, training, and other items and 
authorized $225.0 million for this purpose.
    Report Language.--Ms. Johnson (TX) offered report language 
highlighting the importance of research into firefighter 
protective equipment. The report language was adopted by voice 
vote.
    Report Language.--Ms. Johnson (TX) offered report language 
urging USFA to conduct research into the socioeconomic factors 
that can lead to increased fire risk, including the use of 
security bars. The report language was adopted by voice vote.
    Mr. Smith (MI) also asked the Chairman to instruct staff to 
incorporate report language on the review and implementation of 
the Blue Ribbon Panel report as USFA, which was so ordered.
    With a quorum present, Ms. Johnson moved that the Committee 
report the bill, H.R. 1550, as amended, to the House, that the 
staff prepare the legislative report and make technical and 
conforming changes, and that the Chairman take all necessary 
steps to bring the bill before the House for consideration. The 
motion was approved by voice vote.
    Mr. Sensenbrenner asked and received unanimous consent that 
Committee Members have two subsequent calendar days in which to 
submit supplemental, minority or additional views on the 
measure, and that, pursuant to Clause 1 of Rule XXII of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee authorize 
the Chairman to offer such motions as may be necessary in the 
House to go to conference with the Senate on H.R. 1550 or a 
similar Senate bill.

              VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill

    For Fiscal Year 2000, the bill authorizes $46.13 million, 
$13.863 million (43.0%) over the Fiscal Year 1999 level (see 
Table 1). Of this amount, $2.2 million is set aside for 
research, $250,000 for outsourcing of data analysis, and $6.0 
million for anti-terrorism training.

  TABLE 1.--H.R. 1550--THE FIRE ADMINISTRATION AUTHORIZATION ACT OF 1999: FISCAL YEAR 1999 ENACTED, FISCAL YEAR 2000 REQUEST, AND FISCAL YEAR 2000 AND
                                                             FISCAL YEAR 2001 AUTHORIZATIONS
                                                                 [Dollars in thousands]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2000 authorization change (+ or -)       FY 2001 authorization
                                                                                 ----------------------------------------------      change (+ or -)
          Activity             FY 1999    FY 2000      FY 2000        FY 2001                                                  -------------------------
                               enacted    request   authorization  authorization   FY 1999    Percent     FY 2000     Percent      FY 2000
                                                                                   enacted                request               authorization   Percent
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
U.S. Fire Administration:        32,267     45,130       46,130         49,500       13,863       43.0      1,000         2.2         3,370          7.3
 Total......................
                             ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Research................        650      2,150        2,200          3,000        1,550      238.5         50         2.3           800         36.4
    Data Analysis Grants/             0          0          250            250          250         NA        250          NA             0            0
     Contracts..............
    Anti-Terrorism Training.      4,000      5,000        6,000          8,000        2,000       50.0      1,000        20.0         2,000         33.3
    Other Unspecified            27,617     37,980       37,680         38,250       10,063       36.4       (300)       (0.8)          570          1.5
     Activities.............
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    For Fiscal Year 2001, the bill authorizes $49.5, a 7.3 
percent increase over the Fiscal Year 2000 authorization. FY 
2001 includes $3.0 million for research, $250,000 for 
outsourcing of data analysis, and $8.0 million for anti-
terrorism training. The Fiscal Year 2001 authorization also 
requires the Administrator to certify that funds obligated in 
Fiscal Year 2001 are consistent with the strategic plan 
required in Section 3 of the bill.
    H.R. 1550 requires USFA to develop and submit to Congress a 
strategic plan. The language in this section matches closely 
the language on strategic plans in the Government Performance 
and Results Act. Additional elements of the strategic plan 
include coordination with NIST, DOD, and other federal 
agencies; a plan for disseminating information and materials to 
State and local fire services; and an assessment of the use of 
the Internet in delivering training courses.
    The bill also requires USFA to develop and submit to 
Congress a research agenda. This provision requires USFA to 
develop research priorities and a plan for implementing a 
research agenda, including a description of the roles other 
agencies (NIST and DOD, in particular) could play and ways to 
leverage resources through partnerships and cooperative 
agreements.
    In addition, the bill also directs the Fire Administration 
to: make available to State and local fire/emergency services 
information on the availability and procedures for acquiring 
excess/surplus federal equipment; make available information on 
the procedures for establishing cooperative agreements between 
State and local fire/emergency services and federal facilities 
(e.g., military bases) in their areas; conduct an assessment of 
the need for additional counter-terrorism training for 
emergency responders; review the content and delivery of the 
curriculum offered by NFA; and post abstracts of research 
grants it awards on its Internet home page.
    Consistent with the Oversight Agenda approved by the 
Committee on Science, H.R. 1550 repeals obsolete sections of 
the statute. It also repeals, one year after enactment, Section 
4 of P.L. 103-195, a provision that exempts housing built with 
federal support in New York City from the sprinkler 
requirements found in Section 31 of the statute.

                    VII. Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short title

    Cites the Act as the ``Fire Administration Authorization 
Act of 1999.''

Section 2. Authorization of appropriations

    Amends Section 17 of the Fire Prevention and Control Act of 
1974 by replacing it with the following:
    Sec. 17. Except for the payment of claims for costs of 
firefighting on federal property, authorizes: $46.130 million 
for Fiscal Year 2000, of which $2.2 million shall be used for 
research, $250,000 for outsourcing of data analysis, and $6.0 
million for anti-terrorism training and; $49.5 million for 
Fiscal Year 2001, of which $3.0 million shall be used for 
research, $250,000 for outsourcing of data analysis, and $8.0 
million for anti-terrorism training. None of the funds 
authorized for Fiscal Year 2001 may be obligated unless the 
Administrator certifies that such obligation is consistent with 
the strategic plan required under section 3 of the Fire 
Administration Authorization Act of 1999.

Section 3. Strategic plan

    (a) Requires before April 30, 2000 a five-year strategic 
plan to be transmitted to the Committee on Science of the House 
of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate.
    (b) The contents of the strategic plan shall include: a 
comprehensive mission statement; goals and objectives; a 
description of how these goals and objectives can be achieved; 
an identification of fire-related activities at NIST, the 
Department of Defense (DOD), and other federal agencies and how 
these may contribute to achieving the goals and objectives; 
performance goals; external factors beyond the Fire 
Administration's control that could impede achieving the goals 
and objectives; a description of program evaluations; a plan 
for the timely distribution of information to State and local 
fire services; a description of how the strategic plan produced 
will be incorporated into the strategic and performance plans 
and reports of FEMA; and a description of how the Internet is 
and can be used to deliver training courses.

Section 4. Research agenda

    (a) Requires within 120 days of enactment a research agenda 
to be transmitted to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate.
    (b) The contents of the report shall include: a 
determination of research priorities; a discussion of how the 
research program will be coordinated with related programs at 
NIST, DOD, and other federal agencies; a description of ways to 
leverage resources; and a discussion of how the agenda will 
help the Fire Administration fulfill its mission.
    (c) Directs that the research agenda shall be used when 
preparing the strategic plan required in Section 3.

Section 5. Surplus and excess equipment

    Amends Section 17 the Fire Prevention and Control Act of 
1974 to require the Administrator to make available, including 
through the Internet, information on the availability and 
procedures for acquiring surplus and excess federal fire, 
emergency, and hazardous material equipment or property.

Section 6. Cooperative agreements with Federal facilities

    Amends Section 17 the Fire Prevention and Control Act of 
1974 to require the Administrator to make available, including 
through the Internet, information on the procedures for 
establishing cooperative agreements between State and local 
fire and emergency services and federal facilities.

Section 7. Miscellaneous repeals

    The Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended by 
repealing the following obsolete provisions: section 10(b); 
section 23; subsection 24(b); section 26; and section 27.

Section 8. Need for additional training in counterterrorism

    (a) Requires the Administrator to conduct an assessment of 
the need for additional federal capabilities in counter-
terrorism training for emergency responders.
    (b) Requires that the assessment include: a review of 
existing federal counter-terrorism training programs; an 
estimate of the number of emergency response personnel who in 
the last five Fiscal Years have applied for this training but 
were denied because of oversubscription of training facilities; 
and recommendations on the need for improving counter-terrorism 
centers, including existing federal facilities that could be 
used for this training and a cost-benefit analysis of 
establishing counter-terrorism training centers in regions 
where many applicants reside.
    (c) Requires that a report be submitted to Congress within 
190 days of enactment.

Section 9. National Fire Academy curriculum review

    (a) Requires the Administrator to conduct a review of 
courses of instruction at the National Fire Academy to ensure 
they are up-to-date and do not duplicate courses offered at the 
State level.
    (b) Requires report to Congress to examine courses 
currently offered, identify redundant courses, examine the 
impact of information technology on the delivery of courses, 
and make recommendations for updating the curriculum.

Section 10. Internet availability of information

    Requires the Administrator to make available through the 
USFA's Internet home page abstracts of all grants and awards 
made with funds authorized through this Act.

Section 11. Repeal of exception to fire safety requirement

    Repeals Section 4 of P.L. 103-195 1 year after enactment.

                         VIII. Committee Views


                                general

    The mission of USFA is to provide leadership, coordination, 
and support for the Nation's fire services in such area as fire 
prevention and control, training and education, research, data 
collection and analysis, and emergency medical services 
activities. Since the formation of the Fire Administration in 
1974, fire losses in the U.S. have declined markedly. Between 
1986 and 1995, for example, fire deaths decreased 30 percent, 
and the adjusted dollar loss associaed with fire has decreased 
by 13 percent. Much of this decrease can be traced to research 
sponsored by USFA that led to affordable smoke detectors.
    Nevertheless, fires are still all too common. Between 1986 
and 1995, an average of 2.1 millions fires were reported 
annually. For the same 10-year period, fires caused an average 
of 5,100 civilians deaths, 25,000 injuries, and $9.6 billion in 
losses each year. Moreover, the United States has one of the 
highest fire death rates in the industrialized world--15.6 
deaths per million is population--higher than in Australia, 
Japan, and most of Western Europe.
    The Committee believes that we can and must do better. The 
men and women served by USFA--about 80 percent of whom are 
volunteers--are a critical component of the Nation's emergency 
response capability. Ensuring that they benefit from the unique 
services offered by USFA is critically important if we are to 
achieve--indeed, exceed--the goal of reducing the rate of loss 
of life and property from fire by 5 percent, the benchmark 
established in FEMA's strategic plan.
    In past Views and Estimates, the Committee has voiced its 
concern over the relatively flat budgets proposed for USFA in 
recent years. The Committee, therefore, is pleased that the 
Clinton Administration has taken action to increase funding at 
this agency. However, it remains troubled by reports that the 
agency is not being managed effectively and that it has been 
``buried'' within FEMA. So while it supports the increase 
funding levels authorized in the bill, the Committee plans to 
conduct vigorous oversight to ensure that the problems 
identified in the Blue Ribbon Report and in testmony before the 
Committee are addressed.

                    authorizations of appropriations

    H.R. 1550 authorizes $46.13 million for Fiscal Year 2000 
and $49.5 million for Fiscal Year 2001. The Committee 
recognizes the need for increased funding for USFA but wants to 
ensure that USFA has an acceptable plan in place to spend this 
money wisely. The Committee, therefore, has agreed to authorize 
an increase over the Fiscal Year 1999 level of 43 percent for 
Fiscal Year 2000 and a further increase of 7.3 percent for 
Fiscal Year 2001. However, the bill requires that before funds 
authorized in the bill for Fiscal Year 2001 are obligated, the 
Administrator shall certify that such obligation is consistent 
with the strategic plan required in section 3 of the bill. By 
linking the strategic planning and reform effort to the 
increased funding authorization, as this provision does, the 
Committee believes that it can meet its obligations both to the 
taxpayers and the fire-services community.
    The Committee also has approved increases in research and 
anti-terrorism training, and it has set aside authorizations 
for outsourcing of data analysis. The Committee attaches great 
important to the potential for research to meet USFA's goals of 
reducing fire risk. In addition, the Committee believes that 
anti-terrorism training in FEMA should be the responsibility of 
USFA and that this training should not come at the expense of 
other fire programs in USFA. In a related provision, the bill 
also requests an assessment of counter-terrorism training. 
Finally, the Committee has long encouraged outsourcing where it 
is appropriate and expects USFA to take advantage of data-
analysis capabilities in the private sector.

          implementation of blue ribbon panel recommendations

    The Committee wishes to commend the Blue Ribbon Panel for 
its efforts in producing the review of USFA. The Blue Ribbon 
Panel's Report represents the consensus view of a broad array 
of fire-service organizations on the problems facing USFA. This 
document will provide a good guide for FEMA and the Committee 
to assess the success of future reform efforts.
    The Panel's report identifies deficiencies at the Fire 
Administration in three core areas: leadership, resource 
management, and communication. It noted that, ``there is in 
effect a broken covenant between the federal fire programs and 
the people and institutions they were created to serve.'' In 
general, the Committee endorses the views and recommendations 
expressed in this Report, and it is the Committee's expectation 
that FMEA and USFA will work to put in place reforms that mend 
the rift between the agency and the firefighters it serves.
    Since the Blue Ribbon Panel delivered its report to FEMA on 
October 1, 1998, FEMA has developed a plan and schedule to 
implement its recommendations. The proposal put forward by FEMA 
Director Witt has five Sections. They are: (1) Immediate 
Actions, which includes those recommendations that can be 
implemented immediately through direct action by the FEMA 
Directors; (2) Management Review, which includes those 
recommendations dealing with operations and staffing (due on 
May 1, 1999); (3) USFA Planning, which includes those 
recommendations addressing activities in USFA's four main basic 
program areas--training, research, data collection and 
analysis, and public education (due on June 1, 1999); (4) 
Funding and Resource Management, which includes those 
recommendations concerning continuing and new funding needs 
(due on July 1, 1999); and (5) Strategic Planning, which 
includes those recommendations concerning how USFA can be 
further integrated into FEMA's strategic planning.
    The Committee expects to be consulted throughout this 
process, especially as each of these reporting milestones is 
approached. The Committee also expects that each of the reports 
generated during this process will be provided to it and that 
it will be informed of any delays in the schedule outlined in 
the implementation plan.

                           strategic planning

    The Committee supports strategic planning and has been very 
active in ensuring that the Government Performance and Results 
Act has been implemented in the agencies under its 
jurisdiction. The Committee would note that in FEMA's strategic 
plan, the Fire Administration plays a secondary role, and it is 
mentioned very little. We should keep in mind that, for the 
most part, fires are personal tragedies, not federal ones. So 
while it is important for FEMA to incorporate the Fire 
Administration into its federal-disaster planning, it is also 
important for the Fire Administration to establish priorities 
of its own that, when taken in the aggregate, can have a huge 
impact through reducing life and property loss from fire.
    The strategic plan requirement in section 3 of the bill is 
intended to provide FEMA and USFA with a means for coordinating 
and incorporating their response to the Blue Ribbon Panel 
Report's recommendations into a broader review of USFA's 
activities. Indeed, it should be seen as the culmination of 
this effort, not as a separate exercise.
    The strategic-plan language also directs the Fire 
Administration to look for ways to coordinate with the 
Department of Defense, NIST, and other federal agencies, 
including the Federal Aviation Administration, the Department 
of the Interior, and other appropriate agencies. The U.S. 
spends a great deal of money on research and training in these 
and other agencies, but if the information is not made 
available to the fire services, then an opportunity has been 
lost. The Committee believes that programs at DOD and other 
agencies should be taken into account in USFA's strategic 
planning and that FEMA, through USFA, should play a significant 
role in coordinating these activities and ensuring that 
information generated by these activities is made available to 
State and local fire services.

                             fire research

    For Fiscal Year 1999, USFA has budgeted only $650,000 for 
research. The Committee believes that this level of funding is 
woefully inadequate. Research is one of the four main 
activities of the Fire Administration, but recently, as the 
figure for Fiscal Year 1999 shows, the agency has paid less and 
less attention to it. For Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001, H.R. 1550 
authorizes $2.2 million and $3.0 million, respectively, for 
research.
    Coupled with the increased authorizations, the research 
agenda required by the bill will compel the Fire Administration 
to set priorities and give research a more central role in its 
activities. The fire-services community has identified a number 
of areas needing more research, including ways to protect 
citizens and firefighters and fire-protection systems. These 
and other areas have been outlined in workshops held by NIST in 
1996 and USFA in 1997 and in the Blue Ribbon Panel Report. The 
Committee believes the findings of these reports provide a good 
basis for moving ahead with a research plan.
    As with the strategic plan, the research agenda required in 
section 4 of H.R. 1550 also directs the Fire Administration to 
identify research being conducted at the DOD and other federal 
agencies when developing its agenda. Again, the Committee will 
look to USFA to work with these other agencies to coordinate 
their activities to the greatest extent possible, given their 
different missions, and would encourage inter-agency agreements 
in areas of research beneficial to more than one agency.
    Finally, the Committee is concerned that there has been 
little apparent follow-through on the Memorandum of 
Understanding (MOU) between USFA and NIST agreed to by the 
agencies on November 5, 1997. The goal of this MOU is ``to make 
available improved suppression, protective , auxiliary, and 
warning devices incorporating the latest technology.'' The 
Committee believes the NIST facilities are an integral part of 
any fire research program and expects USFA to use the research 
agenda required in the bill to breathe new life into this 
agreement.

                         firefighter equipment

    In 1984, 10.6 percent of firefighter injuries, over 6,600 
incidents, were due to burns. In 1993, despite 10 years of 
advances in protective clothing, 11.3 percent of firefighter 
injuries, nearly 6,000 incidents, were due to burns. A 1996 
workshop organized by NIST explored the factors that lead to 
burn injuries and identified objectives related to the 
development of effective protective clothing and equipment, to 
fire fighting tactics, and to the training of fire service 
personnel.
    Section 4 of the bill directs the Administrator to prepare 
a research agenda and associated implementation plan. The 
findings of the 1996 NIST workshop and related materials should 
be reviewed as part of the process of developing the research 
agenda. The Committee recognizes that current understanding is 
incomplete regarding the relationships among thermal 
environments, human response to thermal exposures, and fire 
fighting tactics that result in burn injuries.
    The Committee expects the research agenda to address, and 
place an appropriate level of priority on, research needed: (1) 
to support the development of more effective firefighter 
protective equipment, including sensor technologies that have 
promise for informing firefighters of impending untenable 
conditions; (2) to identify best practices in fire fighting 
tactics; and (3) to support the development of appropriate 
training materials to improve the safety of firefighters, 
including imparting knowledge of the limits of protective 
clothing and equipment.

            reducing fire injury for vulnerable populations

    Data collected by the Fire Administration and other sources 
show that certain groups are at greater risk from fire injury 
or death than the general population. Children under five years 
of age perish in fires at twice the national fire death rate. 
For Black children, home fires are the leading cause of injury-
related deaths of those between the ages of one and nine. 
Likewise, for the elderly over seventy years of age, the death 
rate from fire is one and one half times the national average, 
rising to four times the national average by age eighty five. 
The Hispanic community is at-risk due to fire-related injuries 
and deaths.
    Data on socioeconomic factors affecting fire-related injury 
are less exact, but available information indicates that the 
poor suffer a disproportionate share of deaths versus the rest 
of the population. For example, smoking, which is inversely 
related to income level, accounts for 26 percent of all fire 
deaths; and neighborhoods with high proportions of low income 
households have higher fire incidence rates than middle or high 
income neighborhoods.
    The mission of the Fire Administration includes public 
education about fire risk and research related to fire 
protection. The Committee expects the Fire Administration, in 
carrying out the requirement of sections 3 and 4 of the bill, 
to direct its efforts and resources appropriately to address 
ways to combat the vulnerability of the population groups that 
suffer disproportionately from fire injury.
    The Committee expects the Fire Administration to provide in 
its strategic plan for the development of public education 
programs designed for these at-risk audiences. In order to 
develop effective materials and approaches, the Fire 
Administration should consider any actions needed to improve 
the current understanding of the factors that lead to fire 
risk, including the adequacy of current data collection 
activities. In establishing research priorities in accordance 
with section 4 of the bill, the Committee expects the Fire 
Administration to consider whether its research program should 
include studies of the socioeconomic characteristics associated 
with increased fire risk. The Committee believes that 
effective, targeted fire prevention campaigns can be developed 
only from a sound knowledge base.
    The Committee is concerned about recent media reports that 
have detailed fire deaths in Texas and other states from the 
use of security bars known as ``burglary bars'' on doors and 
windows in high crime areas. These devices offer occupants 
protection from criminals. However, in times of fire the bars 
have entrapped individuals inside their residences and have 
prevented their evacuation and rescue. The Committee requests 
that the Fire Administration study ways to prevent fire injury 
and death from the use and the installation of security bars 
and to report its findings to the Committee within 90 days 
following the enactment of the bill.

    information on surplus/excess federal equipment and cooperative 
                               agreements

    Sections 5 and 6 of H.R. 1550 add new responsibilities to 
USFA. Many local fire and emergency services are at a 
disadvantage when it comes to acquiring surplus and excess 
federal equipment because information on such equipment is not 
widely available. In addition, while many local fire services 
have cooperative agreements with local federal facilities, 
usually military bases, other communities may not take 
advantage of these opportunities to improve local services 
because of a lack of information. The Committee believes that 
USFA can play in important role in providing general 
information in these areas. Fire services should be able to 
rely on USFA as the point of contact for such information, much 
of which can be provided on USFA's Internet home page. However, 
USFA's role should be to provide information only, not to 
participate with fire and emergency services either in applying 
for equipment or negotiating a cooperative agreement.

                national fire academy curriculum review

    The need for a review of the curriculum at NFA was 
established in the Blue Ribbon Panel Report and in testimony 
before the Subcommittee on Basic Research. The Committee agrees 
with this assessment and urges USFA to ensure that the courses 
of instruction it develops and delivers at NFA incorporates the 
latest research, takes advantage of advances in information 
technology, and complements, not duplicates, course offered at 
the State level. Further, itbelieves that the curriculum at NFA 
should be comparable to that at other federal facilities, such as the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation Academy in Quantico, Virginia.

                      IX. Committee Cost Estimate

    Rule XIII, clause 3(d)(2) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report accompanying each bill or joint 
resolution of a public character to contain: (1) an estimate, 
made by such committee, of the costs which would be incurred in 
carrying out such bill or joint resolution in the fiscal year 
in that it is reported, and in each of the five fiscal years 
following such fiscal year (or for the authorized duration of 
any program authorized by such bill or joint resolution, if 
less than five years); (2) a comparison of the estimate of 
costs described in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph made by 
such committee with an estimate of such costs made by any 
Government agency and submitted to such committee; and (3) when 
practicable, a comparison of the total estimated funding level 
for the relevant program (or programs) with the appropriate 
levels under current law. However, House Rule XII, clause 
3(d)(3)(B) provides that this requirement does not apply when a 
cost estimate and comparision prepared by the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office under section 403 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted 
prior to the filing of the report and included in the report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3). A cost estimate 
and comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional 
Budget Office under section 403 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 has been timely submitted prior to the filing of this 
report and is included in Section X of this report pursuant to 
House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(2) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report that accompanies a measure 
providing new budget authority (other than continuing 
appropriations), new spending authority, or new credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures to 
contain a cost estimate, as required by section 308(a)(1) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and, when practicable with 
respect to estimates of new budget authority, a comparison of 
the total estimated funding level for the relevant program (or 
programs) to the appropriate levels under current law. H.R. 
1550 does not contain any new budget authority, credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures. Assuming 
that the sums authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 
1550 does authorize additional discretionary spending, as 
described in the Congressional Budget Office report on the 
bill, which is contained in Section X of this report.

              X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     U.S. Congress,
                                       Washington, DC, May 6, 1999.
Hon. F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr., 
Chairman, Committee on Science,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 1550, the Fire 
Administration Authorization Act of 1999.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Megan 
Carroll.
            Sincerely,
                                          Barry B. Anderson
                                    (For Dan L. Grippen, Director).
    Enclosure.

H.R. 1550--Fire Administration Authorization Act of 1999

    Summary: H.R. 1550 would authorize appropriations totaling 
$127 million over the 1999-2001 period for the programs, 
salaries, and expenses of the United States Fire Administration 
(USFA). (That amount includes $31 million for 1999; an 
appropriation of $32 million has already been provided for the 
current year.) The bill would require reports on the agency's 
research agenda, counterterrorism training, and curriculum 
development for the National Fire Academy and would direct the 
USFA to increase efforts to disseminate information. H.R. 1550 
also would direct the USFA to develop a strategic plan by April 
30, 2000, and would require that the agency's budget for 2001 
be consistent with that plan. Other provisions in the bill 
would repeal an exception to a fire safety requirement for 
federally funded pubic housing in New York City as well as 
certain requirements for the USFA.
    Assuming appropriation of the amounts authorized for fiscal 
years 2000 and 2001, CBO estimates that implementing H.R. 1550 
would increase discretionary spending by $96 million over the 
2000-2004 period. CBO estimates that H.R. 1550 would not affect 
spending in the current year because funds have already been 
appropriated that exceed the level authorized by the bill for 
1999. The bill would affect direct spending or receipts; 
therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures would not apply. H.R. 1550 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would 
impose no costs on state, local, or tribal governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: For the purposes 
of this estimate, CBO assumes that the amounts authorized for 
2000 and 2001 will be appropriated by the start of each fiscal 
year and that outlays will follow the historical spending 
pattern for the USFA. CBO estimates that other provisions of 
H.R. 1550 would not have any significant impact on federal 
spending. The estimated cost of the bill is shown in the 
following table. The costs of this legislation fall within 
budget function 450 (community and regional development).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  By fiscal years, in millions of dollars--
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                                                              1999     2000     2001     2002     2003     2004
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending by USFA Under Current Law:
    Budget Authority \1\..................................       32        0        0        0        0        0
    Estimated Outlays.....................................       51       20        8        2        0        0
Proposed Changes:
    Authorization Level...................................        0       46       50        0        0        0
    Estimated Outlays.....................................        0       28       42       18        7        1
Spending by USFA Under H.R. 1550:
    Authorization Level \1\...............................       32       46       50        0        0        0
    Estimated Outlays.....................................       51       48       50       20        7        1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 1999 level of $32 million is the amount appropriated for that year. The bill would authorize $31 million
  for 1999, thus CBO expects that the bill would not affect spending in the current year.

    Pay-as-you-go considerations: None.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 1550 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or 
tribal governments. Some of the funds authorized in this bill 
would be used for grants, technical assistance, and training 
for state and local fire departments.
    Estimate prepared by: Megan Carroll.
    Estimate approved by: Robert A. Sunshine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 1550 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(1) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report to include oversight findings 
and recommendations required pursuant to clause 2(b)(1) of rule 
X. The Committee has no oversight findings.

   XIII. Oversight Findings and Recommendations by the Committee on 
                    Government Reform and Oversight

    Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(4) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report to contain a summary of the 
oversight findings and recommendations made by the House 
Committee on Government Reform pursuant to clause 4(c)(2) of 
rule X, whenever such findings and recommendations have been 
submitted to the Committee in a timely fashion. The Committee 
on Science has received no such findings or recommendations 
from the Committee on Government Reform.

                XIV. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Rule XIII, clause 3(d)(1) of the House of Representatives 
requires each report of a committee on a bill or joint 
resolution of a public character to include a statement citing 
the specific powers granted to the Congress in the Constitution 
to enact the law proposed by the bill or joint resolution. 
Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United States 
grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 1550.

                XV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 1550 does not establish, nor authorize the 
establishment of, any advisory committee.

                 XVI. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 1550 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

      XVII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

FEDERAL FIRE PREVENTION AND CONTROL ACT OF 1974

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                              master plans

  Sec. 10. (a) * * *
  [(b) Report.--Four years after the date of enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary shall submit to the Congress a report on the 
establishment and effectiveness of master plans in the field of 
fire prevention and control throughout the Nation. Such report 
shall include, but need not be limited to--
          [(1) a summary of the extent and quality of master 
        planning activities;
          [(2) a summary and evaluation of master plans that 
        have been prepared by States and political subdivisions 
        thereof. Such summary and evaluation shall consider, 
        with respect to each such plan (A) the characteristics 
        of the jurisdiction adopting it, including, but not 
        limited to, density and distribution of population; 
        ratio of volunteer versus paid fire services; 
        geographic location, topography, and climate; per 
        capita rate of death and property loss from fire; size 
        and characteristics of political subdivisions of the 
        governmental units thereof; and socio-economic 
        composition; and (B) the approach to development and 
        implementation of the master plans;
          [(3) an evaluation of the best approach to the 
        development and implementation of master plans (e.g., 
        central planning by a State agency, regionalized 
        planning within a State coordinated by a State agency, 
        or local planning supplemented and coordinated by a 
        State agency);
          [(4) an assessment of the costs and benefits of 
        master plans;
          [(5) a recommendation to Congress on whether Federal 
        financial assistance should be authorized in order that 
        master plans can be developed in all States; and
          [(6) a model master plan or plans suitable for State 
        and local implementation.]
  [(c)] (b) Definition.--For the purposes of this section, a 
``master plan'' is one which will result in the planning and 
implementation in the area involved of a general program of 
action for fire prevention and control. Such master plan is 
reasonably expected to include (1) a survey of the resources 
and personnel of existing fire services and an analysis of the 
effectiveness of the fire and building codes in such area; (2) 
an analysis of short and long term fire prevention and control 
needs in such area; (3) a plan to meet the fire prevention and 
control needs in such area; and (4) an estimate of cost and 
realistic plans for financing the implementation of the plan 
and operation on a continuing basis and a summary of problems 
that are anticipated in implementing such master plan.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                    [authorization of appropriations

  [Sec. 17. (a) There are authorized to be appropriated to 
carry out the foregoing provisions of this Act, except as 
otherwise specifically provided, with respect to the payment of 
claims, under section 11 of this Act, an amount not to exceed 
$25,210,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980, 
which amount includes--
          [(1) $4,781,000 for programs which are recommended in 
        the report submitted to the Congress by the 
        Administrator pursuant to section 24(b)(1);
          [(2) $9,430,000 for the National Academy for Fire 
        Prevention and Control;
          [(3) $307,000 for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits;
          [(4) $500,000 for additional rural firefighting 
        technical assistance and information activities;
          [(5) $500,000 for the study required by section 26 of 
        this Act; and
          [(6) $110,000 for the study required by section 27 of 
        this Act.
  [(b) There are authorized to be appropriated for the 
additional administrative expenses of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency, which are related to this Act and which 
result from Reorganization Plan Numbered 3 of 1978 (submitted 
June 19, 1978) and related Executive orders, an amount not to 
exceed $600,000 for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1980.
  [(c) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
this Act, except as otherwise specifically provided with 
respect to the payment of claims under section 11 this Act, an 
amount not to exceed $23,814,000 for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1981, which amount includes--
          [(1) not less than $1,100,000 for the first year of a 
        three-year concentrated demonstration program of fire 
        prevention and control in two States with high fire 
        death rates;
          [(2) not less than $2,575,000 for rural fire 
        prevention and control; and
          [(3) not less than $4,255,000 for research and 
        development for the activities under section 18 of this 
        Act at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau 
        of Standards, of which not less than $250,000 shall be 
        available for adjustments required by law in salaries, 
        pay, retirement, and employee benefits.
The funds authorized in paragraph (3) shall be in addition to 
funds authorized in any other law for research and development 
at the Fire Research Center.
  [(d) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated--
          [(1) $20,815,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1982, and $23,312,800 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1983, which amount shall include--
                  [(A) such sums as may be necessary for the 
                support of research and development at the Fire 
                Research Center of the National Bureau of 
                Standards under section 18 of this Act, which 
                sums shall be in addition to those funds 
                authorized to be appropriated under the 
                National Bureau of Standards Authorization Act 
                for fiscal years 1981 and 1982; and
                  [(B) $654,000 for the fiscal year ending 
                September 30, 1982, and $732,480 for the fiscal 
                year ending September 30, 1983, for executive 
                direction by the Federal Emergency Management 
                Agency of program activities for which 
                appropriations are authorized by this 
                subsection; and
          [(2) such further sums as may be necessary in each of 
        the fiscal years ending September 30, 1982, and 
        September 30, 1983, for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits 
        incurred in the conduct of activities for which funds 
        are authorized by paragraph (1) of this subsection.
The funds authorized under section 18 shall be in addition to 
funds authorized in any other law for research and development 
at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau of 
Standards.
  [(e) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated--
          [(1) $15,720,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1984, and $20,983,000 for the fiscal year ending 
        September 30, 1985; and
          [(2) such further sums as may be necessary in each of 
        the fiscal years ending September 30, 1984, and 
        September 30, 1985, for adjustments required by law in 
        salaries, pay, retirement, and employee benefits 
        incurred in the conduct of activities for which funds 
        are authorized by paragraph (1) of this subsection.
The funds authorized under this subsection shall be in addition 
to funds authorized in any other law for research and 
development at the Fire Research Center of the National Bureau 
of Standards.
  [(f) Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect 
to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, to carry 
out the purposes of this Act, there are authorized to be 
appropriated $22,037,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1986 and $18,300,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 1987.
  [(g)(1) Except as otherwise specifically provided with 
respect to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, 
there are authorized to be appropriated to carry out the 
purposes of this Act--
          [(A) $17,039,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1989;
          [(B) $17,737,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1990;
          [(C) $18,464,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1991;
          [(D) $25,550,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1992;
          [(E) $26,521,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1993;
          [(F) $27,529,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1994;
          [(G) $29,664,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1998; and
          [(H) $30,554,000 for the fiscal year ending September 
        30, 1999.
  [(2) Of the amount referred to in paragraph (1), not more 
than $4,150,000 is authorized to be appropriated for each 
fiscal year for National Emergency Training Center site 
administration.
  [(h) In addition to any other amounts that are authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this Act, there are authorized to 
be appropriated to carry out this Act--
          [(1) $500,000 for fiscal year 1995 for basic research 
        on the development of an advanced course on arson 
        prevention;
          [(2) $2,000,000 for fiscal year 1996 for the 
        expansion of arson investigator training programs at 
        the Academy under section 24 and at the Federal Law 
        Enforcement Training Center, or through regional 
        delivery sites;
          [(3) $4,000,000 for each of fiscal years 1995 and 
        1996 for carrying out section 25, except for salaries 
        and expenses for carrying out section 25; and
          [(4) $250,000 for each of the fiscal years 1995 and 
        1996 for salaries and expenses for carrying out section 
        25.]


                    authorization of appropriations


  Sec. 17. Except as otherwise specifically provided with 
respect to the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, 
there are authorized to be appropriated to carry out the 
purposes of this Act--
          (1) $30,554,000 for fiscal year 1999;
          (2) $46,130,000 for fiscal year 2000, of which 
        $2,200,000 shall be used for research activities, and 
        $250,000 shall be used for contracts or grants to non-
        Federal entities for data analysis, including general 
        fire profiles and special fire analyses and report 
        projects, and of which $6,000,000 shall be for anti-
        terrorism training, including associated curriculum 
        development, for fire and emergency services personnel; 
        and
          (3) $49,500,000 for fiscal year 2001, of which 
        $3,000,000 shall be used for research activities, and 
        $250,000 shall be used for contracts or grants to non-
        Federal entities for data analysis, including general 
        fire profiles and special fire analyses and report 
        projects, and of which $8,000,000 shall be for anti-
        terrorism training, including associated curriculum 
        development, for fire and emergency services personnel.
None of the funds authorized by paragraph (3) may be obligated 
unless the Administrator has certified to the Committee on 
Science of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate that the 
obligation offunds is consistent with the strategic plan 
transmitted under section 3 of the Fire Administration Authorization 
Act of 1999.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                         [conforming amendments

  [Sec. 23. Section 12 of the Act of February 14, 1903, as 
amended (15 U.S.C. 1511), is amended to read as follows:

                        [``bureaus in department

  [``Sec. 12. The following named bureaus, administrations, 
services, offices, and programs of the public service, and all 
that pertains thereto, shall be under the jurisdiction and 
subject to the control of the Secretary of Commerce:
  [``(a) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration;
  [``(b) United States Travel Service;
  [``(c) Maritime Administration;
  [``(d) National Bureau of Standards;
  [``(e) Patent Office;
  [``(f) Bureau of the Census;
  [``(g) National Fire Prevention and Control Administration; 
and
  [``(h) such other bureaus or other organizational units as 
the Secretary of Commerce may from time to time establish in 
accordance with law.'']

                    federal programs to combat arson

  Sec. 24. [(a) The] The Administrator shall--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [(b)(1) The Administrator shall prepare and submit to 
Congress not later than March 15, 1979, a report on ways in 
which the Federal Government may better assist the States and 
local jurisdictions in providing for more effective arson 
prevention, detection, and control. Such report shall include, 
but need not be limited to--
          [(A)(i) an assessment of State and local capabilities 
        in regard to arson investigation and detection; and
          [(ii) an evaluation of the necessity for and the 
        desirability of Federal supplementation of such State 
        and local capabilities or other Federal assistance in 
        arson detection;
          [(B) a summary of Federal programs which seek to 
        reduce arson;
          [(C) an identification and analysis of existing 
        Federal and State laws which may contribute to the 
        incidence of arson;
          [(D) recommendations for additional legislation or 
        other programs, including research programs, or 
        policies which may be required to assist in reducing 
        arson in the United States; and
          [(E) an assessment, where practical, of the costs and 
        benefits of those programs and activities cited in 
        paragraphs (1) through (4) of subsection (a) or 
        recommended by the Administration.
  [(2) Of the funds authorized to be appropriated in section 17 
of this Act, $100,000 shall be available in fiscal year 1979 
for carrying out the purposes of paragraph (1) of this 
subsection.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  [Sec. 26. (a) The Administrator shall, within ten months of 
the date of enactment of this section, complete a study of the 
effectiveness of smoke detectors, heat detectors, and sprinkler 
suppression systems in saving lives, preventing injuries, and 
limiting property damage in fires, which report shall be 
submitted to the Congress and the President in conducting such 
study, the Administrator shall consider, among other factors--
          [(1) whether and the extent to which such devices and 
        systems have been and are effective in reducing the 
        severity of fires, including estimates with respect to 
        the potential for savings in lives, and injury 
        prevention attributable to the operation of such 
        systems and devices;
          [(2) the experience of Federal organizations, States, 
        localities, and other political subdivisions which have 
        required the use of such systems and devices; and
          [(3) a description of Administration programs 
        regarding smoke detectors, heat detectors, sprinkler 
        suppression systems and other systems, together with an 
        analysis of the utilization of these systems, and 
        devices as a result of these programs.
  [(b) If the Administrator determines, as a result of the 
study conducted pursuant to subsection (a) of this section, 
that smoke detectors, heat detectors, sprinkler suppression 
systems or other similar systems or devices either have been or 
may be of assistance in the detection and control of fire, the 
Administrator shall include, as part of the report conducted 
pursuant to this section, recommendations regarding what should 
be the Federal role, if any, with respect to creating 
incentives for the use of such devices or systems by the 
public, by business concerns, and by Federal, State and local 
governments. In making such recommendations, the Administrator 
shall consider--
          [(1) the incentives, including financial incentives, 
        which might be developed to require or facilitate 
        installation within new or existing buildings of smoke 
        detectors, heat detectors, sprinkler suppression 
        systems, or any combination of such systems, or other 
        similar systems and devices; and
          [(2) the benefits, if any, of demonstration or other 
        such programs directed at residents in high impact fire 
        areas in order to increase the use of smoke detectors, 
        heat detectors, sprinkler suppression systems, or other 
        systems or devices.
  [(c) As part of its report submitted pursuant to this 
section, the Administrator shall provide specific legislative 
proposals to the Congress for implementing any recommendations 
made pursuant to this section.
  [(d) Upon request of the Administrator, each Federal 
department and agency shall furnish to the Administrator such 
information, data, estimates, and statistics, and allow the 
Administrator access to all information in its possession, as 
the Administrator may reasonably determine to be necessary for 
the conduct of the study required by this section.

                       [firefighter safety study

  [Sec. 27. (a) The Administrator shall conduct a review of 
fire-fighter safety. Such review shall include, but need not be 
limited to--
          [(1) an analysis of the current situation with 
        respect to the safety of firefighters;
          [(2) an analysis of the effectiveness of protective 
        garments, firefighting breathing equipment, personal 
        communications systems, and other protective 
        subsystems, together with recommendations for improving 
        such equipment in order to further firefighting safety;
          [(3) development of a plan for increased technology 
        transfer to firefighting units of more effective 
        technologies in the areas identified in paragraph (2) 
        of this subsection.
  [(b) The Administrator shall submit to Congress the results 
of such review, together with appropriate recommendations for 
legislation, not later than March 31, 1980.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 33. SURPLUS AND EXCESS FEDERAL EQUIPMENT.

  The Administrator shall make publicly available, including 
through the Internet, information on procedures for acquiring 
surplus and excess Federal fire, emergency, hazardous material, 
or other equipment or property that may be useful to State and 
local fire and emergency services.

SEC. 34. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH FEDERAL FACILITIES.

  The Administrator shall make publicly available, including 
through the Internet, information on procedures for 
establishing cooperative agreements between State and local 
fire and emergency services and Federal facilities in their 
region relating to the provision of fire and emergency 
services.
                              ----------                              


               SECTION 4 OF THE ACT OF DECEMBER 14, 1993

     AN ACT To make a technical amendment, and for other purposes.

[SEC. 4. EXCEPTION TO FIRE SAFETY REQUIREMENT FOR NEWLY CONSRUCTED 
                    MULTIFAMILY PROPERTY.

  [In the case of any newly constucted multifamily property, as 
defined in section 31(c)(2)(A)(ii) of the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974, in the city of New York in 
the State of New York, the requirement contained in section 
31(c)(2)(A)(i) of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act 
of 1974 with respect to an automatic sprinkler system shall be 
deemed to be met if such property meets an equivalent level of 
safety (as defined in section 31(a)(3) of such Act).]

                    XVIII. Committee Recommendations

    On April 29, 1999, a quorum being present, the Committee 
favorably reported H.R. 1550, the Fire Administration 
Authorization Act of 1999, by a voice vote, and recommends its 
enactment.

               XIX. Proceedings of Full Committee Markup

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The next bill on the markup 
calendar is H.R. 1550, U.S. Fire Administration Authorization 
Act of 1999. This bill reauthorizes the training, research, 
data collection and analysis, and public education programs of 
the United States Fire Academy--the Fire Administration, which 
includes the National Fire Academy. This year marks the 25th 
anniversary of the Fire Prevention and Control Act establishing 
the Fire Administration, so this seems like an appropriate time 
for Congress to undertake a review of the agency.
    Since its formation in 1974, the Fire Administration has 
played an important role in reducing the loss to life and 
property from fire. But recently, many in the firefighting 
community have begun questioning the value of a Fire 
Administration that appears to have lost its way. These 
concerns were given voice in the recent Blue Ribbon Panel 
report. This panel of experts was commissioned by FEMA Director 
James Lee Witt and identified a number of deficiencies that 
have undermined the agency's effectiveness. This bill will, I 
believe, help get the Fire Administration back on track, 
especially in research, an area that has been neglected in 
recent years.
    The bill not only authorizes additional funding for all the 
agency's programs, it also requires detailed planning on how 
that money will be spent without resorting to micromanagement. 
I would like to commend Mr. Smith, the Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on Basic Research, and Ms. Johnson, the Ranking 
Minority Member of the Subcommittee, for all their work in 
producing a balanced bill that will rejuvenate and strengthen 
the Fire Administration, and it deserves strong and broad 
bipartisan support.
    The gentleman from Michigan, Mr. Smith is recognized for an 
opening statement.
    Mr. Smith. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. H.R. 1550 is 
legislation that I hope is the beginning of a commitment from 
Congress to increase support for our firefighters and emergency 
personnel. Firefighters and EMS personnel are vital to every 
community in our country. They risk their lives, yet 80 percent 
of these men and women are volunteers. H.R. 1550 is a bill that 
addresses problems and will help the Fire Administration meet 
its responsibility.
    The bill authorizes $45.1 million for the Fiscal Year 
2000--$2.2 million is set aside for research. That's four times 
the research money that's used in this current year. The 
overall authorization is consistent with the Administration's 
request and represents an increase of $12.9 million, or nearly 
40 percent, over Fiscal Year 1999. For Fiscal Year 2001, the 
bill authorizes a 5 percent increaseover the 1999 level to 
$47.5 million, increasing the research money to $3 million for 
directed--for research. The bill directs the administrator to certify 
to Congress that the obligation of funds for Fiscal Year 2001 is 
consistent with a strategic plan required in section 3 of the bill.
    The language requiring the strategic plan for the Fire 
Administration is modeled after the Government Performance and 
Results Act. And, while it's important for FEMA to incorporate 
the Fire Administration into its federal disaster planning, 
it's also important for the Fire Administration, individually, 
separately, to establish priorities that will be more effective 
in reducing life and property loss from fire.
    The strategic plan language also directs the Fire 
Administration to look for ways to coordinate with other 
federal agencies, especially the Department of Defense. And it 
will provide an appropriate vehicle for incorporating the 
recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel. I worked with the 
Department of Defense authorizers to include language in their 
bill that will result in closer cooperation, especially in the 
area of terrorism and weapons of mass destruction.
    In addition to a substantial increase for research in 
section 2, H.R. 1550 also directs the Fire Administration to 
establish a research agenda. Research is one of the four main 
activities of the Fire Administration, however, this year, 
research efforts are only $650,000. Coupled with the increased 
authorization, this research agenda will allow the Fire 
Administration to set priorities and give research a more 
central role in its activities. This section of the bill also 
directs the Fire Administration to take stock of research being 
conducted at the Department of Defense and all other 
appropriate federal agencies.
    H.R. 1550 increases assistance to community fire 
departments for the acquisition of excess and surplus federal 
equipment.
    Finally, consistent with the oversight agenda adopted by 
the Committee, the bill deletes obsolete provisions of the 
statute.
    In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, we've made great strides in 
reducing losses from fire. Between 1985 and 1994, fire deaths 
decreased 32 percent and the property losses from fire 
decreased by over 13 percent. Nonetheless, the losses due to 
fire remain unacceptably high. Each year, fire still destroys 
over 4,000 lives, injures another 25,000, and results in 
property losses of about $9 billion a year. We can and must do 
better for our citizens and for the firefighters who risk their 
lives to protect their communities. This bill will strengthen 
the federal fire programs and improve training and research.
    And, before closing, I would like to thank the gentlewoman 
from Texas, Ms. Johnson, for her important support and, Mr. 
Chairman, thank you for your efforts in bringing the bill 
before the Committee today. H.R. 1550 is an important piece of 
legislation that I ask all my colleagues to support.
    [The information follows:]

                  Opening Statement of Hon. Nick Smith

    Thank you, Mr. Chairman. As you said in your opening 
statement, there is a great deal of concern about the situation 
at Fire Administration, both within Congress and the fire-
services community. H.R. 1550 is a bill that addresses these 
problems and will help the agency meet its responsibilities.
    H.R. 1550 authorizes $45.1 million for FY 2000, $2.2 
million of which is set aside for research. This authorization 
is consistent with the Administration's request and represents 
an increase of $12.9 million, or nearly 40 percent, over the 
Fiscal Year 1999 level.
    For Fiscal year 2001, the bill authorizes a 5.3 percent 
increase, to $47.5 million, $3.0 million of which is for 
research. There is, however, a string attached. The bill 
directs the Administrator to certify to Congress that the 
obligation of funds for Fiscal Year 2001 is consistent with the 
strategic plan required in Section 3 of the bill.
    The language requiring the strategic plan is modeled 
closely after that in the Government Performance and Results 
Act. I would note that in FEMA's strategic plan, the Fire 
Administration is mentioned very little. We should keep in mind 
that for the most part, fires are personal tragedies, not 
Federal ones. So while it is important for FEMA to incorporate 
the Fire Administration into its Federal-disaster planning, it 
is also important for the Fire Administration to establish 
priorities of its own that, when taken in the aggregate, can 
have a huge impact in reduced life and property loss from fire. 
The strategic-plan language also directs the Fire 
Administration to look for ways to coordinate with other 
Federal agencies, especially the Department of Defense, and 
will provide an appropriate vehicle for incorporating the 
recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel.
    In addition to the substantial increase for research in 
Section 2, H.R. 1550 also directs the Fire Administration to 
establish a research agenda. Research is one of the four main 
activities of the Fire Administration, but recently the agency 
has paid less and less attention to it. In Fiscal Year 1999, 
for example, the Fire Administration budgeted only $650,000 for 
research. Coupled with the increased authorizations, this 
research agenda will compel the Fire Administration to set 
priorities and give research a more central role in its 
activities. This section of the bill also directs the Fire 
Administration to take stock of research being conducted at the 
Department of Defense and other Federal agencies when 
developing its agenda.
    H.R. 1550 also requires the Fire Administration to make 
accessible, including through the Internet, information on the 
availability of, and the procedures for acquiring, excess and 
surplus Federal equipment and on the procedures for 
establishing a cooperative agreement with a Federal facility, 
such as a local National Guard base. Finally, consistent with 
the Oversight Agenda adopted by the Committee, the bill deletes 
obsolete provisions of the statute.
    Mr. Chairman, we have made great strides in reducing losses 
from fire. Between 1985 and 1994, fire deaths decreased 32 
percent and the property losses for fire have decreased by over 
13 percent. Nevertheless, the losses due to fire remain 
unacceptably high. Each year, fire still destroys over 4,000 
lives, injures another 25,000, and results in property losses 
of about $9 billion.
    We can and must do better for our citizens and for the 
firefighters who risk their lives to protect their communities. 
Together with strong oversight, H.R. 1550 will strengthen 
Federal fire programs and improve training and research.
    Before closing, I would like to thank the Gentlewoman from 
Texas, Ms. Johnson, for her input and support and you, Mr. 
Chairman, for your efforts in bringing the bill before the 
Committee today. I think that it is important that we also note 
the tremendous contribution of the Blue Ribbon Panel to the 
Committee's efforts. Their advice and guidance will result in a 
Fire Administration that will serve more ably the fire services 
in this country.
    H.R. 1550 is an important piece of legislation and I ask my 
colleagues to support it.

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentleman's time has expired. 
The gentlewoman from Texas, Ms. Johnson, the Ranking Member of 
the Subcommittee.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. The Fire 
Administration has long enjoyed the bipartisan support of the 
Science Committee because of its vital mission to improve the 
safety of all of our citizens. I would like to commend Mr. 
Smith, the Chairman of the Basic Research Subcommittee, for 
working with us in a collegial way in developing H.R. 1550, and 
I also thank you for bringing the bill before the Committee for 
its consideration.
    The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 was 
intended to address a serious problem affecting the safety of 
all Americans. Much progress has been made during the past 25 
years in public education about fire safety and improving the 
effectiveness of fire services and the wider use of home fire 
safety devices. Nevertheless, the United States still has one 
of the highest fire death rates among advanced nations. The 
bill before the Committee seeks to reinvigorate the efforts of 
the Fire Administration.
    I am pleased that it endorses the President's Fiscal Year 
2000 proposal for a 40 percent funding increase. Although this 
increase will raise the Fire budget to over $45 million, it 
still pales compared to the scale contemplated for the agency. 
The landmark report, America Burning, which was the genesis of 
the 1974 Act, recommended an initial budget for the Fire 
Administration of $124 million in then-year dollars.
    The bill is a good start to providing the level of 
resources the Fire Administration needs to carry out its 
important mission. H.R. 1550, as introduced, will enable the 
Fire Administration to increase support for its critical 
responsibility for firefighter training through the National 
Fire Academy. Moreover, the budget growth will enable the 
agency to reverse the steep decline in support for fire 
research and for public education programs, especially programs 
to reach the elderly and the poor populations which are most at 
risk from fire injuries. I will suggest report language at the 
appropriate time dealing with these areas.
    In addition to the funding, the bill establishes a 
requirement for a 5-year program plan for the agency. This plan 
will constitute the formal documentation of the Fire 
Administration's response to the recommendation of last year's 
Blue Ribbon Panel report. I still have some questions about the 
mixed messages from the White House that I've received, and Mr. 
Witt. And I appreciate the commitment to hold hearings before 
the next Committee review.
    Part of the progress required for developing this plan will 
include consultation with NIST and the Fire Service 
organizations to establish a prioritized set of research goals. 
I am particularly interested in seeing that this research 
prioritization place adequate emphasis on development of 
firefighter protection equipment. I am pleased to recommend the 
measure to my colleagues for their approval. Thank you, Mr. 
Chairman.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentlewoman's time has expired. 
Without objection, further opening statements will be inserted 
into the record at this point.
    And the bill--without objection, the bill will be read the 
first time and open for amendment at any point.
    [The information follows:]
                               H.R. 1550
  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Fire Administration Authorization Act 
of 1999''.

SEC. 2. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  Section 17 of the Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 (15 
U.S.C. 2216) is amended to read as follows:
                   ``authorization of appropriations
  ``Sec. 17. Except as otherwise specifically provided with respect to 
the payment of claims under section 11 of this Act, there are 
authorized to be appropriated to carry out the purposes of this Act--
          ``(1) $30,554,000 for fiscal year 1999;
          ``(2) $45,130,000 for fiscal year 2000, of which $2,200,000 
        shall be used for research activities; and
          ``(3) $47,500,000 for fiscal year 2001, of which $3,000,000 
        shall be used for research activities.
None of the funds authorized by paragraph (3) may be obligated unless 
the Administrator has certified to the Committee on Science of the 
House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate that the obligation of funds is consistent 
with the strategic plan transmitted under section 3 of the Fire 
Administration Authorization Act of 1999.''.

SEC. 3. STRATEGIC PLAN.

  (a) Requirement.--Not later than April 30, 2000, the Administrator of 
the United States Fire Administration shall prepare and transmit to the 
Committee on Science of the House of Representatives and the Committee 
on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a 5-year 
strategic plan of program activities for the United States Fire 
Administration.
  (b) Contents of Plan.--The plan required by subsection (a) shall 
include--
          (1) a comprehensive mission statement covering the major 
        functions and operations of the United States Fire 
        Administration in the areas of training, research, data 
        collection and analysis, and public education;
          (2) general goals and objectives, including those related to 
        outcomes, for the major functions and operations of the United 
        States Fire Administration;
          (3) a description of how the goals and objectives identified 
        under paragraph (2) are to be achieved, including operational 
        processes, skills and technology, and the human, capital, 
        information, and other resources required to meet those goals 
        and objectives;
          (4) an identification of the fire-related activities of the 
        National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Department 
        of Defense, and other Federal agencies, and a discussion of how 
        those activities can be coordinated with and contribute to the 
        achievement of the goals and objectives identified under 
        paragraph (2);
          (5) a description of objective, quantifiable performance 
        goals needed to define the level of performance achieved by 
        program activities in training, research, data collection and 
        analysis, and public education, and how these performance goals 
        relate to the general goals and objectives in the strategic 
        plan;
          (6) an identification of key factors external to the United 
        States Fire Administration and beyond its control that could 
        affect significantly the achievement of the general goals and 
        objectives;
          (7) a description of program evaluations used in establishing 
        or revising general goals and objectives, with a schedule for 
        future program evaluations; and
          (8) a description of how the strategic plan prepared under 
        this section will be incorporated into the strategic plan and 
        the performance plans and reports of the Federal Emergency 
        Management Agency.

SEC. 4. RESEARCH AGENDA.

  (a) Requirement.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the United States Fire 
Administration, in consultationwith the Director of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency, the Director of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, representatives of trade associations, State 
and local firefighting services, and other appropriate entities, shall 
prepare and transmit to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate a report describing the United States Fire 
Administration's research agenda and including a plan for implementing 
that agenda.
    (b) Contents of Report.--The report required by subsection (a) 
shall--
    (1) identify research priorities;
    (2) describe how the proposed research agenda will be coordinated 
and integrated with the programs and capabilities of the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, the Department of Defense, and 
other Federal agencies;
    (3) identify potential roles of academic and other research 
institutions in achieving the research agenda;
    (4) provide cost estimates, anticipated personnel needs, and a 
schedule for completing the various elements of the research agenda;
    (5) describe ways to leverage resources through partnerships, 
cooperative agreements, and other means; and
    (6) discuss how the proposed research agenda will enhance training, 
improve State and local firefighting services, impact standards and 
codes, increase firefighter and public safety, and advance firefighting 
techniques.
    (c) Use in Preparing Strategic Plan.--The research agenda prepared 
under this section shall be used in the preparation of the strategic 
plan required by section 3.

SEC. 5. SURPLUS AND EXCESS FEDERAL EQUIPMENT.

    The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 33. SURPLUS AND EXCESS FEDERAL EQUIPMENT.

    ``The Administrator shall make publicly available, including 
through the Internet, information on procedures for acquiring surplus 
and excess Federal fire, emergency, hazardous material, or other 
equipment or property that may be useful to State and local fire and 
emergency services.''.

SEC. 6. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH FEDERAL FACILITIES.

    The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 34. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH FEDERAL FACILITIES.

    ``The Administrator shall make publicly available, including 
through the Internet, information on procedures for establishing 
cooperative agreements between State and local fire and emergency 
services and Federal facilities in their region relating to the 
provision of fire and emergency services.''.

SEC. 7. MISCELLANEOUS REPEALS.

    The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended--
    (1) by repealing section 10(b) and redesignating subsection (c) of 
that section as subsection (b);
    (2) by repealing section 23;
    (3) in section 24--
    (A) by striking ``(a) The'' and inserting ``The''; and
    (B) by repealing subsection (b);
    (4) by repealing section 26; and
    (5) by repealing section 27.

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The first amendment on the roster 
is by the gentleman from Colorado, Mr. Udall. And, in the 
interest of time, the Chair is going to make you an offer you 
can't refuse. [Laughter.]
    I notice you also have amendment number six. If you would 
like to offer them both at the same time, you can get a two for 
one.
    Mr. Udall. Mr. Chair, I'd be glad to work with you on this.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Okay. The clerk will report the 
amendments.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mr. Udall----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendments 
will be considered as read. They are also considered en bloc.
    [The information follows:]
        Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mr. Udall of Colorado
    Page 2, line 11, strike ``$45,130,000'' and insert ``$46,130,000''.
    Page 2, line 12, insert ``, and of which $6,000,000 shall be for 
anti-terrorism training, including associated curriculum development, 
for fire and emergency services personnel'' after ``for research 
activities''.
    Page 2, line 13, strike ``$47,500,000'' and insert ``$49,500,000''.
    Page 2, line 14, insert ``, and of which $8,000,000 shall be for 
anti-terrorism training, including associated curriculum development, 
for fire and emergency services personnel'' after ``for research 
activities''.
    Page 7, after line 24, insert the following new section:

SEC. 8. NEED FOR ADDITIONAL TRAINING IN COUNTERTERRORISM.

    (a) In General.--The Administrator of the United States Fire 
Administration shall conduct an assessment of the need for additional 
capabilities for Federal counterterrorism training of emergency 
response personnel.
    (b) Contents of Assessment.--The assessment conducted under this 
section shall include--
          (1) a review of the counterterrorism training programs 
        offered by the United States Fire Administration and other 
        Federal agencies;
          (2) an estimate of the number and types of emergency response 
        personnel that have, during the period between January 1, 1994, 
        and June 1, 1999, sought training described in paragraph (1), 
        but have been unable to receive that training as a result of 
        the oversubscription of the training capabilities; and
          (3) a recommendation on the need to provide additional 
        Federal counterterrorism training centers, including--
                  (A) an analysis of existing Federal facilities that 
                could be used as counterterrorism training facilities; 
                and
                  (B) a cost-benefit analysis of the establishment of 
                counterterrorism training facilities in regions where 
                many applicants for such training reside.
    (c) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall prepare and submit to 
the Congress a report on the results of the assessment conducted under 
this section.

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. And the gentleman from Colorado is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
    Mr. Udall. Thank you, Mr. Chair. I'd like to begin by 
indicating my strong support for H.R. 1550. I intend to offer 
two amendments en bloc in order to strengthen our 
counterterrorism training efforts. As we experience more 
instances of domestic terrorism, it is vital that our 
responders are trained to address possibilities of terrorist 
attack. We are now facing a situation in which a policeman, 
paramedic, or firefighter can be called upon to deal with a 
terrorist scenario.
    At Oklahoma City, the incident commander was the fire 
chief. The law enforcement emergency professionals and others 
reported to him. In the future, training received at the 
National Fire Academy might mean life or death, not just for 
our first responders, but for uncountable numbers of people. It 
is essential that the Fire Administration have the resources 
necessary to help meet the anti-terrorism training needs of the 
Fire Services.
    My first amendment increases the authorization level for 
the Fire Administration's anti-terrorist training activities by 
$1 million for the Fiscal Year 2000 and by an additional $2 
million for the Fiscal Year 2001. These increases will raise 
the total funding level for this important activity to $6 
million per year in the first year and to $8 million, or twice 
the current level, by the second year.
    I've looked back at the report that the Committee issued 
when it authorized the Fire Administration in 1997. In the 
report, the Committee fully approved of the expansion of the 
agency's anti-terrorism training activities. It said that, 
quote, ``The Committee supports the USFA's role in 
counterterrorism training because training for counterterrorism 
in many ways mirrors and/or supplements existing USFA-sponsored 
training programs for major fires, natural disasters, and 
hazardous materials accidents.'' The report goes on to stress 
that support for these important training activities should not 
come at the expense of existing USFA programs.
    I just doubt that the $5 million per year now in the bill 
for the development of curricular materials and for conducting 
training classes will be sufficient to meet the needs of the 
35,000 fire departments across the country. I would note that 
the Blue Ribbon Panel convened last year by FEMA Director Witt 
recommends that the Fire Administration budget for natural 
disaster and terrorism response activities be $15 million. 
That's why I'm proposing this increase.
    My second amendment is related to the first. It would 
direct the United States Fire Administration to assess the need 
for additional capabilities for federal counterterrorism 
training of emergency response personnel. We need to know how 
adequate our current efforts are, what our current need is, and 
how best to satisfy that need in the event that the demand for 
training exceeds our current capacity for training.
    My amendments seek to ensure that the past concerns that 
this Committee's addressed, and an important activity of the 
Fire Administration, is placed on a reasonable growth track, 
consistent with the Blue Ribbon Panel's recommendation. 
Terrorism is a problem that has reached epidemic proportions 
and I feel strongly that, whenever possible, the Science 
Committee should do its part to protect Americans from this 
National threat. I urge support for these amendments. I thank 
you for your help, Mr. Chairman, and I yield back.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Will the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Udall. I yield back.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. I believe that both of these 
amendments are very constructive additions to the bill and we 
are prepared to accept them. The time of the gentleman has 
expired.
    Is there any further discussion on the amendments en bloc 
offered by the gentleman from Colorado?
    Hearing none, all those in favor will signify by saying 
aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it and 
theamendments are agreed to.
    The next amendment on the roster is one proposed by the 
gentlewoman from Illinois, Ms. Biggert. For what purpose does 
she rise?
    Mrs. Biggert. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the 
amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mrs. 
Biggert----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read.
    [The information follows:]
             Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mrs. Biggert
    Page 2, line 12, insert ``, and $250,000 shall be used for 
contracts or grants to non-Federal entities for data analysis, 
including general fire profiles and special fire analyses and report 
projects'' after ``activities''.
    Page 2, line 14, insert ``, and $250,000 shall be used for 
contracts or grants to non-Federal entities for data analysis, 
including general fire profiles and special fire analyses and report 
projects'' after ``activities''.

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentlewoman is recognized for 5 
minutes.
    Mrs. Biggert. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. The amendment that I 
offer today to H.R. 1550 would promote greater efficiency and 
flexibility within the United States Fire Administration while 
returning to the private sector the things done best there. 
This amendment reserves $500,000 over 2 years to implement a 
key recommendation of the FEMA Blue Ribbon Panel that 
identified outsourcing of the data analysis function.
    The panel reported that, by outsourcing its data analysis 
activities, USFA can focus its scarce resources more intensely 
on improving and preserving the National Fire Incident 
Reporting System. Outsourcing of the analysis function can be 
accomplished easily through cooperative agreements, grants and 
contracts with any number of entities in the private and not-
for-profit sectors. USFA would not have to hire additional 
economists or statisticians and current USFA staff would be 
free to focus on what they do best--the collection of the data.
    Mr. Chairman, this amendment would implement the Blue 
Ribbon Panel's recommendation and encourage the Fire 
Administration to outsource some data analysis activities now 
conducted in-house. The Blue Ribbon Panel even recommended 
$250,000 per year for this activity. The Fire Service community 
made it clear through the panel that is supports this 
recommendation and I ask my colleagues to support it as well.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentlewoman's time has expired. 
Is there further discussion on the Biggert amendment?
    Hearing none, all those in favor of the Biggert amendment 
will signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    The third amendment on the roster is one by the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania, Mr. Weldon. For what purpose does he rise?
    Mr. Weldon of Pennsylvania. Mr. Chairman, I have an 
amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the 
amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mr. Weldon of 
Pennsylvania----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read and the gentleman is recognized for 5 
minutes.
    [The information follows:]
      Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mr. Weldon of Pennsylvania
    Page 4, line 16, strike ``and''.
    Page 4, after line 16, insert the following new paragraph:
          (8) a plan for the timely distribution of information and 
        educational materials to State and local firefighting services, 
        including volunteer, career, and combination services 
        throughout the United States; and
    Page 4, line 17, strike ``(8)'' and insert ``(9)''.

    Mr. Weldon of Pennsylvania. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. 
Chairman, first of all, let me congratulate the Subcommittee 
Chairman and Ranking Member for bringing this bill forward and 
for your leadership and the full Committee Ranking Member's 
leadership on issues involving the Fire Service.
    This amendment is simple and straightforward. It simply 
asks the United States Fire Administration to provide a more 
detailed capability to disseminate information to the 32,000 
fire and EMS departments in this country, 85 percent of whom 
are volunteer. This is an ongoing need. USFA is not meeting 
that in a timely way, according to the major fire service 
groups, and this amendment simply asks the Fire Administration 
to provide a system of distribution as part of their strategic 
plan. I think it's very logical and it's something I think USFA 
in fact will welcome.
    While I have the time, Mr. Chairman, I would also like to 
just briefly comment on some of the amendments that are dealing 
with training for the 1.2 million fire and EMS people in this 
country. Unfortunately, while there are hundreds of millions of 
dollars of training and resources that are supposedly aimed at 
the fire and EMS community nationwide, we've had a very 
difficult time getting those dollars down to the firefighter 
and the EMS personnel.
    Part of that has been because--or part of that has been, in 
my opinion, because the Fire Administration did not take an 
aggressive role when this country was debating what way to 
respond to anti-terrorism initiatives. DOD did come in 
aggressively and so did the Department of Justice. As a result, 
the irony here is that hundreds of millions of dollars are 
being spent on training local fire and emergency response 
personnel and yet none of that is coming out of the 
jurisdiction of this Committee or even the Fire Administration. 
It's being carried out by the Department of Justice. It's being 
carried out by the Department of Defense. And it is a 
significant amount of money, far, far greater than the total 
budget of the United States Fire Administration.
    To some extent, I think that's an indictment of the Fire 
Administration and the need for us to provide more support to 
have them become more progressive. At out annual dinner last 
week, James Lee Witt announced that he is, in fact, creating a 
new position within FEMA to become an advocate on behalf of the 
Fire Service of this country. It is long overdue. But I would 
just encourage my colleagues to understand that many of their 
frustrations should not be because of lack of resources, 
because they are there. They are there in the hundreds of 
millions of dollars.
    The problem is those resources are being directed by 
agencies who do not directly report to the men and women they 
are servicing. They report to the Pentagon and they report to 
the FBI and the Department of Justice. And that is extremely 
unfortunate, and that's something that we're trying to rectify.
    The other point I'd mention is that I'm working with the 
Subcommittee Chair to make sure that the Defense assets we're 
putting into fire research are totally coordinated with the 
Fire Service community. We spend a significant amount of money 
each year in the Department of Defense on researching fire and 
life safety and we're trying to bring those two together, and 
the Chairman has been tireless in his efforts in making sure 
that happens in this session of the Congress.
    So, with that, I would ask for support of the amendment 
that I outlined earlier.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentleman yields back the 
balance of this time. Is there further discussion on the Weldon 
of Pennsylvania amendment?
    Hearing none, all those in favor of agreeing to the 
amendment will signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    The next amendment on the list is one by the gentleman from 
Connecticut, Mr. Larson. For what purpose does he seek 
recognition?
    Mr. Larson. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the 
amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mr. Larson--
--
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read.
    [The information follows:]
              Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mr. Larson
  Page 4, line 16, strike ``and''.
  Page 4, line 21, strike the period and insert ``; and''.
  Page 4, after line 21, insert the following new paragraph:
          (9)(A) a description of the current and planned use of the 
        Internet for the delivery of training courses by the National 
        Fire Academy, including a listing of the types of courses and 
        whether they provide real time interaction between instructor 
        and students, and including the number of students enrolled, 
        and the geographic distribution of students, for the most 
        recent fiscal year;
          (B) an assessment of the availability and actual use by the 
        National Fire Academy of Federal facilities suitable for 
        distance education applications, including facilities with 
        teleconferencing capabilities; and
          (C) an assessment of the benefits and problems associated 
        with delivery of instructional courses using the Internet, 
        including limitations due to network bandwidth at training 
        sites, the availability of suitable course materials, and the 
        effectiveness of such courses in terms of student performance.

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. And the gentleman from Connecticut 
is recognized for 5 minutes.
    Mr. Larson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, let me 
start by acknowledging the very hard work put in by 
Representative Smith and Representative Johnson. As you know, 
the Fire Administration Authorization Act, known as H.R. 1550, 
includes a requirement for a 5 year strategic plan, laying out 
the agency's overall goals and program activities.
    The purpose of my amendment is to add to the provision, to 
assess within the strategic plan the benefits of distance 
learning for fire education for local fire departments. The 
amendment accomplishes this by calling for the full 
consideration of how the Internet is now used, and could be 
used more effectively in the future, to deliver the National 
Fire Academy training courses at remote sites.
    Secondly, by requiring the Fire Administration to review 
its current training activities on the Internet and to assess 
the benefits and problems associated with the Internet use for 
training and asking for an inquiry into the availability of 
federal facilities with advanced telecommunications 
capabilities that can be used as a remote setting for the Fire 
Academy courses. In particular, teleconferencing facilities 
that would permit interaction between students and the 
instructor.
    Lastly, Mr. Chairman, I would call for the unanimous 
support of the Committee and, again, compliment my colleagues 
for the hard work that they've put in on the bill. And I would 
yield back my time.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Will the gentleman yield, just 
briefly. This is another good amendment and we are prepared to 
accept it. The gentleman's time has expired.
    Further discussion on the Larson amendment?
    Hearing none, the question is on agreeing to the amendment. 
All those in favor will signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    The next amendment on the roster is one by the gentleman 
from Oklahoma, Mr. Lucas. For what purpose does the gentleman 
seek recognition?
    Mr. Lucas. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the 
amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mr. Lucas----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read.
    [The information follows:]
              Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mr. Lucas
  Page 7, after line 24, insert the following new section:

SEC. 8. NATIONAL FIRE ACADEMY CURRICULUM REVIEW.

  (a) In General.--The Administrator of the United States Fire 
Administration, in consultation with the Board Visitors and 
representatives of trade and professional associations, State and local 
firefighting services, and other appropriate entities, shall conduct a 
review of the courses of instruction available at the National Fire 
Academy to ensure that they are up-to-date and complement, not 
duplicate, courses of instruction offered elsewhere. Not later than 180 
days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall 
prepare and submit a report to the Committee on Science of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate.
  (b) Contents of Report.--The report required by subsection (a) 
shall--
          (1) examine and assess the courses of instruction offered by 
        the National Fire Academy;
          (2) identify redundant and out-of-date courses of 
        instruction;
          (3) examine the current and future impact of information 
        technology on National Fire Academy curricula, methods of 
        instruction, and delivery of services; and
          (4) make recommendations for updating the curriculum, methods 
        of instruction, and delivery of services by the National Fire 
        Academy considering current and future needs, State-based 
        curricula, advances in information technologies, and other 
        relevant factors.

    Chairman Sensenbrenner. And the gentleman from Oklahoma is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
    Mr. Lucas. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. The amendment I am 
offering today would require the Fire Administration to conduct 
a review of the courses of instruction it offers through the 
National Fire Academy. The purpose of this amendment is to 
ensure that the courses offered complement, and do not 
duplicate, courses offered elsewhere, such as at the State 
level, and to get the Fire Academy to think about ways in which 
it can more effectively deliver its courses and services.
    The Blue Ribbon Panel made a compelling case for such an 
assessment in its report. The committee also heard the 
testimony from the Chairman of that Panel on the need to make 
sure that the courses delivered to the leadership of the 
Nation's fire services are courses that cannot be offered 
elsewhere. He also stressed the importance of distance learning 
and getting more instructors out into the states.
    Mr. Chairman, this amendment fulfills a real need 
recognized by the fire services community. The importance of 
the courses offered by the National Fire Academy should be 
comparable to those offered at other Federal institutions. This 
amendment will help ensure that the people who put their lives 
at risk every day protecting our fellow citizens receive the 
best training anywhere in the country, and I ask my colleagues 
to support this amendment. And I yield back.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Further discussion on the Lucas 
amendment?
    Hearing none, all those in favor of agreeing to the 
amendment, will signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    Amendment number six by Mr. Udall has already been taken 
care of. The next amendment is by the gentleman from 
California, Mr. Kuykendall. For what purpose does he seek 
recognition?
    Mr. Kuydendall. I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the 
amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mr. 
Kuykendall----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read and the gentleman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
    [The information follows:]
            Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mr. Kuykendall
    Page 7, after line 24, insert the following new section:

SEC. 8. INTERNET AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION.

    The Administrator of the United States Fire Administration shall 
make available through the Internet home page of the United States Fire 
Administration the abstracts relating to all research grants and awards 
made with funds authorized by the amendments made by this Act. Nothing 
in this section shall be construed to require or permit the release of 
any information prohibited by law or regulation from being released to 
the public.

    Mr. Kuykendall. Again, Mr. Chairman, this is very similar 
to the previous amendment that I offered. It puts the grant or 
the research grant information up on the Internet. I think it's 
interesting that we've had several of those already come before 
us, or another amendment at least, before us. The Internet is 
obviously a new, very vital communication link, and we need to 
make this kind of information available to the constituencies 
across the country that rely on these dollars for doing 
research. And I would urge your passage of it to ensure that 
the research grant information is on the Internet.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentleman yields back the 
balance of his time. Further discussion on the Kuykendall 
amendment?
    Hearing none, all those in favor of agreeing to the 
amendment will signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    The next amendment on the roster is by the gentleman from 
New York, Mr. Weiner. For what purpose does he seek 
recognition?
    Mr. Weiner. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Clerk will report the amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Mr. Weiner--
--
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read and the gentleman from New York is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
    [The information follows:]
              Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Mr. Weiner
    Page 7, after line 24, insert the following new section:

SEC. 8. REPEAL OF EXCEPTION TO FIRE SAFETY REQUIREMENT.

    (a) Repeal.--Section 4 of Public Law 103-195 (107 Stat. 2298) is 
hereby repealed.
    (b) Effective Date.--Subsection (a) shall take effect 1 year after 
the date of the enactment of this section.

    Mr. Weiner.Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I want to thank and 
commend the Chairman of the Full Committee and the Ranking 
Member for their work on this bill and also the Chair of the 
Subcommittee, Mr. Smith, and Ms. Johnson, the Ranking Member.
    This amendment that I'm offering closes a loophole that was 
created in 1993 to allow New York City Federally-funded housing 
to not have the National fire standards, instead, to allow 
equivalent standards to be used. This amendment that I'm 
offering was in a bill that was offered by Congressman Maloney 
and others of us in the New York delegation.
    In fact, since 1993, since this exception was created, 
there have been no exemptions granted by HUD because the fire 
standards that were proposed to be used in New York City 
housing were not up to the standards of the Federal law. What 
we have seen in recent years, unfortunately, is too many 
instances, including one dramatic instance in January, where 
sprinklers were not used and the fire standards that were 
applied were simply not up to the standards.
    What my amendment would do would be essentially to remove 
that exception from New York City housing. It would have the 
one beneficial effect of providing the same Federal standards 
to New York City housing. And a second effect would be to make 
it easier for builders and developers in New York City to 
understand the rules of the road a littlebit more clearly. It 
would allow the Federal standards to be applied uniformly.
    I have been in contact with members of the New York City 
delegation who are near, I think, complete support of this 
amendment. In addition, I have also reached out to folks who do 
building in the New York City area who recognize that this 
would make their lives a lot easier by providing the 
standardization of the rules.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Will the gentleman yield?
    Mr. Weiner. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, I yield back.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. We are happy to note New York City 
wants to join the rest of the country in this respect.
    The gentleman's time has expired.
    Any further discussion of the Weiner amendment. Hearing 
none, all those in favor signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it, and the 
amendment is agreed to.
    It is my understanding that amendment number nine by the 
gentlewoman from Texas, Ms. Johnson, is not going to be 
offered, but does the gentlewoman wish to strike the last word 
at this time.
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Yes, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentlewoman is recognized for 
five minutes.
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Thank you.
    I offered this amendment--my initial effort was to offer a 
more complete amendment, which was actually the Pascrell-Weldon 
bill.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Well, if the gentlewoman--is the 
gentlewoman offering the amendment or not?
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. I want to speak on the 
amendment. I said my initial effort.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Okay.
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. But I still----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Well then let's have the clerk 
report the amendment and then you can withdraw it.
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. I'll put the amendment 
before us and I will withdraw it after I----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Okay. The clerk will report the 
amendment.
    The Clerk. Amendment to H.R. 1550, offered by Ms. Eddie 
Bernice Johnson of Texas----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the amendment is 
considered as read, and the gentlewoman from Texas is 
recognized for five minutes now.
    [The information follows:]
  Amendment to H.R. 1550 Offered by Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas
  Page 7, after line 24, insert the following new section:

SEC. 8. FIREFIGHTER INVESTMENT AND RESPONSE ENHANCEMENT.

  The Federal Fire Prevention and Control Act of 1974 is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 35. FIREFIGHTER INVESTMENT AND RESPONSE ENHANCEMENT.

  ``(a) Grant Program.--
          ``(1) Authority.--In accordance with this section, the 
        Administrator may make grants on a competitive basis to fire 
        departments for the purpose of protecting the health and safety 
        of the public and firefighting personnel against fire and fire-
        related hazards.
          ``(2) Establishment of office for administration of grants.--
        Before making grants under paragraph (1), the Administrator 
        shall establish an office in the United States Fire 
        Administration to establish specific criteria for the selection 
        of grant recipients and to administer the grants.
          ``(3) Use of grant funds.--The Administrator may make a grant 
        under paragraph (1) only if the applicant for the grant agrees 
        to use grant funds for any of the following:
                  ``(A) To hire additional firefighting personnel.
                  ``(B) To train firefighting personnel in 
                firefighting, emergency response, arson prevention and 
                detection, or the handling of hazardous materials, or 
                to train such personnel to provide any of the training 
                described in this subparagraph.
                  ``(C) To fund the creation of rapid intervention 
                teams to protect firefighting personnel at the scenes 
                of fires and other emergencies.
                  ``(D) To certify fire inspectors.
                  ``(E) To establish wellness and fitness programs for 
                firefighting personnel to ensure that such personnel 
                can carry out their duties.
                  ``(F) To fund emergency medical services provided by 
                fire departments.
                  ``(G) To acquire additional firefighting vehicles, 
                including fire trucks.
                  ``(H) To acquire additional firefighting equipment, 
                including equipment for communications and monitoring.
                  ``(I) To acquire personal protective equipment 
                required for firefighting personnel by the Occupational 
                Safety and Health Administration, and other personal 
                protective equipment for firefighting personnel.
                  ``(J) To modify fire stations, fire training 
                facilities, and other facilities to protect the health 
                and safety of firefighting personnel.
                  ``(K) To enforce fire codes.
                  ``(L) To fund fire prevention programs.
                  ``(M) To educate the public about arson prevention 
                and detection.
          ``(4) Matching requirement.--The Administrator may make a 
        grant under paragraph (1) only if the applicant for the grant 
        agrees to match with non-Federal funds 10 percent of the funds 
        received under paragraph (1) in any fiscal year.
          ``(5) Maintenance of expenditures.--The Administrator may 
        make a grant under paragraph (1) only if the applicant for the 
        grant agrees to maintain for the fiscal year in which the grant 
        will be received its aggregate expenditures for uses described 
        in paragraph (3) at or above the average level of such 
        expenditures in the 2 fiscal years preceding the fiscal year in 
        which the grant will be received.
          ``(6) Report to the administrator.--The Administrator may 
        make a grant under paragraph (1) only if the applicant for the 
        grant agrees to submit to the Administrator a report, including 
        a description of how grant funds were used, with respect to 
        each fiscal year for which a grant was received.
          ``(7) Variety of grant recipients.--The Administrator shall 
        ensure that grants under paragraph (1) for a fiscal year are 
        made to a variety of fire departments, including, to the extent 
        that there are eligible applicants--
                  ``(A) paid, volunteer, and combination fire 
                departments;
                  ``(B) fire departments located in communities of 
                varying size; and
                  ``(C) fire departments located in urban, suburban, 
                and rural communities.
          ``(8) Limitation on firefighting vehicles.--The Administrator 
        shall ensure that not more than 25 percent of the assistance 
        made available under paragraph (1) in a fiscal year is used for 
        purposes authorized under paragraph (3)(G).
          ``(9) Limitation on administrative costs.--Of amounts made 
        available under subsection (b) for a fiscal year, the 
        Administrator may use not more than 10 percent for the 
        administrative costs of carrying out this section.
          ``(10) Application.--The Administrator may make a grant under 
        paragraph (1) only if the fire department seeking the grant 
        submits to the Administrator an application in such form and 
        containing such information as the Administrator may require.
          ``(11) Firefighting personnel defined.--In this section the 
        term `firefighting personnel' means individuals, including 
        volunteers, who are firefighters, officers of fire departments, 
        or emergency medical service personnel of fire departments.
  ``(b) Authorization of Appropriations.--For the purposes of carrying 
out this section, there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Administrator $75,000,000 for fiscal year 2000 and $150,000,000 for 
fiscal year 2001.''.

    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Thank you, Mr. 
Chairman. The amendment that I ultimately had drawn was the 
grant amendment. And one of the reasons why I was wanting to 
move forth more vigorously is because as we are considering 
this bill, there are a number of incidences where life will 
continue to be lost by firemen from the lack of equipment and 
other support measures.
    And for that reason, I wanted to address the situation. I 
acknowledge that it is not nearly as complete as the bill. It 
does not call for anywhere near the amount of money. But I 
realize, too, that the authors preferred to wait until we can 
consider the entire bill, have a hearing, and consider the 
entire bill.
    So for that reason, Mr. Chairman, after discussion with a 
number of members, I will withdraw the amendment.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The amendment is withdrawn. That 
completes the----
    Mr. Smith. Mr. Chairman? Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. What?
    Mr. Smith. On this issue, I would move to strike the last 
word.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentleman is recognized for 
five minutes.
    Mr. Smith. I would compliment the efforts of Congressman 
Pascrell as well as Congresswoman Johnson. And let me say that 
as a member of the Budget Committee, I will vigorously work to 
increase the budget limitations for the function areas that 
would allow an expansion of our efforts in firefighting.
    Currently, I am working with Senator Roth and Congressman 
Curt Weldon and Congressman Pascrell, as well as our ranking 
member of the Subcommittee, Eddie Bernice Johnson, to move 
ahead with a bipartisan package that is going to enhance what 
we are doing for firefighters in this country that have been 
for a long time overlooked.
    And I would yield to a leader in this effort, Mr. Curt 
Weldon for a comment.
    Mr. Weldon of Pennsylvania. I thank my friend and colleague 
for yielding, and I, too, want to applaud the gentlelady both 
for her concern and interest and for her leadership. I think it 
is a wise decision to not offer this at this time until we can, 
one, sort out what the correct response is and, two, talk to 
the full Committee Chairman about what his feelings are on 
these issues down the road.
    The concern in the country is that we in the Congress have 
put significant amounts of money into, say, law enforcement. 
And I am a strong supporter of the police, having been a local 
mayor. In fact, we put almost $5 billion a year into law 
enforcement nationwide. We even buy half of the costs of vests 
for every policy officer in the country with Federal money.
    Last year, without any money in the budget, we came up with 
a billion dollars for teachers--a billion dollars. The amount 
of money we spend on the fire service is minuscule. And I am 
not saying we should attempt to create a new Federal handout, 
but if we are going to recognize teachers and police, there is 
no other group in the country where the bulk of the leaders 
volunteer their time who have 100 of those people killed each 
year in volunteering on behalf of their country.
    It is outrageous that this government spends so much more--
on law enforcement and on adding teachers--that wasn't in the 
budget--and I a teacher, by the way, by profession--and yet we 
totally ignore the 1.2 million men and women who risk their 
lives everyday in all of our districts, and who do so with 
basically having to have chicken dinners and tag days to buy 
$500,000 pieces of equipment.
    That is outrageous. And I think it is time that we have a 
national debate, as we are so free and willing to give money to 
other groups who have expensive lobbying interests in town, 
that we looked at those people who truly are in need, who, in 
fact, lose 100 of them each year.
    So I applaud the Subcommittee Chairman. He is a real hero 
to the fire service for what he is doing. I look forward to 
working with him.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Will the gentleman from Michigan 
yield?
    Mr. Weldon of Pennsylvania. I yield to the Chairman.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. I concur in the points that the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania, who as a former fire chief, has 
made. I don't think that this bill is the proper vehicle to 
commence a National debate on this subject, however. And I 
appreciate the gentlewoman, Ms. Johnson, not offering this 
amendment.
    Let me say that the U.S. Fire Administration has had some 
significant problems, and it has required a Blue Ribbon Report 
to figure out how to sort those problems out and to improve the 
administration of the agency. And this bill will provide the 
legislative vehicle for the FEMA director and the administrator 
of the U.S. Fire Administration to be able to do so, together 
with a pretty significant increase in authorization.
    So I think we ought to do one thing at a time. You never 
walk a mile without taking the first step. This bill is an 
important first step, but the concerns expressed by the three 
previous speakers I think ought to be the second step before we 
get to the third.
    Does the gentleman from Michigan yield back the balance of 
his time?
    Mr. Smith. I yield back the balance of my time.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Okay. That concludes the number of 
amendments on the roster. Are there any further amendments?
    Hearing none, report language. And the gentlewoman from 
Texas has two proposals for report language. The Chair 
recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas for the first bit of 
report language, which relates to firefighter protective 
equipment.
    Does the gentlewoman offer that?
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Yes.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the report 
language.
    The Clerk. Report language offered by Representative----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the report 
language is considered as read, and the Chair will note that 
this report language and the second proposal of the gentlewoman 
from Texas are in the packet on the members' desks. And the 
gentlewoman is recognized for five minutes.
    [The information follows:]
    Report Language Offered by Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    In 1984, 10.6% of firefighter injuries, over 6600 incidents, were 
due to burns. In 1993, despite 10 years of advances in protective 
clothing, 11.3% of firefighter injuries, nearly 6000 incidents, were 
due to burns. A 1996 workshop organized by the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) explored the factors that lead to burn 
injuries and identified research objectives related to the development 
of effective protective clothing and equipment, to fire fighting 
tactics, and to the training of fire service personnel.
    Section 4 of the bill directs the Administrator to prepare a 
research agenda and associated implementation plan. The findings of the 
1996 NIST workshop and related materials should be reviewed as part of 
the process of developing the research agenda. The Committee 
understands that current understanding is incomplete regarding the 
relationships among thermal environments, human response to thermal 
exposures, and fire fighting tactics that result in burn injuries.
    The Committee expects the research agenda to address, and place an 
appropriate level of priority on, research needed (1) to support the 
development of more effective firefighter protective equipment, 
including sensor technologies that have promise for informing 
firefighters of impending untenable conditions; (2) to identify best 
practices in fire fighting tactics, and (3) to support the development 
of appropriate training materials to improve the safety of 
firefighters, including imparting knowledge of the limits of protective 
clothing and equipment.

    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Thank you, Mr. 
Chairman.
    The first relates to the provision in section 4 of the bill 
that requires the Fire Administration to prepare a research 
agenda and associated implementation plan. The report language 
asks the agency to take into consideration the results of a 
recent workshop at NIST that defines several research needs 
regarding development of effective protective clothing and 
equipment for firefighters as well as research required to 
formulate firefighting tactics to reduce burn injuries.
    And I move the adoption.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentlewoman yields back the 
balance of her time.
    Further discussion on the report language proposal. Hearing 
none, all those in favor of agreeing the report language will 
signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it. And the 
report language is agreed to.
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Thank you.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The gentlewoman from Texas has 
another proposal for report language on reducing fire injury 
for vulnerable populations. For what purpose does the 
gentlewoman from Texas seek recognition?
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Strike the last word, 
Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Do you have the report language at 
the desk?
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Yes.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The clerk will report the report 
language.
    The Clerk. Report language offered by Representative Eddie 
Bernice Johnson----
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, the report 
language is considered as read and the gentlewoman is 
recognized for five minutes.
    [The information follows:]
    Report Language Offered by Representative Eddie Bernice Johnson
    Data collected by the Fire Administration and other sources show 
that certain groups are at greater risk from fire injury or death than 
the general population. Children under five years of age perish in 
fires at twice the national fire death rate. For Black children, home 
fires are the leading cause of injury-related deaths for those between 
the ages of one and nine. Likewise, for the elderly over seventy years 
of age, the death rate from fire is one and one half times the national 
average, rising to four times the national average by age eighty five. 
The Hispanic community is at-risk due to fire-related injuries and 
deaths.
    Data on socioeconomic factors affecting fire-related injury are 
less exact, but available information indicates that the poor suffer a 
disproportionate share of deaths versus the rest of the population. For 
example, smoking, which is inversely related to income level, accounts 
for 26% of all fire deaths; and neighborhoods with high proportions of 
low income households have higher fire incidence rates than middle or 
high income neighborhoods.
    The mission of the Fire Administration includes public education 
about fire risk and research related to fire protection. The Committee 
expects the Fire Administration, in carrying out the requirement of 
sections 3 and 4 of the bill, to direct its efforts and resources 
appropriately to address ways to combat the vulnerability of the 
population groups that suffer disproportionately from fire injury.
    The Committee expects the Fire Administration to provide in its 
strategic plan for the development of public education programs 
designed for these at-risk audiences. In order to develop effective 
materials and approaches, the Fire Administration should consider any 
actions needed to improve the current understanding of the factors that 
lead to fire risk, including the adequacy of current data collection 
activities. In establishing research priorities in accordance with 
section 4 of the bill, the Committee expects the Fire Administration to 
consider whether its research program should include studies of the 
socioeconomic characteristics associated with increased fire risk. The 
Committee believes that effective, targeted fire prevention campaigns 
can be developed only from a sound knowledge base.
    The Committee is concerned about recent media reports that have 
detailed fire deaths in Texas and other states from the use of security 
bars known as ``burglary bars'' on doors and windows in high crime 
areas. These devices offer occupants protection from criminals. 
However, in times of fire the bars have entrapped individuals inside 
their residences and have prevented their evacuation and rescue. The 
Committee requests that the Fire Administration study ways to prevent 
fire injury and death from the use and the installation of security 
bars and to report its findings to the Committee within 90 days 
following the enactment of the bill.

    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Thank you, Mr. 
Chairman. The second area covered by the report language 
encourages the Fire Administration to direct its efforts to 
address ways to combat the vulnerability of the population 
groups that suffer disproportionately from fire injury. The 
agency would be expected to reflect this guidance in its public 
education programs on fire risk.
    The agency is also asked to assess whether research or 
particular data collection activities would improve 
understanding of the factors that lead to increased fire risk.
    Finally, a report is requested on how, through alternative 
installation procedures or other means, fire injuries may be 
reduced for buildings with anti-burglary bars because in Texas, 
Mr. Chairman, many of the deaths that occur from fire are 
thought to be from people having burglary bars on their 
windows.
    I move the adoption of the language.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner.  The gentlewoman yields back the 
balance of her time. Is there further discussion on this 
proposal for report language?
    Hearing none, all those in favor of agreeing to the report 
language as proposed by the gentlewoman from Texas will signify 
by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    Mr. Smith. Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The Chair is putting the question. 
All those opposed will say no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it. And the 
report language is agreed to.
    Further proposals for report language? For what purpose 
does the gentleman from Michigan arise?
    Mr. Smith. Mr. Chairman, with your permission and on behalf 
of the ranking member, Eddie Bernice Johnson, and Curt Weldon, 
I would like to move that the Chairman instruct staff to draft 
report language on the review and implementation of the Blue 
Ribbon committee report.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. Without objection, it is so 
ordered.
    Further suggestions on report language?
    Hearing no further suggestions, it is now time to report 
the bill favorably, and for that purpose the Chair recognizes 
the gentlewoman from Texas.
    Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas. Thank you, Mr. 
Chairman. I move that the Committee favorably report H.R. 1550 
as amended to the House with the recommendation that the bill 
as amended do pass. Further, I move that the staff be 
instructed to prepare a legislative report and make necessary 
technical and conforming amendments, and that the Chairman take 
all necessary steps to bring the bill before the House for 
consideration.
    Thank you.
    Chairman Sensenbrenner. The question is on reporting the 
bill favorably. Is there any discussion on the motion?
    Hearing none, the Chair notes the presence of a reporting 
quorum. All those in favor will signify by saying aye.
    Opposed, no.
    The ayes appear to have it. The ayes have it. And the 
motion is agreed to, and the bill is favorably reported. 
Without objection, the bill will be reported in the form of a 
single amendment in the nature of a substitute reflecting the 
amendments adopted today.
    Without objection, pursuant to Clause 1 of Rule 22 of the 
Rules of the House, the Committee authorizes the Chairman to 
offer such motions as may be necessary in the House to go to 
conference on the bill. Members will have two days to submit 
additional supplementary or additional views on the measure.
    Without objection, all of those things are so ordered.