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105th Congress                                                   Report
 2d Session             HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                105-432
_______________________________________________________________________


 
              FOREIGN AFFAIRS REFORM AND RESTRUCTURING ACT

                                _______
                                

                 March 10, 1998.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______


 Mr. Gilman, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 1757]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
1757), to consolidate international affairs agencies, to 
authorize appropriations for the Department of State and 
related agencies for fiscal years 1998 and 1999, and to ensure 
that the enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) proceeds in a manner consistent with United States 
interests, to strengthen relations between the United States 
and Russia, to preserve the prerogatives of the Congress with 
respect to certain arms control agreements, and for other 
purposes, having met, after full and free conference, have 
agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses 
as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate and agree to the same with an amendment 
as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed to be inserted by the 
Senate amendment, insert the following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``Foreign Affairs Reform and 
Restructuring Act of 1998''.

SEC. 2. ORGANIZATION OF ACT INTO DIVISIONS; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) Divisions.--This Act is organized into three divisions 
as follows:
            (1) Division a.--Foreign Affairs Agencies 
        Consolidation Act of 1998.
            (2) Division b.--Foreign Relations Authorization 
        Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999.
            (3) Division c.--United Nations Reform Act of 1998.
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Organization of Act into divisions; table of contents.

        Subdivision A--Consolidation of Foreign Affairs Agencies

                       TITLE I--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 101. Short title.
Sec. 102. Purposes.
Sec. 103. Definitions.
Sec. 104. Report on budgetary cost savings resulting from 
          reorganization.

       TITLE II--UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY

                      Chapter 1--General Provisions

Sec. 201. Effective date.

             Chapter 2--Abolition and Transfer of Functions

Sec. 211. Abolition of United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
          Agency.
Sec. 212. Transfer of functions to Secretary of State.
Sec. 213. Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security.

                    Chapter 3--Conforming Amendments

Sec. 221. References.
Sec. 222. Repeals.
Sec. 223. Amendments to the Arms Control and Disarmament Act.
Sec. 224. Compensation of officers.
Sec. 225. Additional conforming amendments.

               TITLE III--UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY

                      Chapter 1--General Provisions

Sec. 301. Effective date.

             Chapter 2--Abolition and Transfer of Functions

Sec. 311. Abolition of United States Information Agency.
Sec. 312. Transfer of functions.
Sec. 313. Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy.
Sec. 314. Abolition of Office of Inspector General of United States 
          Information Agency and transfer of functions.

                  Chapter 3--International Broadcasting

Sec. 321. Congressional findings and declaration of purpose.
Sec. 322. Continued existence of Broadcasting Board of Governors.
Sec. 323. Conforming amendments to the United States International 
          Broadcasting Act of 1994.
Sec. 324. Amendments to the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act.
Sec. 325. Amendments to the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act.
Sec. 326. Transfer of broadcasting related funds, property, and 
          personnel.
Sec. 327. Savings provisions.
Sec. 328. Report on the privatization of RFE/RL, Incorporated.

                    Chapter 4--Conforming Amendments

Sec. 331. References.
Sec. 332. Amendments to title 5, United States Code.
Sec. 333. Application of certain laws.
Sec. 334. Abolition of United States Advisory Commission on Public 
          Diplomacy.
Sec. 335. Conforming amendments.
Sec. 336. Repeals.

  TITLE IV--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY

                      Chapter 1--General Provisions

Sec. 401. Effective date.

             Chapter 2--Abolition and Transfer of Functions

Sec. 411. Abolition of United States International Development 
          Cooperation Agency.
Sec. 412. Transfer of functions and authorities.
Sec. 413. Status of AID.

                    Chapter 3--Conforming Amendments

Sec. 421. References.
Sec. 422. Conforming amendments.

              TITLE V--AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                      Chapter 1--General Provisions

Sec. 501. Effective date.

           Chapter 2--Reorganization and Transfer of Functions

Sec. 511. Reorganization of Agency for International Development.

            Chapter 3--Authorities of the Secretary of State

Sec. 521. Definition of United States assistance.
Sec. 522. Administrator of AID reporting to the Secretary of State.
Sec. 523. Assistance programs coordination and oversight.

                          TITLE VI--TRANSITION

                     Chapter 1--Reorganization Plan

Sec. 601. Reorganization plan and report.

                   Chapter 2--Reorganization Authority

Sec. 611. Reorganization authority.
Sec. 612. Transfer and allocation of appropriations.
Sec. 613. Transfer, appointment, and assignment of personnel.
Sec. 614. Incidental transfers.
Sec. 615. Savings provisions.
Sec. 616. Authority of Secretary of State to facilitate transition.
Sec. 617. Final report.

               Division B--Foreign Relations Authorization

                       TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 1001. Short title.
Sec. 1002. Definition of appropriate congressional committees.

    TITLE XI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Sec. 1101. Administration of foreign affairs.
Sec. 1102. International commissions.
Sec. 1103. Grants to The Asia Foundation.
Sec. 1104. Voluntary contributions to international organizations.
Sec. 1105. Voluntary contributions to peacekeeping operations.
Sec. 1106. Limitation on United States voluntary contributions to United 
          Nations Development Program.
Sec. 1107. United Nations Population Fund.

        TITLE XII--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

                  Chapter 1--Authorities and Activities

Sec. 1201. Reimbursement of Department of State for assistance to 
          overseas educational facilities.
Sec. 1202. Revision of Department of State rewards program.
Sec. 1203. Retention of additional defense trade controls registration 
          fees.
Sec. 1204. Fees for commercial services.
Sec. 1205. Pilot program for foreign affairs reimbursement.
Sec. 1206. Fee for use of diplomatic reception rooms.
Sec. 1207. Budget presentation documents.
Sec. 1208. Office of the Inspector General.
Sec. 1209. Capital Investment Fund.
Sec. 1210. Contracting for local guards services overseas.
Sec. 1211. Authority of the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission.
Sec. 1212. Expenses relating to certain international claims and 
          proceedings.
Sec. 1213. Grants to remedy international abductions of children.
Sec. 1214. Counterdrug and anticrime activities of the Department of 
          State.
Sec. 1215. Annual report on overseas surplus properties.
Sec. 1216. Human rights reports.
Sec. 1217. Reports and policy concerning diplomatic immunity.
Sec. 1218. Reaffirming United States international telecommunications 
          policy.
Sec. 1219. Reduction of reporting.

       Chapter 2--Consular Authorities of the Department of State

Sec. 1221. Use of certain passport processing fees for enhanced passport 
          services.
Sec. 1222. Surcharge for processing certain machine readable visas.
Sec. 1223. Consular officers.
Sec. 1224. Repeal of outdated consular receipt requirements.
Sec. 1225. Elimination of duplicate Federal Register publication for 
          travel advisories.
Sec. 1226. Denial of visas to confiscators of American property. 
Sec. 1227. Inadmissibility of any alien supporting an international 
          child abductor.
Sec. 1228. Haiti; exclusion of certain aliens; reporting requirements.

                    Chapter 3--Refugees and Migration

               SUBCHAPTER A--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 1231. Migration and refugee assistance.

                         SUBCHAPTER B--AUTHORITIES

Sec. 1241. United States policy regarding the involuntary return of 
          refugees.
Sec. 1242. United States policy with respect to the involuntary return 
          of persons in danger of subjection to torture.
Sec. 1243. Reprogramming of migration and refugee assistance funds.
Sec. 1244. Eligibility for refugee status.
Sec. 1245. Reports to Congress concerning Cuban emigration policies.

TITLE XIII--ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE; DEPARTMENT OF STATE 
                     PERSONNEL; THE FOREIGN SERVICE

           Chapter 1--Organization of the Department of State

Sec. 1301. Coordinator for Counterterrorism.
Sec. 1302. Elimination of Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for 
          Burdensharing.
Sec. 1303. Personnel management.
Sec. 1304. Diplomatic security.
Sec. 1305. Number of senior official positions authorized for the 
          Department of State.
Sec. 1306. Nomination of Under Secretaries and Assistant Secretaries of 
          State.

  Chapter 2--Personnel of the Department of State; the Foreign Service

Sec. 1311. Foreign Service reform.
Sec. 1312. Retirement benefits for involuntary separation.
Sec. 1313. Authority of Secretary to separate convicted felons from the 
          Foreign Service.
Sec. 1314. Career counseling.
Sec. 1315. Limitations on management assignments.
Sec. 1316. Availability pay for certain criminal investigators within 
          the Diplomatic Security Service.
Sec. 1317. Nonovertime differential pay.
Sec. 1318. Report concerning minorities and the Foreign Service.

   TITLE XIV--UNITED STATES INFORMATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND CULTURAL 
                                PROGRAMS

               Chapter 1--Authorization of Appropriations

Sec. 1401. International information activities and educational and 
          cultural exchange programs.

                  Chapter 2--Authorities and Activities

Sec. 1411. Retention of interest.
Sec. 1412. Use of selected program fees.
Sec. 1413. Muskie Fellowship Program.
Sec. 1414. Working Group on United States Government-Sponsored 
          International Exchanges and Training.
Sec. 1415. Educational and cultural exchanges and scholarships for 
          Tibetans and Burmese.
Sec. 1416. United States-Japan Commission.
Sec. 1417. Surrogate broadcasting study.
Sec. 1418. Radio broadcasting to Iran in the Farsi language.
Sec. 1419. Authority to administer summer travel and work programs.
Sec. 1420. Permanent administrative authorities regarding 
          appropriations.
Sec. 1421. Voice of America broadcasts.

     TITLE XV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN UNITED NATIONS

Sec. 1501. International conferences and contingencies.
Sec. 1502. Restriction relating to United States accession to any new 
          international criminal tribunal.
Sec. 1503. United States membership in the Bureau of the 
          Interparliamentary Union.
Sec. 1504. Service in international organizations.
Sec. 1505. Reports regarding foreign travel.

      TITLE XVI--UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY

Sec. 1601. Authorization of appropriations.
Sec. 1602. Statutory construction.

                TITLE XVII--EUROPEAN SECURITY ACT OF 1998

Sec. 1701. Short title.
Sec. 1702. Statement of policy.
Sec. 1703. Authorities relating to NATO enlargement.
Sec. 1704. Sense of Congress with respect to the Treaty on Conventional 
          Armed Forces in Europe.
Sec. 1705. Restrictions and requirements relating to ballistic missile 
          defense.

              TITLE XVIII--OTHER FOREIGN POLICY PROVISIONS

Sec. 1801. Reports on claims by United States firms against the 
          Government of Saudi Arabia.
Sec. 1802. Reports on determinations under title IV of the Libertad Act.
Sec. 1803. Report on compliance with the Hague Convention on 
          International Child Abduction.
Sec. 1804. Sense of Congress relating to recognition of the Ecumenical 
          Patriarchate by the Government of Turkey.
Sec. 1805. Report on relations with Vietnam.
Sec. 1806. Reports and policy concerning human rights violations in 
          Laos.
Sec. 1807. Report on an alliance against narcotics trafficking in the 
          Western Hemisphere.
Sec. 1808. Congressional statement regarding the accession of Taiwan to 
          the World Trade Organization.
Sec. 1809. Programs or projects of the International Atomic Energy 
          Agency in Cuba.
Sec. 1810. Limitation on assistance to countries aiding Cuba nuclear 
          development.
Sec. 1811. International Fund for Ireland.
Sec. 1812. United States policy with respect to Jerusalem as the capital 
          of Israel.
Sec. 1813. Support for democratic opposition in Iraq.
Sec. 1814. Development of democracy in the Republic of Serbia.
Sec. 1815. Funds made available under chapter 4 of part II of the 
          Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
Sec. 1816. Foreign organizations that perform or promote abortion; 
          forced abortion in the People's Republic of China.

                    Division C--United Nations Reform

                      TITLE XX--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 2001. Short title.
Sec. 2002. Definitions.
Sec. 2003. Nondelegation of certification requirements.

               TITLE XXI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 2101. Contributions to international organizations.
Sec. 2102. Contributions for international peacekeeping activities.

                  TITLE XXII--UNITED NATIONS ACTIVITIES

Sec. 2201. United Nations policy on Israel and the Palestinians.
Sec. 2202. Data on costs incurred in support of United Nations 
          peacekeeping operations.
Sec. 2203. Reimbursement for goods and services provided by the United 
          States to the United Nations.
Sec. 2204. United States policy regarding United Nations peacekeeping 
          operations.
Sec. 2205. Reform in budget decisionmaking procedures of the United 
          Nations and its specialized agencies.
Sec. 2206. Continued extension of privileges, exemptions, and immunities 
          of the International Organizations Immunities Act to UNIDO.
Sec. 2207. Sense of the Congress regarding compliance with child and 
          spousal support obligations by United Nations personnel.

                TITLE XXIII--ARREARS PAYMENTS AND REFORM

               Chapter 1--Arrearages to the United Nations

      SUBCHAPTER A--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS; OBLIGATION AND 
                          EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS

Sec. 2301. Authorization of appropriations.
Sec. 2302. Obligation and expenditure of funds.
Sec. 2303. Forgiveness of amounts owed by the United Nations to the 
          United States.

                  SUBCHAPTER B--UNITED STATES SOVEREIGNTY

Sec. 2311. Certification requirements.

   SUBCHAPTER C--REFORM OF ASSESSMENTS AND UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING 
                               OPERATIONS

Sec. 2321. Certification requirements.

                 SUBCHAPTER D--BUDGET AND PERSONNEL REFORM

Sec. 2331. Certification requirements.

                   Chapter 2--Miscellaneous Provisions

Sec. 2341. Statutory construction on relation to existing laws.
Sec. 2342. Prohibition on payments relating to UNIDO and other 
          organizations from which the United States has withdrawn or 
          rescinded funding.

         DIVISION A--CONSOLIDATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AGENCIES

                      TITLE I--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

    This division may be cited as the ``Foreign Affairs 
Agencies Consolidation Act of 1998''.

SEC. 102. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of this division are--
            (1) to strengthen--
                    (A) the coordination of United States 
                foreign policy; and
                    (B) the leading role of the Secretary of 
                State in the formulation and articulation of 
                United States foreign policy;
            (2) to consolidate and reinvigorate the foreign 
        affairs functions of the United States within the 
        Department of State by--
                    (A) abolishing the United States Arms 
                Control and Disarmament Agency, the United 
                States Information Agency, and the United 
                States International Development Cooperation 
                Agency, and transferring the functions of these 
                agencies to the Department of State while 
                preserving the special missions and skills of 
                these agencies;
                    (B) transferring certain functions of the 
                Agency for International Development to the 
                Department of State; and
                    (C) providing for the reorganization of the 
                Department of State to maximize the efficient 
                use of resources, which may lead to budget 
                savings, eliminated redundancy in functions, 
                and improvement in the management of the 
                Department of State;
            (3) to ensure that programs critical to the 
        promotion of United States national interests be 
        maintained;
            (4) to assist congressional efforts to balance the 
        Federal budget and reduce the Federal debt;
            (5) to ensure that the United States maintains 
        effective representation abroad within budgetary 
        restraints; and
            (6) to encourage United States foreign affairs 
        agencies to maintain a high percentage of the best 
        qualified, most competent United States citizens 
        serving in the United States Government.

SEC. 103. DEFINITIONS.

    In this division:
            (1) ACDA.--The term ``ACDA'' means the United 
        States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
            (2) AID.--The term ``AID'' means the United States 
        Agency for International Development.
            (3) Agency; federal agency.--The term ``agency'' or 
        ``Federal agency'' means an Executive agency as defined 
        in section 105 of title 5, United States Code.
            (4) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means the 
        Committee on International Relations and the Committee 
        on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and 
        the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate.
            (5) Covered agency.--The term ``covered agency'' 
        means any of the following agencies: ACDA, USIA, IDCA, 
        and AID.
            (6) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the 
        Department of State.
            (7) Function.--The term ``function'' means any 
        duty, obligation, power, authority, responsibility, 
        right, privilege, activity, or program.
            (8) IDCA.--The term ``IDCA'' means the United 
        States International Development Cooperation Agency.
            (9) Office.--The term ``office'' includes any 
        office, administration, agency, institute, unit, 
        organizational entity, or component thereof.
            (10) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the 
        Secretary of State.
            (11) USIA.--The term ``USIA'' means the United 
        States Information Agency.

SEC. 104. REPORT ON BUDGETARY COST SAVINGS RESULTING FROM 
                    REORGANIZATION.

    The Secretary of State shall submit a report, together with 
the congressional presentation document for the budget of the 
Department of State for each of the fiscal years 1999, 2000, 
and 2001, to the appropriate congressional committees 
describing the total anticipated and achieved cost savings in 
budget outlays and budget authority related to the 
reorganization implemented under this division, including cost 
savings by each of the following categories:
            (1) Reductions in personnel.
            (2) Administrative consolidation, including 
        procurement.
            (3) Program consolidation.
            (4) Consolidation of real properties and leases.

      TITLE II--UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY

                     CHAPTER 1--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 201. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    This title, and the amendments made by this title, shall 
take effect on the earlier of--
            (1) October 1, 1998; or
            (2) the date of abolition of the United States Arms 
        Control and Disarmament Agency pursuant to the 
        reorganization plan described in section 601.

             CHAPTER 2--ABOLITION AND TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS

SEC. 211. ABOLITION OF UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT 
                    AGENCY.

    The United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency is 
abolished.

SEC. 212. TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS TO SECRETARY OF STATE.

    There are transferred to the Secretary of State all 
functions of the Director of the United States Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency, and all functions of the United States Arms 
Control and Disarmament Agency and any office or component of 
such agency, under any statute, reorganization plan, Executive 
order, or other provision of law, as of the day before the 
effective date of this title.

SEC. 213. UNDER SECRETARY FOR ARMS CONTROL AND INTERNATIONAL SECURITY.

    Section 1(b) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651(b)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``There'' and inserting the 
        following:
            ``(1) In general.--There''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following:
            ``(2) Under secretary for arms control and 
        international security.--There shall be in the 
        Department of State, among the Under Secretaries 
        authorized by paragraph (1), an Under Secretary for 
        Arms Control and International Security, who shall 
        assist the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary in 
        matters related to international security policy, arms 
        control, and nonproliferation. Subject to the direction 
        of the President, the Under Secretary may attend and 
        participate in meetings of the National Security 
        Council in his role as Senior Advisor to the President 
        and the Secretary of State on Arms Control and 
        Nonproliferation Matters.''.

                    CHAPTER 3--CONFORMING AMENDMENTS

SEC. 221. REFERENCES.

    Except as otherwise provided in section 223 or 225, any 
reference in any statute, reorganization plan, Executive order, 
regulation, agreement, determination, or other official 
document or proceeding to--
            (1) the Director of the United States Arms Control 
        and Disarmament Agency, the Director of the Arms 
        Control and Disarmament Agency, or any other officer or 
        employee of the United States Arms Control and 
        Disarmament Agency or the Arms Control and Disarmament 
        Agency shall be deemed to refer to the Secretary of 
        State; or
            (2) the United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
        Agency or the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency shall 
        be deemed to refer to the Department of State.

SEC. 222. REPEALS.

    The following sections of the Arms Control and Disarmament 
Act (22 U.S.C. 2551 et seq.) are repealed: Sections 21 through 
26 (22 U.S.C. 2561-2566), section 35 (22 U.S.C. 2575), section 
42 (22 U.S.C. 2582), section 43 (22 U.S.C. 2583), sections 45 
through 50 (22 U.S.C. 2585-2593), section 53 (22 U.S.C. 2593c), 
section 54 (22 U.S.C. 2593d), and section 63 (22 U.S.C. 2595b).

SEC. 223. AMENDMENTS TO THE ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT ACT.

    The Arms Control and Disarmament Act (22 U.S.C. 2551 et 
seq.) is amended--
            (1) in section 2 (22 U.S.C. 2551)--
                    (A) in the first undesignated paragraph, by 
                striking ``creating a new agency of peace to 
                deal with'' and inserting ``addressing'';
                    (B) by striking the second undesignated 
                paragraph; and
                    (C) in the third undesignated paragraph--
                            (i) by striking ``This 
                        organization'' and inserting ``The 
                        Secretary of State'';
                            (ii) by striking ``It shall have'' 
                        and inserting ``The Secretary shall 
                        have'';
                            (iii) by striking ``and the 
                        Secretary of State'';
                            (iv) by inserting ``, 
                        nonproliferation,'' after ``arms 
                        control'' in paragraph (1);
                            (v) by striking paragraph (2);
                            (vi) by redesignating paragraphs 
                        (3) through (5) as paragraphs (2) 
                        through (4), respectively; and
                            (vii) by striking ``, as 
                        appropriate,'' in paragraph (3) (as 
                        redesignated);
            (2) in section 3 (22 U.S.C. 2552), by striking 
        subsection (c);
            (3) in the heading for title II, by striking 
        ``ORGANIZATION'' and inserting ``SPECIAL 
        REPRESENTATIVES AND VISITING SCHOLARS'';
            (4) in section 27 (22 U.S.C. 2567)--
                    (A) by striking the third sentence;
                    (B) in the fourth sentence, by striking ``, 
                acting through the Director''; and
                    (C) in the fifth sentence, by striking 
                ``Agency'' and inserting ``Department of 
                State'';
            (5) in section 28 (22 U.S.C. 2568)--
                    (A) by striking ``Director'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Secretary of State'';
                    (B) in the second sentence--
                            (i) by striking ``Agency'' each 
                        place it appears and inserting 
                        ``Department of State''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``Agency's'' and 
                        inserting ``Department of State's''; 
                        and
                    (C) by striking the fourth sentence;
            (6) in section 31 (22 U.S.C. 2571)--
                    (A) by inserting ``this title in'' after 
                ``powers in'';
                    (B) by striking ``Director'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Secretary of State'';
                    (C) by striking ``insure'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``ensure'';
                    (D) in the second sentence, by striking 
                ``in accordance with procedures established 
                under section 35 of this Act'';
                    (E) in the fourth sentence by striking 
                ``The authority'' and all that follows through 
                ``disarmament:'' and inserting the following: 
                ``The authority of the Secretary under this Act 
                with respect to research, development, and 
                other studies concerning arms control, 
                nonproliferation, and disarmament shall be 
                limited to participation in the following:''; 
                and
                    (F) in subsection (l), by inserting ``and'' 
                at the end;
            (7) in section 32 (22 U.S.C. 2572)--
                    (A) by striking ``Director'' and inserting 
                ``Secretary of State''; and
                    (B) by striking ``subsection'' and 
                inserting ``section'';
            (8) in section 33(a) (22 U.S.C. 2573(a))--
                    (A) by striking ``the Secretary of 
                State,''; and
                    (B) by striking ``Director'' and inserting 
                ``Secretary of State'';
            (9) in section 34 (22 U.S.C. 2574)--
                    (A) in subsection (a)--
                            (i) in the first sentence, by 
                        striking ``Director'' and inserting 
                        ``Secretary of State'';
                            (ii) in the first sentence, by 
                        striking ``and the Secretary of 
                        State'';
                            (iii) in the first sentence, by 
                        inserting ``, nonproliferation,'' after 
                        ``in the fields of arms control'';
                            (iv) in the first sentence, by 
                        striking ``and shall have primary 
                        responsibility, whenever directed by 
                        the President, for the preparation, 
                        conduct, and management of the United 
                        States participation in international 
                        negotiations and implementation fora in 
                        the field of nonproliferation'';
                            (v) in the second sentence, by 
                        striking ``section 27'' and inserting 
                        ``section 201''; and
                            (vi) in the second sentence, by 
                        striking ``the'' after ``serve as'';
                    (B) by striking subsection (b);
                    (C) by redesignating subsection (c) as 
                subsection (b); and
                    (D) in subsection (b) (as redesignated)--
                            (i) in the text above paragraph 
                        (1), by striking ``Director'' and 
                        inserting ``Secretary of State'';
                            (ii) by striking paragraph (1); and
                            (iii) by redesignating paragraphs 
                        (2) and (3) as paragraphs (1) and (2), 
                        respectively;
            (10) in section 36 (22 U.S.C. 2576)--
                    (A) by striking ``Director'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Secretary of State''; 
                and
                    (B) by striking ``, in accordance with the 
                procedures established pursuant to section 35 
                of this Act,'';
            (11) in section 37 (22 U.S.C. 2577)--
                    (A) by striking ``Director'' and ``Agency'' 
                each place it appears and inserting ``Secretary 
                of State'' or ``Department of State'', 
                respectively; and
                    (B) by striking subsection (d);
            (12) in section 38 (22 U.S.C. 2578)--
                    (A) by striking ``Director'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Secretary of State''; 
                and
                    (B) by striking subsection (c);
            (13) in section 41 (22 U.S.C. 2581)--
                    (A) by striking ``In the performance of his 
                functions, the Director'' and inserting ``In 
                addition to any authorities otherwise 
                available, the Secretary of State in the 
                performance of functions under this Act'';
                    (B) by striking ``Agency'', ``Agency's'', 
                ``Director'', and ``Director's'' each place 
                they appear and inserting ``Department of 
                State'', ``Department of State's'', ``Secretary 
                of State'', or ``Secretary of State's'', as 
                appropriate;
                    (C) in subsection (a), by striking the 
                sentence that begins ``It is the intent'';
                    (D) in subsection (b)--
                            (i) by striking ``appoint officers 
                        and employees, including attorneys, for 
                        the Agency in accordance with the 
                        provisions of title 5, United States 
                        Code, governing appointment in the 
                        competitive service, and fix their 
                        compensation in accordance with chapter 
                        51 and with subchapter III of chapter 
                        53 of such title, relating to 
                        classification and General Schedule pay 
                        rates, except that the Director may, to 
                        the extent the Director determines 
                        necessary to the discharge of his 
                        responsibilities,'';
                            (ii) in paragraph (1), by striking 
                        ``exception'' and inserting 
                        ``subsection''; and
                            (iii) in paragraph (2)--
                                    (I) by striking 
                                ``exception'' and inserting 
                                ``subsection''; and
                                    (II) by striking 
                                ``ceiling'' and inserting 
                                ``positions allocated to carry 
                                out the purpose of this Act'';
                    (E) by striking subsection (g);
                    (F) by redesignating subsections (h), (i), 
                and (j) as subsections (g), (h), and (i), 
                respectively;
                    (G) by amending subsection (f) to read as 
                follows:
            ``(f) establish a scientific and policy advisory 
        board to advise with and make recommendations to the 
        Secretary of State on United States arms control, 
        nonproliferation, and disarmament policy and 
        activities. A majority of the board shall be composed 
        of individuals who have a demonstrated knowledge and 
        technical expertise with respect to arms control, 
        nonproliferation, and disarmament matters and who have 
        distinguished themselves in any of the fields of 
        physics, chemistry, mathematics, biology, or 
        engineering, including weapons engineering. The members 
        of the board may receive the compensation and 
        reimbursement for expenses specified for consultants by 
        subsection (d) of this section;''; and
                    (H) in subsection (h) (as redesignated), by 
                striking ``Deputy Director'' and inserting 
                ``Under Secretary for Arms Control and 
                International Security'';
            (14) in section 44 (22 U.S.C. 2584)--
                    (A) by striking ``conflict-of-interest 
                and'';
                    (B) by striking ``The members'' and all 
                that follows through ``(5 U.S.C. 2263), or any 
                other'' and inserting ``Members of advisory 
                boards and consultants may serve as such 
                without regard to any''; and
                    (C) by inserting at the end the following 
                new sentence: ``This section shall apply only 
                to individuals carrying out activities related 
                to arms control, nonproliferation, and 
                disarmament.'';
            (15) in section 51 (22 U.S.C. 2593a)--
                    (A) in subsection (a)--
                            (i) in paragraphs (1) and (3), by 
                        inserting ``, nonproliferation,'' after 
                        ``arms control'' each place it appears;
                            (ii) by striking ``Director, in 
                        consultation with the Secretary of 
                        State,'' and inserting ``Secretary of 
                        State with the concurrence of the 
                        Director of Central Intelligence and in 
                        consultation with'';
                            (iii) by striking ``the Chairman of 
                        the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the 
                        Director of Central Intelligence'' and 
                        inserting ``and the Chairman of the 
                        Joint Chiefs of Staff'';
                            (iv) by striking paragraphs (2) and 
                        (4); and
                            (v) by redesignating paragraphs 
                        (3), (5), (6), and (7) as paragraphs 
                        (2) through (5), respectively; and
                    (B) by adding at the end of subsection (b) 
                the following: ``The portions of this report 
                described in paragraphs (4) and (5) of 
                subsection (a) shall summarize in detail, at 
                least in classified annexes, the information, 
                analysis, and conclusions relevant to possible 
                noncompliance by other nations that are 
                provided by United States intelligence 
                agencies.'';
            (16) in section 52 (22 U.S.C. 2593b), by striking 
        ``Director'' and inserting ``Secretary of State'';
            (17) in section 61 (22 U.S.C. 2593a)--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``United 
                States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency'' 
                and inserting ``Department of State'';
                    (B) by striking paragraph (2);
                    (C) by redesignating paragraphs (3) through 
                (7) as paragraphs (2) through (6), 
                respectively;
                    (D) in paragraph (4) (as redesignated), by 
                striking ``paragraph (4)'' and inserting 
                ``paragraph (3)''; and
                    (E) in paragraph (6) (as redesignated), by 
                striking ``United States Arms Control and 
                Disarmament Agency and the'';
            (18) in section 62 (22 U.S.C. 2595a)--
                    (A) in subsection (c)--
                            (i) in the subsection heading, by 
                        striking ``Director'' and inserting 
                        ``Secretary of State''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``2(d), 22, and 
                        34(c)'' and inserting ``102(3) and 
                        304(b)''; and
                    (B) by striking ``Director'' and inserting 
                ``Secretary of State'';
            (19) in section 64 (22 U.S.C. 2595b-1)--
                    (A) by striking the section title and 
                inserting ``SEC. 503. REVIEW OF CERTAIN 
                REPROGRAMMING NOTIFICATIONS.'';
                    (B) by striking subsection (a); and
                    (C) in subsection (b)--
                            (i) by striking ``(b) Review of 
                        Certain Reprogramming Notifications.--
                        ''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``Foreign 
                        Affairs'' and inserting ``International 
                        Relations'';
            (20) in section 65(1) (22 U.S.C. 2595c(1)) by 
        inserting ``of America'' after ``United States''; and
            (21) by redesignating sections 1, 2, 3, 27, 28, 31, 
        32, 33, 34, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 44, 51, 52, 61, 62, 64, 
        and 65, as amended by this section, as sections 101, 
        102, 103, 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 
        308, 401, 402, 403, 404, 501, 502, 503, and 504, 
        respectively.

SEC. 224. COMPENSATION OF OFFICERS.

    Title 5, United States Code, is amended--
            (1) in section 5313, by striking ``Director of the 
        United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.'';
            (2) in section 5314, by striking ``Deputy Director 
        of the United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
        Agency.'';
            (3) in section 5315--
                    (A) by striking ``Assistant Directors, 
                United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
                Agency (4).''; and
                    (B) by striking ``Special Representatives 
                of the President for arms control, 
                nonproliferation, and disarmament matters, 
                United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
                Agency'', and inserting ``Special 
                Representatives of the President for arms 
                control, nonproliferation, and disarmament 
                matters, Department of State''; and
            (4) in section 5316, by striking ``General Counsel 
        of the United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
        Agency.''.

SEC. 225. ADDITIONAL CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

    (a) Arms Export Control Act.--The Arms Export Control Act 
is amended--
            (1) in section 36(b)(1)(D) (22 U.S.C. 
        2776(b)(1)(D)), by striking ``Director of the Arms 
        Control and Disarmament Agency in consultation with the 
        Secretary of State and the Secretary of Defense'' and 
        inserting ``Secretary of State in consultation with the 
        Secretary of Defense and the Director of Central 
        Intelligence'';
            (2) in section 38(a)(2) (22 U.S.C. 2778(a)(2))--
                    (A) in the first sentence, by striking ``be 
                made in coordination with the Director of the 
                United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
                Agency, taking into account the Director's 
                assessment as to'' and inserting ``take into 
                account''; and
                    (B) by striking the second sentence;
            (3) in section 42(a) (22 U.S.C. 2791(a))--
                    (A) in paragraph (1)(C), by striking ``the 
                assessment of the Director of the United States 
                Arms Control and Disarmament Agency as to'';
                    (B) by striking ``(1)'' after ``(a)''; and
                    (C) by striking paragraph (2);
            (4) in section 71(a) (22 U.S.C. 2797(a)), by 
        striking ``, the Director of the Arms Control and 
        Disarmament Agency,'';
            (5) in section 71(b)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2797(b)(1)), by 
        striking ``and the Director of the United States Arms 
        Control and Disarmament Agency'';
            (6) in section 71(b)(2) (22 U.S.C. 2797(b)(2))--
                    (A) by striking ``, the Secretary of 
                Commerce, and the Director of the United States 
                Arms Control and Disarmament Agency'' and 
                inserting ``and the Secretary of Commerce''; 
                and
                    (B) by striking ``or the Director'';
            (7) in section 71(c) (22 U.S.C. 2797(c)), by 
        striking ``with the Director of the United States Arms 
        Control and Disarmament Agency,''; and
            (8) in section 73(d) (22 U.S.C. 2797b(d)), by 
        striking ``, the Secretary of Commerce, and the 
        Director of the United States Arms Control and 
        Disarmament Agency'' and inserting ``and the Secretary 
        of Commerce''.
    (b) Foreign Assistance Act.--Section 511 of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321d) is amended by striking 
``be made in coordination with the Director of the United 
States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and shall take into 
account his opinion as to'' and inserting ``take into 
account''.
    (c) United States Institute of Peace Act.--
            (1) Section 1706(b) of the United States Institute 
        of Peace Act (22 U.S.C. 4605(b)) is amended--
                    (A) by striking paragraph (3);
                    (B) by redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) 
                as paragraphs (3) and (4), respectively; and
                    (C) in paragraph (4) (as redesignated), by 
                striking ``Eleven'' and inserting ``Twelve''.
            (2) Section 1707(d)(2) of that Act (22 U.S.C. 
        4606(d)(2)) is amended by striking ``, Director of the 
        Arms Control and Disarmament Agency''.
    (d) Atomic Energy Act of 1954.--The Atomic Energy Act of 
1954 is amended--
            (1) in section 57b. (42 U.S.C. 2077(b))--
                    (A) in the first sentence, by striking 
                ``the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency,''; 
                and
                    (B) in the second sentence, by striking 
                ``the Director of the Arms Control and 
                Disarmament Agency,'';
            (2) in section 109b. (42 U.S.C. 2129(b)), by 
        striking ``and the Director'';
            (3) in section 111b. (42 U.S.C. 2131(b)) by 
        striking ``the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the 
        Nuclear Regulatory Commission,'' and inserting ``the 
        Nuclear Regulatory Commission'';
            (4) in section 123 (42 U.S.C. 2153)--
                    (A) in subsection a., in the third 
                sentence--
                            (i) by striking ``and in 
                        consultation with the Director of the 
                        Arms Control and Disarmament Agency 
                        (`the Director')'';
                            (ii) by inserting ``and'' after 
                        ``Energy,'';
                            (iii) by striking ``Commission, and 
                        the Director, who'' and inserting 
                        ``Commission. The Secretary of State''; 
                        and
                            (iv) after ``nuclear explosive 
                        purpose.'', by inserting the following 
                        new sentence: ``Each Nuclear 
                        Proliferation Assessment Statement 
                        prepared pursuant to this Act shall be 
                        accompanied by a classified annex, 
                        prepared in consultation with the 
                        Director of Central Intelligence, 
                        summarizing relevant classified 
                        information.'';
                    (B) in subsection d., in the first 
                proviso--
                            (i) by striking ``Nuclear 
                        Proliferation Assessment Statement 
                        prepared by the Director of the Arms 
                        Control and Disarmament Agency,'' and 
                        inserting ``Nuclear Proliferation 
                        Assessment Statement prepared by the 
                        Secretary of State, and any annexes 
                        thereto,''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``has been'' and 
                        inserting ``have been''; and
                    (C) in the first undesignated paragraph 
                following subsection d., by striking ``the Arms 
                Control and Disarmament Agency,'';
            (5) in section 126a.(1), by striking ``the Director 
        of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, and the 
        Nuclear Regulatory Commission'' and inserting ``and the 
        Nuclear Regulatory Commission,'';
            (6) in section 131a. (42 U.S.C. 2160(a))--
                    (A) in paragraph (1)--
                            (i) in the first sentence, by 
                        striking ``the Director,'';
                            (ii) in the third sentence, by 
                        striking ``the Director declares that 
                        he intends'' and inserting ``the 
                        Secretary of State is required''; and
                            (iii) in the third sentence, by 
                        striking ``the Director's declaration'' 
                        and inserting ``the requirement to 
                        prepare a Nuclear Proliferation 
                        Assessment Statement'';
                    (B) in paragraph (2)--
                            (i) by striking ``Director's view'' 
                        and inserting ``view of the Secretary 
                        of State, Secretary of Energy, 
                        Secretary of Defense, or the 
                        Commission''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``he may prepare'' 
                        and inserting ``the Secretary of State, 
                        in consultation with such Secretary or 
                        the Commission, shall prepare''; and
            (7) in section 131c. (42 U.S.C. 2160(c))--
                    (A) in the first sentence, by striking ``, 
                the Director of the Arms Control and 
                Disarmament Agency,'';
                    (B) in the sixth and seventh sentences, by 
                striking ``Director'' each place it appears and 
                inserting ``Secretary of State''; and
                    (C) in the seventh sentence, by striking 
                ``Director's'' and inserting ``Secretary of 
                State's''.
    (e) Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978.--The Nuclear 
Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 is amended--
            (1) in section 4 (22 U.S.C. 3203)--
                    (A) by striking paragraph (2); and
                    (B) by redesignating paragraphs (3) through 
                (8) as paragraphs (2) through (7), 
                respectively;
            (2) in section 102 (22 U.S.C. 3222), by striking 
        ``, the Secretary of State, and the Director of the 
        Arms Control and Disarmament Agency'' and inserting 
        ``and the Secretary of State'';
            (3) in section 304(d) (42 U.S.C. 2156a), by 
        striking ``the Secretary of Defense, and the 
        Director,'' and inserting ``and the Secretary of 
        Defense,'';
            (4) in section 309 (42 U.S.C. 2139a)--
                    (A) in subsection (b), by striking ``the 
                Department of Commerce, and the Arms Control 
                and Disarmament Agency'' and inserting ``and 
                the Department of Commerce''; and
                    (B) in subsection (c), by striking ``the 
                Arms Control and Disarmament Agency,'';
            (5) in section 406 (42 U.S.C. 2160a), by inserting 
        ``, or any annexes thereto,'' after ``Statement''; and
            (6) in section 602 (22 U.S.C. 3282)--
                    (A) in subsection (c), by striking ``the 
                Arms Control and Disarmament Agency,''; and
                    (B) in subsection (e), by striking ``and 
                the Director''.
    (f) State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956.--
Section 23(a) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2695(a)) is amended by striking ``the Agency 
for International Development, and the Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency'' and inserting ``and the Agency for 
International Development''.
    (g) Foreign Relations Authorization Act of 1972.--Section 
502 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act of 1972 (2 
U.S.C. 194a) is amended by striking ``the United States Arms 
Control and Disarmament Agency,''.
    (h) Title 49.--Section 40118(d) of title 49, United States 
Code, is amended by striking ``, or the Director of the Arms 
Control and Disarmament Agency''.

              TITLE III--UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY

                     CHAPTER 1--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 301. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    This title, and the amendments made by this title, shall 
take effect on the earlier of--
            (1) October 1, 1999; or
            (2) the date of abolition of the United States 
        Information Agency pursuant to the reorganization plan 
        described in section 601.

             CHAPTER 2--ABOLITION AND TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS

SEC. 311. ABOLITION OF UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY.

    The United States Information Agency (other than the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors and the International 
Broadcasting Bureau) is abolished.

SEC. 312. TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS.

    (a) In General.--There are transferred to the Secretary of 
State all functions of the Director of the United States 
Information Agency and all functions of the United States 
Information Agency and any office or component of such agency, 
under any statute, reorganization plan, Executive order, or 
other provision of law, as of the day before the effective date 
of this title.
    (b) Exception.--Subsection (a) does not apply to the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors, the International Broadcasting 
Bureau, or any function performed by the Board or the Bureau.

SEC. 313. UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY.

    Section 1(b) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(b)), as amended by this Act, is 
further amended by adding at the end the following new 
paragraph:
            ``(3) Under secretary for public diplomacy.--There 
        shall be in the Department of State, among the Under 
        Secretaries authorized by paragraph (1), an Under 
        Secretary for Public Diplomacy, who shall have primary 
        responsibility to assist the Secretary and the Deputy 
        Secretary in the formation and implementation of United 
        States public diplomacy policies and activities, 
        including international educational and cultural 
        exchange programs, information, and international 
        broadcasting.''.

SEC. 314. ABOLITION OF OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OF UNITED STATES 
                    INFORMATION AGENCY AND TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS.

    (a) Abolition of Office.--The Office of Inspector General 
of the United States Information Agency is abolished.
    (b) Amendments to Inspector General Act of 1978.--Section 
11 of the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.) is 
amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``the Office of 
        Personnel Management, the United States Information 
        Agency'' and inserting ``or the Office of Personnel 
        Management''; and
            (2) in paragraph (2), by striking ``the United 
        States Information Agency,''.
    (c) Executive Schedule.--Section 5315 of title 5, United 
States Code, is amended by striking the following:
            ``Inspector General, United States Information 
        Agency.''.
    (d) Amendments to Public Law 103-236.--Subsections (i) and 
(j) of section 308 of the United States International 
Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6207 (i) and (j)) are 
amended--
            (1) by striking ``Inspector General of the United 
        States Information Agency'' each place it appearsand 
inserting ``Inspector General of the Department of State and the 
Foreign Service''; and
            (2) by striking ``, the Director of the United 
        States Information Agency,''.
    (e) Transfer of Functions.--There are transferred to the 
Office of the Inspector General of the Department of State and 
the Foreign Service the functions that the Office of Inspector 
General of the United States Information Agency exercised 
before the effective date of this title (including all related 
functions of the Inspector General of the United States 
Information Agency).

                 CHAPTER 3--INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING

SEC. 321. CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF PURPOSE.

    Congress finds that--
            (1) it is the policy of the United States to 
        promote the right of freedom of opinion and expression, 
        including the freedom ``to seek, receive, and impart 
        information and ideas through any media and regardless 
        of frontiers'', in accordance with Article 19 of the 
        Universal Declaration of Human Rights;
            (2) open communication of information and ideas 
        among the peoples of the world contributes to 
        international peace and stability, and the promotion of 
        such communication is in the interests of the United 
        States;
            (3) it is in the interest of the United States to 
        support broadcasting to other nations consistent with 
        the requirements of this chapter and the United States 
        International Broadcasting Act of 1994; and
            (4) international broadcasting is, and should 
        remain, an essential instrument of United States 
        foreign policy.

SEC. 322. CONTINUED EXISTENCE OF BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS.

    Section 304(a) of the United States International 
Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6203(a)) is amended to read 
as follows:
    ``(a) Continued Existence Within Executive Branch.--
            ``(1) In general.--The Broadcasting Board of 
        Governors shall continue to exist within the Executive 
        branch of Government as an entity described in section 
        104 of title 5, United States Code.
            ``(2) Retention of existing board members.--The 
        members of the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
        appointed by the President pursuant to subsection 
        (b)(1)(A) before the effective date of title III of the 
        Foreign Affairs Agencies Consolidation Act of 1998 and 
        holding office as of that date may serve the remainder 
        of their terms of office without reappointment.
            ``(3) Inspector general authorities.--
                    ``(A) In general.--The Inspector General of 
                the Department of State and the Foreign Service 
                shall exercise the same authorities with 
                respect to the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
                and the International Broadcasting Bureau as 
                the Inspector General exercises under the 
                Inspector General Act of 1978 and section 209 
                of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 with respect 
                to the Department of State.
                    ``(B) Respect for journalistic integrity of 
                broadcasters.--The Inspector General shall 
                respect the journalistic integrity of all the 
                broadcasters covered by this title and may not 
                evaluate the philosophical or political 
                perspectives reflected in the content of 
                broadcasts.''.

SEC. 323. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS TO THE UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL 
                    BROADCASTING ACT OF 1994.

    (a) References in Section.--Whenever in this section an 
amendment or repeal is expressed as an amendment or repeal of a 
provision, the reference shall be deemed to be made to the 
United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 
6201 et seq.).
    (b) Substitution of Secretary of State.--Sections 
304(b)(1)(B), 304(b) (2) and (3), 304(c), and 304(e) (22 U.S.C. 
6203(b)(1)(B), 6203(b) (2) and (3), 6203(c), and 6203(e)) are 
amended by striking ``Director of the United States Information 
Agency'' each place it appears and inserting ``Secretary of 
State''.
    (c) Substitution of Acting Secretary of State.--Section 
304(c) (22 U.S.C. 6203(c)) is amended by striking ``acting 
Director of the agency'' and inserting ``Acting Secretary of 
State''.
    (d) Standards and Principles of International 
Broadcasting.--Section 303(b) (22 U.S.C. 6202(b)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (3), by inserting ``, including 
        editorials, broadcast by the Voice of America, which 
        present the views of the United States Government'' 
        after ``policies'';
            (2) by redesignating paragraphs (4) through (9) as 
        paragraphs (5) through (10), respectively; and
            (3) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following:
            ``(4) the capability to provide a surge capacity to 
        support United States foreign policy objectives during 
        crises abroad;'';
    (e) Authorities of the Board.--Section 305(a) (22 U.S.C. 
6204(a)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1)--
                    (A) by striking ``direct and''; and
                    (B) by striking ``and the Television 
                Broadcasting to Cuba Act'' and inserting ``, 
                the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and 
                Worldnet Television, except as provided in 
                section 306(b)'';
            (2) in paragraph (4), by inserting ``, after 
        consultation with the Secretary of State,'' after 
        ``annually,'';
            (3) in paragraph (9)--
                    (A) by striking ``, through the Director of 
                the United States Information Agency,''; and
                    (B) by adding at the end the following new 
                sentence: ``Each annual report shall 
placespecial emphasis on the assessment described in paragraph (2).'';
            (4) in paragraph (12)--
                    (A) by striking ``1994 and 1995'' and 
                inserting ``1998 and 1999''; and
                    (B) by striking ``to the Board for 
                International Broadcasting for such purposes 
                for fiscal year 1993'' and inserting ``to the 
                Board and the International Broadcasting Bureau 
                for such purposes for fiscal year 1997''; and
            (5) by adding at the end the following new 
        paragraphs:
            ``(15)(A) To procure temporary and intermittent 
        personal services to the same extent as is authorized 
        by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, at 
        rates not to exceed the daily equivalent of the rate 
        provided for positions classified above grade GS-15 of 
        the General Schedule under section 5108 of title 5, 
        United States Code.
            ``(B) To allow those providing such services, while 
        away from their homes or their regular places of 
        business, travel expenses (including per diem in lieu 
        of subsistence) as authorized by section 5703 of title 
        5, United States Code, for persons in the Government 
        service employed intermittently, while so employed.
            ``(16) To procure, pursuant to section 1535 of 
        title 31, United States Code (commonly known as the 
        `Economy Act'), such goods and services from other 
        departments or agencies for the Board and the 
        International Broadcasting Bureau as the Board 
        determines are appropriate.
            ``(17) To utilize the provisions of titles III, IV, 
        V, VII, VIII, IX, and X of the United States 
        Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, and 
        section 6 of Reorganization Plan Number 2 of 1977, as 
        in effect on the day before the effective date of title 
        III of the Foreign Affairs Agencies Consolidation Act 
        of 1998, to the extent the Board considers necessary in 
        carrying out the provisions and purposes of this title.
            ``(18) To utilize the authorities of any other 
        statute, reorganization plan, Executive order, 
        regulation, agreement, determination, or other official 
        document or proceeding that had been available to the 
        Director of the United States Information Agency, the 
        Bureau, or the Board before the effective date of title 
        III of the Foreign Affairs Consolidation Act of 1998 
        for carrying out the broadcasting activities covered by 
        this title.''.
    (f) Delegation of Authority.--Section 305 (22 U.S.C. 6204) 
is amended--
            (1) by redesignating subsections (b), (c), and (d) 
        as subsections (c), (d), and (e), respectively; and
            (2) by inserting after subsection (a) the following 
        new subsection:
    ``(b) Delegation of Authority.--The Board may delegate to 
the Director of the International Broadcasting Bureau, or any 
other officer or employee of the United States, to the extent 
the Board determines to be appropriate, the authorities 
provided in this section, except those authorities provided in 
paragraph (1), (2), (3), (4), (5), (6), (9), or (11) of 
subsection (a).''.
    (g) Broadcasting Budgets.--Section 305(c)(1) (as 
redesignated) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``(1)'' before ``The Director''; 
        and
            (2) by striking ``the Director of the United States 
        Information Agency for the consideration of the 
        Director as a part of the Agency's budget submission 
        to''.
    (h) Repeal.--Section 305(c)(2) (as redesignated) is 
repealed.
    (i) Implementation.--Section 305(d) (as redesignated) is 
amended to read as follows:
    ``(d) Professional Independence of Broadcasters.--The 
Secretary of State and the Board, in carrying out their 
functions, shall respect the professional independence and 
integrity of the International Broadcasting Bureau, its 
broadcasting services, and the grantees of the Board.''.
    (j) Foreign Policy Guidance.--Section 306 (22 U.S.C. 6205) 
is amended--
            (1) in the section heading, by striking ``FOREIGN 
        POLICY GUIDANCE'' and inserting ``ROLE OF THE SECRETARY 
        OF STATE'';
            (2) by inserting ``(a) Foreign Policy Guidance.--'' 
        immediately before ``To'';
            (3) by striking ``State, acting through the 
        Director of the United States Information Agency,'' and 
        inserting ``State'';
            (4) by inserting before the period at the end the 
        following: ``, as the Secretary may deem appropriate''; 
        and
            (5) by adding at the end the following:
    ``(b) Certain Worldnet Programming.--The Secretary of State 
is authorized to use Worldnet broadcasts for the purposes of 
continuing interactive dialogues with foreign media and other 
similar overseas public diplomacy programs sponsored by the 
Department of State. The Chairman of the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors shall provide access to Worldnet for this purpose on 
a nonreimbursable basis.''.
    (k) International Broadcasting Bureau.--Section 307 (22 
U.S.C. 6206) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``within the 
        United States Information Agency'' and inserting 
        ``under the Board'';
            (2) in subsection (b)(1), by striking ``Chairman of 
        the Board, in consultation with the Director of the 
        United States Information Agency and with the 
        concurrence of a majority of the Board'' and inserting 
        ``President, by and with the advice and consent of the 
        Senate'';
            (3) by redesignating subsection (b)(1) as 
        subsection (b);
            (4) by striking subsection (b)(2); and
            (5) by adding at the end the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(c) Responsibilities of the Director.--The Director shall 
organize and chair a coordinating committee to examine and make 
recommendations to the Board on long-term strategies for the 
future of internationalbroadcasting, including the use of new 
technologies, further consolidation of broadcast services, and 
consolidation of currently existing public affairs and legislative 
relations functions in the various international broadcasting entities. 
The coordinating committee shall include representatives of Radio Free 
Asia, RFE/RL, Incorporated, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, and, 
as appropriate, the Office of Cuba Broadcasting, the Voice of America, 
and Worldnet.''.
    (l) Repeals.--The following provisions of law are repealed:
            (1) Subsections (k) and (l) of section 308 (22 
        U.S.C. 6207 (k), (l)).
            (2) Section 310 (22 U.S.C. 6209).

SEC. 324. AMENDMENTS TO THE RADIO BROADCASTING TO CUBA ACT.

    The Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465 et seq.) 
is amended--
            (1) by striking ``United States Information 
        Agency'' each place it appears and inserting 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
            (2) by striking ``Agency'' each place it appears 
        and inserting ``Board'';
            (3) by striking ``the Director of the United States 
        Information Agency'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``the Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
            (4) in section 4 (22 U.S.C. 1465b), by striking 
        ``the Voice of America'' and inserting ``the 
        International Broadcasting Bureau'';
            (5) in section 5 (22 U.S.C. 1465c)--
                    (A) by striking ``Board'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Advisory Board''; and
                    (B) in subsection (a), by striking the 
                first sentence and inserting ``There is 
                established within the Office of the President 
                the Advisory Board for Cuba Broadcasting (in 
                this Act referred to as the `Advisory 
                Board').''; and
            (6) by striking any other reference to ``Director'' 
        not amended by paragraph (3) each place it appears and 
        inserting ``Board''.

SEC. 325. AMENDMENTS TO THE TELEVISION BROADCASTING TO CUBA ACT.

    The Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465aa 
et seq.) is amended--
            (1) in section 243(a) (22 U.S.C. 1465bb(a)) and 
        section 246 (22 U.S.C. 1465dd), by striking ``United 
        States Information Agency'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
            (2) in section 243(c) (22 U.S.C. 1465bb(c))--
                    (A) in the subsection heading, by striking 
                ``USIA''; and
                    (B) by striking `` `USIA Television'' and 
                inserting ``the `Television'';
            (3) in section 244(c) (22 U.S.C. 1465cc(c)) and 
        section 246 (22 U.S.C. 1465dd), by striking ``Agency'' 
        each place it appears and inserting ``Board'';
            (4) in section 244 (22 U.S.C. 1465cc)--
                    (A) in the section heading, by striking 
                ``OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY'';
                    (B) in subsection (a)--
                            (i) in the first sentence, by 
                        striking ``The Director of the United 
                        States Information Agency shall 
                        establish'' and inserting ``There is''; 
                        and
                            (ii) in the second sentence--
                                    (I) by striking ``Director 
                                of the United States 
                                Information Agency'' and 
                                inserting ``Broadcasting Board 
                                of Governors''; and
                                    (II) by striking ``the 
                                Director of the Voice of 
                                America'' and inserting ``the 
                                International Broadcasting 
                                Bureau'';
                    (C) in subsection (b)--
                            (i) by striking ``Agency 
                        facilities'' and inserting ``Board 
                        facilities''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``Information 
                        Agency'' and inserting 
                        ``International''; and
                    (D) in the heading of subsection (c), by 
                striking ``USIA''; and
            (5) in section 245(d) (22 U.S.C. 1465c note), by 
        striking ``Board'' and inserting ``Advisory Board''.

SEC. 326. TRANSFER OF BROADCASTING RELATED FUNDS, PROPERTY, AND 
                    PERSONNEL.

    (a) Transfer and Allocation of Property and 
Appropriations.--
            (1) In general.--The assets, liabilities (including 
        contingent liabilities arising from suits continued 
        with a substitution or addition of parties under 
        section 327(d)), contracts, property, records, and 
        unexpended balance of appropriations, authorizations, 
        allocations, and other funds employed, held, used, 
        arising from, available to, or to be made available in 
        connection with the functions and offices of USIA 
        transferred to the Broadcasting Board of Governors by 
        this chapter shall be transferred to the Broadcasting 
        Board of Governors for appropriate allocation.
            (2) Additional transfers.--In addition to the 
        transfers made under paragraph (1), there shall be 
        transferred to the Chairman of the Broadcasting Board 
        of Governors the assets, contracts, property, records, 
        and unexpended balance of appropriations, 
        authorizations, allocations, and other funds, as 
        determined by the Secretary, in concurrence with the 
        Broadcasting Board of Governors, to support the 
        functions transferred by this chapter.
    (b) Transfer of Personnel.--Notwithstanding any other 
provision of law--
            (1) except as provided in subsection (c), all 
        personnel and positions of USIA employed or maintained 
        to carry out the functions transferred by this chapter 
        to the Broadcasting Board of Governors shall be 
        transferred to the Broadcasting Board of Governors at 
        the same grade or class and the same rate of basic pay 
        or basic salary rate and with the same tenure held 
        immediately preceding transfer; and
            (2) the personnel and positions of USIA, as 
        determined by the Secretary of State, with the 
        concurrenceof the Broadcasting Board of Governors and 
the Director of USIA, to support the functions transferred by this 
chapter shall be transferred to the Broadcasting Board of Governors, 
including the International Broadcasting Bureau, at the same grade or 
class and the same rate of basic pay or basic salary rate and with the 
same tenure held immediately preceding transfer.
    (c) Transfer and Allocation of Property, Appropriations, 
and Personnel Associated With Worldnet.--USIA personnel 
responsible for carrying out interactive dialogs with foreign 
media and other similar overseas public diplomacy programs 
using the Worldnet television broadcasting system, and funds 
associated with such personnel, shall be transferred to the 
Department of State in accordance with the provisions of title 
VI of this division.
    (d) Incidental Transfers.--The Director of the Office of 
Management and Budget, when requested by the Broadcasting Board 
of Governors, is authorized to make such incidental 
dispositions of personnel, assets, liabilities, grants, 
contracts, property, records, and unexpended balances of 
appropriations, authorizations, allocations, and other funds 
held, used, arising from, available to, or to be made available 
in connection with functions and offices transferred from USIA, 
as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this 
section.

SEC. 327. SAVINGS PROVISIONS.

    (a) Continuing Legal Force and Effect.--All orders, 
determinations, rules, regulations, permits, agreements, 
grants, contracts, certificates, licenses, registrations, 
privileges, and other administrative actions--
            (1) that have been issued, made, granted, or 
        allowed to become effective by the President, any 
        Federal agency or official thereof, or by a court of 
        competent jurisdiction, in the performance of functions 
        exercised by the Broadcasting Board of Governors of the 
        United States Information Agency on the day before the 
        effective date of this title, and
            (2) that are in effect at the time this title takes 
        effect, or were final before the effective date of this 
        title and are to become effective on or after the 
        effective date of this title,

shall continue in effect according to their terms until 
modified, terminated, superseded, set aside, or revoked in 
accordance with law by the President, the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors, or other authorized official, a court of competent 
jurisdiction, or by operation of law.
    (b) Pending Proceedings.--
            (1) In general.--The provisions of this chapter, or 
        amendments made by this chapter, shall not affect any 
        proceedings, including notices of proposed rulemaking, 
        or any application for any license, permit, 
        certificate, or financial assistance pending before the 
        Broadcasting Board of Governors of the United States 
        Information Agency at the time this title takes effect, 
        with respect to functions exercised by the Board as of 
        the effective date of this title but such proceedings 
        and applications shall be continued.
            (2) Orders, appeals, and payments.--Orders shall be 
        issued in such proceedings, appeals shall be taken 
        therefrom, and payments shall be made pursuant to such 
        orders, as if this chapter had not been enacted, and 
        orders issued in any such proceedings shall continue in 
        effect until modified, terminated, superseded, or 
        revoked by a duly authorized official, by a court of 
        competent jurisdiction, or by operation of law.
            (3) Statutory construction.--Nothing in this 
        subsection shall be deemed to prohibit the 
        discontinuance or modification of any such proceeding 
        under the same terms and conditions and to the same 
        extent that such proceeding could have been 
        discontinued or modified if this chapter had not been 
        enacted.
    (c) Nonabatement of Proceedings.--No suit, action, or other 
proceeding commenced by or against any officer in the official 
capacity of such individual as an officer of the Broadcasting 
Board of Governors, or any commission or component thereof, 
shall abate by reason of the enactment of this chapter. No 
cause of action by or against the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors, or any commission or component thereof, or by or 
against any officer thereof in the official capacity of such 
officer, shall abate by reason of the enactment of this 
chapter.
    (d) Continuation of Proceedings With Substitution of 
Parties.--
            (1) Substitution of parties.--If, before the 
        effective date of this title, USIA or the Broadcasting 
        Board of Governors, or any officer thereof in the 
        official capacity of such officer, is a party to a suit 
        which is related to the functions transferred by this 
        chapter, then effective on such date such suit shall be 
        continued with the Broadcasting Board of Governors or 
        other appropriate official of the Board substituted or 
        added as a party.
            (2) Liability of the board.--The Board shall 
        participate in suits continued under paragraph (1) 
        where the Broadcasting Board of Governors or other 
        appropriate official of the Board is added as a party 
        and shall be liable for any judgments or remedies in 
        those suits or proceedings arising from the exercise of 
        the functions transferred by this chapter to the same 
        extent that USIA would have been liable if such 
        judgment or remedy had been rendered on the day before 
        the abolition of USIA.
    (e) Administrative Actions Relating to Promulgation of 
Regulations.--Any administrative action relating to the 
preparation or promulgation of a regulation by the Broadcasting 
Board of Governors relating to a function exercised by the 
Board before the effective date of this title may be continued 
by the Board with the same effect as if this chapter had not 
been enacted.
    (f) References.--Reference in any other Federal law, 
Executive order, rule, regulation, or delegation of authority, 
or any document of or relating to the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors of the United States Information Agency with regard 
to functions exercised before the effective date of this title, 
shall be deemed to refer to the Board.

SEC. 328. REPORT ON THE PRIVATIZATION OF RFE/RL, INCORPORATED.

    Not later than March 1 of each year, the Broadcasting Board 
of Governors shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report on the progress of the Board and of RFE/RL, 
Incorporated, on any steps taken to further the policy declared 
in section 312(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995. The report under this subsection 
shall include the following:
            (1) Efforts by RFE/RL, Incorporated, to terminate 
        individual language services.
            (2) A detailed description of steps taken with 
        regard to section 312(a) of that Act.
            (3) An analysis of prospects for privatization over 
        the coming year.
            (4) An assessment of the extent to which United 
        States Government funding may be appropriate in the 
        year 2000 and subsequent years for surrogate 
        broadcasting to the countries to which RFE/RL, 
        Incorporated, broadcast during the year. This 
        assessment shall include an analysis of the environment 
        for independent media in those countries, noting the 
        extent of government control of the media, the ability 
        of independent journalists and news organizations to 
        operate, relevant domestic legislation, level of 
        government harassment and efforts to censor, and other 
        indications of whether the people of such countries 
        enjoy freedom of expression.

                    CHAPTER 4--CONFORMING AMENDMENTS

SEC. 331. REFERENCES.

    (a) In General.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
division, any reference in any statute, reorganization plan, 
Executive order, regulation, agreement, determination, or other 
official document or proceeding to--
            (1) the Director of the United States Information 
        Agency or the Director of the International 
        Communication Agency shall be deemed to refer to the 
        Secretary of State; and
            (2) the United States Information Agency, USIA, or 
        the International Communication Agency shall be deemed 
        to refer to the Department of State.
    (b) Continuing References to USIA or Director.--Subsection 
(a) shall not apply to section 146 (a), (b), or (c) of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 
(22 U.S.C. 4069a(f), 4069b(g), or 4069c(f)).

SEC. 332. AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 5, UNITED STATES CODE.

    Title 5, United States Code, is amended--
            (1) in section 5313, by striking ``Director of the 
        United States Information Agency.'';
            (2) in section 5315--
                    (A) by striking ``Deputy Director of the 
                United States Information Agency.''; and
                    (B) by striking ``Director of the 
                International Broadcasting Bureau, the United 
                States Information Agency.'' and inserting 
                ``Director of the International Broadcasting 
                Bureau.''; and
            (3) in section 5316--
                    (A) by striking ``Deputy Director, Policy 
                and Plans, United States Information Agency.''; 
                and
                    (B) by striking ``Associate Director 
                (Policy and Plans), United States Information 
                Agency.''.

SEC. 333. APPLICATION OF CERTAIN LAWS.

    (a) Application to Functions of Department of State.--
Section 501 of Public Law 80-402 (22 U.S.C. 1461), section 202 
of Public Law 95-426 (22 U.S.C. 1461-1), and section 208 of 
Public Law 99-93 (22 U.S.C. 1461-1a) shall not apply to public 
affairs and other information dissemination functions of the 
Secretary of State as carried out prior to any transfer of 
functions pursuant to this division.
    (b) Application to Functions Transferred to Department of 
State.--Section 501 of Public Law 80-402 (22 U.S.C. 1461), 
section 202 of Public Law 95-426 (22 U.S.C. 1461-1), and 
section 208 of Public Law 99-93 (22 U.S.C. 1461-1a) shall apply 
only to public diplomacy programs of the Director of the United 
States Information Agency as carried out prior to any transfer 
of functions pursuant to this division to the same extent that 
such programs were covered by these provisions prior to such 
transfer.
    (c) Limitation on Use of Funds.--Except as provided in 
section 501 of Public Law 80-402 and section 208 of Public Law 
99-93, funds specifically authorized to be appropriated for 
such public diplomacy programs shall not be used to influence 
public opinion in the United States, and no program material 
prepared using such funds shall be distributed or disseminated 
in the United States.
    (d) Reporting Requirements.--The report submitted pursuant 
to section 601(f) of this division shall include a detailed 
statement of the manner in which the special mission of public 
diplomacy carried out by USIA prior to the transfer of 
functions under this division shall be preserved within the 
Department of State, including the planned duties and 
responsibilities of any new bureaus that will perform such 
public diplomacy functions. Such report shall also include the 
best available estimates of--
            (1) the amounts to be expended by the Department of 
        State for public affairs programs during fiscal year 
        1998, and on the personnel and support costs for such 
        programs;
            (2) the amounts to be expended by USIA for its 
        public diplomacy programs during fiscal year 1998, and 
        on the personnel and support costs for such programs; 
        and
            (3) the amounts, including funds to be transferred 
        from USIA and funds appropriated to the Department, 
        that will be allocated for the programs described in 
        paragraphs (1) and (2), respectively, during the fiscal 
        year in which the transfer of functions from USIA to 
        the Department occurs.
    (e) Congressional Presentation Document.--The Department of 
State's Congressional Presentation Document for fiscal year 
2000 and each fiscal year thereafter shall include--
            (1) the aggregated amounts that the Department will 
        spend on such public diplomacy programs and on costs of 
        personnel for such programs, and a detailed description 
        of the goals and purposes for which such funds shall be 
        expended; and
            (2) the amount of funds allocated to and the 
        positions authorized for such public diplomacy 
        programs, including bureaus to be created upon the 
        transfer of functions from USIA to the Department.

SEC. 334. ABOLITION OF UNITED STATES ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC 
                    DIPLOMACY.

    (a) Abolition.--The United States Advisory Commission on 
Public Diplomacy is abolished.
    (b) Repeals.--Section 604 of the United States Information 
and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1469) and 
section 8 of Reorganization Plan Numbered 2 of 1977 are 
repealed.

SEC. 335. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

    (a) The United States Information and Educational Exchange 
Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1431 et seq.) is amended--
            (1) in section 505 (22 U.S.C. 1464a)--
                    (A) by striking ``Director of the United 
                States Information Agency'' each place it 
                appears and inserting ``Broadcasting Board of 
                Governors'';
                    (B) by striking ``United States Information 
                Agency'' each place it appears and inserting 
                ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
                    (C) in subsection (b)--
                            (i) by striking ``Agency's'' and 
                        all that follows through `` `USIA-
                        TV')'' and inserting ``television 
                        broadcasts of the United States 
                        International Television Service''; and
                            (ii) in paragraphs (1), (2), and 
                        (3), by striking ``USIA-TV'' each place 
                        it appears and inserting ``The United 
                        States International Television 
                        Service''; and
                    (D) in subsections (d) and (e), by striking 
                ``USIA-TV'' each place it appears and inserting 
                ``the United States International Television 
                Service'';
            (2) in section 506(c) (22 U.S.C. 1464b(c))--
                    (A) by striking ``Director of the United 
                States Information Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
                    (B) by striking ``Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Board''; and
                    (C) by striking ``Director'' and inserting 
                ``Board'';
            (3) in section 705 (22 U.S.C 1477c)--
                    (A) by striking subsections (a) and (c); 
                and
                    (B) in subsection (b)--
                            (i) by striking ``(b) In addition, 
                        the United States Information Agency'' 
                        and inserting ``The Department of 
                        State''; and
                            (ii) by striking ``program grants'' 
                        and inserting ``grants for overseas 
                        public diplomacy programs'';
            (4) in section 801(7) (22 U.S.C. 1471(7))--
                    (A) by striking ``Agency'' and inserting 
                ``overseas public diplomacy''; and
                    (B) by inserting ``other'' after ``together 
                with''; and
            (5) in section 812 (22 U.S.C. 1475g)--
                    (A) by striking ``United States Information 
                Agency post'' each place it appears and 
                inserting ``overseas public diplomacy post'';
                    (B) in subsection (a), by striking ``United 
                States Information Agency'' the first place it 
                appears and inserting ``Department of State'';
                    (C) in subsection (b), by striking 
                ``Director of the United States Information 
                Agency'' and inserting ``Secretary of State''; 
                and
                    (D) in the section heading, by striking 
                ``USIA'' and inserting ``OVERSEAS PUBLIC 
                DIPLOMACY''.
    (b) Section 212 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 1475h) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``United States Information 
        Agency'' each place it appears and inserting 
        ``Department of State'';
            (2) in subsection (a), by inserting ``for carrying 
        out its overseas public diplomacy functions'' after 
        ``grants'';
            (3) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) by striking ``a grant'' the first time 
                it appears and inserting ``an overseas public 
                diplomacy grant''; and
                    (B) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``such'' 
                before ``a grant'' the first place it appears;
            (4) in subsection (c)(1), by inserting ``overseas 
        public diplomacy'' before ``grants'';
            (5) in subsection (c)(3), by inserting ``such'' 
        before ``grant''; and
            (6) by striking subsection (d).
    (c) Section 602 of the National and Community Service Act 
of 1990 (22 U.S.C. 2452a) is amended--
            (1) in the second sentence of subsection (a), by 
        striking ``United States Information Agency'' and 
        inserting ``Department of State''; and
            (2) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) by striking ``appropriations account of 
                the United States Information Agency'' and 
                inserting ``appropriate appropriations account 
                of the Department of State''; and
                    (B) by striking ``and the United States 
                Information Agency''.
    (d) Section 305 of Public Law 97-446 (19 U.S.C. 2604) is 
amended in the first sentence, by striking ``, after 
consultation with the Director of the United States Information 
Agency,''.
    (e) Section 601 of Public Law 103-227 (20 U.S.C. 5951(a)) 
is amended by striking ``of the Director of the United States 
Information Agency and with'' and inserting ``and''.
    (f) Section 1003(b) of the Fascell Fellowship Act (22 
U.S.C. 4902(b)) is amended--
            (1) in the text above paragraph (1), by striking 
        ``9 members'' and inserting ``7 members'';
            (2) in paragraph (4), by striking ``Six'' and 
        inserting ``Five'';
            (3) by striking paragraph (3); and
            (4) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph 
        (3).
    (g) Section 803 of the Intelligence Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Year 1992 (50 U.S.C. 1903) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) by striking paragraph (6); and
                    (B) by redesignating paragraphs (7) and (8) 
                as paragraphs (6) and (7), respectively; and
            (2) in subsection (c), by striking ``subsection 
        (b)(7)'' and inserting ``subsection (b)(6)''.
    (h) Section 7 of the Federal Triangle Development Act (40 
U.S.C. 1106) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (c)(1)--
                    (A) in the text above subparagraph (A), by 
                striking ``15 members'' and inserting ``14 
                members'';
                    (B) by striking subparagraph (F); and
                    (C) by redesignating subparagraphs (G) 
                through (J) as subparagraphs (F) through (I), 
                respectively;
            (2) in paragraphs (3) and (5) of subsection (c), by 
        striking ``paragraph (1)(J)'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``paragraph (1)(I)''; and
            (3) in subsection (d)(3) and subsection (e), by 
        striking ``the Administrator and the Director of the 
        United States Information Agency'' each place it 
        appears and inserting ``and the Administrator''.
    (i) Section 3 of the Woodrow Wilson Memorial Act of 1968 
(Public Law 90-637; 20 U.S.C. 80f) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) in the text preceding paragraph (1), by 
                striking ``19 members'' and inserting ``17 
                members'';
                    (B) by striking paragraph (7);
                    (C) by striking ``10'' in paragraph (10) 
                and inserting ``9''; and
                    (D) by redesignating paragraphs (8) through 
                (10) as paragraphs (7) through (9), 
                respectively; and
            (2) in subsection (c), by striking ``(9)'' and 
        inserting ``(8)''.
    (j) Section 624 of Public Law 89-329 (20 U.S.C. 1131c) is 
amended by striking ``the United States Information Agency,''.
    (k) The Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 et 
seq.) is amended--
            (1) in section 202(a)(1) (22 U.S.C. 3922(a)(1)), by 
        striking ``Director of the United States Information 
        Agency'' and inserting ``Broadcasting Board of 
        Governors'';
            (2) in section 210 (22 U.S.C. 3930), by striking 
        ``United States Information Agency'' and inserting 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
            (3) in section 1003(a) (22 U.S.C. 4103(a)), by 
        striking ``United States Information Agency'' and 
        inserting ``Broadcasting Board of Governors''; and
            (4) in section 1101(c) (22 U.S.C. 4131(c)), by 
        striking ``the United States Information Agency,'' and 
        inserting ``Broadcasting Board of Governors,''.
    (l) The Department of State Basic Authorities Act of 1956, 
as amended by this Act, is further amended--
            (1) in section 23(a) (22 U.S.C. 2695(a)), by 
        striking ``United States Information Agency'' and 
        inserting ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'';
            (2) in section 25(f) (22 U.S.C. 2697(f))--
                    (A) by striking ``Director of the United 
                States Information Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Broadcasting Board of Governors''; and
                    (B) by striking ``with respect to their 
                respective agencies'' and inserting ``with 
                respect to the Board and the Agency'';
            (3) in section 26(b) (22 U.S.C. 2698(b)), as 
        amended by this Act--
                    (A) by striking ``Director of the United 
                States Information Agency, the chairman of the 
                Board for International Broadcasting,'' and 
                inserting ``Broadcasting Board of Governors,''; 
                and
                    (B) by striking ``with respect to their 
                respective agencies'' and inserting ``with 
                respect to the Board and the Agency''; and
            (4) in section 32 (22 U.S.C. 2704), as amended by 
        this Act, by striking ``the Director of the United 
        States Information Agency'' and inserting ``the 
        Broadcasting Board of Governors''.
    (m) Section 507(b)(3) of Public Law 103-317 (22 U.S.C. 
2669a(b)(3)) is amended by striking ``, the United States 
Information Agency,''.
    (n) Section 502 of Public Law 92-352 (2 U.S.C. 194a) is 
amended by striking ``the United States Information Agency,''.
    (o) Section 6 of Public Law 104-288 (22 U.S.C. 2141d) is 
amended--
            (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``Director of 
        the United States Information Agency,''; and
            (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``the Director 
        of the United States Information Agency'' and inserting 
        ``the Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy''.
    (p) Section 40118(d) of title 49, United States Code, is 
amended by striking ``, the Director of the United States 
Information Agency,''.
    (q) Section 155 of Public Law 102-138 is amended--
            (1) by striking the comma before ``Department of 
        Commerce'' and inserting ``and''; and
            (2) by striking ``, and the United States 
        Information Agency''.
    (r) Section 107 of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic 
Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (22 U.S.C. 6037) is amended 
by striking ``Director of the United States Information 
Agency'' each place it appears and inserting ``Director of the 
International Broadcasting Bureau''.

SEC. 336. REPEALS.

    The following provisions are repealed:
            (1) Sections 701 (22 U.S.C. 1476), 704 (22 U.S.C. 
        1477b), 807 (22 U.S.C 1475b), 808 (22 U.S.C 1475c), 811 
        (22 U.S.C 1475f), and 1009 (22 U.S.C. 1440) of the 
        United States Information and Educational Exchange Act 
        of 1948.
            (2) Section 106(c) of the Mutual Educational and 
        Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2456(c)).
            (3) Section 565(e) of the Anti-Economic 
        Discrimination Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 2679c(e)).
            (4) Section 206(b) of Public Law 102-138.
            (5) Section 2241 of Public Law 104-66.
            (6) Sections 1 through 6 of Reorganization Plan 
        Numbered 2 of 1977 (91 Stat. 636).
            (7) Section 207 of the Foreign Relations 
        Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (Public 
        Law 100-204; 22 U.S.C. 1463 note).

  TITLE IV--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY

                     CHAPTER 1--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 401. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    This title, and the amendments made by this title, shall 
take effect on the earlier of--
            (1) October 1, 1998; or
            (2) the date of abolition of the United States 
        International Development Cooperation Agency pursuant 
        to the reorganization plan described in section 601.

             CHAPTER 2--ABOLITION AND TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS

SEC. 411. ABOLITION OF UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
                    COOPERATION AGENCY.

    (a) In General.--Except for the components specified in 
subsection (b), the United States International Development 
Cooperation Agency (including the Institute for Scientific and 
Technological Cooperation) is abolished.
    (b) AID and OPIC Exempted.--Subsection (a) does not apply 
to the Agency for International Development or the Overseas 
Private Investment Corporation.

SEC. 412. TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS AND AUTHORITIES.

    (a) Allocation of Funds.--
            (1) Allocation to the secretary of state.--Funds 
        made available under the categories of assistance 
        deemed allocated to the Director of the International 
        Development Cooperation Agency under section 1-801 of 
        Executive Order No. 12163 (22 U.S.C. 2381 note) as of 
        October 1, 1997, shall be allocated to the Secretary of 
        State on and after the effective date of this title 
        without further action by the President.
            (2) Procedures for reallocations or transfers.--The 
        Secretary of State may allocate or transfer as 
        appropriate any funds received under paragraph (1) in 
        the same manner as previously provided for the Director 
        of the International Development Cooperation Agency 
        under section 1-802 of that Executive Order, as in 
        effect on October 1, 1997.
    (b) With Respect to the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation.--There are transferred to the Administrator of the 
Agency for International Development all functions of the 
Director of the United States International Development 
Cooperation Agency as of the day before the effective date of 
this title with respect to the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation.
    (c) Other Activities.--The authorities and functions 
transferred to the United States International Development 
Cooperation Agency or the Director of that Agency by section 6 
of Reorganization Plan Numbered 2 of 1979 shall, to the extent 
such authorities and functions have not been repealed, be 
transferred to those agencies or heads of agencies, as the case 
may be, in which those authorities and functions were vested by 
statute as of the day before the effective date of such 
reorganization plan.

SEC. 413. STATUS OF AID.

    (a) In General.--Unless abolished pursuant to the 
reorganization plan submitted under section 601, and except as 
provided in section 412, there is within the Executive branch 
of Government the United States Agency for International 
Development as an entity described in section 104 of title 5, 
United States Code.
    (b) Retention of Officers.--Nothing in this section shall 
require the reappointment of any officer of the United States 
serving in the Agency for International Development of the 
United States International Development Cooperation Agency as 
of the day before the effective date of this title.

                    CHAPTER 3--CONFORMING AMENDMENTS

SEC. 421. REFERENCES.

    Except as otherwise provided in this division, any 
reference in any statute, reorganization plan, Executive order, 
regulation, agreement, determination, or other official 
document or proceeding to the United States International 
Development Cooperation Agency (IDCA) or to the Director or any 
other officer or employee of IDCA--
            (1) insofar as such reference relates to any 
        function or authority transferred under section 412(a), 
        shall be deemed to refer to the Secretary of State;
            (2) insofar as such reference relates to any 
        function or authority transferred under section 412(b), 
        shall be deemed to refer to the Administrator of the 
        Agency for International Development;
            (3) insofar as such reference relates to any 
        function or authority transferred under section 412(c), 
        shall be deemed to refer to the head of the agency to 
        which such function or authority is transferred under 
        such section; and
            (4) insofar as such reference relates to any 
        function or authority not transferred by this title, 
        shall be deemed to refer to the President or such 
        agency or agencies as may be specified by Executive 
        order.

SEC. 422. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

    (a) Termination of Reorganization Plans and Delegations.--
The following shall cease to be effective:
            (1) Reorganization Plan Numbered 2 of 1979 (5 
        U.S.C. App.).
            (2) Section 1-101 through 1-103, sections 1-401 
        through 1-403, section 1-801(a), and such other 
        provisions that relate to the United States 
        International Development Cooperation Agency or the 
        Director of IDCA, of Executive Order No. 12163 (22 
        U.S.C. 2381 note; relating to administration of foreign 
        assistance and related functions).
            (3) The International Development Cooperation 
        Agency Delegation of Authority Numbered 1 (44 Fed. Reg. 
        57521), except for section 1-6 of such Delegation of 
        Authority.
            (4) Section 3 of Executive Order No. 12884 (58 Fed. 
        Reg. 64099; relating to the delegation of functions 
        under the Freedom for Russia and Emerging Eurasian 
        Democracies and Open Markets Support Act of 1992, the 
        Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Foreign Operations, 
        Export Financing and Related Programs Appropriations 
        Act, 1993, and section 301 of title 3, United States 
        Code).
    (b) Other Statutory Amendments and Repeal.--
            (1) Title 5.--Section 7103(a)(2)(B)(iv) of title 5, 
        United States Code, is amended by striking ``United 
        States International Development Cooperation Agency'' 
        and inserting ``Agency for International Development''.
            (2) Inspector general act of 1978.--Section 8A of 
        the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App. 3) is 
        amended--
                    (A) in subsection (a)--
                            (i) by striking ``Development'' 
                        through ``(1) shall'' and inserting 
                        ``Development shall'';
                            (ii) by striking ``; and'' at the 
                        end of subsection (a)(1) and inserting 
                        a period; and
                            (iii) by striking paragraph (2);
                    (B) by striking subsections (c) and (f); 
                and
                    (C) by redesignating subsections (d), (e), 
                (g), and (h) as subsections (c), (d), (e), and 
                (f), respectively.
            (3) State department basic authorities act of 
        1956.--The State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
        1956 is amended--
                    (A) in section 25(f) (22 U.S.C. 2697(f)), 
                as amended by this Act, by striking ``Director 
                of the United States International Development 
                Cooperation Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Administrator of the Agency for International 
                Development'';
                    (B) in section 26(b) (22 U.S.C. 2698(b)), 
                as amended by this Act, by striking ``Director 
                of the United States International Development 
                Cooperation Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Administrator of the Agency for International 
                Development''; and
                    (C) in section 32 (22 U.S.C. 2704), by 
                striking ``Director of the United States 
                International Development Cooperation Agency'' 
                and inserting ``Administrator of the Agency for 
                International Development''.
            (4) Foreign service act of 1980.--The Foreign 
        Service Act of 1980 is amended--
                    (A) in section 202(a)(1) (22 U.S.C. 
                3922(a)(1)), by striking ``Director of the 
                United States International Development 
                Cooperation Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Administrator of the Agency for International 
                Development'';
                    (B) in section 210 (22 U.S.C. 3930), by 
                striking ``United States International 
                Development Cooperation Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Agency for International Development'';
                    (C) in section 1003(a) (22 U.S.C. 4103(a)), 
                by striking ``United States International 
                Development Cooperation Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Agency for International Development''; and
                    (D) in section 1101(c) (22 U.S.C. 4131(c)), 
                by striking ``United States International 
                Development Cooperation Agency'' and inserting 
                ``Agency for International Development''.
            (5) Repeal.--Section 413 of Public Law 96-53 (22 
        U.S.C. 3512) is repealed.
            (6) Title 49.--Section 40118(d) of title 49, United 
        States Code, is amended by striking ``the Director of 
        the United States International Development Cooperation 
        Agency'' and inserting ``or the Administrator of the 
        Agency for International Development''.
            (7) Export administration act of 1979.--Section 
        2405(g) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 
        U.S.C. App. 2405(g)) is amended--
                    (A) by striking ``Director of the United 
                States International Development Cooperation 
                Agency'' each place it appears and inserting 
                ``Administrator of the Agency for International 
                Development''; and
                    (B) in the fourth sentence, by striking 
                ``Director'' and inserting ``Administrator''.

             TITLE V--AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                     CHAPTER 1--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 501. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    This title, and the amendments made by this title, shall 
take effect on the earlier of--
            (1) October 1, 1998; or
            (2) the date of reorganization of the Agency for 
        International Development pursuant to the 
        reorganization plan described in section 601.

          CHAPTER 2--REORGANIZATION AND TRANSFER OF FUNCTIONS

SEC. 511. REORGANIZATION OF AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

    (a) In General.--The Agency for International Development 
shall be reorganized in accordance with this division and the 
reorganization plan transmitted pursuant to section 601.
    (b) Functions To Be Transferred.--The reorganization of the 
Agency for International Development shall provide, at a 
minimum, for the transfer to and consolidation with the 
Department of State of the following functions of AID:
            (1) The Press office.
            (2) Certain administrative functions.

            CHAPTER 3--AUTHORITIES OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE

SEC. 521. DEFINITION OF UNITED STATES ASSISTANCE.

    In this chapter, the term ``United States assistance'' 
means development and other economic assistance, including 
assistance made available under the following provisions of 
law:
            (1) Chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961 (relating to development assistance).
            (2) Chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961 (relating to the economic support fund).
            (3) Chapter 10 of part I of the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961 (relating to the Development Fund for 
        Africa).
            (4) Chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961 (relating to assistance for the independent 
        states of the former Soviet Union).
            (5) The Support for East European Democracy Act (22 
        U.S.C. 5401 et seq.).

SEC. 522. ADMINISTRATOR OF AID REPORTING TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

    The Administrator of the Agency for International 
Development, appointed pursuant to section 624(a) of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2384(a)), shall 
report to and be under the direct authority and foreign policy 
guidance of the Secretary of State.

SEC. 523. ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COORDINATION AND OVERSIGHT.

    (a) Authority of the Secretary of State.--
            (1) In general.--Under the direction of the 
        President, the Secretary of State shall coordinate all 
        United States assistance in accordance with this 
        section, except as provided in paragraphs (2) and (3).
            (2) Export promotion activities.--Coordination of 
        activities relating to promotion of exports of United 
        States goods and services shall continue to be 
        primarily the responsibility of the Secretary of 
        Commerce.
            (3) International economic activities.--
        Coordination of activities relating to United States 
        participation in international financial institutions 
        and relating to organization of multilateral efforts 
        aimed at currency stabilization, currency 
        convertibility, debt reduction, and comprehensive 
        economic reform programs shall continue to be primarily 
        the responsibility of the Secretary of the Treasury.
            (4) Authorities and powers of the secretary of 
        state.--The powers and authorities of the Secretary 
        provided in this chapter are in addition to the powers 
        and authorities provided to the Secretary under any 
        other Act, including section 101(b) and section 622(c) 
        of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
        2151(b), 2382(c)).
    (b) Coordination Activities.--Coordination activities of 
the Secretary of State under subsection (a) shall include--
            (1) approving an overall assistance and economic 
        cooperation strategy;
            (2) ensuring program and policy coordination among 
        agencies of the United States Government in carrying 
        out the policies set forth in the Foreign Assistance 
        Act of 1961, the Arms Export Control Act, and other 
        relevant assistance Acts;
            (3) pursuing coordination with other countries and 
        international organizations; and
            (4) resolving policy, program, and funding disputes 
        among United States Government agencies.
    (c) Statutory Construction.--Nothing in this section may be 
construed to lessen the accountability of any Federal agency 
administering any program, project, or activity of United 
States assistance for any funds made available to the Federal 
agency for that purpose.
    (d) Authority To Provide Personnel of the Agency for 
International Development.--The Administrator of the Agency for 
International Development is authorized to detail to the 
Department of State on a nonreimbursable basis such personnel 
employed by the Agency as the Secretary of State may require to 
carry out this section.

                          TITLE VI--TRANSITION

                     CHAPTER 1--REORGANIZATION PLAN

SEC. 601. REORGANIZATION PLAN AND REPORT.

    (a) Submission of Plan and Report.--Not later than 60 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, the President 
shall transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
reorganization plan and report regarding--
            (1) the abolition of the United States Arms Control 
        and Disarmament Agency, the United States Information 
        Agency, and the United States International Development 
        Cooperation Agency in accordance with this division;
            (2) with respect to the Agency for International 
        Development, the consolidation and streamlining of the 
        Agency and the transfer of certain functions of the 
        Agency to the Department in accordance with section 
        511;
            (3) the termination of functions of each covered 
        agency as may be necessary to effectuate the 
        reorganization under this division, and the termination 
        of the affairs of each agency abolished under this 
        division;
            (4) the transfer to the Department of the functions 
        and personnel of each covered agency consistent with 
        the provisions of this division; and
            (5) the consolidation, reorganization, and 
        streamlining of the Department in connection with the 
        transfer of such functions and personnel in order to 
        carry out such functions.
    (b) Covered Agencies.--The agencies covered by this section 
are the following:
            (1) The United States Arms Control and Disarmament 
        Agency.
            (2) The United States Information Agency.
            (3) The United States International Development 
        Cooperation Agency.
            (4) The Agency for International Development.
    (c) Plan Elements.--The plan transmitted under subsection 
(a) shall contain, consistent with this division, such elements 
as the President deems appropriate, including elements that--
            (1) identify the functions of each covered agency 
        that will be transferred to the Department under the 
        plan;
            (2) specify the steps to be taken by the Secretary 
        of State to reorganize internally the functions of the 
        Department, including the consolidation of offices and 
        functions, that will be required under the plan in 
        order to permit the Department to carry out the 
        functions transferred to it under the plan;
            (3) specify the funds available to each covered 
        agency that will be transferred to the Department as a 
        result of the transfer of functions of such agency to 
        the Department;
            (4) specify the proposed allocations within the 
        Department of unexpended funds transferred in 
        connection with the transfer of functions under the 
        plan; and
            (5) specify the proposed disposition of the 
        property, facilities, contracts, records, and other 
        assets and liabilities of each covered agency in 
        connection with the transfer of the functions of such 
        agency to the Department.
    (d) Reorganization Plan of Agency for International 
Development.--In addition to applicable provisions of 
subsection (c), the reorganization plan transmitted under this 
section for the Agency for International Development--
            (1) may provide for the abolition of the Agency for 
        International Development and the transfer of all its 
        functions to the Department of State; or
            (2) in lieu of the abolition and transfer of 
        functions under paragraph (1)--
                    (A) shall provide for the transfer to and 
                consolidation within the Department of the 
                functions set forth in section 511; and
                    (B) may provide for additional 
                consolidation, reorganization, and streamlining 
                of AID, including--
                            (i) the termination of functions 
                        and reductions in personnel of AID;
                            (ii) the transfer of functions of 
                        AID, and the personnel associated with 
                        such functions, to the Department; and
                            (iii) the consolidation, 
                        reorganization, and streamlining of the 
                        Department upon the transfer of such 
                        functions and personnel in order to 
                        carry out the functions transferred.
    (e) Modification of Plan.--The President may, on the basis 
of consultations with the appropriate congressional committees, 
modify or revise any part of the plan transmitted under 
subsection (a) until that part of the plan becomes effective in 
accordance with subsection (g).
    (f) Report.--The report accompanying the reorganization 
plan for the Department and the covered agencies submitted 
pursuant to this section shall describe the implementation of 
the plan and shall include--
            (1) a detailed description of--
                    (A) the actions necessary or planned to 
                complete the reorganization,
                    (B) the anticipated nature and substance of 
                any orders, directives, and other 
                administrative and operational actions which 
                are expected to be required for completing or 
                implementing the reorganization, and
                    (C) any preliminary actions which have been 
                taken in the implementation process;
            (2) the number of personnel and positions of each 
        covered agency (including civil service personnel, 
        Foreign Service personnel, and detailees) that are 
        expected to be transferred to the Department, separated 
        from service with such agency, or eliminated under the 
        plan, and a projected schedule for such transfers, 
        separations, and terminations;
            (3) the number of personnel and positions of the 
        Department (including civil service personnel, Foreign 
        Service personnel, and detailees) that are expected to 
        be transferred within the Department, separated from 
        service with the Department, or eliminated under the 
        plan, and a projected schedule for such transfers, 
        separations, and terminations;
            (4) a projected schedule for completion of the 
        implementation process; and
            (5) recommendations, if any, for legislation 
        necessary to carry out changes made by this division 
        relating to personnel and to incidental transfers.
    (g) Effective Date.--
            (1) In general.--The reorganization plan described 
        in this section, including any modifications or 
        revisions of the plan under subsection (e), shall 
        become effective on the earlier of the date for the 
        respective covered agency specified in paragraph (2) or 
        the date announced by the President under paragraph 
        (3).
            (2) Statutory effective dates.--The effective dates 
        under this paragraph for the reorganization plan 
        described in this section are the following:
                    (A) October 1, 1998, with respect to 
                functions of the Agency for International 
                Development described in section 511.
                    (B) October 1, 1998, with respect to the 
                abolition of the United States Arms Control and 
                Disarmament Agency and the United States 
                International Development Cooperation Agency.
                    (C) October 1, 1999, with respect to the 
                abolition of the United States Information 
                Agency.
            (3) Effective date by presidential determination.--
        An effective date under this paragraph for a 
        reorganization plan described in this section is such 
        date as the President shall determine to be appropriate 
        and announce by notice published in the Federal 
        Register, which date may be not earlier than 90 
        calendar days after the President has transmitted the 
        reorganization plan to the appropriate congressional 
        committees pursuant to subsection (a).
            (4) Statutory construction.--Nothing in this 
        subsection may be construed to require the transfer of 
        functions, personnel, records, balance of 
        appropriations, or other assets of a covered agency on 
        a single date.
            (5) Supersedes existing law.--Paragraph (1) shall 
        apply notwithstanding section 905(b) of title 5, United 
        States Code.
    (h) Publication.--The reorganization plan described in this 
section shall be printed in the Federal Register after the date 
upon which it first becomes effective.

                  CHAPTER 2--REORGANIZATION AUTHORITY

SEC. 611. REORGANIZATION AUTHORITY.

    (a) In General.--The Secretary is authorized, subject to 
the requirements of this division, to allocate or reallocate 
any function transferred to the Department under any title of 
this division, and to establish, consolidate, alter, or 
discontinue such organizational entities within the Department 
as may be necessary or appropriate to carry out any 
reorganization under this division, but this subsection does 
not authorize the Secretary to modify the terms of any statute 
that establishes or defines the functions of any bureau, 
office, or officer of the Department.
    (b) Requirements and Limitations on Reorganization Plan.--
The reorganization plan transmitted under section 601 may not 
have the effect of--
            (1) creating a new executive department;
            (2) continuing a function beyond the period 
        authorized by law for its exercise or beyond the time 
        when it would have terminated if the reorganization had 
        not been made;
            (3) authorizing a Federal agency to exercise a 
        function which is not authorized by law at the time the 
        plan is transmitted to Congress;
            (4) creating a new Federal agency which is not a 
        component or part of an existing executive department 
        or independent agency; or
            (5) increasing the term of an office beyond that 
        provided by law for the office.

SEC. 612. TRANSFER AND ALLOCATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) In General.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
division, the assets, liabilities (including contingent 
liabilities arising from suits continued with a substitution or 
addition of parties under section 615(e)), contracts, property, 
records, and unexpended balance of appropriations, 
authorizations, allocations, and other funds employed, held, 
used, arising from, available to, or to be made available in 
connection with the functions and offices, or portions thereof, 
transferred by any title of this division shall be transferred 
to the Secretary for appropriate allocation.
    (b) Limitation on Use of Transferred Funds.--Except as 
provided in subsection (c), unexpended and unobligated funds 
transferred pursuant to any title of this division shall be 
used only for the purposes for which the funds were originally 
authorized and appropriated.
    (c) Funds To Facilitate Transition.--
            (1) Congressional notification.--Funds transferred 
        pursuant to subsection (a) may be available for the 
        purposes of reorganization subject to notification of 
        the appropriate congressional committees in accordance 
        with the procedures applicable to a reprogramming of 
        funds under section 34 of the State Department Basic 
        Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2706).
            (2) Transfer authority.--Funds in any account 
        appropriated to the Department of State may be 
        transferred to another such account for the purposes of 
        reorganization, subject to notification of the 
        appropriate congressional committees in accordance with 
        the procedures applicable to a reprogramming of funds 
        under section 34 of the State Department Basic 
        Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2706). The authority 
        in this paragraph is in addition to any other transfer 
        authority available to the Secretary of State and shall 
        expire September 30, 2000.

SEC. 613. TRANSFER, APPOINTMENT, AND ASSIGNMENT OF PERSONNEL.

    (a) Transfer of Personnel From ACDA and USIA.--Except as 
otherwise provided in title III--
            (1) not later than the date of abolition of ACDA, 
        all personnel and positions of ACDA, and
            (2) not later than the date of abolition of USIA, 
        all personnel and positions of USIA,

shall be transferred to the Department of State at the same 
grade or class and the same rate of basic pay or basic salary 
rate and with the same tenure held immediately preceding 
transfer.
    (b) Transfer of Personnel From AID.--Except as otherwise 
provided in title III, not later than the date of transfer of 
any function of AID to the Department of State under this 
division, all AID personnel performing such functions and all 
positions associated with such functions shall be transferred 
to the Department of State at the same grade or class and the 
same rate of basic pay or basic salary rate and with the same 
tenure held immediately preceding transfer.
    (c) Assignment Authority.--The Secretary, for a period of 
not more than 6 months commencing on the effective date of the 
transfer to the Department of State of personnel under 
subsections (a) and (b), is authorized to assign such personnel 
to any position or set of duties in the Department of State 
regardless of the position held or duties performed by such 
personnel prior to transfer, except that, by virtue of such 
assignment, such personnel shall not have their grade or class 
or their rate of basic pay or basic salary rate reduced, nor 
their tenure changed. The Secretary shall consult with the 
relevant exclusive representatives (as defined in section 1002 
of the Foreign Service Act and in section 7103 of title 5, 
United States Code) with regard to the exercise of this 
authority. This subsection does not authorize the Secretary to 
assign any individual to any position that by law requires 
appointment by the President, by and with the advice and 
consent of the Senate.
    (d) Superseding Other Provisions of Law.--Subsections (a) 
through (c) shall be exercised notwithstanding any other 
provision of law.

SEC. 614. INCIDENTAL TRANSFERS.

    The Director of the Office of Management and Budget, when 
requested by the Secretary, is authorized to make such 
incidental dispositions of personnel, assets, liabilities, 
grants, contracts, property, records, and unexpended balances 
of appropriations, authorizations, allocations, and other funds 
held, used, arising from, available to, or to be made available 
in connection with such functions, as may be necessary to carry 
out the provisions of any title of this division. The Director 
of the Office of Management and Budget, in consultation with 
the Secretary, shall provide for the termination of the affairs 
of all entities terminated by this division and for such 
further measures and dispositions as may be necessary to 
effectuate the purposes of any title of this division.

SEC. 615. SAVINGS PROVISIONS.

    (a) Continuing Legal Force and Effect.--All orders, 
determinations, rules, regulations, permits, agreements, 
grants, contracts, certificates, licenses, registrations, 
privileges, and other administrative actions--
            (1) that have been issued, made, granted, or 
        allowed to become effective by the President, any 
        Federal agency or official thereof, or by a court of 
        competent jurisdiction, in the performance of functions 
        that are transferred under any title of this division; 
        and
            (2) that are in effect as of the effective date of 
        such title, or were final before the effective date of 
        such title and are to become effective on or after the 
        effective date of such title,
shall continue in effect according to their terms until 
modified, terminated, superseded, set aside, or revoked in 
accordance with law by the President, the Secretary, or other 
authorized official, a court of competent jurisdiction, or by 
operation of law.
    (b) Pending Proceedings.--
            (1) In general.--The provisions of any title of 
        this division shall not affect any proceedings, 
        includingnotices of proposed rulemaking, or any 
application for any license, permit, certificate, or financial 
assistance pending on the effective date of any title of this division 
before any Federal agency, commission, or component thereof, functions 
of which are transferred by any title of this division. Such 
proceedings and applications, to the extent that they relate to 
functions so transferred, shall be continued.
            (2) Orders, appeals, payments.--Orders shall be 
        issued in such proceedings, appeals shall be taken 
        therefrom, and payments shall be made pursuant to such 
        orders, as if this division had not been enacted. 
        Orders issued in any such proceedings shall continue in 
        effect until modified, terminated, superseded, or 
        revoked by the Secretary, by a court of competent 
        jurisdiction, or by operation of law.
            (3) Statutory construction.--Nothing in this 
        division shall be deemed to prohibit the discontinuance 
        or modification of any such proceeding under the same 
        terms and conditions and to the same extent that such 
        proceeding could have been discontinued or modified if 
        this division had not been enacted.
            (4) Regulations.--The Secretary is authorized to 
        promulgate regulations providing for the orderly 
        transfer of proceedings continued under this subsection 
        to the Department.
    (c) No Effect on Judicial or Administrative Proceedings.--
Except as provided in subsection (e) and section 327(d)--
            (1) the provisions of this division shall not 
        affect suits commenced prior to the effective dates of 
        the respective titles of this division; and
            (2) in all such suits, proceedings shall be had, 
        appeals taken, and judgments rendered in the same 
        manner and effect as if this division had not been 
        enacted.
    (d) Nonabatement of Proceedings.--No suit, action, or other 
proceeding commenced by or against any officer in the official 
capacity of such individual as an officer of any Federal 
agency, or any commission or component thereof, functions of 
which are transferred by any title of this division, shall 
abate by reason of the enactment of this division. No cause of 
action by or against any Federal agency, or any commission or 
component thereof, functions of which are transferred by any 
title of this division, or by or against any officer thereof in 
the official capacity of such officer shall abate by reason of 
the enactment of this division.
    (e) Continuation of Proceeding With Substitution of 
Parties.--If, before the effective date of any title of this 
division, any Federal agency, or officer thereof in the 
official capacity of such officer, is a party to a suit, and 
under this division any function of such department, agency, or 
officer is transferred to the Secretary or any other official 
of the Department, then effective on such date such suit shall 
be continued with the Secretary or other appropriate official 
of the Department substituted or added as a party.
    (f) Reviewability of Orders and Actions Under Transferred 
Functions.--Orders and actions of the Secretary in the exercise 
of functions transferred under any title of this division shall 
be subject to judicial review to the same extent and in the 
same manner as if such orders and actions had been by the 
Federal agency or office, or part thereof, exercising such 
functions immediately preceding their transfer. Any statutory 
requirements relating to notice, hearings, action upon the 
record, or administrative review that apply to any function 
transferred by any title of this division shall apply to the 
exercise of such function by the Secretary.

SEC. 616. AUTHORITY OF SECRETARY OF STATE TO FACILITATE TRANSITION.

    Notwithstanding any provision of this division, the 
Secretary of State, with the concurrence of the head of the 
appropriate Federal agency exercising functions transferred 
under this division, may transfer the whole or part of such 
functions prior to the effective dates established in this 
division, including the transfer of personnel and funds 
associated with such functions.

SEC. 617. FINAL REPORT.

    Not later than January 1, 2001, the President, in 
consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury and the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget, shall submit 
to the appropriate congressional committees a report which 
provides a final accounting of the finances and operations of 
the agencies abolished under this division.

              DIVISION B--FOREIGN RELATIONS AUTHORIZATION

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

    This division may be cited as the ``Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999''.

SEC. 1002. DEFINITION OF APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.

    In this division, the term ``appropriate congressional 
committees'' means the Committee on International Relations of 
the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign 
Relations of the Senate.

   TITLE XI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 1101. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for 
the Department of State under ``Administration of Foreign 
Affairs'' to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and 
responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the 
United States and for other purposes authorized by law, 
including the diplomatic security program:
            (1) Diplomatic and consular programs.--For 
        ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', of the Department 
        of State $1,746,977,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
        $1,691,282,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (2) Salaries and expenses.--
                    (A) Authorization of appropriations.--For 
                ``Salaries and Expenses'', of the Department of 
                State $363,513,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
                $367,148,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
                    (B) Limitations.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), 
                $2,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $2,000,000 
                for the fiscal year 1999 are authorized to be 
                appropriated only for the recruitment of 
                minorities for careers in the Foreign Service 
                and international affairs.
            (3) Capital investment fund.--For ``Capital 
        Investment Fund'', of the Department of State 
        $86,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and $118,340,000 
        for the fiscal year 1999.
            (4) Security and maintenance of buildings abroad.--
        For ``Security and Maintenance of Buildings Abroad'', 
        $397,943,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and $590,800,000 
        for the fiscal year 1999.
            (5) Representation allowances.--For 
        ``Representation Allowances'', $4,300,000 for the 
        fiscal year 1998 and $4,300,000 for the fiscal year 
        1999.
            (6) Emergencies in the diplomatic and consular 
        service.--For ``Emergencies in the Diplomatic and 
        Consular Service'', $5,500,000 for the fiscal 1998 and 
        $5,500,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (7) Office of the inspector general.--For ``Office 
        of the Inspector General'', $28,300,000 for the fiscal 
        year 1998 and $28,717,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (8) Payment to the american institute in taiwan.--
        For ``Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan'', 
        $14,490,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and $15,000,000 
        for the fiscal year 1999.
            (9) Protection of foreign missions and officials.--
        (A) For ``Protection of Foreign Missions and 
        Officials'', $7,900,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
        $8,100,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (B) Each amount appropriated pursuant to this 
        paragraph is authorized to remain available through 
        September 30 of the fiscal year following the fiscal 
        year for which the amount appropriated was made.
            (10) Repatriation loans.--For ``Repatriation 
        Loans'', $1,200,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
        $1,200,000 for the fiscal year 1999, for administrative 
        expenses.

SEC. 1102. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated 
under ``International Commissions'' for the Department of State 
to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and 
responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the 
United States and for other purposes authorized by law:
            (1) International boundary and water commission, 
        united states and mexico.--For ``International Boundary 
        and Water Commission, United States and Mexico''--
                    (A) for ``Salaries and Expenses'' 
                $17,490,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
                $19,179,000 for the fiscal year 1999; and
                    (B) for ``Construction'' $6,463,000 for the 
                fiscal year 1998 and $7,125,000 for the fiscal 
                year 1999.
            (2) International boundary commission, united 
        states and canada.--For ``International Boundary 
        Commission, United States and Canada'', $761,000 for 
        the fiscal year 1998 and $835,000 for the fiscal year 
        1999.
            (3) International joint commission.--For 
        ``International Joint Commission'', $3,189,000 for the 
        fiscal year 1998 and $3,432,000 for the fiscal year 
        1999.
            (4) International fisheries commissions.--For 
        ``International Fisheries Commissions'', $14,549,000 
        for the fiscal year 1998 and $14,549,000 for the fiscal 
        year 1999.

SEC. 1103. GRANTS TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION.

    Section 404 of The Asia Foundation Act (title IV of Public 
Law 98-164) is amended to read as follows:
    ``Sec. 404. There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Secretary of State $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 
1998 and 1999 for grants to The Asia Foundation pursuant to 
this title.''.

SEC. 1104. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated for ``Voluntary Contributions to 
International Organizations'', $294,500,000 for the fiscal year 
1998 and $294,500,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
    (b) Limitations.--
            (1) World food program.--Of the amounts authorized 
        to be appropriated under subsection (a), $4,000,000 for 
        the fiscal year 1998 and $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        1999 are authorized to be appropriated only for a 
        United States contribution to the World Food Program.
            (2) United nations voluntary fund for victims of 
        torture.--Of the amount authorized to be appropriated 
        under subsection (a), $3,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        1998 and $3,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999 are 
        authorized to be appropriated only for a United States 
        contribution to the United Nations Voluntary Fund for 
        Victims of Torture.
            (3) International program on the elimination of 
        child labor.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
        appropriated under subsection (a), $5,000,000 for the 
        fiscal year 1998 and $5,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        1999 are authorized to be appropriated only for a 
        United States contribution to the International Labor 
        Organization for the activities of the International 
        Program on the Elimination of Child Labor.
    (c) Availability of Funds.--Amounts authorized to be 
appropriated under subsection (a) are authorized to remain 
available until expended.

SEC. 1105. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated for ``Peacekeeping 
Operations'', $77,500,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
$68,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999 for the Department of 
State to carry out section 551 of Public Law 87-195.

SEC. 1106. LIMITATION ON UNITED STATES VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
                    UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

    (a) Limitation.--Of the amounts made available for fiscal 
years 1998 and 1999 for United States voluntary contributions 
to the United Nations Development Program an amount equal to 
the amount the United Nations Development Program will spend in 
Burma during each fiscal year shall be withheld unless during 
such fiscal year the President submits to the appropriate 
congressional committees the certification described in 
subsection (b).
    (b) Certification.--The certification referred to in 
subsection (a) is a certification by the President that all 
programs and activities of the United Nations Development 
Program (including United Nations Development Program--
Administered Funds) in Burma--
            (1) are focused on eliminating human suffering and 
        addressing the needs of the poor;
            (2) are undertaken only through international or 
        private voluntary organizations that have been deemed 
        independent of the State Law and Order Restoration 
        Council (SLORC), after consultation with the leadership 
        of the National League for Democracy and the leadership 
        of the National Coalition Government of the Union of 
        Burma;
            (3) provide no financial, political, or military 
        benefit to the SLORC; and
            (4) are carried out only after consultation with 
        the leadership of the National League for Democracy and 
        the leadership of the National Coalition Government of 
        the Union of Burma.

SEC. 1107. UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND.

    The amounts made available for each of the fiscal years 
1998 and 1999 to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961, not more than $25,000,000 shall be available for each 
such fiscal year for the United Nations Population Fund.

       TITLE XII--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

                 CHAPTER 1--AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 1201. REIMBURSEMENT OF DEPARTMENT OF STATE FOR ASSISTANCE TO 
                    OVERSEAS EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES.

    Section 29 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2701) is amended by adding at the end the 
following: ``Notwithstanding any other provision of law, where 
the child of a United States citizen employee of an agency of 
the United States Government who is stationed outside the 
United States attends an educational facility assisted by the 
Secretary of State under this section, the head of that agency 
is authorized to reimburse, or credit with advance payment, the 
Department of State for funds used in providing assistance to 
such educational facilities, by grant or otherwise, under this 
section.''.

SEC. 1202. REVISION OF DEPARTMENT OF STATE REWARDS PROGRAM.

    Section 36 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2708) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 36. DEPARTMENT OF STATE REWARDS PROGRAM.

    ``(a) Establishment.--
            ``(1) In general.--There is established a program 
        for the payment of rewards to carry out the purposes of 
        this section.
            ``(2) Purpose.--The rewards program shall be 
        designed to assist in the prevention of acts of 
        international terrorism, international narcotics 
        trafficking, and other related criminal acts.
            ``(3) Implementation.--The rewards program shall be 
        administered by the Secretary of State, in 
        consultation, as appropriate, with the Attorney 
        General.
    ``(b) Rewards Authorized.--In the sole discretion of the 
Secretary (except as provided in subsection (c)(2)) and in 
consultation, as appropriate, with the Attorney General, the 
Secretary may pay a reward to any individual who furnishes 
information leading to--
            ``(1) the arrest or conviction in any country of 
        any individual for the commission of an act of 
        international terrorism against a United States person 
        or United States property;
            ``(2) the arrest or conviction in any country of 
        any individual conspiring or attempting to commit an 
        act of international terrorism against a United States 
        person or United States property;
            ``(3) the arrest or conviction in any country of 
        any individual for committing, primarily outside the 
        territorial jurisdiction of the United States, any 
        narcotics-related offense if that offense involves or 
        is a significant part of conduct that involves--
                    ``(A) a violation of United States 
                narcotics laws such that the individual would 
                be a major violator of such laws;
                    ``(B) the killing or kidnapping of--
                            ``(i) any officer, employee, or 
                        contract employee of the United States 
                        Government while such individual is 
                        engaged in official duties, or on 
                        account of that individual's official 
                        duties, in connection with the 
                        enforcement of United States narcotics 
                        laws or the implementing of United 
                        States narcotics control objectives; or
                            ``(ii) a member of the immediate 
                        family of any such individual on 
                        account of that individual's official 
                        duties, in connection with the 
                        enforcement of United States narcotics 
                        laws or the implementing of United 
                        States narcotics control objectives; or
                    ``(C) an attempt or conspiracy to commit 
                any act described in subparagraph (A) or (B);
            ``(4) the arrest or conviction in any country of 
        any individual aiding or abetting in the commission of 
        an act described in paragraph (1), (2), or (3); or
            ``(5) the prevention, frustration, or favorable 
        resolution of an act described in paragraph (1), (2), 
        or (3).
    ``(c) Coordination.--
            ``(1) Procedures.--To ensure that the payment of 
        rewards pursuant to this section does not duplicate or 
        interfere with the payment of informants or the 
        obtaining of evidence or information, as authorized to 
        the Department of Justice, the offering, 
        administration, and payment of rewards under this 
        section, including procedures for--
                    ``(A) identifying individuals, 
                organizations, and offenses with respect to 
                which rewards will be offered;
                    ``(B) the publication of rewards;
                    ``(C) the offering of joint rewards with 
                foreign governments;
                    ``(D) the receipt and analysis of data; and
                    ``(E) the payment and approval of payment,
        shall be governed by procedures developed by the 
        Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney 
        General.
            ``(2) Prior approval of attorney general 
        required.--Before making a reward under this section in 
        a matter over which there is Federal criminal 
        jurisdiction, the Secretary of State shall obtain the 
        concurrence of the Attorney General.
    ``(d) Funding.--
            ``(1) Authorization of appropriations.--
        Notwithstanding section 102 of the Foreign Relations 
        Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (Public 
        Law 99-93; 99 Stat. 408), but subject to paragraph (2), 
        there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        Department of State from time to time such amounts as 
        may be necessary to carry out this section.
            ``(2) Limitation.--No amount of funds may be 
        appropriated under paragraph (1) which, when added to 
        the unobligated balance of amounts previously 
        appropriated to carry out this section, would cause 
        such amounts to exceed $15,000,000.
            ``(3) Allocation of funds.--To the maximum extent 
        practicable, funds made available to carry out this 
        section should be distributed equally for the purpose 
        of preventing acts of international terrorism and for 
        the purpose of preventing international narcotics 
        trafficking.
            ``(4) Period of availability.--Amounts appropriated 
        under paragraph (1) shall remain available until 
        expended.
    ``(e) Limitations and Certification.--
            ``(1) Maximum amount.--No reward paid under this 
        section may exceed $2,000,000.
            ``(2) Approval.--A reward under this section of 
        more than $100,000 may not be made without the approval 
        of the Secretary.
            ``(3) Certification for payment.--Any reward 
        granted under this section shall be approved and 
        certified for payment by the Secretary.
            ``(4) Nondelegation of authority.--The authority to 
        approve rewards of more than $100,000 set forth in 
        paragraph (2) may not be delegated.
            ``(5) Protection measures.--If the Secretary 
        determines that the identity of the recipient of a 
        reward or of the members of the recipient's immediate 
        family must be protected, the Secretary may take such 
        measures in connection with the payment of the reward 
        as he considers necessary to effect such protection.
    ``(f) Ineligibility.--An officer or employee of any entity 
of Federal, State, or local government or of a foreign 
government who, while in the performance of his or her official 
duties, furnishes information described in subsection (b) shall 
not be eligible for a reward under this section.
    ``(g) Reports.--
            ``(1) Reports on payment of rewards.--Not later 
        than 30 days after the payment of any reward under this 
        section, the Secretary shall submit a report to the 
        appropriate congressional committees with respect to 
        such reward. The report, which may be submitted in 
        classified form if necessary, shall specify the amount 
        of the reward paid, to whom the reward was paid, and 
        the acts with respect to which the reward was paid. The 
        report shall also discuss the significance of the 
        information for which the reward was paid in dealing 
        with those acts.
            ``(2) Annual reports.--Not later than 60 days after 
        the end of each fiscal year, the Secretary shall submit 
        a report to the appropriate congressional committees 
        with respect to the operation of the rewards program. 
        The report shall provide information on the total 
        amounts expended during the fiscal year ending in that 
        year to carry out this section, including amounts 
        expended to publicize the availability of rewards.
    ``(h) Publication Regarding Rewards Offered by Foreign 
Governments.--Notwithstanding any other provision of this 
section, in the sole discretion of the Secretary, the resources 
of the rewards program shall be available for the publication 
of rewards offered by foreign governments regarding acts of 
international terrorism which do not involve United States 
persons or property or a violation of the narcotics laws of the 
United States.
    ``(i) Determinations of the Secretary.--A determination 
made by the Secretary under this section shall be final and 
conclusive and shall not be subject to judicial review.
    ``(j) Definitions.--As used in this section:
            ``(1) Act of international terrorism.--The term 
        `act of international terrorism' includes--
                    ``(A) any act substantially contributing to 
                the acquisition of unsafeguarded special 
                nuclear material (as defined in paragraph (8) 
                of section 830 of the Nuclear Proliferation 
                Prevention Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 3201 note)) 
                or any nuclear explosive device (as defined in 
                paragraph (4) of that section) by an 
                individual, group, or non-nuclear-weapon state 
                (as defined in paragraph (5) of that section); 
                and
                    ``(B) any act, as determined by the 
                Secretary, which materially supports the 
                conduct of international terrorism, including 
                the counterfeiting of United States currency or 
                the illegal use of other monetary instruments 
                by an individual, group, or country supporting 
                international terrorism as determined for 
                purposes of section 6(j)(1)(A) of the Export 
                Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
                2405(j)(1)(A)).
            ``(2) Appropriate congressional committees.--The 
        term `appropriate congressional committees' means the 
        Committee on International Relations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations 
        of the Senate.
            ``(3) Member of the immediate family.--The term 
        `member of the immediate family', with respect to an 
        individual, includes--
                    ``(A) a spouse, parent, brother, sister, or 
                child of the individual;
                    ``(B) a person with respect to whom the 
                individual stands in loco parentis; and
                    ``(C) any person not covered by 
                subparagraph (A) or (B) who is living in the 
                individual's household and is related to the 
                individual by blood or marriage.
            ``(4) Rewards program.--The term `rewards program' 
        means the program established in subsection (a)(1).
            ``(5) United states narcotics laws.--The term 
        `United States narcotics laws' means the laws of the 
        United States for the prevention and control of illicit 
        trafficking in controlled substances (as such term is 
        defined in section 102(6) of the Controlled Substances 
        Act (21 U.S.C. 802(6))).
            ``(6) United states person.--The term `United 
        States person' means--
                    ``(A) a citizen or national of the United 
                States; and
                    ``(B) an alien lawfully present in the 
                United States.''.

SEC. 1203. RETENTION OF ADDITIONAL DEFENSE TRADE CONTROLS REGISTRATION 
                    FEES.

    Section 45(a) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2717(a)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$700,000 of the'' and inserting 
        ``all'';
            (2) at the end of paragraph (1), by striking 
        ``and'';
            (3) in paragraph (2)--
                    (A) by striking ``functions'' and inserting 
                ``functions, including compliance and 
                enforcement activities,''; and
                    (B) by striking the period at the end and 
                inserting ``; and''; and
            (4) by adding at the end the following new 
        paragraph:
            ``(3) the enhancement of defense trade export 
        compliance and enforcement activities, including 
        compliance audits of United States and foreign parties, 
        the conduct of administrative proceedings, monitoring 
        of end-uses in cases of direct commercial arms sales or 
        other transfers, and cooperation in proceedings for 
        enforcement of criminal laws related to defense trade 
        export controls.''.

SEC. 1204. FEES FOR COMMERCIAL SERVICES.

    Section 52(b) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2724(b)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following: ``Funds deposited under this subsection shall remain 
available for obligation through September 30 of the fiscal 
year following the fiscal year in which the funds were 
deposited.''.

SEC. 1205. PILOT PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS REIMBURSEMENT.

    (a) Foreign Affairs Reimbursement.--
            (1) In general.--Section 701 of the Foreign Service 
        Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4021) is amended--
                    (A) by redesignating subsection (d)(4) as 
                subsection (g); and
                    (B) by inserting after subsection (d) the 
                following new subsections:
    ``(e)(1) The Secretary may provide appropriate training or 
related services, except foreign language training, through the 
institution to any United States person (or any employee or 
family member thereof) that is engaged in business abroad.
    ``(2) The Secretary may provide job-related training or 
related services, including foreign language training, through 
the institution to a United States person under contract to 
provide services to the United States Government or to any 
employee thereof that is performing such services.
    ``(3) Training under this subsection may be provided only 
to the extent that space is available and only on a 
reimbursable or advance-of-funds basis. Reimbursements and 
advances shall be credited to the currently available 
applicable appropriation account.
    ``(4) Training and related services under this subsection 
is authorized only to the extent that it will not interfere 
with the institution's primary mission of training employees of 
the Department and of other agencies in the field of foreign 
relations.
    ``(5) In this subsection, the term `United States person' 
means--
            ``(A) any individual who is a citizen or national 
        of the United States; or
            ``(B) any corporation, company, partnership, 
        association, or other legal entity that is 50 percent 
        or more beneficially owned by citizens or nationals of 
        the United States.
    ``(f)(1) The Secretary is authorized to provide, on a 
reimbursable basis, training programs to Members of Congress or 
the Judiciary.
    ``(2) Employees of the legislative branch and employees of 
the judicial branch may participate, on a reimbursable basis, 
in training programs offered by the institution.
    ``(3) Reimbursements collected under this subsection shall 
be credited to the currently available applicable appropriation 
account.
    ``(4) Training under this subsection is authorized only to 
the extent that it will not interfere with the institution's 
primary mission of training employees of the Department and of 
other agencies in the field of foreign relations.''.
            (2) Effective date.--The amendments made by 
        paragraph (1) shall take effect on October 1, 1998.
            (3) Termination of pilot program.--Effective 
        October 1, 2002, section 701 of the Foreign Service Act 
        of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4021), as amended by this 
        subsection, is further amended--
                    (A) by striking subsections (e) and (f); 
                and
                    (B) by redesignating subsection (g) as 
                paragraph (4) of subsection (d).
    (b) Fees for Use of National Foreign Affairs Training 
Center.--Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.) is amended by adding at the 
end the following new section:

``SEC. 53. FEES FOR USE OF THE NATIONAL FOREIGN AFFAIRS TRAINING 
                    CENTER.

    ``The Secretary is authorized to charge a fee for use of 
the National Foreign Affairs Training Center of the Department 
of State. Amounts collected under this section (including 
reimbursements and surcharges) shall be deposited as an 
offsetting collection to any Department of State appropriation 
to recover the costs of such use and shall remain available for 
obligation until expended.''.
    (c) Reporting on Pilot Program.--Two years after the date 
of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a 
report to the appropriate congressional committees containing--
            (1) the number of persons who have taken advantage 
        of the pilot program established under subsections (e) 
        and (f) of section 701 of the Foreign Service Act of 
        1980 and section 53 of the State Department Basic 
        Authorities Act of 1956, as added by this section;
            (2) the business or government affiliation of such 
        persons;
            (3) the amount of fees collected; and
            (4) the impact of the program on the primary 
        mission of the National Foreign Affairs Training 
        Center.

SEC. 1206. FEE FOR USE OF DIPLOMATIC RECEPTION ROOMS.

    Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.), as amended by this Act, is 
further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 54. FEE FOR USE OF DIPLOMATIC RECEPTION ROOMS.

    ``The Secretary is authorized to charge a fee for use of 
the diplomatic reception rooms of the Department of State. 
Amounts collected under this section (including reimbursements 
and surcharges) shall be deposited as an offsetting collection 
to any Department of State appropriation to recover the costs 
of such use and shall remain available for obligation until 
expended.''.

SEC. 1207. ACCOUNTING OF COLLECTIONS IN BUDGET PRESENTATION DOCUMENTS.

    Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.), as amended by this Act, is 
further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 55. ACCOUNTING OF COLLECTIONS IN BUDGET PRESENTATION DOCUMENTS.

    ``The Secretary shall include in the annual Congressional 
Presentation Document and the Budget in Brief a detailed 
accounting of the total collections received by the Department 
of State from all sources, including fee collections. Reporting 
on total collections shall also cover collections from the 
preceding fiscal year and the projected expenditures from all 
collections accounts.''.

SEC. 1208. OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL.

    (a) Procedures.--Section 209(c) of the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3929(c)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following:
            ``(4) The Inspector General shall develop and 
        provide to employees--
                    ``(A) information detailing their rights to 
                counsel; and
                    ``(B) guidelines describing in general 
                terms the policies and procedures of the Office 
                of Inspector General with respect to 
                individuals under investigation other than 
                matters exempt from disclosure under other 
                provisions of law.''.
    (b) Notice.--Section 209(e) of the Foreign Service Act of 
1980 (22 U.S.C. 3929(e)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new paragraph:
    ``(3) The Inspector General shall ensure that only 
officials from the Office of the Inspector General may 
participate in formal interviews or other formal meetings with 
the individual who is the subject of an investigation, other 
than an intelligence-related or sensitive undercover 
investigation, or except in those situations when the Inspector 
General has a reasonable basis to believe that such notice 
would cause tampering with witnesses, destroying evidence, or 
endangering the lives of individuals, unless that individual 
receives prior adequate notice regarding participation by 
officials of any other agency, including the Department of 
Justice, in such interviews or meetings.''.
    (c) Report.--
            (1) In general.--Not later than September 30, 1998, 
        the Inspector General of the Department of State and 
        the Foreign Service shall submit a report to the 
        appropriate congressional committees which includes the 
        following:
                    (A) Detailed descriptions of the internal 
                guidance developed or used by the Office of the 
                Inspector General with respect to public 
                disclosure of any information related to an 
                ongoing investigation of any officer or 
                employee of the Department of State, the United 
                States Information Agency, or the United States 
                Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
                    (B) Detailed descriptions of those 
                instances for the year ending December 31, 
                1997, in which any disclosure of information to 
                the public by an employee of the Office of 
                Inspector General about an ongoing 
                investigation occurred, including details on 
                the recipient of the information, the date of 
                the disclosure, and the internal clearance 
                process for the disclosure.
            (2) Statutory construction.--Disclosure of 
        information to the public under this section shall not 
        be construed to include information shared with 
        Congress by an employee of the Office of the Inspector 
        General.

SEC. 1209. CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND.

    Section 135 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 2684a) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a), by inserting ``and 
        enhancement'' after ``procurement'';
            (2) in subsection (c), by striking ``are authorized 
        to'' and inserting ``shall'';
            (3) in subsection (d), by striking ``for 
        expenditure to procure capital equipment and 
        information technology'' and inserting ``for purposes 
        of subsection (a)''; and
            (4) by amending subsection (e) to read as follows:
    ``(e) Reprogramming Procedures.--Funds credited to the 
Capital Investment Fund shall not be available for obligation 
or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures 
applicable to reprogramming notifications under section 34 of 
the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 
2706).''.

SEC. 1210. CONTRACTING FOR LOCAL GUARDS SERVICES OVERSEAS.

    Section 136(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (22 U.S.C. 4864(c)) is amended--
            (1) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:
            ``(3) in evaluating proposals for such contracts, 
        award contracts to the technically acceptable firm 
        offering the lowest evaluated price, except that 
        proposals of United States persons and qualified United 
        States joint venture persons (as defined in subsection 
        (d)) shall be evaluated by reducing the bid price by 10 
        percent;'';
            (2) by inserting ``and'' at the end of paragraph 
        (5);
            (3) by striking ``; and'' at the end of paragraph 
        (6) and inserting a period; and
            (4) by striking paragraph (7).

SEC. 1211. AUTHORITY OF THE FOREIGN CLAIMS SETTLEMENT COMMISSION.

    Section 4(a) of the International Claims Settlement Act of 
1949 (22 U.S.C. 1623(a)) is amended--
            (1) by redesignating paragraphs (1) and (2) as 
        subparagraphs (A) and (B), respectively;
            (2) in the first sentence, by striking ``(a) The'' 
        and all that follows through the period and inserting 
        the following:
    ``(a)(1) The Commission shall have jurisdiction to receive, 
examine, adjudicate, and render a final decision with respect 
to any claim of the Government of the United States or of any 
national of the United States--
            ``(A) included within the terms of the Yugoslav 
        Claims Agreement of 1948;
            ``(B) included within the terms of any claims 
        agreement concluded on or after March 10, 1954, between 
        the Government of the United States and a foreign 
        government (exclusive of governments against which the 
        United States declared the existence of a state of war 
        during World War II) similarly providing for the 
        settlement and discharge of claims of the Government of 
        the United States and of nationals of the United States 
        against a foreign government, arising out of the 
        nationalization or other taking of property, by the 
        agreement of the Government of the United States to 
        accept from that government a sum in en bloc settlement 
        thereof; or
            ``(C) included in a category of claims against a 
        foreign government which is referred to the Commission 
        by the Secretary of State.''; and
            (3) by redesignating the second sentence as 
        paragraph (2).

SEC. 1212. EXPENSES RELATING TO CERTAIN INTERNATIONAL CLAIMS AND 
                    PROCEEDINGS.

    (a) Recovery of Certain Expenses.--The Department of State 
Appropriation Act of 1937 (22 U.S.C. 2661) is amended in the 
fifth undesignated paragraph under the heading entitled 
``international fisheries commission'' by inserting 
``(including such expenses as salaries and other personnel 
expenses)'' after ``extraordinary expenses''.
    (b) Procurement of Services.--Section 38(c) of the State 
Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2710(c)) is 
amended in the first sentence by inserting ``personal and'' 
before ``other support services''.

SEC. 1213. GRANTS TO REMEDY INTERNATIONAL ABDUCTIONS OF CHILDREN.

    Section 7 of the International Child Abduction Remedies Act 
(42 U.S.C. 11606; Public Law 100-300) is amended by adding at 
the end the following new subsection:
    ``(e) Grant Authority.--The United States Central Authority 
is authorized to make grants to, or enter into contracts or 
agreements with, any individual, corporation, other Federal, 
State, or local agency, or private entity or organization in 
the United States for purposes of accomplishing its 
responsibilities under the Convention and this Act.''.

SEC. 1214. COUNTERDRUG AND ANTICRIME ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
                    STATE.

    (a) Counterdrug and Law Enforcement Strategy.--
            (1) Requirement.--Not later than 180 days after the 
        date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State 
        shall establish, implement, and submit to Congress a 
        comprehensive, long-term strategy to carry out the 
        counterdrug responsibilities of the Department of State 
        in a manner consistent with the National Drug Control 
        Strategy. The strategy shall involve all elements of 
        the Department in the United States and abroad.
            (2) Objectives.--In establishing the strategy, the 
        Secretary shall--
                    (A) coordinate with the Office of National 
                Drug Control Policy in the development of 
                clear, specific, and measurable counterdrug 
                objectives for the Department that support the 
                goals and objectives of the National Drug 
                Control Strategy;
                    (B) develop specific and, to the maximum 
                extent practicable, quantifiable measures of 
                performance relating to the objectives, 
                including annual and long-term measures of 
                performance, for purposes of assessing the 
                success of the Department in meeting the 
                objectives;
                    (C) assign responsibilities for meeting the 
                objectives to appropriate elements of the 
                Department;
                    (D) develop an operational structure within 
                the Department that minimizes impediments to 
                meeting the objectives;
                    (E) ensure that every United States 
                ambassador or chief of mission is fully briefed 
                on the strategy, and works to achieve the 
                objectives; and
                    (F) ensure that--
                            (i) all budgetary requests and 
                        transfers of equipment (including the 
                        financing of foreign military sales and 
                        the transfer of excess defense 
                        articles) relating tointernational 
counterdrug efforts conforms with the objectives; and
                            (ii) the recommendations of the 
                        Department regarding certification 
                        determinations made by the President on 
                        March 1 as to the counterdrug 
                        cooperation, or adequate steps on its 
                        own, of each major illicit drug 
                        producing and drug trafficking country 
                        to achieve full compliance with the 
                        goals and objectives established by the 
                        United Nations Convention Against 
                        Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and 
                        Psychotropic Substances also conform to 
                        meet such objectives.
            (3) Reports.--Not later than February 15 of each 
        year subsequent to the submission of the strategy 
        described in paragraph (1), the Secretary shall submit 
        to Congress an update of the strategy. The update shall 
        include--
                    (A) an outline of the proposed activities 
                with respect to the strategy during the 
                succeeding year, including the manner in which 
                such activities will meet the objectives set 
                forth in paragraph (2); and
                    (B) detailed information on how 
                certification determinations described in 
                paragraph (2)(F) made the previous year 
                affected achievement of the objectives set 
                forth in paragraph (2) for the previous 
                calendar year.
            (4) Limitation on delegation.--The Secretary shall 
        designate an official in the Department who reports 
        directly to the Secretary to oversee the implementation 
        of the strategy throughout the Department.
    (b) Information on International Criminals.--
            (1) Information system.--The Secretary shall, in 
        consultation with the heads of appropriate United 
        States law enforcement agencies, including the Attorney 
        General and the Secretary of the Treasury, take 
        appropriate actions to establish an information system 
        or improve existing information systems containing 
        comprehensive information on serious crimes committed 
        by foreign nationals. The information system shall be 
        available to United States embassies and missions 
        abroad for use in consideration of applications for 
        visas for entry into the United States.
            (2) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
        of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to 
        the appropriate congressional committees a report on 
        the actions taken under paragraph (1).
    (c) Overseas Coordination of Counterdrug and Anticrime 
Programs, Policy, and Assistance.--
            (1) Strengthening coordination.--The 
        responsibilities of every diplomatic mission of the 
        United States shall include the strengthening of 
        cooperation between and among the United States and 
        foreign governmental entities and multilateral entities 
        with respect to activities relating to international 
        narcotics and crime.
            (2) Designation of officers.--
                    (A) In general.--Consistent with existing 
                memoranda of understanding between the 
                Department of State and other departments and 
                agencies of the United States, including the 
                Department of Justice, the chief of mission of 
                every diplomatic mission of the United States 
                shall designate an officer or officers within 
                the mission to carry out the responsibility of 
                the mission under paragraph (1), including the 
                coordination of counterdrug, law enforcement, 
                rule of law, and administration of justice 
                programs, policy, and assistance. Such officer 
                or officers shall report to the chief of 
                mission, or the designee of the chief of 
                mission, on a regular basis regarding 
                activities undertaken in carrying out such 
                responsibility.
                    (B) Reports.--The chief of mission of every 
                diplomatic mission of the United States shall 
                submit to the Secretary on a regular basis a 
                report on the actions undertaken by the mission 
                to carry out such responsibility.
            (3) Report to congress.--Not later than 180 days 
        after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary 
        shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations of 
        the Senate and the Committee on International Relations 
        of the House of Representatives a report on the status 
        of any proposals for action or on action undertaken to 
        improve staffing and personnel management at diplomatic 
        missions of the United States in order to carry out the 
        responsibility set forth in paragraph (1).

SEC. 1215. ANNUAL REPORT ON OVERSEAS SURPLUS PROPERTIES.

    The Foreign Service Buildings Act, 1926 (22 U.S.C. 292 et 
seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
section:
    ``Sec. 12. Not later than March 1 of each year, the 
Secretary of State shall submit to Congress a report listing 
overseas United States surplus properties that are administered 
under this Act and that have been identified for sale.''.

SEC. 1216. HUMAN RIGHTS REPORTS.

    Section 116(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
U.S.C. 2151n(d)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``January 31'' and inserting 
        ``February 25'';
            (2) by redesignating paragraphs (3), (4), and (5) 
        as paragraphs (4), (5), and (6), respectively; and
            (3) by inserting after paragraph (2) the following 
        new paragraph:
            ``(3) the status of child labor practices in each 
        country, including--
                    ``(A) whether such country has adopted 
                policies to protect children from exploitation 
                in the workplace, including a prohibition of 
                forced and bonded labor and policies regarding 
                acceptable working conditions; and
                    ``(B) the extent to which each country 
                enforces such policies, including the adequacy 
                of the resources and oversight dedicated to 
                such policies;''.

SEC. 1217. REPORTS AND POLICY CONCERNING DIPLOMATIC IMMUNITY.

    Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.), as amended by this Act, is 
further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 56. CRIMES COMMITTED BY DIPLOMATS.

    ``(a) Annual Report Concerning Diplomatic Immunity.--
            ``(1) Report to congress.--180 days after the date 
        of enactment, and annually thereafter, the Secretary of 
        State shall prepare and submit to the Congress, a 
        report concerning diplomatic immunity entitled ``Report 
        on Cases Involving Diplomatic Immunity''.
            ``(2) Content of report.--In addition to such other 
        information as the Secretary of State may consider 
        appropriate, the report under paragraph (1) shall 
        include the following:
                    ``(A) The number of persons residing in the 
                United States who enjoy full immunity from the 
                criminal jurisdiction of the United States 
                under laws extending diplomatic privileges and 
                immunities.
                    ``(B) Each case involving an alien 
                described in subparagraph (A) in which an 
                appropriate authority of a State, a political 
                subdivision of a State, or the United States 
                reported to the Department of State that the 
                authority had reasonable cause to believe the 
                alien committed a serious criminal offense 
                within the United States, and any additional 
                information provided to the Secretary relating 
                to other serious criminal offenses that any 
                such authority had reasonable cause to believe 
                the alien committed before the period covered 
                by the report. The Secretary may omit from such 
                report any matter the provision of which the 
                Secretary reasonably believes would compromise 
                a criminal investigation or prosecution or 
                which would directly compromise law enforcement 
                or intelligence sources or methods.
                    ``(C) Each case described in subparagraph 
                (B) in which the Secretary of State has 
                certified that a person enjoys full immunity 
                from the criminal jurisdiction of the United 
                States under laws extending diplomatic 
                privileges and immunities.
                    ``(D) The number of United States citizens 
                who are residing in a receiving state and who 
                enjoy full immunity from the criminal 
                jurisdiction of such state under laws extending 
                diplomatic privileges and immunities.
                    ``(E) Each case involving a United States 
                citizen under subparagraph (D) in which the 
                United States has been requested by the 
                government of a receiving state to waive the 
                immunity from criminal jurisdiction of the 
                United States citizen.
                    ``(F) Whether the Secretary has made the 
                notifications referred to in subsection (c) 
                during the period covered by the report.
            ``(3) Serious criminal offense defined.--For the 
        purposes of this section, the term `serious criminal 
        offense' means--
                    ``(A) any felony under Federal, State, or 
                local law;
                    ``(B) any Federal, State, or local offense 
                punishable by a term of imprisonment of more 
                than 1 year;
                    ``(C) any crime of violence as defined for 
                purposes of section 16 of title 18, United 
                States Code; or
                    ``(D)(i) driving under the influence of 
                alcohol or drugs;
                    ``(ii) reckless driving; or
                    ``(iii) driving while intoxicated.
    ``(b) United States Policy Concerning Reform of Diplomatic 
Immunity.--It is the sense of the Congress that the Secretary 
of State should explore, in appropriate fora, whether states 
should enter into agreements and adopt legislation--
            ``(1) to provide jurisdiction in the sending state 
        to prosecute crimes committed in the receiving state by 
        persons entitled to immunity from criminal jurisdiction 
        under laws extending diplomatic privileges and 
        immunities; and
            ``(2) to provide that where there is probable cause 
        to believe that an individual who is entitled to 
        immunity from the criminal jurisdiction of the 
        receiving state under laws extending diplomatic 
        privileges and immunities committed a serious crime, 
        the sending state will waive such immunity or the 
        sending state will prosecute such individual.
    ``(c) Notification of Diplomatic Corps.--The Secretary 
should periodically notify each foreign mission of United 
States policies relating to criminal offenses committed by 
individuals with immunity from the criminal jurisdiction of the 
United States under laws extending diplomatic privileges and 
immunities.''.

SEC. 1218. REAFFIRMING UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
                    POLICY.

    (a) Procurement Policy.--It is the policy of the United 
States to foster and support procurement of goods and services 
from private, commercial companies.
    (b) Implementation.--In order to achieve the policy set 
forth in subsection (a), the Diplomatic Telecommunications 
Service Program Office (DTS-PO) shall--
            (1) utilize full and open competition, to the 
        maximum extent practicable, in the procurement of 
        telecommunications services, including satellite space 
        segment, for the Department of State and each other 
        Federal entity represented at United States diplomatic 
        missions and consular posts overseas;
            (2) make every effort to ensure and promote the 
        participation in the competition for such procurement 
        of commercial private sector providers of satellite 
        space segment who have no ownership or other connection 
        with an intergovernmental satellite organization; and
            (3) implement the competitive procedures required 
        by paragraphs (1) and (2) at the prime contracting 
        level and, to the maximum extent practicable, the 
        subcontracting level.

SEC. 1219. REDUCTION OF REPORTING.

    (a) Repeals.--The following provisions of law are repealed:
            (1) Model foreign language competence posts.--The 
        second sentence of section 161(c) of the Foreign 
        Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1990 and 1991 
        (22 U.S.C. 4171 note).
            (2) Actions of the government of haiti.--Section 
        705(c) of the International Security and Development 
        Cooperation Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-83).
            (3) Training facility for the foreign service 
        institute.--Section 123(e)(2) of the Foreign Relations 
        Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (Public 
        Law 99-93).
            (4) Military assistance for haiti.--Section 203(c) 
        of the Special Foreign Assistance Act of 1986 (Public 
        Law 99-529).
            (5) International sugar agreement, 1977.--Section 5 
        of the Act entitled ``An Act providing for the 
        implementation of the International Sugar Agreement, 
        1977, and for other purposes'' (Public Law 96-236; 7 
        U.S.C. 3605 and 3606).
            (6) Audience survey of worldnet program.--Section 
        209 (c) and (d) of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
        Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (Public Law 100-204).
            (7) Research on the near and middle east.--Section 
        228(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138; 22 
        U.S.C. 2452 note).
    (b) Progress Toward Regional Nonproliferation.--Section 
620F(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2376(c); relating to periodic reports on progress toward 
regional nonproliferation) is amended by striking ``Not later 
than April 1, 1993 and every six months thereafter,'' and 
inserting ``Not later than April 1 of each year,''.
    (c) Report on Participation by United States Military 
Personnel Abroad in United States Elections.--Section 101(b)(6) 
of the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act of 
1986 (42 U.S.C. 1973ff(b)(6)) is amended by striking ``of voter 
participation'' and inserting ``of uniformed services voter 
participation, a general assessment of overseas nonmilitary 
participation,''.

       CHAPTER 2--CONSULAR AUTHORITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 1221. USE OF CERTAIN PASSPORT PROCESSING FEES FOR ENHANCED 
                    PASSPORT SERVICES.

    For each of the fiscal years 1998 and 1999, of the fees 
collected for expedited passport processing and deposited to an 
offsetting collection pursuant to title V of the Department of 
State and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 
1995 (Public Law 103-317; 22 U.S.C. 214 note), 30 percent shall 
be available only for enhancing passport services for United 
States citizens, improving the integrity and efficiency of the 
passport issuance process, improving the secure nature of the 
United States passport, investigating passport fraud, and 
deterring entry into the United States by terrorists, drug 
traffickers, or other criminals.

SEC. 1222. SURCHARGE FOR PROCESSING CERTAIN MACHINE READABLE VISAS.

    Section 140(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ``providing 
        consular services'' and inserting ``the Department of 
        State's border security program, including the costs of 
        the installation and operation of the machine readable 
        visa and automated name-check process, improving the 
        quality and security of the United States passport, 
        investigations of passport and visa fraud, and the 
        technological infrastructure to support the programs 
        referred to in this sentence'';
            (2) by striking the first sentence of paragraph (3) 
        and inserting ``For each of the fiscal years 1998 and 
        1999, any amount collected under paragraph (1) that 
        exceeds $140,000,000 may be made available only if a 
        notification is submitted to Congress in accordance 
        with the procedures applicable to reprogramming 
        notifications under section 34 of the State Department 
        Basic Authorities Act of 1956.''; and
            (3) by striking paragraphs (4) and (5).

SEC. 1223. CONSULAR OFFICERS.

    (a) Persons Authorized To Issue Reports of Births Abroad.--
Section 33 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2705) is amended in paragraph (2) by adding at 
the end the following: ``For purposes of this paragraph, the 
term `consular officer' includes any United States citizen 
employee of the Department of State who is designated by the 
Secretary of State to adjudicate nationality abroad pursuant to 
such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe.''.
    (b) Provisions Applicable to Consular Officers.--Section 
1689 of the Revised Statutes (22 U.S.C. 4191) is amended by 
inserting ``and to such other United States citizen employees 
of the Department of State as may be designated by the 
Secretary of State pursuant to such regulations as the 
Secretary may prescribe'' after ``such officers''.
    (c) Persons Authorized To Authenticate Foreign Documents.--
            (1) Designated united states citizens performing 
        notarial acts.--Section 1750 of the Revised Statutes, 
        as amended (22 U.S.C. 4221) is further amended by 
        inserting after the first sentence: ``At any post, 
        port, or place where there is no consular officer, the 
        Secretary of State may authorize any other officer or 
        employee of the United States Government who is a 
        United States citizen serving overseas, including any 
        contract employee of the United States Government, to 
        perform such acts, and any such contractor so 
        authorized shall not be considered to be a consular 
        officer.''.
            (2) Definition of consular officers.--Section 
        3492(c) of title 18, United States Code, is amended by 
        adding at the end the following: ``For purposes of this 
        section and sections 3493 through3496 of this title, 
the term `consular officers' includes any United States citizen who is 
designated to perform notarial functions pursuant to section 1750 of 
the Revised Statutes, as amended (22 U.S.C. 4221).''.
    (d) Persons Authorized To Administer Oaths.--Section 115 of 
title 35, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end 
the following: ``For purposes of this section, a consular 
officer shall include any United States citizen serving 
overseas, authorized to perform notarial functions pursuant to 
section 1750 of the Revised Statutes, as amended (22 U.S.C. 
4221).''.
    (e) Definition of Consular Officer.--Section 101(a)(9) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(9)) is 
amended by--
            (1) inserting ``or employee'' after ``officer'' the 
        second place it appears; and
            (2) inserting before the period at the end of the 
        sentence ``or, when used in title III, for the purpose 
        of adjudicating nationality''.
    (f) Training for Employees Performing Consular Functions.--
Section 704 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4024) 
is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(d)(1) Before a United States citizen employee (other 
than a diplomatic or consular officer of the United States) may 
be designated by the Secretary of State, pursuant to 
regulation, to perform a consular function abroad, the United 
States citizen employee shall--
            ``(A) be required to complete successfully a 
        program of training essentially equivalent to the 
        training that a consular officer who is a member of the 
        Foreign Service would receive for purposes of 
        performing such function; and
            ``(B) be certified by an appropriate official of 
        the Department of State to be qualified by knowledge 
        and experience to perform such function.
    ``(2) As used in this subsection, the term `consular 
function' includes the issuance of visas, the performance of 
notarial and other legalization functions, the adjudication of 
passport applications, the adjudication of nationality, and the 
issuance of citizenship documentation.''.

SEC. 1224. REPEAL OF OUTDATED CONSULAR RECEIPT REQUIREMENTS.

    Sections 1726, 1727, and 1728 of the Revised Statutes of 
the United States (22 U.S.C. 4212, 4213, and 4214), as amended 
(relating to accounting for consular fees) are repealed.

SEC. 1225. ELIMINATION OF DUPLICATE FEDERAL REGISTER PUBLICATION FOR 
                    TRAVEL ADVISORIES.

    (a) Foreign Airports.--Section 44908(a) of title 49, United 
States Code, is amended--
            (1) by inserting ``and'' at the end of paragraph 
        (1);
            (2) by striking paragraph (2); and
            (3) by redesignating paragraph (3) as paragraph 
        (2).
    (b) Foreign Ports.--Section 908(a) of the International 
Maritime and Port Security Act of 1986 (46 U.S.C. App. 1804(a)) 
is amended by striking the second sentence, relating to Federal 
Register publication by the Secretary of State.

SEC. 1226. DENIAL OF VISAS TO CONFISCATORS OF AMERICAN PROPERTY.

    (a) Denial of Visas.--Except as otherwise provided in 
section 401 of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity 
(LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-114), and subject to 
subsection (b), the Secretary of State may deny the issuance of 
a visa to any alien who--
            (1) through the abuse of position, including a 
        governmental or political party position, converts or 
        has converted for personal gain real property that has 
        been confiscated or expropriated, a claim to which is 
        owned by a national of the United States, or who is 
        complicit in such a conversion; or
            (2) induces any of the actions or omissions 
        described in paragraph (1) by any person.
    (b) Exceptions.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to--
            (1) any country established by international 
        mandate through the United Nations; or
            (2) any territory recognized by the United States 
        Government to be in dispute.
    (c) Reporting Requirement.--Not later than 6 months after 
the date of enactment of this Act, and every 12 months 
thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the Speaker 
of the House of Representatives and to the chairman of the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report, 
including--
            (1) a list of aliens who have been denied a visa 
        under this subsection; and
            (2) a list of aliens who could have been denied a 
        visa under subsection (a) but were issued a visa and an 
        explanation as to why each such visa was issued.

SEC. 1227. INADMISSIBILITY OF ANY ALIEN SUPPORTING AN INTERNATIONAL 
                    CHILD ABDUCTOR.

    (a) Amendment of Immigration and Nationality Act.--Section 
212(a)(10)(C) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1182(a)(10)(C)) is amended by striking clause (ii) and 
inserting the following:
                            ``(ii) Aliens supporting abductors 
                        and relatives of abductors.--Any alien 
                        who--
                                    ``(I) is known by the 
                                Secretary of State to have 
                                intentionally assisted an alien 
                                in the conduct described in 
                                clause (i),
                                    ``(II) is known by the 
                                Secretary of State to be 
                                intentionally providing 
                                material support or safe haven 
                                to an alien described in clause 
                                (i), or
                                    ``(III) is a spouse (other 
                                than the spouse who is the 
                                parent of the abducted child), 
                                child (other than the abducted 
                                child), parent, sibling, or 
                                agent of an alien described in 
                                clause (i), if such person has 
                                been designated by the 
                                Secretary of State at the 
                                Secretary's sole and 
                                unreviewable discretion,is 
inadmissible until the child described in clause (i) is surrendered to 
the person granted custody by the order described in that clause, and 
such person and child are permitted to return to the United States or 
such person's place of residence.
                            ``(iii) Exceptions.--Clauses (i) 
                        and (ii) shall not apply--
                                    ``(I) to a government 
                                official of the United States 
                                who is acting within the scope 
                                of his or her official duties;
                                    ``(II) to a government 
                                official of any foreign 
                                government if the official has 
                                been designated by the 
                                Secretary of State at the 
                                Secretary's sole and 
                                unreviewable discretion; or
                                    ``(III) so long as the 
                                child is located in a foreign 
                                state that is a party to the 
                                Convention on the Civil Aspects 
                                of International Child 
                                Abduction, done at The Hague on 
                                October 25, 1980.''.
    (b) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (a) 
shall apply to aliens seeking admission to the United States on 
or after the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 1228. HAITI; EXCLUSION OF CERTAIN ALIENS; REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Grounds for Exclusion.--Except as provided in 
subsection (c), a consular officer shall not issue a visa to, 
and the Attorney General shall exclude from the United States, 
any alien who the Secretary of State, in the Secretary's sole 
and unreviewable discretion, has reason to believe is a person 
who--
            (1) has been credibly alleged to have ordered, 
        carried out, or materially assisted, in the 
        extrajudicial and political killings of Antoine Izmery, 
        Guy Malary, Father Jean-Marie Vincent, Pastor Antoine 
        Leroy, Jacques Fleurival, Mireille Durocher Bertin, 
        Eugene Baillergeau, Michelange Hermann, Max Mayard, 
        Romulus Dumarsais, Claude Yves Marie, Mario Beaubrun, 
        Leslie Grimar, Joseph Chilove, Michel Gonzalez, and 
        Jean-Hubert Feuille;
            (2) was included in the list presented to former 
        president Jean-Bertrand Aristide by former National 
        Security Council Advisor Anthony Lake in December 1995, 
        and acted upon by President Rene Preval;
            (3) was sought for an interview by the Federal 
        Bureau of Investigation as part of its inquiry into the 
        March 28, 1995, murder of Mireille Durocher Bertin and 
        Eugene Baillergeau, Jr., and was credibly alleged to 
        have ordered, carried out, or materially assisted, in 
        those murders, per a June 28, 1995, letter to the then 
        Minister of Justice of the Government of Haiti, Jean-
        Joseph Exume;
            (4)(A) was a member of the Haitian High Command 
        during the period 1991-1994, who has been credibly 
        alleged to have planned, ordered, or participated with 
        members of the Haitian Armed Forces in the September 
        1991 coup against the duly elected Government of Haiti 
        or the subsequent murders of as many as three thousand 
        Haitians during that period; or
            (B) is an immediate relative of an individual 
        described in subparagraph (A); or
            (5) has been credibly alleged to have been a member 
        of the paramilitary organization known as FRAPH who 
        planned, ordered, or participated in acts of violence 
        against the Haitian people.
    (b) Exemption.--Subsection (a) shall not apply where the 
Secretary of State finds, on a case by case basis, that the 
entry into the United States of the person who would otherwise 
be excluded under subsection (a) is necessary for medical 
reasons, or such person has cooperated fully with the 
investigation of the political murders or acts of violence 
described in subsection (a). If the Secretary of State exempts 
such a person, the Secretary shall notify the appropriate 
congressional committees in writing.
    (c) Reporting Requirement on Exclusion of Certain Haitian 
Aliens.--
            (1) Preparation of list.--The United States chief 
        of mission in Haiti shall provide the Secretary of 
        State a list of those who have been credibly alleged to 
        have ordered or carried out the extrajudicial and 
        political killings referred to in paragraph (1) of 
        subsection (a).
            (2) Submission of list to congress.--Not later than 
        3 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
        Secretary of State shall submit the list provided under 
        paragraph (1) to the appropriate congressional 
        committees.
            (3) Lists of visa denials and exclusions.--The 
        Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on 
        Foreign Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary of 
        the Senate and the Committee on International Relations 
        and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
        Representatives a list of aliens denied visas, and the 
        Attorney General shall submit to the appropriate 
        congressional committees a list of aliens refused entry 
        to the United States, as a result of subsection (a).
            (4) Duration for submission of lists.--The 
        Secretary shall submit the list under paragraph (3) not 
        later than six months after the date of enactment of 
        this Act and not later than March 1 of each year 
        thereafter as long as the Government of Haiti has not 
        completed the investigation of the extrajudicial and 
        political killings and has not prosecuted those 
        implicated for the killings specified in paragraph (1) 
        of subsection (a).
    (d) Report on the Cost of United States Activities in 
Haiti.--(1) Not later than September 1, 1998, and every 6 
months thereafter, the President shall submit a report to 
Congress on the situation in Haiti, including--
            (A) a listing of the units of the United States 
        Armed Forces or Coast Guard and of the police and 
        military units of other nations participating in 
        operations in and around Haiti;
            (B) incidents of the use of force in Haiti 
        involving hostile acts against United States Armed 
        Forces or Coast Guard personnel during the period 
        covered by the report;
            (C) the estimated cumulative program costs of all 
        United States activities in Haiti during the period 
        covered by the report, including--
                    (i) the incremental cost of deployments of 
                United States Armed Forces and Coast Guard 
                personnel training, exercises, mobilization, 
                and preparation activities, including the 
                United States contribution to the training and 
                transportation of police and military units of 
                other nations of any multilateral force 
                involved in activities in Haiti;
                    (ii) the costs of all other activities 
                relating to United States policy toward Haiti, 
                including humanitarian assistance, 
                reconstruction assistance, assistance under 
                part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
                and other financial assistance, and all other 
                costs to the United States Government; and
            (D) a detailed accounting of the source of funds 
        obligated or expended to meet the costs described in 
        paragraph (3), including--
                    (i) in the case of amounts expended out of 
                funds available to the Department of Defense 
                budget, by military service or defense agency, 
                line item, and program; and
                    (ii) in the case of amounts expended out of 
                funds available to departments and agencies 
                other than the Department of Defense, by 
                department or agency and program.
    (2) Definition.--In this section, the term ``period covered 
by the report'' means the 6-month period prior to the date the 
report is required to be submitted, except that, in the case of 
the initial report, the term means the period since the date of 
enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Years 1998 and 1999.

                   CHAPTER 3--REFUGEES AND MIGRATION

             Subchapter A--Authorization of Appropriations

SEC. 1231. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

    (a) Migration and Refugee Assistance.--
            (1) Authorization of appropriations.--There are 
        authorized to be appropriated for ``Migration and 
        Refugee Assistance'' for authorized activities, 
        $650,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and $704,500,000 
        for the fiscal year 1999.
            (2) Limitations.--
                    (A) Limitation regarding tibetan refugees 
                in india and nepal.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be appropriated in paragraph (1), not more 
                than $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
                $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999 are 
                authorized to be available only for 
                humanitarian assistance, including food, 
                medicine, clothing, and medical and vocational 
                training, to Tibetan refugees in India and 
                Nepal who have fled Chinese-occupied Tibet.
                    (B) Refugees resettling in israel.--Of the 
                amounts authorized to be appropriated in 
                paragraph (1), $80,000,000 for the fiscal year 
                1998 and $80,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999 
                are authorized to be available for assistance 
                for refugees resettling in Israel from other 
                countries.
                    (C) Humanitarian assistance for displaced 
                burmese.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
                appropriated in paragraph (1), $1,500,000 for 
                the fiscal year 1998 and $1,500,000 for the 
                fiscal year 1999 for humanitarian assistance 
                are authorized to be available, including food, 
                medicine, clothing, and medical and vocational 
                training, to persons displaced as a result of 
                civil conflict in Burma, including persons 
                still within Burma.
    (b) Availability of Funds.--Funds appropriated pursuant to 
this section are authorized to remain available until expended.

                       Subchapter B--Authorities

SEC. 1241. UNITED STATES POLICY REGARDING THE INVOLUNTARY RETURN OF 
                    REFUGEES.

    (a) In General.--None of the funds made available by this 
division shall be available to effect the involuntary return by 
the United States of any person to a country in which the 
person has a well-founded fear of persecution on account of 
race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social 
group, or political opinion, except on grounds recognized as 
precluding protection as a refugee under the United Nations 
Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees of July 28, 1951, 
and the Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees of January 
31, 1967, subject to the reservations contained in the United 
States Senate Resolution of Ratification.
    (b) Migration and Refugee Assistance.--None of the funds 
made available by section 1231 of this Act or by section 2(c) 
of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (22 U.S.C. 
2601(c)) shall be available to effect the involuntary return of 
any person to any country unless the Secretary of State first 
notifies the appropriate congressional committees, except that 
in the case of an emergency involving a threat to human life 
the Secretary of State shall notify the appropriate 
congressional committees as soon as practicable.
    (c) Involuntary Return Defined.--As used in this section, 
the term ``to effect the involuntary return'' means to require, 
by means of physical force or circumstances amounting to a 
threat thereof, a person to return to a country against the 
person's will, regardless of whether the person is physically 
present in the United States and regardless of whether the 
United States acts directly or through an agent.

SEC. 1242. UNITED STATES POLICY WITH RESPECT TO THE INVOLUNTARY RETURN 
                    OF PERSONS IN DANGER OF SUBJECTION TO TORTURE.

    (a) Policy.--It shall be the policy of the United States 
not to expel, extradite, or otherwise effect the involuntary 
return of any person to a country in which there are 
substantial grounds for believing the person would be in danger 
of being subjected to torture, regardless of whether the person 
is physically present in the United States.
    (b) Regulations.--Not later than 120 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the heads of the appropriate agencies 
shall prescribe regulations to implement the obligations of the 
United States under Article 3 of theUnited Nations Convention 
Against Torture and Other Forms of Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading 
Treatment or Punishment, subject to any reservations, understandings, 
declarations, and provisos contained in the United States Senate 
resolution of ratification of the Convention.
    (c) Exclusion of Certain Aliens.--To the maximum extent 
consistent with the obligations of the United States under the 
Convention, subject to any reservations, understandings, 
declarations, and provisos contained in the United States 
Senate resolution of ratification of the Convention, the 
regulations described in subsection (b) shall exclude from the 
protection of such regulations aliens described in section 
241(b)(3)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 
1231(b)(3)(B)).
    (d) Review and Construction.--Notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, and except as provided in the regulations 
described in subsection (b), no court shall have jurisdiction 
to review the regulations adopted to implement this section, 
and nothing in this section shall be construed as providing any 
court jurisdiction to consider or review claims raised under 
the Convention or this section, or any other determination made 
with respect to the application of the policy set forth in 
subsection (a), except as part of the review of a final order 
of removal pursuant to section 242 of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1252).
    (e) Authority To Detain.--Nothing in this section shall be 
construed as limiting the authority of the Attorney General to 
detain any person under any provision of law, including, but 
not limited to, any provision of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act.
    (f) Definitions.--
            (1) Convention defined.--In this section, the term 
        ``Convention'' means the United Nations Convention 
        Against Torture and Other Forms of Cruel, Inhuman or 
        Degrading Treatment or Punishment, done at New York on 
        December 10, 1984.
            (2) Same terms as in the convention.--Except as 
        otherwise provided, the terms used in this section have 
        the meanings given those terms in the Convention, 
        subject to any reservations, understandings, 
        declarations, and provisos contained in the United 
        States Senate resolution of ratification of the 
        Convention.

SEC. 1243. REPROGRAMMING OF MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE FUNDS.

    Section 34 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2706) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)--
                    (A) by striking ``Foreign Affairs'' and 
                inserting ``International Relations and the 
                Committee on Appropriations''; and
                    (B) by inserting ``and the Committee on 
                Appropriations'' after ``Foreign Relations''; 
                and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(c) The Secretary of State may waive the notification 
requirement of subsection (a), if the Secretary determines that 
failure to do so would pose a substantial risk to human health 
or welfare. In the case of any waiver under this subsection, 
notification to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on 
International Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of 
the House of Representatives shall be provided as soon as 
practicable, but not later than 3 days after taking the action 
to which the notification requirement was applicable, and shall 
contain an explanation of the emergency circumstances.''.

SEC. 1244. ELIGIBILITY FOR REFUGEE STATUS.

    Section 584 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, 
and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-
208; 110 Stat. 3009-171) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)--
                    (A) by striking ``For purposes'' and 
                inserting ``Notwithstanding any other provision 
                of law, for purposes''; and
                    (B) by striking ``fiscal year 1997'' and 
                inserting ``fiscal years 1997 and 1998''; and
            (2) by amending subsection (b) to read as follows:
    ``(b) Aliens Covered.--
            ``(1) In general.-- An alien described in this 
        subsection is an alien who--
                    ``(A) is the son or daughter of a qualified 
                national;
                    ``(B) is 21 years of age or older; and
                    ``(C) was unmarried as of the date of 
                acceptance of the alien's parent for 
                resettlement under the Orderly Departure 
                Program.
            ``(2) Qualified national.--For purposes of 
        paragraph (1), the term `qualified national' means a 
        national of Vietnam who--
                    ``(A)(i) was formerly interned in a 
                reeducation camp in Vietnam by the Government 
                of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam; or
                    ``(ii) is the widow or widower of an 
                individual described in clause (i); and
                    ``(B)(i) qualified for refugee processing 
                under the reeducation camp internees subprogram 
                of the Orderly Departure Program; and
                    ``(ii) on or after April 1, 1995, is or has 
                been accepted--
                            ``(I) for resettlement as a 
                        refugee; or
                            ``(II) for admission as an 
                        immigrant under the Orderly Departure 
                        Program.''.

SEC. 1245. REPORTS TO CONGRESS CONCERNING CUBAN EMIGRATION POLICIES.

    Beginning not later than 6 months after the date of 
enactment of this Act, and every 6 months thereafter, the 
Secretary of State shall supplement the monthly report to 
Congress entitled ``Update on Monitoring of Cuban Migrant 
Returnees'' with additional information concerning the methods 
employed by the Government of Cuba to enforce the United 
States-Cuba agreement of September 1994 and the treatment by 
the Government of Cuba of persons who have returned to Cuba 
pursuant to the United States-Cuba agreement of May 1995.

  TITLE XIII--ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE; DEPARTMENT OF 
                  STATE PERSONNEL; THE FOREIGN SERVICE

           CHAPTER 1--ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 1301. COORDINATOR FOR COUNTERTERRORISM.

    (a) Establishment.--Section 1 of the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a) is amended by adding 
at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(f) Coordinator for Counterterrorism.--
            ``(1) In general.--There is within the office of 
        the Secretary of State a Coordinator for 
        Counterterrorism (in this paragraph referred to as the 
        `Coordinator') who shall be appointed by the President, 
        by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.
            ``(2) Duties.--
                    ``(A) In general.--The Coordinator shall 
                perform such duties and exercise such powers as 
                the Secretary of State shall prescribe.
                    ``(B) Duties described.--The principal duty 
                of the Coordinator shall be the overall 
                supervision (including policy oversight of 
                resources) of international counterterrorism 
                activities. The Coordinator shall be the 
                principal adviser to the Secretary of State on 
                international counterterrorism matters. The 
                Coordinator shall be the principal 
                counterterrorism official within the senior 
                management of the Department of State and shall 
                report directly to the Secretary of State.
            ``(3) Rank and status of ambassador.--The 
        Coordinator shall have the rank and status of 
        Ambassador at Large.''.
    (b) Technical and Conforming Amendments.--Section 161 of 
the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 
1995 (Public Law 103-236) is amended by striking subsection 
(e).

SEC. 1302. ELIMINATION OF DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF STATE FOR 
                    BURDENSHARING.

    Section 161 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 2651a note) is amended by 
striking subsection (f).

SEC. 1303. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT.

    Section 1 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a), as amended by this Act, is further 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(g) Qualifications of Officer Having Primary 
Responsibility for Personnel Management.--The officer of the 
Department of State with primary responsibility for assisting 
the Secretary of State with respect to matters relating to 
personnel in the Department of State, or that officer's 
principal deputy, shall have substantial professional 
qualifications in the field of human resource policy and 
management.''.

SEC. 1304. DIPLOMATIC SECURITY.

    Section 1 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a), as amended by this Act, is further 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(h) Qualifications of Officer Having Primary 
Responsibility for Diplomatic Security.--The officer of the 
Department of State with primary responsibility for assisting 
the Secretary of State with respect to diplomatic security, or 
that officer's principal deputy, shall have substantial 
professional qualifications in the fields of (1) management, 
and (2) Federal law enforcement, intelligence, or security.''.

SEC. 1305. NUMBER OF SENIOR OFFICIAL POSITIONS AUTHORIZED FOR THE 
                    DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    (a) Under Secretaries.--
            (1) In general.--Section 1(b) of the State 
        Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 
        2651a(b)) is amended by striking ``5'' and inserting 
        ``6''.
            (2) Conforming amendment to title 5.--Section 5314 
        of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking 
        ``Under Secretaries of State (5)'' and inserting 
        ``Under Secretaries of State (6)''.
    (b) Assistant Secretaries.--
            (1) In general.--Section 1(c)(1) of the State 
        Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 
        2651a(c)(1)) is amended by striking ``20'' and 
        inserting ``24''.
            (2) Conforming amendment to title 5.--Section 5315 
        of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking 
        ``Assistant Secretaries of State (20)'' and inserting 
        ``Assistant Secretaries of State (24)''.
    (c) Deputy Assistant Secretaries.--Section 1 of the State 
Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a), as 
amended by this Act, is further amended--
            (1) by striking subsection (d); and
            (2) by redesignating subsections (e), (f), (g), and 
        (h) as subsections (d), (e), (f), and (g), 
        respectively.

SEC. 1306. NOMINATION OF UNDER SECRETARIES AND ASSISTANT SECRETARIES OF 
                    STATE.

    (a) Under Secretaries of State.--Section 1(b) of the State 
Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(c)), 
as amended by this Act, is further amended by adding at the end 
the following new paragraph:
            ``(4) Nomination of Under Secretaries.--Whenever 
        the President submits to the Senate a nomination of an 
        individual for appointment to a position in the 
        Department of State that is described in paragraph (1), 
        the President shall designate the particular Under 
        Secretary position in the Department of State that the 
        individual shall have.''.
    (b) Assistant Secretaries of State.--Section 1(c) of the 
State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 
2651a(c)), as amended by this Act, is further amended by adding 
at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(3) Nomination of Assistant Secretaries.--
        Whenever the President submits to the Senate a 
        nomination of an individual for appointment to a 
        position in the Department of State that is described 
        in paragraph (1), the President shall designate the 
        regional or functional bureau or bureaus of the 
        Department of State with respect to which the 
        individual shall have responsibility.''.

  CHAPTER 2--PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE; THE FOREIGN SERVICE

SEC. 1311. FOREIGN SERVICE REFORM.

    (a) Performance Pay.--Section 405 of the Foreign Service 
Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3965) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``Members'' and 
        inserting ``Subject to subsection (e), members''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(e) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of State may provide for recognition of the 
meritorious or distinguished service of any member of the 
Foreign Service described in subsection (a) (including any 
member of the Senior Foreign Service) by means other than an 
award of performance pay in lieu of making such an award under 
this section.''.
    (b) Expedited Separation Out.--
            (1) Separation of lowest ranked foreign service 
        members.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
        enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall 
        develop and implement procedures to identify, and 
        recommend for separation, any member of the Foreign 
        Service ranked by promotion boards of the Department of 
        State in the bottom 5 percent of his or her class for 2 
        or more of the 5 years preceding the date of enactment 
        of this Act (in this subsection referred to as the 
        ``years of lowest ranking'') if the rating official for 
        such member was not the same individual for any two of 
        the years of lowest ranking.
            (2) Special internal reviews.--In any case where 
        the member was evaluated by the same rating official in 
        any 2 of the years of lowest ranking, an internal 
        review of the member's file shall be conducted to 
        determine whether the member should be considered for 
        action leading to separation.
            (3) Procedures.--The Secretary of State shall 
        develop procedures for the internal reviews required 
        under paragraph (2).

SEC. 1312. RETIREMENT BENEFITS FOR INVOLUNTARY SEPARATION.

    (a) Benefits.--Section 609 of the Foreign Service Act of 
1980 (22 U.S.C. 4009) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)(2)(A), by inserting ``or any 
        other applicable provision of chapter 84 of title 5, 
        United States Code,'' after ``section 811'';
            (2) in subsection (a), by inserting ``or section 
        855, as appropriate'' after ``section 806''; and
            (3) in subsection (b)(2)--
                    (A) by striking ``(2)'' and inserting 
                ``(2)(A) for those participants in the Foreign 
                Service Retirement and Disability System,''; 
                and
                    (B) by inserting before the period at the 
                end ``; and (B) for those participants in the 
                Foreign Service Pension System, benefits as 
                provided in section 851''; and
            (4) in subsection (b) in the matter following 
        paragraph (2), by inserting ``(for participants in the 
        Foreign Service Retirement and Disability System) or 
        age 62 (for participants in the Foreign Service Pension 
        System)'' after ``age 60''.
    (b) Entitlement to Annuity.--Section 855(b) of the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4071d(b)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1)--
                    (A) by inserting ``611,'' after ``608,'';
                    (B) by inserting ``or for participants in 
                the Foreign Service Pension System,'' after 
                ``for participants in the Foreign Service 
                Retirement and Disability System''; and
                    (C) by striking ``Service shall'' and 
                inserting ``Service, shall''; and
            (2) in paragraph (3), by striking ``or 610'' and 
        inserting ``610, or 611''.
    (c) Effective Dates.--
            (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph 
        (2), the amendments made by this section shall take 
        effect on the date of the enactment of this Act.
            (2) Exceptions.--The amendments made by paragraphs 
        (2) and (3) of subsection (a) and paragraphs (1)(A) and 
        (2) of subsection (b) shall apply with respect to any 
        actions taken under section 611 of the Foreign Service 
        Act of 1980 on or after January 1, 1996.

SEC. 1313. AUTHORITY OF SECRETARY TO SEPARATE CONVICTED FELONS FROM THE 
                    FOREIGN SERVICE.

    Section 610(a)(2) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 
U.S.C. 4010(a)(2)) is amended in the first sentence by striking 
``A member'' and inserting ``Except in the case of an 
individual who has been convicted of a crime for which a 
sentence of imprisonment of more than 1 year may be imposed, a 
member''.

SEC. 1314. CAREER COUNSELING.

    (a) In General.--Section 706(a) of the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4026(a)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new sentence: ``Career counseling and related 
services provided pursuant to this Act shall not be construed 
to permit an assignment that consists primarily of paid time to 
conduct a job search and without other substantive duties for 
more than one month.''.
    (b) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (a) 
shall be effective 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act.

SEC. 1315. LIMITATIONS ON MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENTS.

    Section 1017(e)(2) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 
U.S.C. 4117(e)(2)) is amended to read as follows:
            ``(2) For the purposes of paragraph (1)(A)(ii) and 
        paragraph (1)(B), the term `management official' does 
        not include--
                    ``(A) any chief of mission;
                    ``(B) any principal officer or deputy 
                principal officer;
                    ``(C) any administrative or personnel 
                officer abroad; or
                    ``(D) any individual described in section 
                1002(12) (B), (C), or (D) who is not involved 
                in the administration of this chapter or in the 
                formulation of the personnel policies and 
                programs of the Department.''.

SEC. 1316. AVAILABILITY PAY FOR CERTAIN CRIMINAL INVESTIGATORS WITHIN 
                    THE DIPLOMATIC SECURITY SERVICE.

    (a) In General.--Section 5545a of title 5, United States 
Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(k)(1) For purposes of this section, the term `criminal 
investigator' includes a special agent occupying a position 
under title II of Public Law 99-399 if such special agent--
            ``(A) meets the definition of such term under 
        paragraph (2) of subsection (a) (applied 
disregardingthe parenthetical matter before subparagraph (A) thereof); 
and
            ``(B) such special agent satisfies the requirements 
        of subsection (d) without taking into account any hours 
        described in paragraph (2)(B) thereof.
    ``(2) In applying subsection (h) with respect to a special 
agent under this subsection--
            ``(A) any reference in such subsection to `basic 
        pay' shall be considered to include amounts designated 
        as `salary';
            ``(B) paragraph (2)(A) of such subsection shall be 
        considered to include (in addition to the provisions of 
        law specified therein) sections 609(b)(1), 805, 806, 
        and 856 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980; and
            ``(C) paragraph (2)(B) of such subsection shall be 
        applied by substituting for `Office of Personnel 
        Management' the following: `Office of Personnel 
        Management or the Secretary of State (to the extent 
        that matters exclusively within the jurisdiction of the 
        Secretary are concerned)'.''.
    (b) Implementation.--Not later than the date on which the 
amendments made by this section take effect, each special agent 
of the Diplomatic Security Service who satisfies the 
requirements of subsection (k)(1) of section 5545a of title 5, 
United States Code, as amended by this section, and the 
appropriate supervisory officer, to be designated by the 
Secretary of State, shall make an initial certification to the 
Secretary of State that the special agent is expected to meet 
the requirements of subsection (d) of such section 5545a. The 
Secretary of State may prescribe procedures necessary to 
administer this subsection.
    (c) Technical and Conforming Amendments.--(1) Paragraph (2) 
of section 5545a(a) of title 5, United States Code, is amended 
(in the matter before subparagraph (A)) by striking ``Public 
Law 99-399)'' and inserting ``Public Law 99-399, subject to 
subsection (k))''.
    (2) Section 5542(e) of such title is amended by striking 
``title 18, United States Code,'' and inserting ``title 18 or 
section 37(a)(3) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
of 1956,''.
    (d) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section 
shall take effect on the first day of the first applicable pay 
period--
            (1) which begins on or after the 90th day following 
        the date of the enactment of this Act; and
            (2) on which date all regulations necessary to 
        carry out such amendments are (in the judgment of the 
        Director of the Office of Personnel Management and the 
        Secretary of State) in effect.

SEC. 1317. NONOVERTIME DIFFERENTIAL PAY.

    Title 5 of the United States Code is amended--
            (1) in section 5544(a), by inserting after the 
        fourth sentence the following new sentence: ``For 
        employees serving outside the United States in areas 
        where Sunday is a routine workday and another day of 
        the week is officially recognized as the day of rest 
        and worship, the Secretary of State may designate the 
        officially recognized day of rest and worship as the 
        day with respect to which the preceding sentence shall 
        apply instead of Sunday.''; and
            (2) at the end of section 5546(a), by adding the 
        following new sentence: ``For employees serving outside 
        the United States in areas where Sunday is a routine 
        workday and another day of the week is officially 
        recognized as the day of rest and worship, the 
        Secretary of State may designate the officially 
        recognized day of rest and worship as the day with 
        respect to which the preceding sentence shall apply 
        instead of Sunday.''.

SEC. 1318. REPORT CONCERNING MINORITIES AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

    The Secretary of State shall during each of calendar years 
1998 and 1999 submit a report to the Congress concerning 
minorities and the Foreign Service officer corps. In addition 
to such other information as is relevant to this issue, the 
report shall include the following data for the last preceding 
examination and promotion cycles for which such information is 
available (reported in terms of real numbers and percentages 
and not as ratios):
            (1) The numbers and percentages of all minorities 
        taking the written Foreign Service examination.
            (2) The numbers and percentages of all minorities 
        successfully completing and passing the written Foreign 
        Service examination.
            (3) The numbers and percentages of all minorities 
        successfully completing and passing the oral Foreign 
        Service examination.
            (4) The numbers and percentages of all minorities 
        entering the junior officers class of the Foreign 
        Service.
            (5) The numbers and percentages of all minority 
        Foreign Service officers at each grade.
            (6) The numbers of and percentages of minorities 
        promoted at each grade of the Foreign Service officer 
        corps.

   TITLE XIV--UNITED STATES INFORMATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND CULTURAL 
                                PROGRAMS

               CHAPTER 1--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

SEC. 1401. INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION ACTIVITIES AND EDUCATIONAL AND 
                    CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated to 
carry out international information activities and educational 
and cultural exchange programs under the United States 
Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, the Mutual 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, Reorganization 
Plan Number 2 of 1977, the United States International 
Broadcasting Act of 1994, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, 
the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act, the Board for 
International Broadcasting Act, the North/South Center Act of 
1991, and the National Endowment for Democracy Act, and to 
carry out other authorities in law consistent with such 
purposes:
            (1) Salaries and expenses.--For ``Salaries and 
        Expenses'', $431,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
        $457,146,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (2) Technology fund.--For the ``Technology Fund'' 
        for the United States Information Agency, $5,050,000 
        for the fiscal year 1998 and $5,050,000 for the fiscal 
        year 1999.
            (3) Educational and cultural exchange programs.--
                    (A) Fulbright academic exchange programs.--
                            (i) Fulbright academic exchange 
                        programs.--There are authorized to be 
                        appropriated for the ``Fulbright 
                        Academic Exchange Programs'' (other 
                        than programs described in subparagraph 
                        (B)), $99,236,000 for the fiscal year 
                        1998 and $99,236,000 for the fiscal 
                        year 1999.
                            (ii) Vietnam fulbright academic 
                        exchange programs.--Of the amounts 
                        authorized to be appropriated under 
                        clause (i), $5,000,000 for the fiscal 
                        year 1998 and $5,000,000 for the fiscal 
                        year 1999 are authorized to be 
                        available for the Vietnam scholarship 
                        program established by section 229 of 
                        the Foreign Relations Authorization 
                        Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public 
                        Law 102-138).
                    (B) Other educational and cultural exchange 
                programs.--
                            (i) In general.--There are 
                        authorized to be appropriated for other 
                        educational and cultural exchange 
                        programs authorized by law, 
                        $100,764,000 for the fiscal year 1998 
                        and $100,764,000 for the fiscal year 
                        1999.
                            (ii) South pacific exchanges.--Of 
                        the amounts authorized to be 
                        appropriated under clause (i), $500,000 
                        for the fiscal year 1998 and $500,000 
                        for the fiscal year 1999 are authorized 
                        to be available for ``South Pacific 
                        Exchanges''.
                            (iii) East timorese scholarships.--
                        Of the amounts authorized to be 
                        appropriated under clause (i), $500,000 
                        for the fiscal year 1998 and $500,000 
                        for the fiscal year 1999 are authorized 
                        to be available for ``East Timorese 
                        Scholarships''.
                            (iv) Tibetan exchanges.--Of the 
                        amounts authorized to be appropriated 
                        under clause (i), $500,000 for the 
                        fiscal year 1998 and $500,000 for the 
                        fiscal year 1999 are authorized to be 
                        available for ``Educational and 
                        Cultural Exchanges with Tibet'' under 
                        section 236 of the Foreign Relations 
                        Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 
                        and 1995 (Public Law 103-236).
            (4) International broadcasting activities.--
                    (A) Authorization of appropriations.--For 
                ``International Broadcasting Activities'', 
                $344,655,000 for the fiscal year 1998, and 
                $341,655,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
                    (B) Allocation.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), the 
                Director of the United States Information 
                Agency and the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
                shall seek to ensure that the amounts made 
                available for broadcasting to nations whose 
                people do not fully enjoy freedom of expression 
                do not decline in proportion to the amounts 
                made available for broadcasting to other 
                nations.
            (5) Radio construction.--For ``Radio 
        Construction'', $40,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998, 
        and $25,308,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (6) Radio free asia.--For ``Radio Free Asia'', 
        $22,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and $22,000,000 
        for the fiscal year 1999, and an additional $8,000,000 
        in fiscal year 1998 for one-time capital costs.
            (7) Broadcasting to cuba.--For ``Broadcasting to 
        Cuba'', $22,095,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and 
        $22,704,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (8) Center for cultural and technical interchange 
        between east and west.--For the ``Center for Cultural 
        and Technical Interchange between East and West'', not 
        more than $12,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and not 
        more than $10,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999.
            (9) National endowment for democracy.--For the 
        ``National Endowment for Democracy'', $30,000,000 for 
        the fiscal year 1998 and $30,000,000 for the fiscal 
        year 1999.
            (10) Center for cultural and technical interchange 
        between north and south.--For ``Center for Cultural and 
        Technical Interchange between North and South'' not 
        more than $1,500,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and not 
        more than $1,500,000 for the fiscal year 1999.

                 CHAPTER 2--AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 1411. RETENTION OF INTEREST.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, with the 
approval of the National Endowment for Democracy, grant funds 
made available by the National Endowment for Democracy may be 
deposited in interest-bearing accounts pending disbursement, 
and any interest which accrues may be retained by the grantee 
without returning such interest to the Treasury of the United 
States and interest earned may be obligated and expended for 
the purposes for which the grant was made without further 
appropriation.

SEC. 1412. USE OF SELECTED PROGRAM FEES.

    Section 810 of the United States Information and 
Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1475e) is amended 
to read as follows:


                 ``use of english-teaching program fees


    ``Sec. 810. (a) In General.--Notwithstanding section 3302 
of title 31, United States Code, or any other law or limitation 
of authority, fees and receipts described in subsection (b) are 
authorized to be credited each fiscal year for authorized 
purposes to the appropriate appropriations of the United States 
Information Agency to such extent as may be provided in advance 
in appropriations acts.
    ``(b) Fees and Receipts Described.--The fees and receipts 
described in this subsection are fees and payments received by 
or for the use of the United States Information Agency from or 
in connection with--
            ``(1) English-teaching and library services,
            ``(2) educational advising and counseling,
            ``(3) Exchange Visitor Program Services,
            ``(4) advertising and business ventures of the 
        Voice of America and the International Broadcasting 
        Bureau,
            ``(5) cooperating international organizations, and
            ``(6) Agency-produced publications,
            ``(7) an amount not to exceed $100,000 of the 
        payments from motion picture and television programs 
        produced or conducted by or on behalf of the Agency 
        under the authority of this Act or the Mutual Education 
        and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961.''.

SEC. 1413. MUSKIE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.

    (a) Guidelines.--Section 227(c)(5) of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 2452 
note) is amended by inserting ``journalism and communications, 
education administration, public policy, library and 
information science,'' after ``business administration,'' each 
of the two places it appears.
    (b) Redesignation of Soviet Union.--Section 227 of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 
(22 U.S.C. 2452 note) is amended--
            (1) in subsections (a), (b), and (c)(5), by 
        striking ``Soviet Union'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``independent states of the former Soviet 
        Union'';
            (2) in subsection (c)(11), by striking ``Soviet 
        republics'' and inserting ``independent states of the 
        former Soviet Union''; and
            (3) in the section heading, by inserting 
        ``INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER'' after ``FROM 
        THE''.

SEC. 1414. WORKING GROUP ON UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT-SPONSORED 
                    INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGES AND TRAINING.

    Section 112 of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange 
Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2460) is amended by adding at the end 
the following new subsection:
    ``(g) Working Group on United States Government Sponsored 
International Exchanges and Training.--(1) In order to carry 
out the purposes of subsection (f) and to improve the 
coordination, efficiency, and effectiveness of United States 
Government-sponsored international exchanges and training, 
there is established within the United States Information 
Agency a senior-level interagency working group to be known as 
the Working Group on United States Government-Sponsored 
International Exchanges and Training (in this section referred 
to as the `Working Group').
    ``(2) For purposes of this subsection, the term 
`Government-sponsored international exchanges and training' 
means the movement of people between countries to promote the 
sharing of ideas, to develop skills, and to foster mutual 
understanding and cooperation, financed wholly or in part, 
directly or indirectly, with United States Government funds.
    ``(3) The Working Group shall be composed as follows:
            ``(A) The Associate Director for Educational and 
        Cultural Affairs of the United States Information 
        Agency, who shall act as Chair.
            ``(B) A senior representative of the Department of 
        State, who shall be designated by the Secretary of 
        State.
            ``(C) A senior representative of the Department of 
        Defense, who shall be designated by the Secretary of 
        Defense.
            ``(D) A senior representative of the Department of 
        Education, who shall be designated by the Secretary of 
        Education.
            ``(E) A senior representative of the Department of 
        Justice, who shall be designated by the Attorney 
        General.
            ``(F) A senior representative of the Agency for 
        International Development, who shall be designated by 
        the Administrator of the Agency.
            ``(G) Senior representatives of such other 
        departments and agencies as the Chair determines to be 
        appropriate.
    ``(4) Representatives of the National Security Adviser and 
the Director of the Office of Management and Budget may 
participate in the Working Group at the discretion of the 
Adviser and the Director, respectively.
    ``(5) The Working Group shall be supported by an 
interagency staff office established in the Bureau of 
Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States 
Information Agency.
    ``(6) The Working Group shall have the following purposes 
and responsibilities:
            ``(A) To collect, analyze, and report data provided 
        by all United States Government departments and 
        agencies conducting international exchanges and 
        training programs.
            ``(B) To promote greater understanding and 
        cooperation among concerned United States Government 
        departments and agencies of common issues and 
        challenges in conducting international exchanges and 
        training programs, including through the establishment 
        of a clearinghouse for information on international 
        exchange and training activities in the governmental 
        and nongovernmental sectors.
            ``(C) In order to achieve the most efficient and 
        cost-effective use of Federal resources, to identify 
        administrative and programmatic duplication and overlap 
        of activities by the various United States Government 
        departments and agencies involved in Government-
        sponsored international exchange and training programs, 
        to identify how each Government-sponsored international 
        exchange and training program promotes United States 
        foreign policy, and to report thereon.
            ``(D)(i) Not later than 1 year after the date of 
        the enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
        Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999, the Working Group 
        shall develop a coordinated and cost-effective strategy 
        for all United States Government-sponsored 
        international exchange and training programs, including 
        an action plan with the objective of achieving a 
        minimum of 10 percent cost savings through greater 
        efficiency, the consolidation of programs, or the 
        elimination of duplication, or any combination thereof.
            ``(ii) Not later than 1 year after the date of 
        enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999, the Working Group shall 
        submit a report to the appropriate congressional 
        committees setting forth the strategy and action plan 
        required by clause (i).
            ``(iii) Each year thereafter the Working Group 
        shall assess the strategy and plan required by clause 
        (i).
            ``(E) Not later than 2 years after the date of the 
        enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999, to develop recommendations 
        on common performance measures for all United States 
        Government-sponsored international exchange and 
        training programs, and to issue a report.
            ``(F) To conduct a survey of private sector 
        international exchange activities and develop 
        strategies for expanding public and private 
        partnerships in, and leveraging private sector support 
        for, United States Government-sponsored international 
        exchange and training activities.
            ``(G) Not later than 6 months after the date of the 
        enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999, to report on the 
        feasibility and advisability of transferring funds and 
        program management for the ATLAS or the Mandela Fellows 
        programs, or both, in South Africa from the Agency for 
        International Development to the United States 
        Information Agency. The report shall include an 
        assessment of the capabilities of the South African 
        Fulbright Commission to manage such programs and the 
        cost effects of consolidating such programs under one 
        entity.
    ``(7) All reports prepared by the Working Group shall be 
submitted to the President, through the Director of the United 
States Information Agency.
    ``(8) The Working Group shall meet at least on a quarterly 
basis.
    ``(9) All decisions of the Working Group shall be by 
majority vote of the members present and voting.
    ``(10) The members of the Working Group shall serve without 
additional compensation for their service on the Working Group. 
Any expenses incurred by a member of the Working Group in 
connection with service on the Working Group shall be 
compensated by that member's department or agency.
    ``(11) With respect to any report issued under paragraph 
(6), a member may submit dissenting views to be submitted as 
part of the report of the Working Group.''.

SEC. 1415. EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGES AND SCHOLARSHIPS FOR 
                    TIBETANS AND BURMESE.

    (a) In General.--Section 103(b)(1) of the Human Rights, 
Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 
(Public Law 104-319; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``for fiscal year 1997'' and 
        inserting ``for the fiscal year 1999''; and
            (2) by inserting after ``who are outside Tibet'' 
        the following: ``(if practicable, including individuals 
        active in the preservation of Tibet's unique culture, 
        religion, and language)''.
    (b) Effective Date.--The amendments made by subsection (a) 
shall take effect on October 1, 1998.

SEC. 1416. UNITED STATES-JAPAN COMMISSION.

    (a) Relief From Restriction of Interchangeability of 
Funds.--
            (1) Elimination of restriction.--Section 6(4) of 
        the Japan-United States Friendship Act (22 U.S.C. 
        2905(4)) is amended by striking ``needed, except'' and 
        all that follows through ``United States'' and 
        inserting ``needed''.
            (2) Authorized investments.--The second sentence of 
        section 7(b) of the Japan-United States Friendship Act 
        (22 U.S.C. 2906(b)) is amended to read as follows: 
        ``Such investment may be made only in interest-bearing 
        obligations of the United States, in obligations 
        guaranteed as to both principal and interest by the 
        United States, in interest-bearing obligations of 
        Japan, or in obligations guaranteed as to both 
        principal and interest by Japan.''.
    (b) Redesignation of Commission.--
            (1) Redesignation.--Effective on the date of 
        enactment of this Act, the Japan-United States 
        Friendship Commission shall be redesignated as the 
        ``United States-Japan Commission''. Any reference in 
        any provision of law, Executive order, regulation, 
        delegation of authority, or other document to the 
        Japan-United States Friendship Commission shall be 
        considered to be a reference to the United States-Japan 
        Commission.
            (2) Conforming amendment.--The heading of section 4 
        of the Japan-United States Friendship Act (22 U.S.C. 
        2903) is amended to read as follows:


                  ``united states-japan commission''.


            (3) Conforming amendment.--The Japan-United States 
        Friendship Act is amended by striking ``Japan-United 
        States Friendship Commission'' each place such term 
        appears and inserting ``United States-Japan 
        Commission''.
    (c) Redesignation of Trust Fund.--
            (1) Redesignation.--Effective on the date of 
        enactment of this Act, the Japan-United States 
        Friendship Trust Fund shall be redesignated as the 
        ``United States-Japan Trust Fund''. Any reference in 
        any provision of law, Executive order, regulation, 
        delegation of authority, or other document to the 
        Japan-United States Friendship Trust Fund shall be 
        considered to be a reference to the United States-Japan 
        Trust Fund.
            (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 3(a) of the 
        Japan-United States Friendship Act (22 U.S.C. 2902(a)) 
        is amended by striking ``Japan-United States Friendship 
        Trust Fund'' and inserting ``United States-Japan Trust 
        Fund''.

SEC. 1417. SURROGATE BROADCASTING STUDY.

    Not later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this 
Act, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, acting through the 
International Broadcasting Bureau, should conduct and complete 
a study of the appropriateness, feasibility, and projected 
costs of providing surrogate broadcasting service to Africa and 
transmit the results of the study to the appropriate 
congressional committees.

SEC. 1418. RADIO BROADCASTING TO IRAN IN THE FARSI LANGUAGE.

    (a) Radio Free Iran.--Not more than $2,000,000 of the funds 
made available under section 1401(a)(4) of this Act for each of 
the fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for grants to RFE/RL, 
Incorporated, shall be available only for surrogate radio 
broadcasting by RFE/RL, Incorporated, to the Iranian people in 
the Farsi language, such broadcasts to be designated as ``Radio 
Free Iran''.
    (b) Report to Congress.--Not later than 60 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act, the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors of the United States Information Agency shall submit 
a detailed report to Congress describing the costs, 
implementation, and plans for creation of the surrogate 
broadcasting service described in subsection (a).
    (c) Availability of Funds.--None of the funds made 
available under subsection (a) may be made availableuntil 
submission of the report required under subsection (b).

SEC. 1419. AUTHORITY TO ADMINISTER SUMMER TRAVEL AND WORK PROGRAMS.

    The Director of the United States Information Agency is 
authorized to administer summer travel and work programs 
without regard to preplacement requirements.

SEC. 1420. PERMANENT ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES REGARDING 
                    APPROPRIATIONS.

    Section 701(f) of the United States Information and 
Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1476(f)) is amended 
by striking paragraph (4).

SEC. 1421. VOICE OF AMERICA BROADCASTS.

    (a) In General.--The Voice of America shall devote 
programming each day to broadcasting information on the 
individual States of the United States. The broadcasts shall 
include--
            (1) information on the products, tourism, and 
        cultural and educational facilities of each State;
            (2) information on the potential for trade with 
        each State; and
            (3) discussions with State officials with respect 
        to the matters described in paragraphs (1) and (2).
    (b) Report.--Not later than one year after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Broadcasting Board of Governors of 
the United States Information Agency shall submit a report to 
Congress detailing the actions that have been taken to carry 
out subsection (a).
    (c) State Defined.--In this section, the term ``State'' 
means any of the several States of the United States, the 
District of Columbia, or any commonwealth or territory of the 
United States.

    TITLE XV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS OTHER THAN UNITED NATIONS

SEC. 1501. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES AND CONTINGENCIES.

    There are authorized to be appropriated for ``International 
Conferences and Contingencies'', $3,500,000 for the fiscal year 
1998 and $1,223,000 for the fiscal year 1999 for the Department 
of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and 
responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the 
United States with respect to international conferences and 
contingencies and to carry out other authorities in law 
consistent with such purposes.

SEC. 1502. RESTRICTION RELATING TO UNITED STATES ACCESSION TO ANY NEW 
                    INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL TRIBUNAL.

    (a) Prohibition.--The United States shall not become a 
party to any new international criminal tribunal, nor give 
legal effect to the jurisdiction of such a tribunal over any 
matter described in subsection (b), except pursuant to--
            (1) a treaty made under Article II, section 2, 
        clause 2 of the Constitution of the United States on or 
        after the date of enactment of this Act; or
            (2) any statute enacted by Congress on or after the 
        date of enactment of this Act.
    (b) Jurisdiction Described.--The jurisdiction described in 
this section is jurisdiction over--
            (1) persons found, property located, or acts or 
        omissions committed, within the territory of the United 
        States; or
            (2) nationals of the United States, wherever found.
    (c) Statutory Construction.--Nothing in this section 
precludes sharing information, expertise, or other forms of 
assistance with such tribunal.
    (d) Definition.--The term ``new international criminal 
tribunal'' means any permanent international criminal tribunal 
established on or after the date of enactment of this Act and 
does not include--
            (1) the International Tribunal for the Prosecution 
        of Persons Responsible for Serious Violations of 
        International Humanitarian Law in the Territory of the 
        Former Yugoslavia, as established by United Nations 
        Security Council Resolution 827 of May 25, 1993; or
            (2) the International Tribunal for the Prosecution 
        of Persons Responsible for Genocide and Other Serious 
        Violations of International Humanitarian Law Committed 
        in the Territory of Rwanda and Rwandan Citizens 
        Responsible for Genocide and Other Such Violations 
        Committed in the Territory of Neighboring States, as 
        established by United Nations Security Council 
        Resolution 955 of November 8, 1994.

SEC. 1503. UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP IN THE BUREAU OF THE 
                    INTERPARLIAMENTARY UNION.

    (a) Interparliamentary Union Limitation.--Unless the 
Secretary of State certifies to Congress that the United States 
will be assessed not more than $500,000 for its annual 
contribution to the Bureau of the Interparliamentary Union 
during fiscal year 1999, then effective October 1, 1999, the 
authority for further participation by the United States in the 
Bureau shall terminate in accordance with subsection (d).
    (b) Elimination of Authority To Pay Expenses of the 
American Group.--Section 1 of the Act entitled ``An Act to 
authorize participation by the United States in the 
Interparliamentary Union'', approved June 28, 1935 (22 U.S.C. 
276) is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence--
                    (A) by striking ``fiscal year'' and all 
                that follows through ``(1) for'' and inserting 
                ``fiscal year for'';
                    (B) by striking ``; and''; and
                    (C) by striking paragraph (2); and
            (2) by striking the second sentence.
    (c) Elimination of Permanent Appropriation.--Section 303 of 
the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1988 (as contained in 
section 101(a) of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 1988 
(Public Law 100-202; 22 U.S.C. 276 note)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$440,000'' and inserting 
        ``$350,000''; and
            (2) by striking ``paragraph (2) of the first 
        section of Public Law 74-170,''.
    (d) Conditional Termination of Authority.--Unless Congress 
receives the certification described in subsection (a) before 
October 1, 1999, effective on that date the Act entitled ``An 
Act to authorize participation by the United States in the 
Interparliamentary Union'', approved June 28, 1935 (22 U.S.C. 
276-276a-4) is repealed.
    (e) Transfer of Funds to the Treasury.--Unobligated 
balances of appropriations made under section 303 of the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act 1988 (as contained in 
section 101(a) of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 1988; 
Public Law 100-202) that are available as of the day before the 
date of enactment of this Act shall be transferred on such date 
to the general fund of the Treasury of the United States.

SEC. 1504. SERVICE IN INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) In General.--Section 3582(b) of title 5, United States 
Code, is amended by striking all after the first sentence and 
inserting the following: ``On reemployment, an employee 
entitled to the benefits of subsection (a) is entitled to the 
rate of basic pay to which the employee would have been 
entitled had the employee remained in the civil service. On 
reemployment, the agency shall restore the sick leave account 
of the employee, by credit or charge, to its status at the time 
of transfer. The period of separation caused by the employment 
of the employee with the international organization and the 
period necessary to effect reemployment are deemed creditable 
service for all appropriate civil service employment purposes. 
This subsection does not apply to a congressional employee.''.
    (b) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (a) 
shall apply with respect to transfers that take effect on or 
after the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 1505. REPORTS REGARDING FOREIGN TRAVEL.

    (a) Prohibition.--Except as provided in subsection (e), 
none of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for 
fiscal year 1999 may be used to pay for the expenses of foreign 
travel by an officer or employee of an Executive branch agency 
to attend an international conference, or for the routine 
services that a United States diplomatic mission or consular 
post provides in support of foreign travel by such an officer 
or employee to attend an international conference, unless that 
officer or employee has submitted a preliminary report with 
respect to that foreign travel in accordance with subsection 
(b), and has not previously failed to submit a final report 
with respect to foreign travel to attend an international 
conference required by subsection (c).
    (b) Preliminary Reports.--A preliminary report referred to 
in subsection (a) is a report by an officer or employee of an 
Executive branch agency with respect to proposed foreign travel 
to attend an international conference, submitted to the 
Director prior to commencement of the travel, setting forth--
            (1) the name and employing agency of the officer or 
        employee;
            (2) the name of the official who authorized the 
        travel; and
            (3) the purpose and duration of the travel.
    (c) Final Reports.--A final report referred to in 
subsection (a) is a report by an officer or employee of an 
Executive branch agency with respect to foreign travel to 
attend an international conference, submitted to the Director 
not later than 30 days after the conclusion of the travel--
            (1) setting forth the actual duration and cost of 
        the travel; and
            (2) updating any other information included in the 
        preliminary report.
    (d) Report to Congress.--The Director shall submit a report 
not later than April 1, 1999, to the Committees on Foreign 
Relations and Appropriations of the Senate and the Committees 
on International Relations and Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives, setting forth with respect to each 
international conference for which reports described in 
subsection (c) were required to be submitted to the Director 
during the preceding six months--
            (1) the names and employing agencies of all 
        officers and employees of Executive branch agencies who 
        attended the international conference;
            (2) the names of all officials who authorized 
        travel to the international conference, and the total 
        number of officers and employees who were authorized to 
        travel to the conference by each such official; and
            (3) the total cost of travel by officers and 
        employees of Executive branch agencies to the 
        international conference.
    (e) Exceptions.--This section shall not apply to travel 
by--
            (1) the President or the Vice President; or
            (2) any officer or employee who is carrying out an 
        intelligence or intelligence-related activity, who is 
        performing a protective function, or who is engaged in 
        a sensitive diplomatic mission.
    (f) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the 
        Director of the Office of International Conferences of 
        the Department of State.
            (2) Executive branch agency.--The terms ``Executive 
        branch agency'' and ``Executive branch agencies'' 
        mean--
                    (A) an entity or entities, other than the 
                General Accounting Office, defined in section 
                105 of title 5, United States Code; and
                    (B) the Executive Office of the President 
                (except as provided in subsection (e)).
            (3) International conference.--The term 
        ``international conference'' means any meeting held 
        under the auspices of an international organization or 
        foreign government, at which representatives of more 
        than two foreign governments are expected to be in 
        attendance, and to which United States Executive branch 
        agencies will send a total of ten or more 
        representatives.
    (g) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the President 
shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a 
report describing--
            (1) the total Federal expenditure of all official 
        international travel in each Executive branch agency 
        during the previous fiscal year; and
            (2) the total number of individuals in each agency 
        who engaged in such travel.

      TITLE XVI--UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY

SEC. 1601. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out the 
purposes of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act $41,500,000 
for the fiscal year 1998.

SEC. 1602. STATUTORY CONSTRUCTION.

    Section 303 of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (22 
U.S.C. 2573), as redesignated by section 1223 of this Act, is 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(c) Statutory Construction.--Nothing contained in this 
chapter shall be construed to authorize any policy or action by 
any Government agency which would interfere with, restrict, or 
prohibit the acquisition, possession, or use of firearms by an 
individual for the lawful purpose of personal defense, sport, 
recreation, education, or training.''.

               TITLE XVII--EUROPEAN SECURITY ACT OF 1998

SEC. 1701. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ``European Security Act of 
1998''.

SEC. 1702. STATEMENT OF POLICY.

    (a) Policy With Respect to NATO Enlargement.--Congress 
urges the President to outline a clear and complete strategic 
rationale for the enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO), and declares that--
            (1) Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic should 
        not be the last emerging democracies in Central and 
        Eastern Europe invited to join NATO;
            (2) the United States should ensure that NATO 
        continues a process whereby all other emerging 
        democracies in Central and Eastern Europe that wish to 
        join NATO will be considered for membership in NATO as 
        soon as they meet the criteria for such membership;
            (3) the United States should ensure that no 
        limitations are placed on the numbers of NATO troops or 
        types of equipment, including tactical nuclear weapons, 
        to be deployed on the territory of new member states;
            (4) the United States should reject all efforts to 
        condition NATO decisions on review or approval by the 
        United Nations Security Council;
            (5) the United States should clearly delineate 
        those NATO deliberations, including but not limited to 
        discussions on arms control, further Alliance 
        enlargement, procurement matters, and strategic 
        doctrine, that are not subject to review or discussion 
        in the NATO-Russia Permanent Joint Council;
            (6) the United States should work to ensure that 
        countries invited to join the Alliance are provided an 
        immediate seat in NATO discussions; and
            (7) the United States already pays more than a 
        proportionate share of the costs of the common defense 
        of Europe and should obtain, in advance, agreement on 
        an equitable distribution of the cost of NATO 
        enlargement to ensure that the United States does not 
        continue to bear a disproportionate burden.
    (b) Policy With Respect to Negotiations With Russia.--
            (1) Implementation.--NATO enlargement should be 
        carried out in such a manner as to underscore the 
        Alliance's defensive nature and demonstrate to Russia 
        that NATO enlargement will enhance the security of all 
        countries in Europe, including Russia. Accordingly, the 
        United States and its NATO allies should make this 
        intention clear in negotiations with Russia, including 
        negotiations regarding adaptation of the Conventional 
        Armed Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty of November 19, 
        1990.
            (2) Limitations on commitments to russia.--In 
        seeking to demonstrate to Russia NATO's defensive and 
        security-enhancing intentions, it is essential that 
        neither fundamental United States security interests in 
        Europe nor the effectiveness and flexibility of NATO as 
        a defensive alliance be jeopardized. In particular, no 
        commitments should be made to Russia that would have 
        the effect of--
                    (A) extending rights or imposing 
                responsibilities on new NATO members different 
                from those applicable to current NATO members, 
                including rights or responsibilities with 
                respect to the deployment of nuclear weapons 
                and the stationing of troops and equipment from 
                other NATO members;
                    (B) limiting the ability of NATO to defend 
                the territory of new NATO members by, for 
                example, restricting the construction of 
                defense infrastructure or limiting the ability 
                of NATO to deploy necessary reinforcements;
                    (C) providing any international 
                organization, or any country that is not a 
                member of NATO, with authority to delay, veto, 
                or otherwise impede deliberations and decisions 
                of the North Atlantic Council or the 
                implementation of such decisions, including 
                deliberations and decisions with respect to the 
                deployment of NATO forces or the admission of 
                additional members to NATO;
                    (D) impeding the development of enhanced 
                relations between NATO and other European 
                countries that do not belong to the Alliance;
                    (E) establishing a nuclear weapons-free 
                zone in Central or Eastern Europe;
                    (F) requiring NATO to subsidize Russian 
                arms sales, service, or support to the 
                militaries of those former Warsaw Pact 
                countries invited to join the Alliance; or
                    (G) legitimizing Russian efforts to link 
                concessions in arms control negotiations to 
                NATO enlargement.
            (3) Commitments from russia.--In order to enhance 
        security and stability in Europe, the United States 
        should seek commitments from Russia--
                    (A) to demarcate and respect all its 
                borders with neighboring states;
                    (B) to achieve the immediate and complete 
                withdrawal of any armed forces and military 
                equipment under the control of Russia that are 
                deployed on the territories of the independent 
                states of the former Soviet Union without the 
                full and complete agreement of those states;
                    (C) to station its armed forces on the 
                territory of other states only with the full 
                and complete agreement of that state and in 
                strict accordance with international law; and
                    (D) to take steps to reduce further its 
                nuclear and conventional forces in Kaliningrad.
            (4) Consultations.--As negotiations on adaptation 
        of the Treaty on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe 
        proceed, the United States should engage in close and 
        continuous consultations not only with its NATO allies, 
        but also with the emerging democracies of Central and 
        Eastern Europe, Ukraine, and the South Caucasus.
    (c) Policy With Respect to Ballistic Missile Defense 
Cooperation.--
            (1) In general.--As the United States proceeds with 
        efforts to develop defenses against ballistic missile 
        attack, it should seek to foster a climate of 
        cooperation with Russia on matters related to missile 
        defense. In particular, the United States and its NATO 
        allies should seek to cooperate with Russia in such 
        areas as early warning.
            (2) Discussions with nato allies.--The United 
        States should initiate discussions with its NATO allies 
        for the purpose of examining the feasibility of 
        deploying a ballistic missile defense capable of 
        protecting NATO's southern and eastern flanks from a 
        limited ballistic missile attack.
            (3) Constitutional prerogatives.--Even as the 
        Congress seeks to promote ballistic missile defense 
        cooperation with Russia, it must insist on its 
        constitutional prerogatives regarding consideration of 
        arms control agreements with Russia that bear on 
        ballistic missile defense.

SEC. 1703. AUTHORITIES RELATING TO NATO ENLARGEMENT.

    (a) Policy of Section.--This section is enacted in order to 
implement the policy set forth in section 2702(a).
    (b) Designation of Additional Countries Eligible for NATO 
Enlargement Assistance.--
            (1) Designation of additional countries.--Romania, 
        Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Bulgaria are each 
        designated as eligible to receive assistance under the 
        program established under section 203(a) of the NATO 
        Participation Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 1928 note) and 
        shall be deemed to have been so designated pursuant to 
        section 203(d)(1) of such Act.
            (2) Rule of construction.--The designation of 
        countries pursuant to paragraph (1) as eligible to 
        receive assistance under the program established under 
        section 203(a) of the NATO Participation Act of 1994--
                    (A) is in addition to the designation of 
                other countries by law or pursuant to section 
                203(d)(2) of such Act as eligible to receive 
                assistance under the program established under 
                section 203(a) of such Act; and
                    (B) shall not preclude the designation by 
                the President of other emerging democracies in 
                Central and Eastern Europe pursuant to section 
                203(d)(2) of such Act as eligible to receive 
                assistance under the program established under 
                section 203(a) of such Act.
            (3) Sense of congress.--It is the sense of Congress 
        that Romania, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and 
        Bulgaria--
                    (A) are to be commended for their progress 
                toward political and economic reform and 
                meeting the guidelines for prospective NATO 
                members;
                    (B) would make an outstanding contribution 
                to furthering the goals of NATO and enhancing 
                stability, freedom, and peace in Europe should 
                they become NATO members; and
                    (C) upon complete satisfaction of all 
                relevant criteria should be invited to become 
                full NATO members at the earliest possible 
                date.
    (c) Regional Airspace Initiative and Partnership for Peace 
Information Management System.--
            (1) In general.--Funds described in paragraph (2) 
        are authorized to be made available to support the 
        implementation of the Regional Airspace Initiative and 
        the Partnership for Peace Information Management 
        System, including--
                    (A) the procurement of items in support of 
                these programs; and
                    (B) the transfer of such items to countries 
                participating in these programs.
            (2) Funds described.--Funds described in this 
        paragraph are funds that are available--
                    (A) during any fiscal year under the NATO 
                Participation Act of 1994 with respect to 
                countries eligible for assistance under that 
                Act; or
                    (B) during fiscal year 1998 under any Act 
                to carry out the Warsaw Initiative.
    (d) Extension of Authority Regarding Excess Defense 
Articles.--Section 105 of Public Law 104-164 (110 Stat. 1427) 
is amended by striking ``1996 and 1997'' and inserting ``1997, 
1998, and 1999''.
    (e) Conforming Amendments to the NATO Participation Act of 
1994.--Section 203(c) of the NATO Participation Act of 1994 (22 
U.S.C. 1928 note) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``, without 
        regard to the restrictions'' and all that follows 
        through ``section)'';
            (2) by striking paragraph (2);
            (3) in paragraph (6), by striking ``appropriated 
        under the `Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund' 
        account'' and inserting ``made available for the 
        `Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund' ''; and
            (4) in paragraph (8)--
                    (A) by striking ``any restrictions in 
                sections 516 and 519'' and inserting ``section 
                516(e)'';
                    (B) by striking ``as amended,''; and
                    (C) by striking ``paragraphs (1) and (2)'' 
                and inserting ``paragraph (1)''; and
            (5) by redesignating paragraphs (3) through (8) as 
        paragraphs (2) through (7), respectively.

SEC. 1704. SENSE OF CONGRESS WITH RESPECT TO THE TREATY ON CONVENTIONAL 
                    ARMED FORCES IN EUROPE.

    It is the sense of Congress that no revisions to the Treaty 
on Conventional Armed Forces in Europe will be approved for 
entry into force with respect to the United States that 
jeopardize fundamental United States security interests in 
Europe or the effectiveness and flexibility of NATO as a 
defensive alliance by--
            (1) extending rights or imposing responsibilities 
        on new NATO members different from those applicable to 
        current NATO members, including rights or 
        responsibilities with respect to the deployment of 
        nuclear weapons and the stationing of troops and 
        equipment from other NATO members;
            (2) limiting the ability of NATO to defend the 
        territory of new NATO members by, for example, 
        restricting the construction of defense infrastructure 
        or limiting the ability of NATO to deploy necessary 
        reinforcements;
            (3) providing any international organization, or 
        any country that is not a member of NATO, with the 
        authority to delay, veto, or otherwise impede 
        deliberations and decisions of the North Atlantic 
        Council or the implementation of such decisions, 
        including deliberations and decisions with respect to 
        the deployment of NATO forces or the admission of 
        additional members to NATO; or
            (4) impeding the development of enhanced relations 
        between NATO and other European countries that do not 
        belong to the Alliance.

SEC. 1705. RESTRICTIONS AND REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO BALLISTIC MISSILE 
                    DEFENSE.

    (a) Policy of Section.--This section is enacted in order to 
implement the policy set forth in section 1702(c).
    (b) Restriction on Entry Into Force of ABM/TMD Demarcation 
Agreements.--An ABM/TMD demarcation agreement shall not be 
binding on the United States, and shall not enter into force 
with respect to the United States, unless, after the date of 
enactment of this Act, that agreement is specifically approved 
with the advice and consent of the United States Senate 
pursuant to Article II, section 2, clause 2 of the 
Constitution.
    (c) Sense of Congress With Respect to Demarcation 
Agreements.--
            (1) Relationship to multilateralization of abm 
        treaty.--It is the sense of Congress that no ABM/TMD 
        demarcation agreement will be considered for advice and 
        consent to ratification unless, consistent with the 
        certification of the President pursuant to condition 
        (9) of the resolution of ratification of the CFE Flank 
        Document, the President submits for Senate advice and 
        consent to ratification any agreement, arrangement, or 
        understanding that would--
                    (A) add one or more countries as State 
                Parties to the ABM Treaty, or otherwise convert 
                the ABM Treaty from a bilateral treaty to a 
                multilateral treaty; or
                    (B) change the geographic scope or coverage 
                of the ABM Treaty, or otherwise modify the 
                meaning of the term ``national territory'' as 
                used in Article VI and Article IX of the ABM 
                Treaty.
            (2) Preservation of united states theater ballistic 
        missile defense potential.--It is the sense of Congress 
        that no ABM/TMD demarcation agreement that would reduce 
        the capabilities of United States theater missile 
        defense systems, or the numbers or deployment patterns 
        of such systems, will be approved for entry into force 
        with respect to the United States.
    (d) Report on Cooperative Projects With Russia.--Not later 
than January 1, 1999, and January 1, 2000, the President shall 
submit to the Committees on International Relations, National 
Security, and Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
and the Committees on Foreign Relations, Armed Services, and 
Appropriations of the Senate a report on cooperative projects 
with Russia in the area of ballistic missile defense, including 
in the area of early warning. Each such report shall include 
the following:
            (1) Cooperative projects.--A description of all 
        cooperative projects conducted in the area of early 
        warning and ballistic missile defense during the 
        preceding fiscal year and the fiscal year during which 
        the report is submitted.
            (2) Funding.--A description of the funding for such 
        projects during the preceding fiscal year and the year 
        during which the report is submitted and the proposed 
        funding for such projects for the next fiscal year.
            (3) Status of dialogue or discussions.--A 
        description of the status of any dialogue or 
        discussions conducted during the preceding fiscal year 
        between the United States and Russia aimed at exploring 
        the potential for mutual accommodation of outstanding 
        issues between the two nations on matters relating to 
        ballistic missile defense and the ABM Treaty, including 
        the possibility of developing a strategic relationship 
        not based on mutual nuclear threats.
    (e) Definitions.--In this section:
            (1) ABM/TMD demarcation agreement.--The term ``ABM/
        TMD demarcation agreement'' means any agreement that 
        establishes a demarcation between theater ballistic 
        missile defense systems and strategic antiballistic 
        missile defense systems for purposes of the ABM Treaty.
            (2) ABM treaty.--The term ``ABM Treaty'' means the 
        Treaty Between the United States of America and the 
        Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on the Limitation 
        of Anti-Ballistic Missile Systems, signed at Moscow on 
        May 26, 1972 (23 UST 3435), and includes the Protocols 
        to that Treaty, signed at Moscow on July 3, 1974 (27 
        UST 1645).

              TITLE XVIII--OTHER FOREIGN POLICY PROVISIONS

SEC. 1801. REPORTS ON CLAIMS BY UNITED STATES FIRMS AGAINST THE 
                    GOVERNMENT OF SAUDI ARABIA.

    (a) In General.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act and every 180 days thereafter, the 
Secretary of State, after consultation with the Secretary of 
Defense and the Secretary of Commerce, shall submit a report to 
the appropriate congressional committees on specific actions 
taken by the Department of State, the Department of Defense, 
and the Department of Commerce toward progress in resolving the 
commercial disputes between United States firms and the 
Government of Saudi Arabia that are described in the June 30, 
1993, report by the Secretary of Defense pursuant to section 
9140(c) of the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 1993 
(Public Law 102-396), including the additional claims noticed 
by the Department of Commerce on page 2 of that report.
    (b) Termination.--Subsection (a) shall cease to have effect 
on the earlier of--
            (1) the date of submission of the third report 
        under that subsection; or
            (2) the date that the Secretary of State, after 
        consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the 
        Secretary of Commerce, certifies in writing to the 
        appropriate congressional committees that the 
        commercial disputes referred to in subsection (a) have 
        been resolved satisfactorily.

SEC. 1802. REPORTS ON DETERMINATIONS UNDER TITLE IV OF THE LIBERTAD 
                    ACT.

    (a) Reports Required.--Not later than 30 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act and every 3 months thereafter 
during the period ending September 30, 1999, the Secretary of 
State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees 
a report on the implementation of section 401 of the Cuban 
Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (22 
U.S.C. 6091). Each report shall include--
            (1) an unclassified list, by economic sector, of 
        the number of entities then under review pursuant to 
        that section;
            (2) an unclassified list of all entities and a 
        classified list of all individuals that the Secretary 
        of State has determined to be subject to that section;
            (3) an unclassified list of all entities and a 
        classified list of all individuals that the Secretary 
        of State has determined are no longer subject to that 
        section;
            (4) an explanation of the status of the review 
        underway for the cases referred to in paragraph (1); 
        and
            (5) an unclassified explanation of each 
        determination of the Secretary of State under section 
        401(a) of that Act and each finding of the Secretary 
        under section 401(c) of that Act--
                    (A) since the date of the enactment of this 
                Act, in the case of the first report under this 
                subsection; and
                    (B) in the preceding 3-month period, in the 
                case of each subsequent report.
    (b) Protection of Identity of Concerned Entities.--In 
preparing the report under subsection (a), the names of 
entities shall not be identified under paragraph (1) or (4).

SEC. 1803. REPORT ON COMPLIANCE WITH THE HAGUE CONVENTION ON 
                    INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION.

    (a) In General.--Beginning 6 months after the date of the 
enactment of this Act and every 12 months thereafter during the 
period ending September 30, 1999, the Secretary of State shall 
submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on 
the compliance with the provisions of the Convention on the 
Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, done at The 
Hague on October 25, 1980, by the signatory countries of the 
Convention. Each such report shall include the following 
information:
            (1) The number of applications for the return of 
        children submitted by United States citizens to the 
        Central Authority for the United States that remain 
        unresolved more than 18 months after the date of 
        filing.
            (2) A list of the countries to which children in 
        unresolved applications described in paragraph (1) are 
        alleged to have been abducted.
            (3) A list of the countries that have demonstrated 
        a pattern of noncompliance with the obligations of the 
        Convention with respect to applications for the return 
        of children submitted by United States citizens to the 
        Central Authority for the United States.
            (4) Detailed information on each unresolved case 
        described in paragraph (1) and on actions taken by the 
        Department of State to resolve each such case.
            (5) Information on efforts by the Department of 
        State to encourage other countries to become 
        signatories of the Convention.
    (b) Definition.--In this section, the term ``Central 
Authority for the United States'' has the meaning given the 
term in Article 6 of the Convention on the Civil Aspects of 
International Child Abduction, done at The Hague on October 25, 
1980.

SEC. 1804. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO RECOGNITION OF THE ECUMENICAL 
                    PATRIARCHATE BY THE GOVERNMENT OF TURKEY.

    It is the sense of Congress that the United States should 
use its influence with the Government of Turkey to suggest that 
the Government of Turkey--
            (1) recognize the Ecumenical Patriarchate and its 
        nonpolitical, religious mission;
            (2) ensure the continued maintenance of the 
        institution's physical security needs, as provided for 
        under Turkish and international law, including the 
        Treaty of Lausanne, the 1968 Protocol, the Helsinki 
        Final Act (1975), and the Charter of Paris;
            (3) provide for the proper protection and safety of 
        the Ecumenical Patriarch and Patriarchate personnel; 
        and
            (4) reopen the Ecumenical Patriarchate's Halki 
        Patriarchal School of Theology.

SEC. 1805. REPORT ON RELATIONS WITH VIETNAM.

    In order to provide Congress with the necessary information 
by which to evaluate the relationship between the United States 
and Vietnam, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to 
the appropriate congressional committees, not later than 90 
days after the date of enactment of this Act and every 180 days 
thereafter during the period ending September 30, 1999, on the 
extent to which--
            (1) the Government of the Socialist Republic of 
        Vietnam is cooperating with the United States in 
        providing the fullest possible accounting of all 
        unresolved cases of prisoners of war (POWs) or persons 
        missing-in-action (MIAs) through the provision of 
        records and the unilateral and joint recovery and 
        repatriation of American remains;
            (2) the Government of the Socialist Republic of 
        Vietnam has made progress toward the release of all 
        political and religious prisoners, including Catholic, 
        Protestant, and Buddhist clergy;
            (3) the Government of the Socialist Republic of 
        Vietnam is cooperating with requests by the United 
        States to obtain full and free access to persons of 
        humanitarian interest to the United States for 
        interviews under the Orderly Departure (ODP) and 
        Resettlement Opportunities for Vietnamese Refugees 
        (ROVR) programs, and in providing exit visas for such 
        persons;
            (4) the Government of the Socialist Republic of 
        Vietnam has taken vigorous action to end extortion, 
        bribery, and other corrupt practices in connection with 
        such exit visas; and
            (5) the Government of the United States is making 
        vigorous efforts to interview and resettle former 
        reeducation camp victims, their immediate families 
        including unmarried sons and daughters, former United 
        States Government employees, and other persons eligible 
        for the ODP program, and to give such persons the full 
        benefit of all applicable United States laws including 
        sections 599D and 599E of the Foreign Operations, 
        Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations 
        Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-167).

SEC. 1806. REPORTS AND POLICY CONCERNING HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS IN 
                    LAOS.

    Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the 
appropriate congressional committees on the allegations of 
persecution and abuse of the Hmong and Laotian refugees who 
have returned to Laos. The report shall include the following:
            (1) A full investigation, including full 
        documentation of individual cases of persecution, of 
        the Lao Government's treatment of Hmong and Laotian 
        refugees who have returned to Laos.
            (2) The steps the Department of State will take to 
        continue to monitor any systematic human rights 
        violations by the Government of Laos.
            (3) The actions which the Department of State will 
        take to seek to ensure the cessation of human rights 
        violations.

SEC. 1807. REPORT ON AN ALLIANCE AGAINST NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING IN THE 
                    WESTERN HEMISPHERE.

    (a) Sense of Congress on Discussions for Alliance.--
            (1) Sense of congress.--It is the sense of Congress 
        that the President should discuss with the 
        democratically-elected governments of the Western 
        Hemisphere, the prospect of forming a multilateral 
        alliance to address problems relating to international 
        drug trafficking in the Western Hemisphere.
            (2) Consultations.--In the consultations on the 
        prospect of forming an alliance described in paragraph 
        (1), the President should seek the input of such 
        governments on the possibility of forming one or more 
        structures within the alliance--
                    (A) to develop a regional, multilateral 
                strategy to address the threat posed to nations 
                in the Western Hemisphere by drug trafficking; 
                and
                    (B) to establish a new mechanism for 
                improving multilateral coordination of drug 
                interdiction and drug-related law enforcement 
                activities in the Western Hemisphere.
    (b) Report.--
            (1) Requirement.--Not later than 60 days after the 
        date of enactment of this Act, the President shall 
        submit to Congress a report on the proposal discussed 
        under subsection (a). The report shall include the 
        following:
                    (A) An analysis of the reactions of the 
                governments concerned to the proposal.
                    (B) An assessment of the proposal, 
                including an evaluation of the feasibility and 
                advisability of forming the alliance.
                    (C) A determination in light of the 
                analysis and assessment whether or not the 
                formation of the alliance is in the national 
                interests of the United States.
                    (D) If the President determines that the 
                formation of the alliance is in the national 
                interests of the United States, a plan for 
                encouraging and facilitating the formation of 
                the alliance.
                    (E) If the President determines that the 
                formation of the alliance is not in the 
                national interests of the United States, an 
                alternative proposal to improve significantly 
                efforts against the threats posed by narcotics 
                trafficking in the Western Hemisphere, 
                including an explanation of how the alternative 
                proposal will--
                            (i) improve upon current 
                        cooperation and coordination of 
                        counter-drug efforts among nations in 
                        the Western Hemisphere;
                            (ii) provide for the allocation of 
                        the resources required to make 
                        significant progress in disrupting and 
                        disbanding the criminal organizations 
                        responsible for the trafficking of 
                        illegal drugs in the Western 
                        Hemisphere; and
                            (iii) differ from and improve upon 
                        past strategies adopted by the United 
                        States Government which have failed to 
                        make sufficient progress against the 
                        trafficking of illegal drugs in the 
                        Western Hemisphere.
            (2) Unclassified form.--The report under paragraph 
        (1) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may 
        contain a classified annex.

SEC. 1808. CONGRESSIONAL STATEMENT REGARDING THE ACCESSION OF TAIWAN TO 
                    THE WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION.

    (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) The people of the United States and the people 
        of the Republic of China on Taiwan have long enjoyed 
        extensive ties.
            (2) Taiwan is currently the 8th largest trading 
        partner of the United States.
            (3) The executive branch of Government has 
        committed publicly to support Taiwan's bid to join the 
        World Trade Organization and has declared that the 
        United States will not oppose this bid solely on the 
        grounds that the People's Republic of China, which also 
        seeks membership in the World Trade Organization, is 
        not yet eligible because of its unacceptable trade 
        practices.
            (4) The United States and Taiwan have concluded 
        discussions on a variety of outstanding trade issues 
        that remain unresolved with the People's Republic of 
        China and that are necessary for the United States to 
        support Taiwan's membership in the World Trade 
        Organization.
            (5) The reversion of control over Hong Kong--a 
        member of the World Trade Organization--to the People's 
        Republic of China in many respects affords to the 
        People's Republic of China the practical benefit of 
        membership in the World Trade Organization for a 
        substantial portion of its trade in goods despite the 
        fact that the trade practices of the People's Republic 
        of China currently fall far short of what the United 
        States expects for membership in the World Trade 
        Organization.
            (6) The executive branch of Government has 
        announced its interest in the admission of the People's 
        Republic of China to the World Trade Organization; the 
        fundamental sense of fairness of the people of the 
        United States warrants the United States Government's 
        support for Taiwan's relatively more meritorious 
        application for membership in the World Trade 
        Organization.
            (7) Despite having made significant progress in 
        negotiations for its accession to the World Trade 
        Organization, Taiwan has yet to offer acceptable terms 
        of accession in agricultural and certain other market 
        sectors.
            (8) It is in the economic interest of United States 
        consumers and exporters for Taiwan to complete those 
        requirements for accession to the World Trade 
        Organization at the earliest possible moment.
    (b) Congressional Statement.--The Congress favors public 
support by officials of the Department of State for the 
accession of Taiwan to the World Trade Organization.

SEC. 1809. PROGRAMS OR PROJECTS OF THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY 
                    AGENCY IN CUBA.

    (a) Withholding of United States Proportional Share of 
Assistance.--Section 307(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 (22 U.S.C. 2227(c)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``The limitations'' and inserting 
        ``(1) Subject to paragraph (2), the limitations''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following:
    ``(2)(A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), with 
respect to funds authorized to be appropriated by this chapter 
and available for the International Atomic Energy Agency, the 
limitations of subsection (a) shall apply to programs or 
projects of such Agency in Cuba.
    ``(B)(i) Subparagraph (A) shall not apply with respect to 
programs or projects of the International Atomic Energy Agency 
that provide for the discontinuation, dismantling, or safety 
inspection of nuclear facilities or related materials, or for 
inspections and similar activities designed to prevent the 
development of nuclear weapons by a country described in 
subsection (a).
    ``(ii) Clause (i) shall not apply with respect to the 
Juragua Nuclear Power Plant near Cienfuegos, Cuba, or the Pedro 
Pi Nuclear Research Center unless Cuba--
            ``(I) ratifies the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation 
        of Nuclear Weapons (21 UST 483) or the Treaty for the 
        Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America 
        (commonly known as the Treaty of Tlatelolco);
            ``(II) negotiates full-scope safeguards of the 
        International Atomic Energy Agency not later than two 
        years after ratification by Cuba of such Treaty; and
            ``(III) incorporates internationally accepted 
        nuclear safety standards.''.
    (b) Opposition to Certain Programs or Projects.--The 
Secretary of State shall direct the United States 
representative to the International Atomic Energy Agency to 
oppose the following:
            (1) Technical assistance programs or projects of 
        the Agency at the Juragua Nuclear Power Plant near 
        Cienfuegos, Cuba, and at the Pedro Pi Nuclear Research 
        Center.
            (2) Any other program or project of the Agency in 
        Cuba that is, or could become, a threat to the security 
        of the United States.
    (c) Reporting Requirements.--
            (1) Request for iaea reports.--The Secretary of 
        State shall direct the United States representative to 
        the International Atomic Energy Agency to request the 
        Director-General of the Agency to submit to the United 
        States all reports prepared with respect to all 
        programs or projects of the Agency that are of concern 
        to the United States, including the programs or 
        projects described in subsection (b).
            (2) Annual reports to the congress.--Not later than 
        180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
        and on an annual basis thereafter, the Secretary of 
        State, in consultation with the United States 
        representative to the International Atomic Energy 
        Agency, shall prepare and submit to the Congress a 
        report containing a description of all programs or 
        projects of the Agency in each country described in 
        section 307(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
        (22 U.S.C. 2227(a)).

SEC. 1810. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO COUNTRIES AIDING CUBA NUCLEAR 
                    DEVELOPMENT.

    (a) In General.--Section 620 of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2370), as amended by this Act, is further 
amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(y)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), the President 
shall withhold from amounts made available under this Act or 
any other Act and allocated for a country for a fiscal year an 
amount equal to the aggregate value of nuclear fuel and related 
assistance and credits provided by that country, or any entity 
of that country, to Cuba during the preceding fiscal year.
    ``(2) The requirement to withhold assistance for a country 
for a fiscal year under paragraph (1) shall not apply if Cuba--
            ``(A) has ratified the Treaty on the Non-
        Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (21 UST 483) or 
theTreaty of Tlatelelco, and Cuba is in compliance with the 
requirements of either such Treaty;
            ``(B) has negotiated and is in compliance with 
        full-scope safeguards of the International Atomic 
        Energy Agency not later than two years after 
        ratification by Cuba of such Treaty; and
            ``(C) incorporates and is in compliance with 
        internationally accepted nuclear safety standards.
    ``(3) The Secretary of State shall prepare and submit to 
the Congress each year a report containing a description of the 
amount of nuclear fuel and related assistance and credits 
provided by any country, or any entity of a country, to Cuba 
during the preceding year, including the terms of each transfer 
of such fuel, assistance, or credits.''.
    (b) Effective Date.--Section 620(y) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961, as added by subsection (a), shall apply 
with respect to assistance provided in fiscal years beginning 
on or after the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 1811. INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR IRELAND.

    (a) Purposes.--Section 2(b) of the Anglo-Irish Agreement 
Support Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-415; 100 Stat. 947) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new sentences: 
``United States contributions should be used in a manner that 
effectively increases employment opportunities in communities 
with rates of unemployment higher than the local or urban 
average of unemployment in Northern Ireland. In addition, such 
contributions should be used to benefit individuals residing in 
such communities.''.
    (b) Conditions and Understandings.--Section 5(a) of such 
Act is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence--
                    (A) by striking ``The United States'' and 
                inserting the following:
            ``(1) In general.--The United States'';
                    (B) by striking ``in this Act may be used'' 
                and inserting the following: ``in this Act--
                    ``(A) may be used'';
                    (C) by striking the period and inserting 
                ``; and''; and
                    (D) by adding at the end the following:
                    ``(B) should be provided to individuals or 
                entities in Northern Ireland which employ 
                practices consistent with the principles of 
                economic justice.''; and
            (2) in the second sentence, by striking ``The 
        restrictions'' and inserting the following:
            ``(2) Additional requirements.--The restrictions''.
    (c) Prior Certifications.--Section 5(c)(2) of such Act is 
amended--
            (1) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``in 
        accordance with the principle of equality'' and all 
        that follows and inserting ``to individuals and 
        entities whose practices are consistent with principles 
        of economic justice; and''; and
            (2) in subparagraph (B), by inserting before the 
        period at the end the following: ``and will create 
        employment opportunities in regions and communities of 
        Northern Ireland suffering from high rates of 
        unemployment''.
    (d) Annual Reports.--Section 6 of such Act is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ``and'' at the 
        end;
            (2) in paragraph (3), by striking the period and 
        inserting ``; and''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new 
        paragraph:
            ``(4) the extent to which the practices of each 
        individual or entity receiving assistance from United 
        States contributions to the International Fund has been 
        consistent with the principles of economic justice.''.
    (e) Requirements Relating to Funds.--Section 7 of such Act 
is amended by adding at the end the following:
    ``(c) Prohibition.--Nothing included herein shall require 
quotas or reverse discrimination or mandate their use.''.
    (f) Definitions.--Section 8 of such Act is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``and'' at the 
        end;
            (2) in paragraph (2), by striking the period at the 
        end and inserting ``; and''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following new 
        paragraph:
            ``(3) the term `principles of economic justice' 
        means the following principles:
                    ``(A) Increasing the representation of 
                individuals from underrepresented religious 
                groups in the workforce, including managerial, 
                supervisory, administrative, clerical, and 
                technical jobs.
                    ``(B) Providing adequate security for the 
                protection of minority employees at the 
                workplace.
                    ``(C) Banning provocative sectarian or 
                political emblems from the workplace.
                    ``(D) Providing that all job openings be 
                advertised publicly and providing that special 
                recruitment efforts be made to attract 
                applicants from underrepresented religious 
                groups.
                    ``(E) Providing that layoff, recall, and 
                termination procedures do not favor a 
                particular religious group.
                    ``(F) Abolishing job reservations, 
                apprenticeship restrictions, and differential 
                employment criteria which discriminate on the 
                basis of religion.
                    ``(G) Providing for the development of 
                training programs that will prepare substantial 
                numbers of minority employees for skilled jobs, 
                including the expansion of existing programs 
                and the creation of new programs to train, 
                upgrade, and improve the skills of minority 
                employees.
                    ``(H) Establishing procedures to assess, 
                identify, and actively recruit minority 
                employees with the potential for further 
                advancement.
                    ``(I) Providing for the appointment of a 
                senior management staff member to be 
                responsible for the employment efforts of the 
                entity and, within a reasonable period of time, 
                the implementation of the principles described 
                in subparagraphs (A) through (H).''.

SEC. 1812. UNITED STATES POLICY WITH RESPECT TO JERUSALEM AS THE 
                    CAPITAL OF ISRAEL.

    (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--Of the amounts 
authorized to be appropriated by section 1101(4) of this Act 
for ``Security and Maintenance of Buildings Abroad'', 
$25,000,000 for the fiscal year 1998 and $75,000,000 for the 
fiscal year 1999 are authorized to be appropriated for the 
construction of a United States Embassy in Jerusalem, Israel.
    (b) Limitation on Use of Funds for Consulate in 
Jerusalem.--None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by 
this Act should be expended for the operation of a United 
States consulate or diplomatic facility in Jerusalem unless 
such consulate or diplomatic facility is under the supervision 
of the United States Ambassador to Israel.
    (c) Limitation on Use of Funds for Publications.--None of 
the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be 
available for the publication of any official government 
document which lists countries and their capital cities unless 
the publication identifies Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
    (d) Record of Place of Birth as Israel for Passport 
Purposes.--For purposes of the registration of birth, 
certification of nationality, or issuance of a passport of a 
United States citizen born in the city of Jerusalem, the 
Secretary of State shall, upon the request of the citizen, 
record the place of birth as Israel.

SEC. 1813. SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRATIC OPPOSITION IN IRAQ.

    (a) Assistance for Justice in Iraq.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated for fiscal year 1998 $3,000,000 for 
assistance to an international commission to establish an 
international record for the criminal culpability of Saddam 
Hussein and other Iraqi officials and for an international 
criminal tribunal established for the purpose of indicting, 
prosecuting, and punishing Saddam Hussein and other Iraqi 
officials responsible for crimes against humanity, genocide, 
and other violations of international law.
    (b) Assistance to the Democratic Opposition in Iraq.--There 
are authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 1998 
$15,000,000 to provide support for democratic opposition forces 
in Iraq, of which--
            (1) not more than $10,000,000 shall be for 
        assistance to the democratic opposition, including 
        leadership organization, training political cadre, 
        maintaining offices, disseminating information, and 
        developing and implementing agreements among opposition 
        elements; and
            (2) not more than $5,000,000 of the funds made 
        available under this subsection shall be available only 
        for grants to RFE/RL, Incorporated, for surrogate radio 
        broadcasting by RFE/RL, Incorporated, to the Iraqi 
        people in the Arabic language, such broadcasts to be 
        designated as ``Radio Free Iraq''.
    (c) Assistance for Humanitarian Relief and 
Reconstruction.--There are authorized to be appropriated for 
fiscal year 1998 $20,000,000 for the relief, rehabilitation, 
and reconstruction of people living in Iraq, and communities 
located in Iraq, who are not under the control of the Saddam 
Hussein regime.
    (d) Availability.--Amounts authorized to be appropriated by 
this section shall be provided in addition to amounts otherwise 
made available and shall remain available until expended.
    (e) Notification.--All assistance provided pursuant to this 
section shall be notified to Congress in accordance with the 
procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications under 
section 634A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
    (f) Relation to Other Laws.--Funds made available to carry 
out the provisions of this section may be made available 
notwithstanding any other provision of law.
    (g) Report.--Not later than 45 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State and the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors of the United States 
Information Agency shall submit a detailed report to Congress 
describing--
            (1) the costs, implementation, and plans for the 
        establishment of an international war crimes tribunal 
        described in subsection (a);
            (2) the establishment of a political assistance 
        program, and the surrogate broadcasting service, as 
        described in subsection (b); and
            (3) the humanitarian assistance program described 
        in subsection (c).

SEC. 1814. DEVELOPMENT OF DEMOCRACY IN THE REPUBLIC OF SERBIA.

    (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) The United States stands as the beacon of 
        democracy and freedom in the world.
            (2) A stable and democratic Republic of Serbia is 
        important to the interests of the United States, the 
        international community, and to peace in the Balkans.
            (3) Democratic forces in the Republic of Serbia are 
        beginning to emerge, notwithstanding the efforts of 
        Europe's longest-standing communist dictator, Slobodan 
        Milosevic.
            (4) The Serbian authorities have sought to continue 
        to hinder the growth of free and independent news media 
        in the Republic of Serbia, in particular the broadcast 
        news media, and have harassed journalists performing 
        their professional duties.
            (5) Under Slobodan Milosevic, the political 
        opposition in Serbia has been denied free, fair, and 
        equal opportunity to participate in the democratic 
        process.
    (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
            (1) the United States, the international community, 
        nongovernmental organizations, and the private sector 
        should continue to promote the building of democratic 
        institutions and civic society in the Republic of 
        Serbia, help strengthen the independent news media, and 
        press for the Government of the Republic of Serbia to 
        respect the rule of law; and
            (2) the normalization of relations between the 
        ``Federal Republic of Yugoslavia'' (Serbia and 
        Montenegro) and the United States requires, among other 
        things, that President Milosevic and the leadership of 
        Serbia--
                    (A) promote the building of democratic 
                institutions, including strengthening the 
                independent news media and respecting the rule 
                of law;
                    (B) promote the respect for human rights 
                throughout the ``Federal Republic of 
                Yugoslavia'' (Serbia and Montenegro); and
                    (C) promote and encourage free, fair, and 
                equal conditions for the democratic opposition 
                in Serbia.

SEC. 1815. FUNDS MADE AVAILABLE UNDER CHAPTER 4 OF PART II OF THE 
                    FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961.

    Not less than $2,000,000 shall be made available under 
chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
U.S.C. 2346; relating to the economic support fund), for fiscal 
years 1998 and 1999 to carry out the programs and activities 
under the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) 
Act of 1996 (22 U.S.C. 6021 et seq.) and the Cuban Democracy 
Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 6001 et seq.).

SEC. 1816. FOREIGN ORGANIZATIONS THAT PERFORM OR PROMOTE ABORTION; 
                    FORCED ABORTION IN THE PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA.

    (a) Section 104 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(h) Restriction on Assistance to Foreign Organizations 
That Perform or Actively Promote Abortions.--
            ``(1) Performance of abortions.--
                    ``(A) Notwithstanding section 614 of this 
                Act or any other provision of law, no funds 
                appropriated for population planning activities 
                or other population assistance may be made 
                available for any foreign private, 
                nongovernmental, or multilateral organization 
                until the organization certifies that it will 
                not, during the period for which the funds are 
                made available, perform abortions in any 
                foreign country, except where the life of the 
                mother would be endangered if the pregnancy 
                were carried to term or in cases of forcible 
                rape or incest.
                    ``(B) Subparagraph (A) may not be construed 
                to apply to the treatment of injuries or 
                illnesses caused by legal or illegal abortions 
                or to assistance provided directly to the 
                government of a country.
            ``(2) Lobbying activities.--(A) Notwithstanding 
        section 614 of this Act or any other provision of law, 
        no funds appropriated for population planning 
        activities or other population assistance may be made 
        available for any foreign private, nongovernmental, or 
        multilateral organization until the organization 
        certifies that it will not, during the period for which 
        the funds are made available, violate the laws of any 
        foreign country concerning the circumstances under 
        which abortion is permitted, regulated, or prohibited, 
        or engage in any activity or effort to alter the laws 
        or governmental policies of any foreign country 
        concerning the circumstances under which abortion is 
        permitted, regulated, or prohibited.
            ``(B) Subparagraph (A) shall not apply to 
        activities in opposition to coercive abortion or 
        involuntary sterilization.
            ``(3) Application to foreign organizations.--The 
        prohibitions of this subsection apply to funds made 
        available to a foreign organization either directly or 
        as a subcontractor or subgrantee, and the 
        certifications required by paragraphs (1) and (2) apply 
        to activities in which the organization engages either 
        directly or through a subcontractor or subgrantee.''.
    (b) Section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is 
amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
    ``(i) Limitation Relating to Forced Abortions in the 
People's Republic of China.--Notwithstanding section 614 of 
this Act or any other provision of law, no funds may be made 
available for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) in any 
fiscal year unless the President certifies that--
            ``(1) UNFPA has terminated all activities in the 
        People's Republic of China, and the United States has 
        received assurances that UNFPA will conduct no such 
        activities during the fiscal year for which the funds 
        are to be made available; or
            ``(2) during the 12 months preceding such 
        certification there have been no abortions as the 
        result of coercion associated with the family planning 
        policies of the national government or other 
        governmental entities within the People's Republic of 
        China.
As used in this section, the term `coercion' includes physical 
duress or abuse, destruction or confiscation of property, loss 
of means of livelihood, or severe psychological pressure.''.
    (c) The President may waive the provisions of section 
104(h)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, 
pertaining to population assistance to foreign organizations 
that perform abortions in foreign countries, for any fiscal 
year: Provided, That if the President exercises the waiver 
provided by this subsection for any fiscal year, not to exceed 
$356,000,000 may be made available for population planning 
activities or other population assistance for such fiscal year: 
Provided further, That the limitation in the previous proviso 
includes all funds for programs and activities designed to 
control fertility or to reduce or delay childbirths or 
pregnancies, irrespective of the heading under which such funds 
are made available.

                   DIVISION C--UNITED NATIONS REFORM

                      TITLE XX--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 2001. SHORT TITLE.

    This division may be cited as the ``United Nations Reform 
Act of 1998''.

SEC. 2002. DEFINITIONS.

    In this division:
            (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means the 
        Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on 
        International Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives.
            (2) Designated specialized agency defined.--The 
        term ``designated specialized agency'' means the 
        International Labor Organization, the World Health 
        Organization, and the Food and Agriculture 
        Organization.
            (3) General assembly.--The term ``General 
        Assembly'' means the General Assembly of the United 
        Nations.
            (4) Secretary general.--The term ``Secretary 
        General'' means the Secretary General of the United 
        Nations.
            (5) Security council.--The term ``Security 
        Council'' means the Security Council of the United 
        Nations.
            (6) United nations member.--The term ``United 
        Nations member'' means any country that is a member of 
        the United Nations.
            (7) United nations peacekeeping operation.--The 
        term ``United Nations peacekeeping operation'' means 
        any United Nations-led operation to maintain or restore 
        international peace or security that--
                    (A) is authorized by the Security Council; 
                and
                    (B) is paid for from assessed contributions 
                of United Nations members that are made 
                available for peacekeeping activities.

SEC. 2003. NONDELEGATION OF CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    The Secretary of State may not delegate the authority in 
this division to make any certification.

               TITLE XXI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

SEC. 2101. CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated under the heading ``Contributions to 
International Organizations'' $901,000,000 for the fiscal year 
1998 and $900,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999 for the 
Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, 
duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign 
affairs of the United States with respect to international 
organizations and to carry out other authorities in law 
consistent with such purposes.
    (b) No Growth Budget.--Of the funds made available for 
fiscal year 1999 under subsection (a), $80,000,000 may be made 
available only after the Secretary of State certifies that the 
United Nations has taken no action during calendar year 1998 to 
increase funding for any United Nations program without 
identifying an offsetting decrease elsewhere in the United 
Nations budget of $2,533,000,000 and cause the United Nations 
to exceed that budget.
    (c) Inspector General of the United Nations.--
            (1) Withholding of funds.--Twenty percent of the 
        funds made available in each fiscal year under 
        subsection (a) for the assessed contribution of the 
        United States to the United Nations shall be withheld 
        from obligation and expenditure until a certification 
        is made under paragraph (2).
            (2) Certification.--A certification under this 
        paragraph is a certification by the Secretary of State 
        in the fiscal year concerned that the following 
        conditions are satisfied:
                    (A) Action by the united nations.--The 
                United Nations--
                            (i) has met the requirements of 
                        paragraphs (1) through (6) of section 
                        401(b) of the Foreign Relations 
                        Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 
                        and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 287e note), as 
                        amended by paragraph (3);
                            (ii) has established procedures 
                        that require the Under Secretary 
                        General of the Office of Internal 
                        Oversight Service to report directly to 
                        the Secretary General on the adequacy 
                        of the Office's resources to enable the 
                        Office to fulfill its mandate; and
                            (iii) has made available an 
                        adequate amount of funds to the Office 
                        for carrying out its functions.
                    (B) Authority of oios.--The Office of 
                Internal Oversight Services has authority to 
                audit, inspect, or investigate each program, 
                project, or activity funded by the United 
                Nations, and each executive board created under 
                the United Nations has been notified, in 
                writing, of that authority.
            (3) Amendment of the foreign relations 
        authorization act, fiscal years 1994 and 1995.--Section 
        401(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 is amended--
                    (A) by amending paragraph (6) to read as 
                follows:
            ``(6) the United Nations has procedures in place to 
        ensure that all reports submitted by the Office of 
        Internal Oversight Service are made available to the 
        member states of the United Nations without 
        modification except to the extent necessary to protect 
        the privacy rights of individuals.''; and
                    (B) by striking ``Inspector General'' each 
                place it appears and inserting ``Office of 
                Internal Oversight Service''.
    (d) Prohibition on Certain Global Conferences.--None of the 
funds made available under subsection (a) shall be available 
for any United States contribution to pay for any expenses 
related to the holding of a United Nations Global Conference 
except any conference that the General Assembly, prior to the 
date of enactment of this Act, decided to convene.
    (e) Reduction in Number of Posts.--
            (1) Fiscal year 1999.--Of the funds authorized to 
        be appropriated for fiscal year 1999 for the United 
        Nations by subsection (a), $50,000,000 shall be 
        withheld from obligation and expenditure until the 
        Secretary of State certifies to Congress that the 
        number of posts authorized by the General Assembly, has 
        resulted in a net reduction of at least 1,000 posts 
        from the 10,012 posts authorized under the 1996-97 
        United Nations biennium budget, as a result of a 
        suppression of that number of posts.
            (2) Report.--Not later than October 1, 1998, the 
        Secretary of State shall submit a report to the 
        appropriate congressional committees specifying--
                    (A) the budget savings associated with the 
                reduction of the 1,000 posts specified in 
                paragraph (1), including any reduction in the 
                United States assessed contribution for the 
                United Nations regular budget resulting from 
                those savings;
                    (B) the vacancy rates for United Nations 
                professional and general service staff 
                contained in the United Nations biennium budget 
                for 1998-99, including any reduction in the 
                United States assessed contribution for the 
                United Nations regular budget resulting from 
                those vacancy rates; and
                    (C) the goals of the United States for 
                further staff reductions and associated budget 
                savings for the 1998-99 United Nations biennium 
                budget.
    (f) Prohibition on Funding Other Framework Treaty-Based 
Organizations.--None of the funds made available for the 1998-
1999 biennium budget under subsection (a) for United States 
contributions to the regular budget of the United Nations shall 
be available for the United States proportionate share of any 
other framework treaty-based organization, including the 
Framework Convention on Global Climate Change, the 
International Seabed Authority, and the 1998 Desertification 
Convention.
    (g) Limitations for Fiscal Years 1999 and 2000.--
            (1) In general.--The total amount of funds made 
        available for all United States memberships in 
        international organizations under the heading 
        ``Contributions to International Organizations'' may 
        not exceed $900,000,000 for each of fiscal years 1999 
        and 2000.
            (2) Consultations with congress.--The Secretary of 
        State shall regularly consult with the appropriate 
        congressional committees regarding the impact, if any, 
        of the limitation in paragraph (1) on the maintenance 
        of United States membership in such international 
        organizations.
    (h) Foreign Currency Exchange Rates.--
            (1) Authorization of appropriations.--In addition 
        to amounts authorized to be appropriated by subsection 
        (a), there are authorized to be appropriated such sums 
        as may be necessary for each of fiscal years 1998 and 
        1999 to offset adverse fluctuations in foreign currency 
        exchange rates.
            (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated 
        under this subsection shall be available for obligation 
        and expenditure only to the extent that the Director of 
        the Office of Management and Budget determines and 
        certifies to Congress that such amounts are necessary 
        due to such fluctuations.
    (i) Refund of Excess Contributions.--The United States 
shall continue to insist that the United Nations and its 
specialized and affiliated agencies shall credit or refund to 
each member of the agency concerned its proportionate share of 
the amount by which the total contributions to the agency 
exceed the expenditures of the regular assessed budgets of 
these agencies.

SEC. 2102. CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES.

    (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated under the heading ``Contributions for 
International Peacekeeping Activities'' $210,000,000 for the 
fiscal year 1998 and $220,000,000 for the fiscal year 1999 for 
the Department of State to carry out the authorities, 
functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the 
foreign affairs of the United States with respect to 
international peacekeeping activities and to carry out other 
authorities in law consistent with such purposes.
    (b) Codification of Required Notice of Proposed United 
Nations Peacekeeping Operations.--
            (1) Codification.--Section 4 of the United Nations 
        Participation Act of 1945 (22 U.S.C. 287b) is amended--
                    (A) in subsection (a), by striking the 
                second sentence; and
                    (B) by striking subsection (e) and 
                inserting the following:
    ``(e) Consultations and Reports on United Nations 
Peacekeeping Operations.--
            ``(1) Consultations.--Each month the President 
        shall consult with Congress on the status of United 
        Nations peacekeeping operations.
            ``(2) Information to be provided.--In connection 
        with such consultations, the following information 
        shall be provided each month to the designated 
        congressional committees:
                    ``(A) With respect to ongoing United 
                Nations peacekeeping operations, the following:
                            ``(i) A list of all resolutions of 
                        the United Nations Security Council 
                        anticipated to be voted on during such 
                        month that would extend or change the 
                        mandate of any United Nations 
                        peacekeeping operation.
                            ``(ii) For each such operation, any 
                        changes in the duration, mandate, and 
                        command and control arrangements that 
                        are anticipated as a result of the 
                        adoption of the resolution.
                            ``(iii) An estimate of the total 
                        cost to the United Nations of each such 
                        operation for the period covered by the 
                        resolution, and an estimate of the 
                        amount of that cost that will be 
                        assessed to the United States.
                            ``(iv) Any anticipated significant 
                        changes in United States participation 
                        in or support for each such operation 
                        during the period covered by the 
                        resolution (including the provision of 
                        facilities, training, transportation, 
                        communication, and logistical support, 
                        but not including intelligence 
                        activities reportable under title V of 
                        the National Security Act of 1947 (50 
                        U.S.C. 413 et seq.)), and the estimated 
                        costs to the United States of such 
                        changes.
                    ``(B) With respect to each new United 
                Nations peacekeeping operation that is 
                anticipated to be authorized by a Security 
                Council resolution during such month, the 
                following information for the period covered by 
                the resolution:
                            ``(i) The anticipated duration, 
                        mandate, the command and control 
                        arrangements of such operation, the 
                        planned exit strategy, and the vital 
                        national interest to be served.
                            ``(ii) An estimate of the total 
                        cost to the United Nations of the 
                        operation, and an estimate of the 
                        amount of that cost that will be 
                        assessed to the United States.
                            ``(iii) A description of the 
                        functions that would be performed by 
                        any United States Armed Forces 
                        participating in or otherwise operating 
                        in support of the operation, an 
                        estimate of the number of members of 
                        the Armed Forces that will participate 
                        in or otherwise operate in support of 
                        the operation, and an estimate of the 
                        cost to the United States of such 
                        participation or support.
                            ``(iv) A description of any other 
                        United States assistance to or support 
                        for the operation (including the 
                        provision of facilities, training, 
                        transportation, communication, and 
                        logistical support, but not including 
                        intelligence activities reportable 
                        under title V of the National Security 
                        Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 413 et seq.)) 
                        and an estimate of the cost to the 
                        United States of such assistance or 
                        support.
                            ``(v) A reprogramming of funds 
                        pursuant to section 34 of the State 
                        Department Basic Authorities Act of 
                        1956, submitted in accordance with the 
                        procedures set forth in such section, 
                        describing the source of funds that 
                        will be used to pay for the cost of the 
                        new United Nations peacekeeping 
                        operation, provided that such 
                        notification shall also be submitted to 
                        the Committee on Appropriations of the 
                        House of Representatives and the 
                        Committee on Appropriations of the 
                        Senate.
            ``(3) Form and timing of information.--
                    ``(A) Form.--The President shall submit 
                information under clauses (i) and (iii) of 
                paragraph (2)(A) in writing.
                    ``(B) Timing.--
                            ``(i) Ongoing operations.--The 
                        information required under paragraph 
                        (2)(A) for a month shall be submitted 
                        not later than the 10th day of the 
                        month.
                            ``(ii) New operations.--The 
                        information required under paragraph 
                        (2)(B) shall be submitted in writing 
                        with respect to each new United Nations 
                        peacekeeping operation not less than 15 
                        days before the anticipated date of the 
                        vote on the resolution concerned unless 
                        the President determines that 
                        exceptional circumstances prevent 
                        compliance with the requirement to 
                        report 15 days in advance. If the 
                        President makes such a determination, 
                        the information required under 
                        paragraph (2)(B) shall be submitted as 
                        far in advance of the vote as is 
                        practicable.
            ``(4) New united nations peacekeeping operation 
        defined.--As used in paragraph (2), the term `new 
        United Nations peacekeeping operation' includes any 
        existing or otherwise ongoing United Nations 
        peacekeeping operation--
                    ``(A) where the authorized force strength 
                is to be expanded;
                    ``(B) that is to be authorized to operate 
                in a country in which it was not previously 
                authorized to operate; or
                    ``(C) the mandate of which is to be changed 
                so that the operation would be engaged in 
                significant additional or significantly 
                different functions.
            ``(5) Notification and quarterly reports regarding 
        united states assistance.--
                    ``(A) Notification of certain assistance.--
                            ``(i) In general.--The President 
                        shall notify the designated 
                        congressional committees at least 15 
                        days before the United States provides 
                        any assistance to the United Nations to 
                        support peacekeeping operations.
                            ``(ii) Exception.--This 
                        subparagraph does not apply to--
                                    ``(I) assistance having a 
                                value of less than $3,000,000 
                                in the case of nonreimbursable 
                                assistance or less than 
                                $14,000,000 in the case of 
                                reimbursable assistance; or
                                    ``(II) assistance provided 
                                under the emergency drawdown 
                                authority of sections 506(a)(1) 
                                and 552(c)(2) of the Foreign 
                                Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
                                U.S.C. 2318(a)(1) and 
                                2348a(c)(2)).
                    ``(B) Quarterly reports.--
                            ``(i) In general.--The President 
                        shall submit quarterly reports to the 
                        designated congressional committees on 
                        all assistance provided by the United 
                        States during the preceding calendar 
                        quarter to the United Nations to 
                        support peacekeeping operations.
                            ``(ii) Matters included.--Each 
                        report under this subparagraph shall 
                        describe the assistance provided for 
                        each such operation, listed by category 
                        of assistance.
                            ``(iii) Fourth quarter report.--The 
                        report under this subparagraph for the 
                        fourth calendar quarter of each year 
                        shall be submitted as part of the 
                        annual report required by subsection 
                        (d) and shall include cumulative 
                        information for the preceding calendar 
                        year.
    ``(f) Designated Congressional Committees.--In this 
section, the term `designated congressional committees' means 
the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on International 
Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
Representatives.''.
            (2) Conforming repeal.--Subsection (a) of section 
        407 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
        Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 22 U.S.C. 287b 
        note; 108 Stat. 448) is repealed.
    (c) Relationship to Other Notice Requirements.--Section 4 
of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945, as amended by 
subsection (b), is further amended by adding at the end the 
following:
    ``(g) Relationship to Other Notification Requirements.--
Nothing in this section is intended to alter or supersede any 
notification requirement with respect to peacekeeping 
operations that is established under any other provision of 
law.''.

                 TITLE XXII--UNITED NATIONS ACTIVITIES

SEC. 2201. UNITED NATIONS POLICY ON ISRAEL AND THE PALESTINIANS.

    (a) Congressional Statement.--It shall be the policy of the 
United States to promote an end to the persistent inequity 
experienced by Israel in the United Nations whereby Israel is 
the only longstanding member of the organization to be denied 
acceptance into any of the United Nation's regional blocs.
    (b) Policy on Abolition of Certain United Nations Groups.--
It shall be the policy of the United States to seek abolition 
of certain United Nations groups the existence of which is 
inimical to the ongoing Middle East peace process, those groups 
being the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices 
Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and other 
Arabs of the Occupied Territories; the Committee on the 
Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People; 
the Division for the Palestinian Rights; and the Division on 
Public Information on the Question of Palestine.
    (c) Annual Reports.--On January 15 of each year, the 
Secretary of State shall submit a report to the appropriate 
congressional committees (in classified or unclassified form as 
appropriate) on--
            (1) actions taken by representatives of the United 
        States to encourage the nations of the Western Europe 
        and Others Group (WEOG) to accept Israel into their 
        regional bloc;
            (2) other measures being undertaken, and which will 
        be undertaken, to ensure and promote Israel's full and 
        equal participation in the United Nations; and
            (3) steps taken by the United States to secure 
        abolition by the United Nations of groups under 
        subsection (b).
    (d) Annual Consultation.--At the time of the submission of 
each annual report under subsection (c), the Secretary of State 
shall consult with the appropriate congressional committees on 
specific responses received by the Secretary of State from each 
of the nations of the Western Europe and Others Group (WEOG) on 
their position concerning Israel's acceptance into their 
organization.

SEC. 2202. DATA ON COSTS INCURRED IN SUPPORT OF UNITED NATIONS 
                    PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    Chapter 6 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 
(22 U.S.C. 2348 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the 
following:

``SEC. 554. DATA ON COSTS INCURRED IN SUPPORT OF UNITED NATIONS 
                    PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    ``(a) United States Costs.--The United States shall 
annually provide to the Secretary General of the United Nations 
data regarding all costs incurred by the United States in 
support of all United Nations peacekeeping operations.
    ``(b) United Nations Member Costs.--The United States shall 
request that the United Nations compile and publish information 
concerning costs incurred by United Nations members in support 
of such operations.''.

SEC. 2203. REIMBURSEMENT FOR GOODS AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE UNITED 
                    STATES TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

    The United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (22 U.S.C. 287 
et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
section:

``SEC. 10. REIMBURSEMENT FOR GOODS AND SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE UNITED 
                    STATES TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

    ``(a) Requirement To Obtain Reimbursement.--
            ``(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph 
        (2), the President shall seek and obtain in a timely 
        fashion a commitment from the United Nations to provide 
        reimbursement to the United States from the United 
        Nations whenever the United States Government furnishes 
        assistance pursuant to the provisions of law described 
        in subsection (c)--
                    ``(A) to the United Nations when the 
                assistance is designed to facilitate or assist 
                in carrying out an assessed peacekeeping 
                operation;
                    ``(B) for any United Nations peacekeeping 
                operation that is authorized by the United 
                Nations Security Council under Chapter VI or 
                Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter and 
                paid for by peacekeeping or regular budget 
                assessment of the United Nations members; or
                    ``(C) to any country participating in any 
                operation authorized by the United Nations 
                Security Council under Chapter VI or Chapter 
                VII of the United Nations Charter and paid for 
                by peacekeeping assessments of United Nations 
                members when the assistance is designed to 
                facilitate or assist the participation of that 
                country in the operation.
            ``(2) Exceptions.--(A) The requirement in paragraph 
        (1) shall not apply to--
                    ``(i) goods and services provided to the 
                United States Armed Forces;
                    ``(ii) assistance having a value of less 
                than $3,000,000 per fiscal year per operation;
                    ``(iii) assistance furnished before the 
                date of enactment of this section;
                    ``(iv) salaries and expenses of civilian 
                police and other civilian and military monitors 
                where United Nations policy is to require 
                payment by contributing members for similar 
                assistance to United Nations peacekeeping 
                operations; or
                    ``(v) any assistance commitment made before 
                the date of enactment of the United Nations 
                Reform Act of 1998.
            ``(B) The requirements of subsection (d)(1)(B) 
        shall not apply to the deployment of United States 
        military forces when the President determines that such 
        deployment is important to the security interests of 
        the United States. The cost of such deployment shall be 
        included in the data provided under section 554 of the 
        Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
            ``(3) Form and amount.--
                    ``(A) Amount.--The amount of any 
                reimbursement under this subsection shall be 
                determined at the usual rate established by the 
                United Nations.
                    ``(B) Form.--Reimbursement under this 
                subsection may include credits against the 
                United States assessed contributions for United 
                States peacekeeping operations, if the expenses 
                incurred by any United States department or 
                agency providing the assistance have first been 
                reimbursed.
    ``(b) Treatment of Reimbursements.--
            ``(1) Credit.--The amount of any reimbursement paid 
        the United States under subsection (a) shall be 
        credited to the current applicable appropriation, fund, 
        or account of the United States department or agency 
        providing the assistance for which the reimbursement is 
        paid.
            ``(2) Availability.--Amounts credited under 
        paragraph (1) shall be merged with the appropriations, 
        or with appropriations in the fund or account, to which 
        credited and shall be available for the same purposes, 
        and subject to the same conditions and limitations, as 
        the appropriations with which merged.
    ``(c) Covered Assistance.--Subsection (a) applies to 
assistance provided under the following provisions of law:
            ``(1) Sections 6 and 7 of this Act.
            ``(2) Sections 451, 506(a)(1), 516, 552(c), and 607 
        of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
            ``(3) Any other provisions of law pursuant to which 
        assistance is provided by the United States to carry 
        out the mandate of an assessed United Nations 
        peacekeeping operation.
    ``(d) Waiver.--
            ``(1) Authority.--
                    ``(A) In general.--The President may 
                authorize the furnishing of assistance covered 
                by this section without regard to subsection 
                (a) if the President determines, and so 
                notifies in writing the Committee on Foreign 
                Relations of the Senate and the Speaker of the 
                House of Representatives, that to do so is 
                important to the security interests of the 
                United States.
                    ``(B) Congressional notification.--When 
                exercising the authorities of subparagraph (A), 
                the President shall notify the appropriate 
                congressional committees in accordance with the 
                procedures applicable to reprogramming 
                notifications under section 634A of the Foreign 
                Assistance Act of 1961.
            ``(2) Congressional review.--Notwithstanding a 
        notice under paragraph (1) with respect to assistance 
        covered by this section, subsection (a) shall apply to 
        the furnishing of the assistance if, not later than 15 
        calendar days after receipt of a notification under 
        that paragraph, the Congress enacts a joint resolution 
        disapproving the determination of the President 
        contained in the notification.
            ``(3) Senate procedures.--Any joint resolution 
        described in paragraph (2) shall be considered in the 
        Senate in accordance with the provisions of section 
        601(b) of the International Security Assistance and 
        Arms Export Control Act of 1976.
    ``(e) Relationship to Other Reimbursement Authority.--
Nothing in this section shall preclude the President from 
seeking reimbursement for assistance covered by this section 
that is in addition to the reimbursement sought for the 
assistance under subsection (a).
    ``(f) Definition.--In this section, the term `assistance' 
includes personnel, services, supplies, equipment, facilities, 
and other assistance if such assistance is provided by the 
Department of Defense or any other United States Government 
agency.''.

SEC. 2204. UNITED STATES POLICY REGARDING UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING 
                    OPERATIONS.

    It shall be the policy of the United States--
            (1) to ensure that major peacekeeping operations 
        (in general, those comprised of more than 10,000 
        troops) authorized by the United Nations Security 
        Council under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter 
        (or missions such as the United Nations Protection 
        Force (UNPROFOR)) are undertaken by a competent 
        regional organization or a multinational force, and not 
        established as a peacekeeping operation under United 
        Nations operational control which would be paid for by 
        assessment of United Nations members;
            (2) to consider, on a case-by-case basis, whether 
        it is in the national interest of the United States to 
        agree that smaller peacekeeping operations authorized 
        by the United Nations Security Council under Chapter 
        VII of the United Nations Charter and paid for by 
        assessment of United Nations members (such as the 
        United Nations Transitional Authority in Slavonia 
        (UNTAES)) should be established as peacekeeping 
        operations under United Nations operational control 
        which would be paid for by assessment of United Nations 
        members; and
            (3) to oppose the establishment of United Nations 
        peace operations approved by the General Assembly and 
        funded out of the regular budget of the United Nations.

SEC. 2205. REFORM IN BUDGET DECISIONMAKING PROCEDURES OF THE UNITED 
                    NATIONS AND ITS SPECIALIZED AGENCIES.

    For the fiscal year 1999, the President may withhold funds 
for the United States assessed contribution to the United 
Nations or to any of its specialized agencies in the same 
percentage and subject to the same requirements as are 
applicable to the withholding of funds under section 409 of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 
(22 U.S.C. 287e note).

SEC. 2206. CONTINUED EXTENSION OF PRIVILEGES, EXEMPTIONS, AND 
                    IMMUNITIES OF THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 
                    IMMUNITIES ACT TO UNIDO.

    Section 12 of the International Organizations Immunities 
Act (22 U.S.C. 288f-2) is amended by inserting ``and the United 
Nations Industrial Development Organization'' after 
``International Labor Organization''.

SEC. 2207. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING COMPLIANCE WITH CHILD AND 
                    SPOUSAL SUPPORT OBLIGATIONS BY UNITED NATIONS 
                    PERSONNEL.

    (a) Sense of the Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress 
that--
            (1) all United Nations staff, including diplomats, 
        should comply with binding United States Federal, 
        State, and local court orders regarding child and 
        spousal support obligations;
            (2) the internal regulations of the United Nations 
        allows--
                    (A) the United Nations to release staff 
                salary information to the courts in spousal and 
                child support cases;
                    (B) the Secretary General to authorize 
                deduction of dependency related allowances from 
                staff salary;
                    (C) the United Nations to cooperate with 
                appropriate authorities to facilitate proper 
                legal or judicial resolution of the family's 
                claim.
    (b) Congressional Statement.--The Secretary of State should 
urge the United Nations to comply fully with regulations 
regarding compliance with child and spousal support obligations 
by United Nations personnel, in a timely manner and to the 
fullest extent possible.

                TITLE XXIII--ARREARS PAYMENTS AND REFORM

              CHAPTER 1--ARREARAGES TO THE UNITED NATIONS

     Subchapter A--Authorization of Appropriations; Obligation and 
                          Expenditure of Funds

SEC. 2301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) In General.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
the Department of State for payment of arrearages owed by the 
United States described in subsection (b) as of September 30, 
1997--
            (1) $100,000,000 for fiscal year 1998;
            (2) $475,000,000 for fiscal year 1999; and
            (3) $244,000,000 for fiscal year 2000.
    (b) Limitation.--Amounts made available under subsection 
(a) are authorized to be available only--
            (1) to pay the United States share of assessments 
        for the regular budget of the United Nations;
            (2) to pay the United States share of United 
        Nations peacekeeping operations;
            (3) to pay the United States share of United 
        Nations specialized agencies; and
            (4) to pay the United States share of other 
        international organizations.
    (c) Availability of Funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant 
to subsection (a) are authorized to remain available until 
expended.
    (d) Statutory Construction.--For purposes of payments made 
pursuant to subsection (a), section 404(b)(2) of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public 
Law 103-236) shall not apply to United Nations peacekeeping 
operation assessments received by the United States prior to 
October 1, 1995.

SEC. 2302. OBLIGATION AND EXPENDITURE OF FUNDS.

    (a) In General.--Funds made available pursuant to section 
2301 may be obligated and expended only if the requirements of 
subsections (b) and (c) of this section are satisfied.
    (b) Obligation and Expenditure Upon Satisfaction of 
Certification Requirements.--Subject to subsection (e), funds 
made available pursuant to section 2301 may be obligated and 
expended only in the following allotments and upon the 
following certifications:
            (1) Amounts authorized to be appropriated for 
        fiscal year 1998, upon the certification described in 
        section 2311.
            (2) Amounts authorized to be appropriated for 
        fiscal year 1999, upon the certification described in 
        section 2321.
            (3) Amounts authorized to be appropriated for 
        fiscal year 2000, upon the certification described in 
        section 2331.
    (c) Advance Congressional Notification.--Funds made 
available pursuant to section 2301 may be obligated and 
expended only if the appropriate certification has been 
submitted to the appropriate congressional committees 30 days 
prior to the payment of the funds.
    (d) Transmittal of Certifications.--Certifications made 
under this chapter shall be transmitted by the Secretary of 
State to the appropriate congressional committees.
    (e) Waiver Authority.--
            (1) Fiscal year 1999 funds.--Subject to paragraph 
        (3) and notwithstanding subsection (b), funds made 
        available under section 2301 may be obligated or 
        expended pursuant to subsection (b)(2) even if the 
        Secretary of State cannot certify that one of the 
        following three conditions has been satisfied:
                    (A) The condition described in section 
                2321(b)(1).
                    (B) The condition described in section 
                2321(b)(4).
                    (C) The condition described in section 
                2321(b)(5).
            (2) Fiscal year 2000 funds.--Subject to paragraph 
        (3) and notwithstanding subsection (b), funds made 
        available under section 2301 may be obligated or 
        expended pursuant to subsection (b)(3) even if the 
        Secretary of State cannot certify that one of the 
        following seven conditions has been satisfied: A 
        condition described in paragraph (3), (4), (5), (6), 
        (7), (8), or (9) of section 2331(b).
            (3) Requirements.--
                    (A) In general.--The authority to waive a 
                condition under paragraph (1) or (2) of this 
                subsection may be exercised only if--
                            (i) the Secretary of State 
                        determines that substantial progress 
                        towards satisfying the condition has 
                        been made and that the expenditure of 
                        funds pursuant to that paragraph is 
                        important to the interests of the 
                        United States; and
                            (ii) the Secretary of State has 
                        notified, and consulted with, the 
                        appropriate congressional committees 
                        prior to exercising the authority.
                    (B) Effect on subsequent certification.--If 
                the Secretary of State exercises the authority 
                of paragraph (1) with respect to a condition, 
                such condition shall be deemed to have been 
                satisfied for purposes of making any 
                certification under section 2331.
            (4) Additional requirement.--If the authority to 
        waive a condition under paragraph (1)(A) is exercised, 
        the Secretary of State shall notify the United Nations 
        that the Congress does not consider the United States 
        obligated to pay, and does not intend to pay, 
        arrearages that have not been included in the contested 
        arrearages account or other mechanism described in 
        section 2321(b)(1).

SEC. 2303. FORGIVENESS OF AMOUNTS OWED BY THE UNITED NATIONS TO THE 
                    UNITED STATES.

    (a) Forgiveness of Indebtedness.--Subject to subsection 
(b), the President is authorized to forgive or reduce any 
amount owed by the United Nations to the United States as a 
reimbursement, including any reimbursement payable under the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 or the United Nations 
Participation Act of 1945.
    (b) Limitations.--
            (1) Total amount.--The total of amounts forgiven or 
        reduced under subsection (a) may not exceed 
        $107,000,000.
            (2) Relation to United States arrearages.--Amounts 
        shall be forgiven or reduced under this section only to 
        the same extent as the United Nations forgives or 
        reduces amounts owed by the United States to the United 
        Nations as of September 30, 1997.
    (c) Requirements.--The authority in subsection (a) shall be 
available only to the extent and in the amounts provided in 
advance in appropriations Acts.
    (d) Congressional Notification.--Before exercising any 
authority in subsection (a), the President shall notify the 
appropriate congressional committees in accordance with the 
same procedures as are applicable to reprogramming 
notifications under section 634A of the Foreign Assistance Act 
of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1).
    (e) Effective Date.--This section shall take effect on the 
later of--
            (1) the date a certification is transmitted to the 
        appropriate congressional committees under section 
        2331; or
            (2) October 1, 1999.

                Subchapter B--United States Sovereignty

SEC. 2311. CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) Contents of certification.--A certification described 
in this section is a certification by the Secretary of State 
that the following conditions are satisfied:
            (1) Supremacy of the united states constitution.--
        No action has been taken by the United Nations or any 
        of its specialized or affiliated agencies that requires 
        the United States to violate the United States 
        Constitution or any law of the United States.
            (2) No united nations sovereignty.--Neither the 
        United Nations nor any of its specialized or affiliated 
        agencies--
                    (A) has exercised sovereignty over the 
                United States; or
                    (B) has taken any steps that require the 
                United States to cede sovereignty.
            (3) No united nations taxation.--
                    (A) No legal authority.--Except as provided 
                in subparagraph (D), neither the United Nations 
                nor any of its specialized or affiliated 
                agencies has the authority under United States 
                law to impose taxes or fees on United States 
                nationals.
                    (B) No taxes or fees.--Except as provided 
                in subparagraph (D), a tax or fee has not been 
                imposed on any United States national by the 
                United Nations or any of its specialized or 
                affiliated agencies.
                    (C) No taxation proposals.--Except as 
                provided in subparagraph (D), neither the 
                United Nations nor any of its specialized or 
                affiliated agencies has, on or after October 1, 
                1996, officially approved any formal effort to 
                develop, advocate, or promote any proposal 
                concerning the imposition of a tax or fee on 
                any United States national in order to raise 
                revenue for the United Nations or any such 
                agency.
                    (D) Exception.--This paragraph does not 
                apply to--
                            (i) fees for publications or other 
                        kinds of fees that are not tantamount 
                        to a tax on United States citizens;
                            (ii) the World Intellectual 
                        Property Organization; or
                            (iii) the staff assessment costs of 
                        the United Nations and its specialized 
                        or affiliated agencies.
            (4) No standing army.--The United Nations has not, 
        on or after October 1, 1996, budgeted any funds for, 
        nor taken any official steps to develop, create, or 
        establish any special agreement under Article 43 of the 
        United Nations Charter to make available to the United 
        Nations, on its call, the armed forces of any member of 
        the United Nations.
            (5) No interest fees.--The United Nations has not, 
        on or after October 1, 1996, levied interest penalties 
        against the United States or any interest on arrearages 
        on the annual assessment of the United States, and 
        neither the United Nations nor its specialized agencies 
        have, on or after October 1, 1996, amended their 
        financial regulations or taken any other action that 
        would permit interest penalties to be levied against 
        the United States or otherwise charge the United States 
        any interest on arrearages on its annual assessment.
            (6) United states real property rights.--Neither 
        the United Nations nor any of its specialized or 
        affiliated agencies has exercised authority or control 
        over any United States national park, wildlife 
        preserve, monument, or real property, nor has the 
        United Nations nor any of its specialized or affiliated 
        agencies implemented plans, regulations, programs, or 
        agreements that exercise control or authority over the 
        private real property of United States citizens located 
        in the United States without the approval of the 
        property owner.
            (7) Termination of borrowing authority.--
                    (A) Prohibition on authorization of 
                external borrowing.--On or after the date of 
                enactment of this Act, neither the United 
                Nations nor any specialized agency of the 
                United Nations has amended its financial 
                regulations to permit external borrowing.
                    (B) Prohibition of united states payment of 
                interest costs.--The United States has not, on 
                or after October 1, 1984, paid its share of any 
                interest costs made known to or identified by 
                the United States Government for loans 
                incurred, on or after October 1, 1984, by the 
                United Nations or any specialized agency of the 
                United Nations through external borrowing.
    (b) Transmittal.--The Secretary of State may transmit a 
certification under subsection (a) at any time during fiscal 
year 1998 or thereafter if the requirements of the 
certification are satisfied.

  Subchapter C--Reform of Assessments and United Nations Peacekeeping 
                               Operations

SEC. 2321. CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) In General.--A certification described in this section 
is a certification by the Secretary of State that the 
conditions in subsection (b) are satisfied. Such certification 
shall not be made by the Secretary if the Secretary determines 
that any of the conditions set forth in section 2311 are no 
longer satisfied.
    (b) Conditions.--The conditions under this subsection are 
the following:
            (1) Contested arrearages.--The United Nations has 
        established an account or other appropriate mechanism 
        with respect to all United States arrearages incurred 
        before the date of enactment of this Act with respect 
        to which payments are not authorized by this Act, and 
        the failure to pay amounts specified in the account do 
        not affect the application of Article 19 of the Charter 
        of the United Nations. The account established under 
        this paragraph may be referred to as the ``contested 
        arrearages account''.
            (2) Limitation on assessed share of budget for 
        United Nations peacekeeping operations.--The assessed 
        share of the budget for each assessed United Nations 
        peacekeeping operation does not exceed 25 percent for 
        any single United Nations member.
            (3) Limitation on assessed share of regular budget 
        for the designated specialized agencies.--The share of 
        the total of all assessed contributions for the regular 
        budget of the United Nations or any designated 
        specialized agency does not exceed 22 percent for any 
        single United Nations member.
            (4) Review of regular budget-funded peace 
        operations.--The mandates of the United Nations Truce 
        Supervision Organization (UNTSO) and the United Nations 
        Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) 
        are reviewed annually by the Security Council, and are 
        subject to the notification requirements pursuant to 
        section 4(e) of the United Nations Participation Act of 
        1945, as amended by section 2102(b) of this Act.
            (5) Procurement.--
                    (A) Prohibition on punitive actions.--The 
                United Nations has implemented a system that 
                prohibits punitive actions, such as suspension 
                of contract eligibility against contractors on 
                the basis that they have challengedcontract 
awards or complained about delayed payments.
                    (B) Public announcement of certain contract 
                awards.--The United Nations has implemented a 
                system for public announcement of the award of 
                any contract over $100,000.
                    (C) Notification of unsuccessful bidders.--
                The United Nations has implemented a system to 
                notify unsuccessful bidders for contracts and 
                to provide an explanation upon request of the 
                reason for rejection of their bids.
                    (D) Periodic reporting to united nations 
                members.--The United Nations reports to all 
                United Nations members on a regular basis the 
                value and a brief description of local 
                procurement contracts awarded in excess of 
                $70,000.

               Subchapter D--Budget and Personnel Reform

SEC. 2331. CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) In General.--A certification described in this section 
is a certification by the Secretary of State that the following 
conditions in subsection (b) are satisfied. Such certification 
shall not be made by the Secretary if the Secretary determines 
that any of the conditions set forth in sections 2311 and 2321 
are no longer satisfied.
    (b) Conditions.--The conditions under this subsection are 
the following:
            (1) Limitation on assessed share of regular 
        budget.--The share of the total of all assessed 
        contributions for the regular budget of the United 
        Nations, or any designated specialized agency of the 
        United Nations, does not exceed 20 percent for any 
        single United Nations member.
            (2) Inspectors general for certain organizations.--
                    (A) Establishment of offices.--Each 
                designated specialized agency has established 
                an independent office of inspector general to 
                conduct and supervise objective audits, 
                inspections, and investigations relating to the 
                programs and operations of the organization.
                    (B) Appointment of inspectors general.--The 
                Director General of each designated specialized 
                agency has appointed an inspector general, with 
                the approval of the member states, and that 
                appointment was made principally on the basis 
                of the appointee's integrity and demonstrated 
                ability in accounting, auditing, financial 
                analysis, law, management analysis, public 
                administration, or investigations.
                    (C) Assigned functions.--Each inspector 
                general appointed under subparagraph (A) is 
                authorized to--
                            (i) make investigations and reports 
                        relating to the administration of the 
                        programs and operations of the agency 
                        concerned;
                            (ii) have access to all records, 
                        documents, and other available 
                        materials relating to those programs 
                        and operations of the agency concerned; 
                        and
                            (iii) have direct and prompt access 
                        to any official of the agency 
                        concerned.
                    (D) Complaints.--Each designated 
                specialized agency has procedures in place 
                designed to protect the identity of, and to 
                prevent reprisals against, any staff member 
                making a complaint or disclosing information 
                to, or cooperating in any investigation or 
                inspection by, the inspector general of the 
                agency.
                    (E) Compliance with recommendations.--Each 
                designated specialized agency has in place 
                procedures designed to ensure compliance with 
                the recommendations of the inspector general of 
                the agency.
                    (F) Availability of reports.--Each 
                designated specialized agency has in place 
                procedures to ensure that all annual and other 
                relevant reports submitted by the inspector 
                general to the agency are made available to the 
                member states without modification except to 
                the extent necessary to protect the privacy 
                rights of individuals.
            (3) New budget procedures for the united nations.--
        The United Nations has established and is implementing 
        budget procedures that--
                    (A) require the maintenance of a budget not 
                in excess of the level agreed to by the General 
                Assembly at the beginning of each United 
                Nations budgetary biennium, unless increases 
                are agreed to by consensus; and
                    (B) require the systemwide identification 
                of expenditures by functional categories such 
                as personnel, travel, and equipment.
            (4) Sunset policy for certain united nations 
        programs.--
                    (A) Existing authority.--The Secretary 
                General and the Director General of each 
                designated specialized agency have used their 
                existing authorities to require program 
                managers within the United Nations Secretariat 
                and the Secretariats of the designated 
                specialized agencies to conduct evaluations of 
                United Nations programs approved by the General 
                Assembly and of programs of the designated 
                specialized agencies in accordance with the 
                standardized methodology referred to in 
                subparagraph (B).
                    (B) Development of evaluation criteria.--
                            (i) United nations.--The Office of 
                        Internal Oversight Services has 
                        developed a standardized methodology 
                        for the evaluation of United Nations 
                        programs approved by the General 
                        Assembly, including specific criteria 
                        for determining the continuing 
                        relevance and effectiveness of the 
                        programs.
                            (ii) Designated specialized 
                        agencies.--Patterned on the work of the 
                        Office of Internal Oversight Services 
                        of the United Nations, each designated 
                        specialized agency has developed a 
                        standardized methodology for the 
                        evaluation of programs of designated 
                        specialized agencies, including 
                        specific criteria for determining the 
                        continuing relevance and effectiveness 
                        of the programs.
                    (C) Procedures.--Consistent with the July 
                16, 1997, recommendations of the Secretary 
                General of the United Nations regarding a 
                sunset policy and results-based budgeting for 
                United Nations programs, the United Nations and 
                each designated specialized agency has 
                established and is implementing procedures--
                            (i) requiring the Secretary General 
                        or the Director General of the agency, 
                        as the case may be, to report on the 
                        results of evaluations referred to in 
                        this paragraph, including the 
                        identification of programs that have 
                        met criteria for continuing relevance 
                        and effectiveness and proposals to 
                        terminate or modify programs that have 
                        not met such criteria; and
                            (ii) authorizing an appropriate 
                        body within the United Nations or the 
                        agency, as the case may be, to review 
                        each evaluation referred to in this 
                        paragraph andreport to the General 
Assembly on means of improving the program concerned or on terminating 
the program.
                    (D) United states policy.--It shall be the 
                policy of the United States to seek adoption by 
                the United Nations of a resolution requiring 
                that each United Nations program approved by 
                the General Assembly, and to seek adoption by 
                each designated specialized agency of a 
                resolution requiring that each program of the 
                agency, be subject to an evaluation referred to 
                in this paragraph and have a specific 
                termination date so that the program will not 
                be renewed unless the evaluation demonstrates 
                the continuing relevance and effectiveness of 
                the program.
                    (E) Definition.--For purposes of this 
                paragraph, the term ``United Nations program 
                approved by the General Assembly'' means a 
                program approved by the General Assembly of the 
                United Nations, which is administered or funded 
                by the United Nations.
            (5) United nations advisory committee on 
        administrative and budgetary questions.--
                    (A) In general.--The United States has a 
                seat on the United Nations Advisory Committee 
                on Administrative and Budgetary Questions or 
                the five largest member contributors each have 
                a seat on the Advisory Committee.
                    (B) Definition.--As used in this paragraph, 
                the term ``5 largest member contributors'' 
                means the 5 United Nations member states that, 
                during a United Nations budgetary biennium, 
                have more total assessed contributions than any 
                other United Nations member state to the 
                aggregate of the United Nations regular budget 
                and the budget (or budgets) for United Nations 
                peacekeeping operations.
            (6) Access by the general accounting office.--The 
        United Nations has in effect procedures providing 
        access by the United States General Accounting Office 
        to United Nations financial data to assist the Office 
        in performing nationally mandated reviews of United 
        Nations operations.
            (7) Personnel.--
                    (A) Appointment and service of personnel.--
                The Secretary General--
                            (i) has established and is 
                        implementing procedures that ensure 
                        that staff employed by the United 
                        Nations is appointed on the basis of 
                        merit consistent with Article 101 of 
                        the United Nations Charter; and
                            (ii) is enforcing those contractual 
                        obligations requiring worldwide 
                        availability of all professional staff 
                        of the United Nations to serve and be 
                        relocated based on the needs of the 
                        United Nations.
                    (B) Code of conduct.--The General Assembly 
                has adopted, and the Secretary General has the 
                authority to enforce and is effectively 
                enforcing, a code of conduct binding on all 
                United Nations personnel, including the 
                requirement of financial disclosure statements 
                binding on senior United Nations personnel and 
                the establishment of rules against nepotism 
                that are binding on all United Nations 
                personnel.
                    (C) Personnel evaluation system.--The 
                United Nations has adopted and is enforcing a 
                personnel evaluation system.
                    (D) Periodic assessments.--The United 
                Nations has established and is implementing a 
                mechanism to conduct periodic assessments of 
                the United Nations payroll to determine total 
                staffing, and the results of such assessments 
                are reported in an unabridged form to the 
                General Assembly.
                    (E) Review of united nations allowance 
                system.--The United States has completed a 
                thorough review of the United Nations personnel 
                allowance system. The review shall include a 
                comparison of that system with the United 
                States civil service, and shall make 
                recommendations to reduce entitlements to 
                allowances and allowance funding levels from 
                the levels in effect on January 1, 1998.
            (8) Reduction in budget authorities.--The 
        designated specialized agencies have achieved a 
        negative growth budget in their biennium budgets for 
        2000-01 from the 1998-99 biennium budget levels of the 
        respective agencies.
            (9) New budget procedures and financial 
        regulations.--Each designated specialized agency has 
        established procedures to--
                    (A) require the maintenance of a budget 
                that does not exceed the level agreed to by the 
                member states of the organization at the 
                beginning of each budgetary biennium, unless 
                increases are agreed to by consensus;
                    (B) require the identification of 
                expenditures by functional categories such as 
                personnel, travel, and equipment; and
                    (C) require approval by the member states 
                of the agency's supplemental budget requests to 
                the Secretariat in advance of expenditures 
                under those requests.

                  CHAPTER 2--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

SEC. 2341. STATUTORY CONSTRUCTION ON RELATION TO EXISTING LAWS.

    Except as otherwise specifically provided, nothing in this 
title may be construed to make available funds in violation of 
any provision of law containing a specific prohibition or 
restriction on the use of the funds, including section 114 of 
the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 
and 1985 (22 U.S.C. 287e note) and section 151 of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (22 
U.S.C. 287e note), and section 404 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 287e 
note).

SEC. 2342. PROHIBITION ON PAYMENTS RELATING TO UNIDO AND OTHER 
                    INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS FROM WHICH THE UNITED 
                    STATES HAS WITHDRAWN OR RESCINDED FUNDING.

    None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this 
division shall be used to pay any arrearage for--
            (1) the United Nations Industrial Development 
        Organization;
            (2) any costs to merge that organization into the 
        United Nations;
            (3) the costs associated with any other 
        organization of the United Nations from which the 
        United States has withdrawn including the costs of the 
        merger of such organization into the United Nations; or
            (4) the World Tourism Organization, or any other 
        international organization with respect to which 
        Congress has rescinded funding.
    And the Senate agree to the same.

                For consideration of the House bill and the 
                Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
                to conference
                                   Benjamin A. Gilman,
                                   Henry Hyde,
                                   Christopher H. Smith,

                For consideration of the House bill (except 
                title XXI) and the Senate amendment, and 
                modifications committed to conference:
                                   William Goodling,
                                   Dan Burton,
                                   Doug Bereuter,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Jesse Helms,
                                   Paul Coverdell,
                                   Chuck Hagel,
                                   Rod Grams,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.
       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 1757) to 
consolidate international affairs agencies, to authorize 
appropriations for the Department of State and related agencies 
for fiscal years 1998 and 1999, and to ensure that the 
enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) 
proceeds in a manner consistent with United States interests, 
to strengthen relations between the United States and Russia, 
to preserve the prerogatives of the Congress with respect to 
certain arms control agreements, and for other purposes, submit 
the following joint statement to the House and the Senate in 
explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon by the 
managers and recommended in the accompanying conference report:

          Division A--Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring

                         USIA and Broadcasting

      Section 313 of the Senate bill provides for the creation 
of a new Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy. It 
should be noted that it is slightly different from the original 
Senate-passed bill (S. 903) in delineating the duties of this 
Under Secretary. Specifically, Section 313 provides that the 
Under Secretary will have primary responsibility for assisting 
the Secretary and Deputy Secretary in carrying out the public 
diplomacy function. Additionally, although the bill provides, 
as did the original Senate bill, that the new Under Secretary 
will have responsibility for assisting the Secretary and Deputy 
Secretary with regard to international broadcasting, the 
authorities of the Department of State with regard to 
broadcasting are limited. While the Secretary has a seat and 
vote on the Broadcasting Board of Governors, and she provides 
foreign policy guidance to the Board, neither she nor the Under 
Secretary will have specific supervisory powers over the 
international broadcasting function; those powers are vested in 
the Broadcasting Board of Governors, as explained below.
      Chapter 3 of Title III provides for the organization of 
all U.S.-sponsored international broadcasting. It is very 
similar to the original Senate bill (S. 903), with several 
modifications. The central element of this chapter is that the 
current Broadcasting Board of Governors--which supervises 
international broadcasting, but is currently part of the U.S. 
Information Agency--will remain in place, but it will not be 
merged into the Department of State. Instead, the Board will 
become an independent federal establishment.
      The Broadcasting Board of Governors was established by 
the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (Title 
III of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 
1994-1995, P.L. 103-236). In that Act, Congress consolidated 
all U.S.-sponsored international broadcasting--the Voice of 
America (VOA), Radio and TV Marti, Worldnet TV, Radio Free 
Europe/Radio Liberty (RFE/RL), and Radio Free Asia (RFA)--under 
the direction and supervision of one governing board. The Board 
is part of the United States Information Agency, although in 
essence it is a self-contained unit within the Agency.
      The bill does not alter the consolidation achieved in 
1994, but it does prevent the Board and the international 
broadcasting entities from being merged into the State 
Department, where the credibility and journalistic integrity of 
the broadcasters would be threatened. The rationale for 
creating this arms-length distance from the State Department is 
two-fold: (1) to provide ``deniability'' for the Department 
when foreign governments voice their complaints about specific 
broadcasts; and (2) to provide a ``firewall'' between the 
Department and the broadcasters to ensure the integrity of the 
journalism.
      Establishing this structure is not to deny that the 
broadcast entities are funded by the United States government--
quite obviously, they are. This structure in no way should be 
construed to lessen the responsibility of the Board to ensure 
that U.S. broadcasts are ``consistent with the broad foreign 
policy objectives of the United States,'' as required by 
Section 303(a)(1) of the 1994 Broadcasting Act. For example, 
this legislation states that the VOA should continue to include 
editorials which present the views of U.S. policy. But the 
concepts of ``deniability'' and ``firewall'' are not merely 
diplomatic fictions. In truth, the State Department will be 
able todeny responsibility for a specific broadcast--because it 
will have denied itself the ability to directly affect the content of 
any specific broadcast. It can do so because the ``firewall'' will have 
operational meaning. Whenever a foreign government complains to a U.S. 
diplomat that a broadcast is inconsistent with U.S. foreign policy 
objectives, that diplomat can plausibly deny that the broadcast is 
``not my department,'' and refer their counterpart to the Board. The 
Board, in turn, will exercise its oversight duties to investigate the 
matter, take steps to influence overall broadcast policy to ensure that 
broadcasts are consistent with broad foreign policy objectives of the 
United States, but the journalists themselves will be shielded from 
political interference by State Department officials.
      Of course, this bureaucratic separation does not mean 
that the broadcasters should remain aloof from U.S. foreign 
policy interests. Broadcasting is an important instrument of 
U.S. foreign policy, and should remain so. The broadcasting 
agencies would continue to serve the foreign policy needs of 
the U.S. government, and would be linked to the foreign affairs 
apparatus by what might be described as a ``dotted-line'' 
relationship to the State Department: (1) the Secretary of 
State would be a permanent voting member of the Board (as the 
USIA Director is now), would provide foreign policy guidance to 
the Board, and would be consulted about the addition or 
deletion of language services; (2) the VOA mission of telling 
America's story would remain intact, as would the VOA Charter; 
(3) the statutory requirements requiring that the broadcasts be 
consistent with the broad foreign policy objectives of the 
United States would remain intact; (4) the broadcasters would 
continue to have the capability to provide surge capacity to 
support broad U.S. foreign policy objectives during crises 
abroad.
      Although the Board will be a federal agency, the work 
performed by the international broadcasting entities under it 
can hardly be described as a typical government function. 
Cynics may deride their work as ``propaganda,'' but in fact the 
broadcasters are journalists, reporting the news of the United 
States and the world to foreign audiences. The news gathering 
and reporting functions of the broadcasters must continue to be 
independent and objective. The broadcasters themselves 
understand the importance of this imperative. It is no accident 
that VOA employees treasure the VOA Charter, which states that 
the VOA will ``serve as a consistently reliable and 
authoritative source of news'' and that VOA news will be 
``accurate, objective, and comprehensive.'' The employees do so 
because they take this command seriously. Similarly, the 
employees of the surrogate services--Radio and TV Marti, RFE/RL 
and RFA--are committed to the highest standards of professional 
journalism. Accuracy and credibility are their watchwords.
      This credibility would be at risk if the various 
broadcast services were placed inside the Department of State, 
where they would be perceived by foreign audiences as mere 
adjuncts of the Department, and where they would be subject to 
the daily pressures of diplomacy. But in establishing this 
structure, it is not intended that the broadcasters will become 
unmoored from the broad objectives of American policy.
      The provision in this bill also provides that the current 
Board members may complete their existing terms without being 
reappointed. Furthermore, they may be appointed to new terms 
when those terms expire.
      It should be noted here that the bill does not include 
the original Senate proposal to create a separate Inspector 
General for broadcasting within the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors.Instead, that function will continue to be performed 
by the Inspector General of the Department of State. The bill states, 
however, that the Inspector General shall respect the journalistic 
integrity of all broadcasters covered by this title, and may not 
evaluate the philosophical or political perspectives reflected in the 
content of broadcasts. The Inspector General must take great care in 
reviewing broadcast operations, for, as noted earlier, international 
broadcasting is not a typical government function. The broadcasters are 
journalists, and the Inspector General must not be involved in second-
guessing the daily decisions of journalists and their editors. To do so 
could have a chilling effect on the activities of the journalists. The 
Inspector General is currently conducting a review of the Cuba services 
of the Voice of America, known as Radio and TV Marti. She contends that 
this review is limited to analyzing whether the Martis have a process 
in place for assuring that broadcasts are consistent with broad U.S. 
foreign policy objectives. This provision is intended to ensure that 
any content review not cross this line drawn by the Inspector General.
      In establishing the Broadcasting Board of Governors as an 
independent agency in the executive branch, several changes to 
existing law were made--and new authorities were provided to 
the Board. A few of these changes are highlighted below:
      Section 323(d) amends the ``standards and principles'' 
section of the 1994 Broadcasting Act in two respects. First, it 
makes clear that U.S. international broadcasting should include 
editorials broadcast by the Voice of America which present the 
views of the U.S. government (only the VOA performs this 
function). This provision and this title are not intended to 
change in any manner the current process for ensuring that 
editorials are consistent with U.S. policy. Second, this 
section states that international broadcasting should have the 
capability to provide surge capacity to support U.S. foreign 
policy objectives during crises abroad.
      Sections 323(e) and 323(f) make several amendments to the 
authorities of the Board, which are set forth in Section 305 of 
the 1994 Broadcasting Act. First, it amends the statute to 
provide that the Board has the power to ``supervise'' all 
broadcasting activities; current law gives the Board the power 
to ``direct and supervise.'' This change is intended to clarify 
any confusion that may have been caused by the use of the word 
``direct''. The word ``direct'' implies day-to-day management 
responsibilities, a function that is incongruous with a part-
time oversight board. The daily operations of the broadcasters 
are conducted by the Director of the International Broadcasting 
Bureau, and the presidents of the respective grantees (RFE/RL 
and RFA), operating under the supervision of the Board.
      Second, the bill requires the Board to consult with the 
Secretary of State in making its determinations on the addition 
or deletion of language services. This change is not intended 
to give the Secretary veto power over such decisions; at the 
end of the day, she has but one vote on the Board. The 
amendment does recognize, however, that the addition or 
deletion of language services has foreign policy implications, 
and that the Board should give careful consideration to the 
Secretary's views on such matters.
      Third, the bill provides the Board with several 
additional legal authorities that are necessary for it to 
function as a separate federal agency. These are intended to 
ensure that the Board and the Director of the International 
Broadcasting Bureau have, for the purposes of carrying out 
their respective duties, all the authorities which are now 
available to the Director of the U.S. Information Agency on the 
day before the effective date of this division. It is 
intendedthat the Board and the Bureau be enabled thereby to operate 
utilizing the full range of the Director's administrative, technical, 
contracting, personnel, and all other authorities, including 
acquisition and disposal of international broadcasting facilities 
abroad, liberally interpreted, to carry out their functions.
      Fourth, the bill provides the Board with the authority to 
procure, pursuant to the ``Economy Act,'' goods and services 
from other federal departments and agencies. In keeping the 
Board and the Bureau outside the State Department, it is not 
intended that these entities will grow significantly. The 
Bureau will likely need additional personnel to carry out 
certain administrative tasks now performed by the 
administrative offices of USIA. But some of these routine 
functions may just as easily--and perhaps more efficiently--be 
performed by existing federal agencies.
      Finally, the bill provides authority for the Board to 
delegate certain authorities to the Director of the 
International Broadcasting Bureau, and any other officer or 
employee of the United States. It bears emphasis here that the 
Board need not do so, for the Board has a small professional 
staff which assists it to carry out its statutory functions; 
the provision simply provides the Board with the option to 
delegate certain authorities.
      Section 323(j) of the bill makes two changes to current 
law with regard to the role of the Secretary of State. First, 
the bill amends current law to make clear that the Secretary's 
authority to provide foreign policy guidance to the Board may 
be exercised at her discretion.
      Second, it authorizes the Secretary of State to use 
Worldnet broadcasts, on a non-reimbursable basis, for the 
purposes of continuing interactive dialogues with foreign media 
and other similar overseas public diplomacy programs sponsored 
by the State Department. ``Interactive dialogue'' is a term of 
art, which describes, in essence, press conferences between a 
U.S. policy maker (sitting in a studio in Washington), and 
foreign journalists (sitting in a U.S. Information Service post 
or other facility overseas). This is a public diplomacy 
function that should be under the policy control of the State 
Department after the integration of USIA into the Department. 
Most other Worldnet programs are, by contrast, the type of 
traditional broadcasting carried out by the VOA; for example, 
the VOA has recently commenced simulcasts of its radio programs 
on television. The Broadcasting Board of Governors and USIA 
have already reached a cooperative agreement regarding Worldnet 
(which was submitted recently to the Foreign Relations 
Committee in the form of a reprogramming) that is similar to 
the design set forth in the bill. It is intended that this 
arrangement continue when USIA is merged into the State 
Department, with the Board making available appropriate 
broadcasting time slots to the State Department to continue 
this important program. This provision is not intended to limit 
the access the Secretary currently has to Worldnet for other 
purposes, such as the current practice of using this service to 
broadcast from time to time to employees located at U.S. 
missions abroad.
      Section 326 contains specific authority for the transfer 
of appropriate USIA assets and personnel to the Broadcasting 
Board of Governors. This includes those assets and personnel 
employed in connection with, or to carry out, the functions 
transferred by this chapter to the Board. It also includes 
provisions which will permit the transfer of assets and 
personnel which support the functions transferred by this 
chapter. These latter determinations will be made by the 
Secretary of State, with the concurrence of the Broadcasting 
Board of Governors. It is intended that the Broadcasting Board 
of Governors should receive administrative support funds 
andpersonnel commensurate with the administrative support it now 
receives from the U.S. Information Agency.

                              Smith-Mundt

      Section 333 addresses the complex question of how to 
apply restrictions in current law on USIA to influence public 
opinion in the United States once USIA is integrated into the 
Department of State. The Department has a responsibility to 
communicate with the American people on U.S. foreign policy, 
for example, to explain the importance of continuing U.S. 
involvement in international affairs. Subsection (a) makes 
clear that none of the restrictions applicable to USIA shall 
become applicable to public affairs and other information 
dissemination functions of the Secretary of State as carried 
out prior to any transfer of functions pursuant to this 
division. Subsection (b) provides that existing restrictions 
will, however, continue to apply to USIA public diplomacy 
programs (which are carried out abroad) once they are 
integrated into the State Department. This subsection preserves 
the exceptions in current law. Under this approach, public 
diplomacy programs that are unique to USIA, including the 
program material produced by them, shall continue to be subject 
to the restrictions of the Zorinsky Amendment and in the Smith-
Mundt Act, as relevant. At the same time, the Department of 
State will be able to integrate the activities that it already 
performs, such as public outreach, direct public affairs 
contact with domestic and foreign press, and administrative 
activities, with such activities of the other foreign affairs 
agencies without these restrictions being applicable.
      In addition, subsection (c) provides that funds that are 
specifically authorized in statute for such public diplomacy 
programs at the Department in the future shall not be used to 
influence public opinion in the United States, and that no 
program material prepared using such funds shall be distributed 
or disseminated in the United States. This provision makes 
clear that if an amount is specifically authorized in an 
authorization bill for such public diplomacy programs, such 
amount will be subject to these restrictions.
      Subsections (d) and (e) create greater planning and 
budget transparency for how public diplomacy functions are 
integrated into the Department.

                 Authority to reorganize the Department

      Section 611(a) authorizes the Secretary, subject to the 
requirements of the subdivision, to allocate or reallocate any 
function transferred to the Department, and to establish, 
consolidate, alter, or discontinue such organizational entities 
within the Department as may be necessary or appropriate to 
carry out any reorganization under this subdivision. This 
subsection does not authorize the Secretary to modify the terms 
of any statute that establishes or defines the functions of any 
bureau, office or officer of the Department. Thus, while the 
Secretary could add functions and responsibilities to a bureau 
that is mandated under current law, she could not eliminate 
such a bureau or take away any responsibilities currently 
mandated by statute to be performed by that bureau.

                         Transfer of Personnel

      Section 613 of the Senate bill provides in subsections 
(a) and (b) that except as provided in Title III, not later 
than the date of abolition of ACDA and USIA, or the transfer of 
any function of AID to the Department of State, affected 
personnel and positions of those agencies shall be transferred 
to the Department of State at their same grade or class, the 
same rate of basic pay or basic salary rate, and with the same 
tenure held immediately preceding transfer. Thus,members of the 
Foreign Service will transfer to the Department in the same Foreign 
Service class (or, in the case of Foreign Service nationals, at the 
same grade), at the same salary rate, and with the same tenure held 
prior to transfer. Civil Service employees transferred to the 
Department will transfer at the same Civil Service grade, at the same 
rate of basic pay, and with the same tenure held prior to transfer. 
Tenure, in this context, refers to the employment status of the 
employee (e.g., probationary, career conditional, or career tenure). 
This provision is also intended to ensure that the type of appointment 
(e.g., Civil Service competitive or excepted service appointment, or 
Foreign Service career or limited appointment) held immediately 
preceding transfer will remain unchanged by reason of the transfer.
      Subsection (c) authorizes the Secretary, for a period of 
not more than six months commencing on the effective date of 
the transfer of personnel to the Department under subsections 
(a) and (b), to assign such personnel to any position or set of 
duties at any grade in the Department except that by virtue of 
such assignment, such personnel shall not have their grade or 
class or rate of basic pay or basic salary rate reduced, nor 
their tenure changed. Although the Secretary's authority to 
make assignments under this subsection is limited to a six-
month period following transfer, the duration of any assignment 
made pursuant to this authority and the retention of grade may 
continue indefinitely, as long as the employee remains in a 
position to which s/he is assigned during the six month period. 
This provision will overcome any requirement for the Department 
of State involuntarily to demote or reassign personnel at the 
end of the six-month period, even though the number of 
employees who retain a particular grade may exceed the number 
of positions at that grade level. This provision does not, 
however, provide Civil Service personnel with a guaranteed 
grade if, for example, they apply for and obtain another 
position or the Department chooses to employ reduction in force 
procedures to reduce the number of Department employees. The 
Secretary shall consult with the relevant labor organizations 
with regard to the exercise of this authority. This subsection 
gives the Secretary the flexibility to assign and reassign for 
a six month period transferred personnel to any position within 
the Department after they have been transferred to the 
Department, except to positions that by law require appointment 
by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate.

         Reorganization of Agency for International Development

      The bill requires that AID's Press Office and certain 
administrative functions be transferred to and consolidated 
with the Department of State. The committee of conference is 
aware that the Department of State and the Agency for 
International Development recently entered into an agreement to 
implement the President's April 1997 decision that these two 
agencies should share certain administrative functions.
      The single largest change will occur overseas as the 
International Cooperative Administrative Support Services 
(ICASS) system is put into place. ICASS is designed to provide 
AID with the data and other information needed to compare the 
costs of services within the system that encourages the use of 
the most economic service provider. Both agencies will, over 
the next fiscal year, work to maximize shared administrative 
support services. As part of this agreement, both agencies 
agree to analyze jointly the data generated by ICASS to 
identify opportunities where one or the other agency can expand 
shared services.
      Also, AID had agreed already to have the Department of 
State provide retirement processing for Foreign Service 
officers, retirement counseling for AID officers, and site 
consolidation of AIDheadquarters' computer operations. 
According to the Administration, these are either now implemented or on 
their way to implementation.
      Further, AID has agreed to expand its use of training 
services offered by the Department of State. Specifically, AID 
will attempt to obtain all of its foreign language training 
from the Department of State. In addition, State and AID have 
agreed to jointly develop training programs so that other 
professional and technical training can be shared to the 
maximum extent possible.
      The Department of State has agreed to try to accommodate 
AID by taking responsibility for storage of employees' 
household goods. In addition, State and AID already share other 
transportation and storage services, and they will continue to 
review these areas for other opportunities. The committee of 
conference expects AID and the State Department to continue to 
explore areas in which additional consolidation and cost 
savings can occur and that the Foreign Relations Committee and 
the International Relations Committee will be notified of such 
progress.

             Assistance programs coordination and oversight

      The bill provides for the coordination of activities of 
the Secretary of State in relation to United States assistance. 
The activities include designing of an overall assistance 
strategy for countries in the region; ensuring the coordination 
of United States government agencies; coordinating with the 
individual country governments and international organizations; 
and resolving policy disputes among United States government 
agencies with respect to assistance being provided.
      This coordination authority does not supersede the 
responsibility of the Secretary of Commerce in relation to the 
promotion of exports of United States goods and services. Nor 
does this supersede the responsibility of the Secretary of the 
Treasury to coordinate the activities of the United States in 
relation to the International Financial Institutions, and the 
organization of multilateral efforts aimed at currency 
stabilization, currency convertibility, debt reduction, and 
comprehensive economic reform programs.
      This section of the bill is essential to bring improved 
coordination and rationalization to U.S. overseas economic and 
development assistance programs. The establishment within the 
Department of State of this coordination function will ensure 
that, in the future, foreign aid programs are being carried out 
in a manner consistent with our nations overall foreign policy. 
It furthers the President's goal of establishing the Secretary 
of State's pre-eminence in foreign policy making. According to 
the State Department's April 17, 1997, statement regarding 
reorganization, one reform ``. . . would be to further improve 
coordination between AID's and State's regional Bureaus.'' This 
section supports that objective.

 A.I.D. under the Direct Authority and Foreign Policy Guidance of the 
                           Secretary of State

      The President's decision on reorganization retains the 
Agency for International Development as a distinct agency but 
places it under the direct authority and foreign policy 
guidance of the Secretary of State. This bill supports that 
objective.
      This bill includes a section which provides that funds 
formerly allocated to the International Development Cooperation 
Agency (IDCA)--which is abolished by this legislation--now be 
allocated to the Secretary of State. The bill provides that the 
Secretary of State may allocate ortransfer these funds to the 
head of any other agency. It is the understanding of the committee of 
conference that Secretary Albright intends to allocate this foreign aid 
and the administrative funds currently apportioned to AID to its 
Administrator. Bringing AID under the direct authority and foreign 
policy guidance of the Secretary of State, will strengthen the U.S. 
Government's coordination of long term development and humanitarian 
assistance.

                 Authority to Transfer Functions Early

      Section 616 provides that the Secretary may, 
notwithstanding any provision of this subdivision and with the 
concurrence of the head of the appropriate Federal Agency, 
transfer the whole or part of any function prior to the 
effective dates established in this subdivision, including the 
transfer of personnel and funds associated with such functions. 
In exercising this authority, personnel and funds would be 
transferred in accordance with the applicable provisions of 
Title VI. This provision is intended to permit the 
Administration to have an orderly transfer of functions if the 
Administration chooses to transfer some functions from an 
agency prior to its abolition. It is intended that the 
Secretary will consult with the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
if she exercises the authority of this section to transfer 
personnel or assets that might otherwise be used to provide 
administrative support for the Board when it becomes a separate 
federal establishment.

  Division B--State Department and Related Agencies Authorization Act

      Authorization of Appropriations for the Department of State

      The conference substitute authorizes a total of 
$6,140,895,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $6,664,093,000 for 
fiscal 1999. The President's request for FY 1999 is 
$6,789,259,000. The conference substitute follows the Senate 
format providing the authorization of appropriations in the 
specific sections of the bill.

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

      The House bill (sec. 1101) authorizes $2,610,271,000 for 
fiscal year 1998 and $2,610,271,000 for fiscal year 1999 for 
the Administration of Foreign Affairs. The House bill (sec. 
1101(1)(B)) requires the Secretary of State to provide passport 
information without charge to citizens of the U.S.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1101) authorizes for 
$2,609,661,000 fiscal year 1998 and $2,634,706,000 for fiscal 
year 1999 for the Administration of Foreign Affairs. The Senate 
amendment has no comparable provision to House sec. 1101(1)(B) 
on passport information.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1101) authorizes 
$2,656,143,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $2,830,387,000 for 
fiscal year 1999 for the Administration of Foreign Affairs. The 
conference substitute is the same as the Senate amendment with 
regard to the passport information provision.
      The recommended level of authorization for Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs is intended to be utilized to maintain a 
strong U.S. presence abroad, and to meet current unfunded 
needs, including security of personnel and overseas U.S. 
facilities, and does not include funding for new programs, not 
presently funded for environmental conferences, programs, and 
associated expanded staffing.
      The conference substitute incorporates the sub-
authorization of $2,000,000 for fiscal years1998 and 1999 for 
recruitment of minorities for careers in the foreign Service.

                       International Commissions

      The House bill (sec. 1103) authorizes $43,512,000 for 
fiscal year 1998 and $43,512,000 for fiscal year 1999 for the 
International Commissions.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1202) authorizes $43,512,000 
for fiscal year 1998 and $43,512,000 for fiscal year 1999 for 
the International Commissions.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1102) authorizes 
$42,452,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $45,120,000 for fiscal 
year 1999 for the International Commissions.

                            Asia Foundation

      The House bill (sec. 1105) authorizes $10,000,000 for 
fiscal year 1998 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 for the 
Asia Foundation.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1103) authorizes $8,000,000 
fiscal year 1998 and $8,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 for the 
Asia Foundation.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1103) authorizes 
$10,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $10,000,000 for fiscal 
year 1999 for the Asia Foundation.

                        Voluntary Contributions

      The House bill (sec. 1102(b)) authorizes $199,725,000 for 
fiscal year 1988 and $199,725,000 for fiscal year 1999 for 
voluntary contributions to international organizations. The 
provision also includes limitations for the World Food Program, 
the United Nations Voluntary Fund for victims of Torture, and 
International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1104) is the same as the 
House bill, except it authorizes $294,500,000 for fiscal year 
1988 and $294,500,000 for fiscal year 1999.

    Voluntary Contributions to International Peacekeeping Operations

      The House bill (sec. 1102(d)) authorizes $87,600,000 in 
fiscal year 1988 and $67,000,000 in fiscal year 1999 for 
voluntary contributions to peacekeeping operations.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1105) authorizes 
$77,500,000 in fiscal year 1988 and $68,000,000 in fiscal year 
1999 for voluntary contributions to peacekeeping operations.

        Limitations on U.S. Voluntary Contributions to the UNDP

      The House bill (sec. 1102(g)) requires the withholding 
from U.S. voluntary contributions to the UN Development Program 
an amount equal to the amount UNDP intends to spend in Burma 
during each of the fiscal years 1998 and 1999, unless the 
President certifies to Congress that UNDP programs in Burma are 
focused on eliminating human sufffering and other issues.
      The Senate amendment contains no comparable provision.
      The conference subsititute (sec. 1106) is the same as the 
House bill.

                           UN Population Fund

      The House (1523) House bill section 1523 UN Population 
Fund, authorizes $25 million for the UN Population Fund for 
fiscal years 1998 and 1999, but makes only $12.5 million 
available to UNFPA before March 1 of each fiscal year. It also 
contains other prohibitions.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1107) is similar to the 
House bill, but deletes subsections (b), (c) and (d).


             Department of State Authorities and Activities

                    Overseas Educational Facilities

      The House bill (sec. 1213) provides the authority for US 
government agencies to make grants to overseas educational 
facilities. This amendment allows agencies that may not have 
grant authority to make grants to support these schools if 
agency employees have children attending these schools.
      The Senate provision (sec. 1136) is identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1201) is identical to the 
House provision.

            Revision of Department of State rewards program

      The House bill (sec. 1201(a)) rewrites the State 
Department rewards statute to update the program and improve 
its use as a tool to help capture fugitives abroad in cases of 
terrorism and narcotics offenses. The following changes are 
made to current law: (1) raising the cap on the funds available 
for the rewards program; (2) requiring that, to the maximum 
extent possible, the program funds are split equally between 
terrorism and narcotics related rewards programs; (3) allowing 
rewards to be paid for help in preventing counterfeiting of 
U.S. currency by state sponsors and others supporting 
terrorism; (4) allowing rewards to be paid for help in 
arresting any individual who aids or abets in the commission of 
any narcotics-related offense; (5) deleting the requirement for 
consultation over procedures for the chiefs' of mission 
recommendations of rewards the Secretary of State and the 
Attorney General; (6) requiring an annual report on the rewards 
program and; (7) making clear that the funds authorized for the 
rewards program are available to advertise rewards offered by 
foreign governments for international terrorism offenses. The 
Secretary is also required to submit a report to Congress when 
a reward payment is made.
      The House bill also clarifies that determinations by the 
Secretary of State regarding counter terrorism and narcotics-
related rewards are solely at the discretion of the Secretary, 
in consultation, as appropriate, with the Attorney General and 
are not subject to judicial review. This language conforms the 
State Department rewards program to similar provisions in 
various statutes that provide the reward authorities of the 
Attorney General, including those related to domestic 
terrorism. This language is intended to preclude unnecessary 
lawsuits that could divert Department resources, as well as 
bring unwarranted negative publicity to the rewards program and 
discourage potential informers.
      The House bill (sec. 1201(b)) makes available to carry 
out the rewards program up to two percent of the foreign assets 
frozen by of the President under the International Emergency 
Economic Powers Act. This section also clarifies that 
determinations by the Secretary of State regarding counter 
terrorism and narcotics-related rewards are solely at the 
discretion of the Secretary, in consultation as appropriate 
with the Attorney General and are not subject to judicial 
review.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1125) similar to the House 
provision, amends section 36 of the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956 to make clear that terrorism rewards 
would be paid at the sole discretion of the Secretary of State 
and that reward determinations made by the Secretary would not 
be subject to judicial review.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1202) adopts the House 
language with modifications. The conference substitute requires 
that before making a reward in a matter over which there is 
federal criminal jurisdiction, the Secretary of State shall 
obtain the concurrence of the Attorney General. The House 
provision required ``consultation'' with the Attorney General. 
The conference substitutealso deletes the House section 
requiring the use of frozen foreign assets for the rewards program.

    Retention of additional defense trade controls registration fees

      The House bill (sec. 1208) amends section 45(a) of the 
State Department Basic Authorities Act to enable the Department 
to retain all of the registration fees that the Department's 
office of Defense Trade Controls collects. The additional fees 
are to be used for enhanced reporting on end-use monitoring and 
expanded registration and licensing and company audits.
      The Senate amendment contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1203) is the same as the 
House bill.

                      Fees for commercial services

      The House bill (sec. 1211) allows fees collected for 
commercial services provided to businesses to remain available 
for obligation until expended. This authority will ensure the 
Department does not forfeit funds collected late in a fiscal 
year and that are not obligated by the end of that year.
      The Senate amendment contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1204) is similar to the 
House position but makes the collected funds available only for 
two fiscal years.

            Pilot program for foreign affairs reimbursement

      The House bill (sec. 1209) amends section 701 of the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980 by adding a new subsection to allow 
the State Department to provide training for employees and 
their family members of the U.S. companies operating overseas 
on a reimbursable basis. In addition, this section allows the 
Department to provide foreign language training on a 
reimbursable basis to Members and employees of Congress. 
Section 1209(b) authorizes the Secretary of State to charge a 
fee for use of the National Foreign Affairs Training Center 
Facility. These fees shall be deposited as an offsetting 
collection to any State Department appropriations and shall 
remain available until expended. Fees set for renting these 
facilities should not provide a competitive advantage over 
other commercial facilities.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1135) is similar to the House 
bill except the training program is set up as a pilot project 
that terminates October 1, 1999. The provision also requires an 
assessment of the program within one year after enactment.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1205) is similar to the 
Senate amendment. Changes include extending the pilot program 
to October 2002, and requiring the report two years after 
enactment.

               Fee for use of diplomatic reception rooms

      The House bill (sec. 1210) authorizes the Secretary of 
State to charge a fee for use of the Department of State 
diplomatic reception rooms. Such fees are deposited as an 
offsetting collection to recover the costs of such use and 
shall remain available for obligation until expended.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1124) is identical to the 
House bill.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1206) is the same as the 
House bill.

                     Budget presentation documents

      The House bill (sec. 1212) requires the State Department 
to report in the budget presentation documents all sources of 
income from fees or other collections.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1207) is the same as the 
House bill. This Act provides several additional new fee 
collections for the Department, as well as continuing the 
collection and retention of fees for machine readable visas. 
This provision is designed to secure budget transparency 
particularly for funds that are not subject to appropriations, 
and provide a full accounting of resources available to the 
Department. The report on income required by this provision is 
intended to include an accounting of proceeds from the sale of 
properties owned by the Department, projected expenditures from 
and the balance in the Foreign Service Building Fund for long 
term capital reinvestment.

                    Office of the Inspector General

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1126) amends Section 209 of 
the Foreign Service Act of 1980 to require the State Department 
Inspector General (IG) to provide (1) information to employees 
on rights to counsel, and (2) guidelines describing in general 
terms IG policies and procedures with respect to individuals 
under investigation, other than matters exempt from disclosure 
under other provisions of law.
      The House bill contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1208) maintains the 
Senate language and further amends Section 209 of the Foreign 
Service Act to require that only officials from the Office of 
the Inspector General may participate in formal interviews or 
other formal meetings with the individual who is the subject of 
an investigation unless that individual receives prior adequate 
notice regarding the participation of any other person, 
including any officer or employee of the Department of Justice, 
in such interview or meeting. The notice requirement does not 
apply to (1) any intelligence-related or sensitive undercover 
investigation; or (2) any situation in which the Inspector 
General has reasonable grounds to believe that the provision of 
notice would cause tampering with any witness, the destruction 
of evidence, or the endangering of the life of any individual.

                        Capital Investment Fund

      The House bill (sec. 1202) amends section 135 of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 
to allow the Capital Investment Fund to be used for the 
procurement and upgrade of information technology and other 
related capital investments of the department of State. Sec. 
135(e) eliminates the requirement that subjects money in the 
fund to Congressional reprogramming requirements before it is 
obligated.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1209) is identical to the 
House bill.

             Contracting for Local Guard Services Overseas

      The House bill (sec. 1204) amends section 136 of PL 101-
246 by repealing subsection (c)(7)and replacing (c)(3) with a 
more efficient process for evaluating requests for proposals for 
contracts for the local guard program. These changes continue a 
preference for firms and joint ventures qualifying under an existing 
definition of a U.S. person.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1210) is similar to the 
House bill, with a change to the price preference system. The 
price preference which is used to reduce the price of US firms' 
contracts, was increased from five percent to ten percent.

         Authority of the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission

      The House bill (sec. 1205) amends section 4 of the 
International Claims Settlement Act to permit the Foreign 
Claims Settlement Commission to preadjudicate claims by U.S. 
citizens. Preadjudication would provide the Department with 
important information on the value and validity of claims by 
the U.S. public in advance of the negotiations and conclusion 
of an agreement. The Committee understands that in the event of 
preadjudication, the Secretary of State will make every effort 
to inform affected people.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1122) amends section 4 of the 
International Claims Settlement Act to permit the Foreign 
Claims Settlement Commission to preadjudicate claims by the US 
citizens in a category determined by the Secretary of State. 
Currently the Commission only has general authority to 
adjudicate claims after settlement has been reached by the 
Department with a foreign government. This section is designed 
to facilitate claims settlement practices by providing a 
mechanism for obtaining further information from US citizens 
about their claims in advance of actual negotiation.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1211) is identical to the 
Senate amendment.

   Expenses relating to certain international claims and proceedings

      The House bill (sec. 1206) allows the Department to 
accept in certain cases reimbursement from private sector 
claimants for tribunal expenses, salaries and ordinary 
expenses. The intent of this provision is to allow the 
Department to accept reimbursement from claimants who would 
normally pay for the legal expenses of pursuing a claim.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1212) is similar to the 
House bill, with a clarification that eligible expenses include 
salaries and personnel expenses.

         Grants to Remedy International Abductions of Children

      The House bill (sec. 1214) amends section 7 of the 
International Child Abduction Remedies Act to allow the U.S. 
Central Authority to make grants or enter into contracts or 
agreements for the purposes of carrying out certain functions 
required by the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of 
International Child Abduction.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1137) is identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1213) is identical to the 
House bill.

    Counterdrug and Anticrime activities of the Department of State

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1128(a)) requires that not 
later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall establish, implement, and submit 
to Congress a comprehensive, long-term strategy, involving all 
elements of the Department, to carry out State Department 
counterdrug responsibilities in a manner consistent with the 
National Drug Control Strategy (``National Strategy'').
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1214) adopts the Senate 
approach with several modifications: (1) the strategy shall 
also ensure that the President's drug certification 
determinations conform to meet the objectives of the strategy; 
(2) the annual reports shall include a detailed analysis of how 
drug certification determinations made the previous year 
affected achievement of such objectives for the previous 
calendar year; (3) the required coordination of counterdrug and 
law enforcement programs, policy and assistance shall include 
coordination of rule of law and administration of justice 
enforcement programs, policy and assistance; and (4) the 
section clarifies that such coordination will be consistent 
with memoranda of understanding between the State Department 
and other United States agencies.

              Annual report on overseas surplus properties

      The House bill (sec. 1216) requires the Secretary of 
State to report annually on the list of overseas surplus 
properties for sale. In addition, the provision requires that 
proceeds for the sale of U.S. overseas surplus properties be 
deposited in the Treasury to be used for deficit reduction.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1215) requires an annual 
report on the surplus properties identified for sale.

                          Human rights reports

      The House bill (sec. 1704) makes two changes to the 
requirement for the annual country reports on Human Rights 
Practices. First, the reporting date is extended from January 
31 to February 25. Second, the section requires that the report 
include information on child labor practices in each country 
the report covers.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1216) is identical to the 
House bill.

           Reports and Policy concerning diplomatic immunity

      The House bill (sec. 1215 and 1706) requires the 
Secretary of State to submit to Congress an annual report on 
cases involving diplomatic immunity.
      A related provision, section 1215 of the House bill 
amends the State Department Basic Authorities Act, requiring 
reporting similar to that required under section 1706 of the 
House bill. It also requires the Secretary to take ``such steps 
as may be necessary'' to educate and encourage local law 
enforcement officials to investigate, charge and prosecute 
members of foreign missions to the extent consistent with 
international law. Section 1215 forbids ``interference'' by 
State Department officers in the investigation, charge, or 
prosecution of aliens not exempt from the criminal 
jurisdictionof the United States and requires notification by the 
Secretary to members of diplomatic missions about United States 
policies relative to criminal offenses committed by members of the 
diplomatic corps.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision to House 
bill section 1215, and Senate section 1610 is identical to 
section 1706 of the House bill.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1217) is a modification 
and consolidation of sections 1215 and 1706 of the House bill. 
The conference substitute adds several provisions drawn from 
Section 1215 of the House bill, such as broadening the 
definition of ``serious crime'' (triggering reports to 
Congress) to include reckless driving and driving while 
intoxicated or under the influence of drugs or alcohol whether 
or not personal injury resulted, requiring the provision of 
information furnished to the Secretary on crimes that appear to 
have been committed by a person with diplomatic immunity in 
periods prior to the period covered by a particular report by 
the Secretary (so that readers of the report will be aware if 
there is a pattern of violations attributable to a particular 
person), and encouraging the Secretary to notify diplomatic 
missions of United States policies encouraging the prosecution 
of members of foreign missions who commit crimes.
      The conference substitute provides Congressional impetus 
for restructuring a troubling aspect of international practice 
with respect to diplomatic immunity: the prospect that an 
individual who commits a serious offense will escape all 
liability because of his or her status as a diplomat. A number 
of highly publicized, and indeed tragic, cases have occurred in 
recent years. The fact is that while cases of diplomats abusing 
their immunity in the United States are relatively rare, the 
number of such cases needs to be reduced, if possible, to zero.
      Diplomatic immunity serves the interests of the United 
States. The United States cannot have its diplomats exposed to 
the full rigor of the criminal laws of the countries where they 
are stationed, since they could be subject to trumped-up 
charges, unfair treatment in court, or inhumane punishments.
      The committee of conference applaud governments, such as 
the government of the Republic of Georgia, which have waived 
the immunity of their diplomats accused of serious crimes. They 
suggest that in the exceedingly rare cases where American 
officials apparently abuse their status--and do so in countries 
where they would be prosecuted on an equal footing with local 
residents and can receive a fair trial and humane treatment if 
convicted--the Department consider waiving the immunity of the 
Americans in question.
      The committee of conference also supports the 
Administration's practice of notifying prosecutors that they 
may charge diplomats whose immunity has not been waived and who 
have been withdrawn from or expelled from the United States. 
Such abusers of diplomatic immunity are then put on the 
Department's ``watch list'' and are denied visas; they may also 
be subject to extradition if they travel to third countries 
where they are not covered by diplomatic immunity.

   Reaffirming United States International Telecommunications Policy

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1127) clarifies that the 
Diplomatic Telecommunications Service Program Office will have 
full and open competition in the procurement of 
telecommunications services; will make efforts to promote the 
participation of all commercial private sector providers; and 
will implement these requirements at the prime contracting 
level and at the subcontracting level unless the fixed price 
contracts make it more costly to require a prime contractor to 
compete subcontracts.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1218) is identical to the 
Senate amendment.
      Concerns about DTSPO continue as certain users have 
decided to utilize other systems to meet their overseas 
communications needs. DTS was unable to meet agency 
requirements in a timely fashion. Developing a cost sharing 
system to increase resources for DTS for post communications 
upgrades and maintenance should be priority. The committee of 
conference urges the Office of Management and Budget to 
promptly finalize a charge back system thereby enhancing DTS's 
capabilities to coordinate overseas communications structures 
and provide the services for which it was created.

                         Reduction of Reporting

      The House bill (sec. 1203) eliminates several reporting 
requirements. This provision has been requested by the 
Administration.
      The Senate (Sec. 1121) eliminates several reporting 
requirements as follows: Repeals section 161(c), second 
sentence, 22 U.S.C. 4171 note, on required reports on 
competency of foreign language experts at embassies. Repeals 
Section 502B(b), 22 U.S.C. 2304(b), on required reports on 
human rights in countries that receive security assistance. 
Repeals Section 705(c), P.L. 99-83, on required reports on 
emigration from Haiti. Repeals Section 123(e)(2), P.L. 99-93, 
on required reports on Operation, Maintenance, Security, 
Alteration, Repair of Foreign Service facilities. Repeals 
Section 203(c), P.L. 99-529, on required reports on military 
training and other nonlethal assistance for Haiti. Repeals 
Sections 5 and 6, P.L. 96-236; 7 U.S.C. 3605 and 3606, on 
required reports on implementation of the sugar agreement. 
Repeals Section 514, P.L. 97-121, the Foreign Assistance and 
Related Programs Appropriations Act, a one time report on 
appropriations. Repeals Section 209 (c) and (d), P.L. 100-204, 
on required reports on audience survey of Worldnet program and 
notification of selected surveyor. Repeals Section 228(b), P.L. 
102-138; 22 U.S.C. 2452 note, on required reports on Near and 
Middle East research and training.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1219) is similar to the 
Senate amendment and eliminates seven reports and modifies two 
reporting requirements. The provision does not repeal Section 
502(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2304(b)) and Section 514 of the Foreign Assistance and Related 
Programs Appropriations Act, 1982 (PL 97-121).

 Use of Certain Passport Processing Fees for Enhanced Passport Services

      The House bill (sec. 1241) requires that thirty percent 
of the funds generated by the expedited passport fee (estimated 
to be $18 million in fiscal year 1998) be dedicated exclusively 
to enhancing passport services for U.S. citizens, improving the 
system of issuing the passport, developing a more secure 
document and increasing U.S. border security.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1221) is identical to the 
House bill.
      The Committee of conference is alarmed by recent 
revelations that the State Department does not maintain a data 
base on lost or stolen U.S. passports. These U.S. passports are 
the frequent document of choice for international travel by 
drug traffickers, other criminals, and terrorists who may 
target U.S. interests. The timely identification of lost or 
stolen documents for law enforcement purposes is critical to 
protecting our national security.
      In addition, the committee of conference is aware that on 
weekends there is no Departmentalprocedure or mechanism to 
access the passport issuance records maintained by the Consular Affairs 
Bureau. The result is that when a foreign law enforcement authority 
inquires about the status of a person or passport on the weekend, the 
State Department does not or cannot respond. This is a clear deficiency 
in border security procedures. The two identified shortcomings limit 
the U.S. government's responses to foreign police security inquires at 
airports and often makes it impossible for such authorities to prevent 
travel by possible criminals and terrorists who may use lost or stolen 
U.S. travel documents.
      The Department shall provide a report within 180 days of 
enactment on the Department's efforts to rectify weekend access 
to passport data, and establishing a data base for lost or 
stolen passports. The committee of conference urges that the 
Consular Affairs Bureau work expeditiously with the Diplomatic 
Security Bureau to establish a weekend access program to 
records now available on U.S. passports.

        Surcharge for Processing Certain Machine Readable Visas

      The House bill (sec. 1207) extends the authority to 
collect and retain fees collected for the machine readable visa 
for fiscal years 1998 and 1999. The fees collected are 
offsetting collections to be used for the costs of the State 
Department's border security program. The House bill limits 
fees deposited to $140 million in each fiscal year and fees are 
subject to appropriation.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1222) is similar to the 
House bill. The limitation on the deposit of $140 million and 
requiring that fees be subject to appropriations were both 
deleted. The provision requires that collections that exceed 
$140 million will only be available for expenditure subject to 
Congressional approval of a reprogramming notice that details 
how the Department intends to spend any fees above $140 million 
in either fiscal year 1998 or fiscal year 1999. The 
reprogramming notification will be sent to the Chairmen of the 
House and Senate authorizing committees and the House and 
Senate appropriations committees.

                           Consular Officers

      The House bill (sec. 1242) permits U.S. citizen employees 
abroad who are not consular officers to perform additional 
consular functions, including the issuance of reports of birth 
abroad, the authentication of foreign documents, the 
administration of nationality provisions, and the 
administration of oaths for patent purposes. This provision is 
intended to improve the service to the public and to overcome 
consular staffing shortfalls abroad.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1151) is similar to the House 
bill except that it also authorizes the Secretary to allow US 
government contractors to serve as notaries abroad.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1223) is similar to the 
House bill with the inclusion of the Senate provision on 
notaries.

            Repeal of Outdated Consular Receipt Requirements

      The House bill (sec. 1243) repeals an 1856 Act that 
required the issuance of a receipt when fees were collected by 
a consular officer for a service.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1152) is virtually identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1224) is identical to the 
House bill.

   Elimination of Duplicate Federal Register Publication for Travel 
                               Advisories

      The House bill (sec. 1244) eliminates a duplicative 
report on travel advisories. Presently, both the Secretary of 
Transportation and the Secretary of State publish the same 
advisories. This section eliminates the need for the Secretary 
of State to publish this advisory.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1153) is virtually identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1225) is the same as the 
Senate amendment.

  Denial of Visas to Aliens Who Have Confiscated Property Claimed by 
                     Nationals of the United States

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1155) would provide the 
Secretary of State with discretion to deny the issuance of a 
visa to any alien who has confiscated or has directed or 
overseen the confiscation or expropriation of property claimed 
by a United States national, or converts or has converted for 
personal gain confiscated or expropriated property claimed by a 
United States national.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1226) provides the 
Secretary of State with the authority to deny the issuance of a 
visa to any alien who, through the abuse of position, including 
a position of governmental or political party position, 
converts or has converted for personal gain real property that 
has been confiscated or expropriated, a claim to which is held 
by a United States national, or who is complicit in such 
conversions, or who induces any such actions or omissions.
      The committee of conference consulted closely with the 
Department of State in fashioning a provision that is 
acceptable to both sides. The committee of conference intends 
that this section provides the Secretary of State with the 
authority to respond to particularly egregious, unlawful 
confiscations by foreign governments, especially those 
confiscations not undertaken for a public purpose but rather 
for the private gain of certain persons of public position. The 
committee notes that this provision would cover abuses of 
governmental or political positions, but there may be rare 
cases where aliens hold positions of particular social 
prominence and exercise forms of authority that allow them to 
take the property of foreign nationals for personal gain.
      This section is not intended to apply to the issuance of 
a visa to aliens involved in a foreign government's legitimate 
expropriation of property, consistent with international law. 
Neither is this section intended to affect in any way the broad 
variety of private commercial disputes in which United States 
citizens are involved all over the world. Further, this section 
does not cover the exercise of ministerial functions or 
legitimate police powers, such as seizures of property used in 
police and judicial authorities involved in anti-drug programs. 
While this section supplements the sanctioning authority of 
Section 527 of the 1994-1995 Foreign Relations Authorization 
Act (P.L. 103-236, April 30, 1994), it is not meant to revise 
or otherwise detract from the substantive requirements of that 
section of law.

Inadmissibility of Any Alien Supporting an International Child Abductor

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1156) denies visas to aliens 
or family members of such aliens who assist in the abducting of 
children.
      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1227) is similar to the 
Senate amendment with technical changes.

             Haiti; Reports and Exclusion of certain aliens

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1607) requires a report to 
Congress on the deployment of United States armed forces, and 
the costs thereof, in Haiti. The Senate amendment (sec. 1614) 
makes findings regarding political killings in Haiti and 
requires the exclusion from the United States of any alien 
credibly alleged to have been involved in such political 
killings or in the September 1991 coup d'etat or related 
violence against Haitians. This exclusion provision is subject 
to an exemption by the Secretary of State on a case-by-case 
basis, under specific conditions.
      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1228) combines and 
modifies Senate sections 1607 and 1614. This section clarifies 
the subjects of the report to Congress. For the purposes of the 
report, activities ``in Haiti'' shall apply to those activities 
in the territory of the Republic of Haiti, including its 
territorial waters; and ``cost of deployments of United States 
Armed Forces'' shall include, inter alia, any extraordinary 
United States Coast Guard operations initiated to control 
smuggling to and from Haiti.
      Regarding the exclusion of aliens, the conference 
substitute incorporates several technical amendments requested 
by the Department of State; however, it does not include 
language that the Department requested that would have 
broadened the Secretary's exemption to include ``compelling 
foreign policy'' reasons.

                    Migration and Refugee Assistance

      The House bill (sec. 1104) authorizes $623,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for Migration and 
Refugee Assistance. Of this amount, $1,000,000 is authorized 
for each fiscal year 1998 and 1999 for Tibetan refugees in 
India. This section authorizes an additional $80,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for the resettlement of 
refugees in Israel; and $1,500,000 for each of the fiscal years 
1998 and 1999 for displaced Burmese. The total amount available 
for refugee programs for fiscal years '98 and '99 is 
$704,500,000.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1102) authorizes a total of 
$650,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for 
Migration and Refugee Assistance.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1231) authorizes 
$650,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $704,500,000 for fiscal 
year 1999 for Migration and Refugee Assistance. The total for 
each fiscal year includes specific authorization of no more 
than $2 million for the Tibetan refugee program, the 
resettlement of refugees in Israel and for humanitarian 
assistance for the displaced Burmese.

   United States Policy Regarding the Involuntary Return of Refugees

      The House bill (sec. 1701) provides that no funds 
authorized by division B be used for the involuntary return of 
refugees to countries in which they have a well-founded fear of 
persecution, except on grounds recognized as precluding refugee 
protection under the 195l Convention and the 1967 Protocol. It 
would not prohibit funding for the return of persons who had 
been found to be non-refugees by a process genuinely calculated 
to identify and protect refugees.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1241) is similar to the 
House bill with a technical change.

US Policy with Respect to the Involuntary Return of Person in Danger of 
                         Subjection to Torture

      The House bill (sec. 1702) prohibits the involuntary 
return of any person to country in which he or she is in 
serious danger of being subjected to torture.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1606) prohibits the United 
States from expelling, extraditing, or otherwise effecting the 
involuntary return of any person to a country in which there 
are reasonable grounds for believing the person would be in 
danger of subjection to torture.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1242) is similar to the 
House bill but makes a statement of policy regarding 
implementation of the Torture Convention. The provision gives 
the authority to the appropriate federal agencies to promulgate 
regulations to implement the Convention, subject to the 
conditions of ratification set by the Senate in its resolution 
of ratification of the Torture Convention. The conference 
provision also makes clear that the regulations will be 
consistent with the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The 
provision agreed to by the conferees does not permit for 
judicial review of of the regulations or of most claims under 
the Convention. Finally, the Conference provision ensures that 
the Attorney General is not prevented from detaining any 
individual under the INA.

        Reprogramming of Migration and Refugee Assistance Funds

      The House bill (sec. 1262) provides a waiver of the 15-
day notification requirement of the drawdown of funds from the 
migration and refugee account in the case of an emergency.
      The Senate amendment has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1243) is identical to the 
House bill.

                     Eligibility for refugee status

      The Senate amendment (Sec. 1624) amends current law to 
permit the unmarried children of Vietnamese persons who 
emigrate to the United States under the Orderly Departure 
Program to also qualify for emigration under the program.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 1244) is identical to the 
Senate provision.

        Report to Congress Concerning Cuban Emigration Policies

      The House bill (sec. 1261) requires periodic reports on 
the Cuban Government's methods of enforcing its 1994 and 1995 
anti-immigration agreements with the United States, on 
treatment of persons returned to Cuba under the 1995 agreement, 
and on the methods used by the United States to monitor such 
treatment and enforcement.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1245) is similar to the 
House bill with technical change on the first reporting date.

  Organization of the Department of State; Personnel; Foreign Service

                   Coordinator for Counter terrorism

      The House bill (sec. 1301) establishes the office of the 
Coordinator for Counter terrorism.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1301) is identical to the 
House bill.

  Elimination of Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Burdensharing

      The House bill (sec. 1302) eliminates the statutory 
requirements for the Assistant Secretary for South Asia, the 
Assistant Secretary for Oceans, Environment and Science and the 
Deputy Assistant Secretary for Burden sharing.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1131) eliminates the Deputy 
Assistant Secretary for Burden sharing.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1302) is identical to the 
Senate amendment.

                          Personnel Management

      The House bill (sec. 1303) provides that the official 
with primary responsibility for matters relating to personnel 
in the Department of State, or that person's deputy, shall have 
substantial professional qualifications in the field of human 
resource policy and management.
      The Senate amendment contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1303) is similar to the 
House bill and includes technical changes.

        Diplomatic Security Officials of the Department of State

      The House bill (sec. 1304) provides that any Assistant 
Secretary with primary responsibility for diplomatic security, 
or that person's principal deputy, shall have substantial 
professional qualifications in the fields of (1) management and 
(2) federal law enforcement, intelligence, or security.
      The Senate amendment contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1304) is similar to the 
House bill. It modifies the House provision so that any 
``official'' with primary responsibility, rather than any 
``Assistant Secretary'' with such responsibility (or that 
person's deputy), is required to have the stated 
qualifications. This provision is intended to apply even if the 
primary responsibility for diplomatic security is lodged with 
someone other than an Assistant Secretary.
      The committee of conference is concerned that a lack of 
professional expertise in the areas of security, law 
enforcement, intelligence, and management at the top often 
places the Bureau at an operational disadvantage. The head of 
the Diplomatic Security bureau must contend with the 
institutional indifference to security matters while keeping 
abreast of threats and countermeasures.Professionally 
experienced leadership should help improve the implementation of 
security standards, oversight of regional security operations, 
confidence within the executive branch agencies, and advocacy within 
the State Department for appropriate resources. In short qualified 
leadership will ensure that the duties assigned to the Diplomatic 
Security Service are fully executed.

       Nomination of Under Secretaries and Assistant Secretaries

      The conference substitute (sec. 1306) added this section 
to require that the President identify the particular position 
the Under Secretary or the Assistant Secretary will occupy when 
the nomination is transmitted to the Senate for confirmation.

                         Foreign Service Reform

      The Senate bill (Sec. 1138): (1) requires that Foreign 
Service Officers, as Officers commissioned by the President, 
receive in all such instances their regular salaries based upon 
rank and service; (2) makes it possible to confer a 
Presidential award without requiring an accompanying cash 
payment; and (3) requires the Secretary of State to develop and 
implement a plan to identify officers who are ranked by 
promotion boards in the bottom 5% of their class for any two of 
five years, and recommend such officers for separation from the 
Foreign Service.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 1311) is similar to the 
Senate bill but eliminates the requirement regarding regular 
salaries. The substitute also amends the expedited separation 
out requirement to add protections where one supervisor has a 
grudge against an individual he or she is supervising.

             Retirement Benefits for Involuntary Separation

      The House bill (sec. 1326) corrects drafting oversights 
regarding retirement benefits for the foreign service employees 
under the ``new system'' for those who are involuntarily 
separated. The amendment makes clear that separated members 
cannot receive both immediate retirement benefits and 
severance-type payments.
      The Senate amendment had no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1312 ) is identical to 
the House bill.

    Authority of Secretary to Separate Convicted Felons From Service

      The House bill (sec. 1323) excludes individuals who have 
been convicted of a crime for which a sentence of imprisonment 
of greater than one year may be imposed from the right to have 
the cause for their separation established in a hearing before 
the Foreign Service Grievance Board.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1313) is identical to the 
House bill. The committee of conference believes that because 
of the special trust placed in members of the Foreign Service, 
in the case of an individual who has been convicted of a felony 
and where the Secretary has determined that the individual be 
separated for cause, the due process rights of the individual 
will have been sufficiently protected by the processes of the 
criminal justice system, and the individual in questionmay be 
separated without the need for a hearing before the Grievance Board.

                           Career Counseling

      The House bill (sec. 1324) provides that the statutory 
authority permitting career counseling and related job 
placement services that may be provided to employees prior to 
their separation from the Foreign Service shall not be 
construed to permit an assignment that consists primarily of 
paid time to conduct a job search and without other substantive 
duties. This limitation would not have applied to individuals 
being separated from the Foreign Service and who are both (a) 
not receiving an immediate annuity, and (b) have not been 
stationed in the United States within one year prior to their 
separation.
      The Senate amendment contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1314) modifies the House 
provision to prohibit any member of the foreign service to be 
assigned to more than one month of paid time, free of other 
substantive duties, to undertake a job search. This limitation 
does not apply to the one month ``job search seminar'' 
currently offered to certain departing employees. The Committee 
of conference does not intend to create an entitlement to 
either program. The Administration may further limit or 
eliminate the program.
      As in the House bill, the effective date of this new 
provision is delayed for 180 days so as not to disadvantage 
individuals who had relied on the earlier policies of the 
Administration.

                 Limitations on Management Assignments

      The House bill (sec. 1328) amends section 1017(e) of the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980 to modify the definition of 
``management official'' to include only those individuals 
involved in labor-management relations or personnel programs. 
Section 1017 was previously amended to restrict the movement of 
Foreign Service personnel between certain positions in labor 
organizations and management positions in the Foreign Affairs 
agencies in order to prevent conflicts of interests from 
arising. This provision is intended to continue to protect 
against conflicts of interest, but narrows the application of 
the two-year prohibition to individuals who take management 
jobs subsequent to serving in a position with the American 
Foreign Service Association and vice versa.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1141) is identical to the 
House bill.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1315) is the same as the 
Senate amendment.

          Availability pay for the diplomatic security service

      The House bill (sec. 1327) extends eligibility for law 
enforcement availability pay (LEAP) to certain agents with the 
Department of State's Diplomatic Security service. The House 
intended to provide LEAP to certain individuals (1) whose 
``primary'' duties consist of ``performing'' protective 
functions or criminal investigations or both, and (2) who 
actually worked the required hours.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1139) is similar to the House 
bill but it does not contain either of the two conditions set 
out above.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1316) is similar to the 
House bill. It deletes condition (1) and retains condition (2) 
of the House bill.

                     Non overtime Differential Pay

      The House bill (sec. 1322) allows the Secretary of State 
to substitute another day in lieu of Sunday for purposes of 
Sunday premium pay in countries where the normal workweek 
includes Sunday.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1134) is virtually identical 
to the House bill.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1317) is identical to the 
House bill.

          Report Concerning Minorities and the Foreign Service

      The House bill (sec. 1325) requires the Secretary of 
State to submit an annual report concerning minorities in the 
Foreign Service.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1318) is similar to the 
House bill with two modifications: (1) it requires a report 
only for calendar years 1998 and 1999; and (2) it deletes the 
redundant requirement to provide the numbers and percentages of 
all minorities in the Foreign Service.

    Authorities and Activities for United States Information Agency

                    Authorization of Appropriations

      The House bill (sec. 1106) authorizes a total of 
$1,112,928,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $1,102,928,000 for 1999 
for the U.S. Information Agency.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1301) authorizes a total of 
$1,093,120,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $1,083,410,000 for 1999 
for the U.S. Information Agency.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1401) authorizes a total 
of $1,116,300,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $1,115,363,000 for 
1999 for the U.S. Information Agency. The conference report 
includes the following subauthorizations:
      (1) Vietnam Fulbright exchange programs: $5,000,000 for 
fiscal year 1998 and $5,000,000 for fiscal year 1999.
      (2) South Pacific exchanges programs: $500,000 for fiscal 
year 1998 and $500,000 for fiscal year 1999.
      (3) East Timorese Scholarships: $500,000 for fiscal year 
1998 and $500,000 for fiscal year 1999.
      (4) Tibetan Exchanges: $500,000 for fiscal year 1998 and 
$500,000 for fiscal year 1999.
      Vietnam Fulbright Authorization. The Senate bill (section 
1301 (b)) authorizes to be appropriated $5,000,000 in each of 
the fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for the Vietnam Fulbright 
Program established by Section 229 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (PL 102-138).
      The House bill contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1401(3)(A)(ii)) is 
identical to the Senate provision.
      This program was first authorized at an annual level of 
$3 million in fiscal year 1994 and was funded at $2.7 million 
in fiscal year 1997. The increase in authorization will provide 
for an increase in the number of scholarships given to 
Vietnamese candidates to study in the United States and an 
expansion of the teaching program in Vietnam including the 
curricula and the number of American teachers and Vietnamese 
students.
      The conferees remain deeply concerned about the current 
lack of political and religious freedom in Vietnam. However, 
the conferees believe that exchange programs of this nature, 
which provide educational opportunities and exposure to 
American institutions and values, can be important tools in 
hastening the transition of countries like Vietnam into free 
and open societies. The conferees understand that the 
Vietnamese Government does not select the participants in this 
program and that any Vietnamese citizen can apply for admission 
to this program. The conferees expect USIA to continue to 
ensure that opportunities to participate in the program are 
made available to all qualified applicants and to administer 
this program under the guidelines set out in Section 102 of the 
Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Provisions Act of 1996 
(PL 104-319).
      The success of the Vietnam Fulbright Program and similar 
programs in like countries will be marked by the extent of 
progress toward freedom and democracy. The conferees will 
continue to monitor this program to evaluate its impact on such 
progress.
      Women's World Cup Soccer. The committee of conference is 
pleased to note that the 1999 Women's World Cup soccer event 
will take place in the United States. The committee of 
conference recognizes that the U.S. Information Agency has 
provided support for similar events in the past since such 
competitions offer opportunities to advance the public 
diplomacy goals of the United States. Accordingly, the 
committee of conference urges the U.S. Information Agency to 
provide appropriate support within available resources for 
exchange-related activities associated with the World Cup.
      National Endowment for Democracy. The Senate amendment 
(sec. 1302) authorizes $30,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and 
$30,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 to carry out the National 
Endowment for Democracy Act. The section prescribes in law 
current National Endowment for Democracy (NED) practice, that 
55 percent of funding will be divided equally between the four 
major NED grantees: the International Republican Institute 
(IRI), the National Democratic Institute (NDI), the Free Trade 
Union Institute (FTUI), and the Center for International 
Private Enterprise.
      The House bill (sec. 1106(9)) authorizes $30,000,000 for 
fiscal year 1998 and $30,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 to carry 
out the National Endowment for Democracy Act.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1401(9)) is identical to 
the House bill.

                         Retention of Interest

      The House bill (sec. 1402) authorizes grantees of the 
National Endowment of Democracy to deposit their grant money in 
interest bearing accounts and to use the interest for the 
purposes of the grant.
      The Senate bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1411) is identical to the 
House bill.

                      Use of Selected Program Fees

      The House bill (sec. 1404) expands the United States 
Information Agency's existing fee retention authority.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1311) is virtually identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1412) is similar to the 
Senate amendment, with technical changes to fully rewrite the 
section of law amended by the section.

                       Muskie Fellowship Program

      The House bill (sec. 1405) expands the fields of study 
covered by the Muskie Fellowship Exchange Program which 
operates in the former Soviet Union, Lithuania, Latvia, and 
Estonia. In addition, the provision replaces the term ``Soviet 
Union'' in the statute with ``Independent States of the Former 
Soviet Union.''
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1313) is nearly identical to 
the House bill.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1413) is identical to the 
House bill.

   Working Group on United States Government Sponsored International 
                         Exchanges and Training

      The House bill (sec. 1406) establishes an interagency 
working group on international exchanges and training to 
improve the coordination, efficiency and effectiveness of US 
government sponsored exchange programs.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1317) is similar to the House 
bill.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1414) is similar to the 
House bill with technical changes.

   Educational/Cultural Exchanges and Scholarships for Tibetans and 
                                Burmese

      The House bill (sec. 1407) requires USIA to provide 30 
scholarships for Tibetans and 15 scholarships for Burmese. It 
also requires USIA to establish exchange programs for Tibetans 
and Burmese.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1415) is similar to the 
House bill. The provision was redrafted to amend current law 
(Section 103(b)(1) of PL 104-319) to extend the Tibet and 
Burmese scholarship program for fiscal years 1998 and 1999. In 
addition, section 1732 of the House bill was incorporated into 
this section which provides for participants from Tibet to be 
active in the preservation of Tibet's culture, religion and 
language.

                     United States-Japan Commission

      The House bill (sec. 1408) amends the United States-Japan 
Friendship Act (PL 94-118) to permit the Commission to invest 
the trust fund in either Japan or US Government securities.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1618) is virtually identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1416) is identical to the 
House bill.

                      Surrogate Broadcasting Study

      The House bill (sec. 1409) requires the USIA to conduct 
studies on the feasibility of providing surrogate broadcasting 
service to Africa and Iran.
      The Senate has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1417) is similar to the 
House bill but eliminates the study regarding Iran.

                       Radio Broadcasting to Iran

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1315) provides $2 million of 
the grant funds designated for Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty 
to be available for broadcasting to Iran. It also requires a 
report on how this new surrogate broadcasting service will be 
implemented.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1418) is identical to the 
Senate amendment.

        Authority to Administer Summer Travel and Work Programs

      The House bill (sec. 1410) authorizes the Director of 
USIA to administer the summer travel/work program without 
regard to the pre-placement requirements of the ``J'' visa.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1319) is virtually identical.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1419) is identical to the 
Senate amendment.

     Permanent Administrative Authorities Regarding Appropriations

      The House bill (sec. 1411) allows the USIA to transfer 
among accounts in the second year of a two-year bill and makes 
this authority permanent. The transfers could exceed the 
authorized levels, but are subject to limitation. The 
limitations are that amounts appropriated to the Salaries and 
Expenses and Exchange Program accounts may not exceed by more 
than 5% the authorized level. No other appropriation account 
may exceed by more than 10% the amount authorized.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1312) is similar to the House 
provision, except that it permits the transfer to occur in 
either year of a two year authorization and makes the authority 
permanent.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1420) is the same as the 
House bill.

                      Voice of America Broadcasts

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1316) requires that the Voice 
of America devote programming time each day to broadcasting 
information on the individual States of the United States. The 
broadcasts are to include information on the products, cultural 
and educational facilities, and trade opportunities.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1421) is the same as the 
Senate amendment. The committee of conference notes that the 
House Report (105-94) discussed this issue in support of 
expanding VOA programming to incorporate specific interests of 
the states and territories. Such programming is in keeping with 
U.S. international broadcasting standards and principles.

              International Conferences and Contingencies

      The House bill (sec. 1102) provides authorization of 
appropriations for voluntary and assessed contributions to 
international organizations, voluntary and assessed 
contributions to UN peacekeeping, and international conferences 
and contingencies.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1201) provides authorization 
of appropriations for international conferences and 
contingencies on; $3,944,000 for fiscal year 1998, and 
$3,500,000 for fiscal year 1999.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1501) provides $3,500,000 
for fiscal years 1998, and $1,223,000 for fiscal year 1999 for 
international conferences and contingencies.

        Restrictions Relating to International Criminal Tribunal

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1211) requires that any 
participation of the United States in an international criminal 
court is subject to the advise and consent of the Senate and 
statutory implementing legislation.
      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1502) is similar to the 
Senate bill but clarifies the definition of membership and 
jurisdiction under such a court. The provision also makes clear 
that nothing in the section would prohibit the sharing of 
information, expertise, or other such assistance with such a 
court prior to Congressional approval. Finally, the conference 
substitute makes clear that this provision does not apply to 
the existing Rwanda and Former Yugoslavia war crimes tribunals.

              Membership in the Inter-Parliamentary Union

      The Senate bill (Sec. 1213) requires either a cap of 
$500,000 on U.S. payments to the Inter-Parliamentary Union 
(IPU) or withdrawal by the United States. The fund also 
requires that funds allocated for travel by Members of Congress 
be returned to the State Department.
      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 1503) makes technical and 
conforming amendments to the Senate provision. The provision 
has the same effect of capping U.S. payments at $500,000 or 
requiring withdrawal so that the United States will not 
accumulate arrears to the IPU. The provision also makes 
conforming amendments to delete the permanent appropriation for 
travel by Members of Congress. Unobligated balances in this 
account shall be transferred to the U.S. Treasury following 
enactment of this Act. This provision was requested by the 
Secretary of the Senate and the Clerk of the House of 
Representatives due to a lack of Congressional interest during 
the last decade. The Secretary of the Senate has indicated that 
interested Members of Congress can still travel under 
Leadership authorization and use State Department 502b funds.

                 Service in International Organizations

      The House bill (sec. 1501) repeals a provision in the 
Federal Employees International Organizations Services Act 
which entitles a Federal employee after terminating his/her 
service with an international organization and reentering the 
federal service, the difference between (a) the salary, 
allowance, post adjustment and other monetary benefits actually 
paid to him/her by the international organization and (b) 
salary/benefits that he/she would have received had he/she been 
detailed to the international organization but paid by the U.S. 
Government.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1504) is similar to the 
House bill with technical changes.

                    Reports regarding Foreign Travel

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1214) requires any officer or 
employee of United States Executive agencies attending any 
international conference or engaging in any other foreign 
travel to submit a report to the Director of the Office of 
International Conferences of the Department of State stating 
the purpose, duration and estimated cost of the travel. The 
requirement does not apply to the President, the Vice 
President, or any person traveling on a delegation led by the 
President or Vice President, or any officer or employee of the 
Executive Office of the President, or the foreign travel of 
officers or employees of United States Executive agencies who 
are carrying out intelligence or intelligence-related 
activities, or law enforcement activities, or the deployment of 
members of the Armed forces of the United States or U.S. 
Government officials engaged in sensitive diplomatic missions.
      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1505) is similar to the 
Senate amendment but makes changes to limit the application of 
the reporting requirement to travel to and from international 
conferences and meetings. The exception to this reporting 
requirement is narrowed to apply only to the President or Vice 
President (not their staffs), and officers or employees engaged 
in protective functions, intelligence activities, or sensitive 
diplomatic missions. For all other travel, the substitute 
requires the President to submit a report detailing the cost of 
and number of persons engaged in international travel.

                  ACDA Authorization of Appropriations

      The House bill (sec. 1107) authorizes $44,000,000 for 
fiscal year 1998 and $44,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 for the 
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1501) authorizes $39,000,000 
for fiscal year 1998 and $0 for fiscal year 1999 for the Arms 
Control and Disarmament Agency.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1601) authorizes 
$41,500,000 for fiscal year 1998. For fiscal year 1999, $0 is 
authorzied for ACDA. The committee of conference notes that 
there will be an expected 2-fold increase in fees collected 
from the Machine Readable Visa which can be used to offset 
costs for ACDA.

                         Statutory construction

      The Senate bill (sec. 1511) reinstates a clarification 
contained in the Arms Control and Disarmament Act removed in 
the 102nd Congress. This section makes clear that the Arms 
Control and Disarmament Agency cannot authorize policies which 
would interfere with the use of firearms by an individual for 
the lawful purpose of personal defense, sport, recreation 
education or training.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1602) is identical to the 
Senate amendment.

                   TITLE XVIII--EUROPEAN SECURITY ACT

      The House bill (sec. 3201-3207), includes the ``European 
Security Act of 1998'' which contains various provisions 
relating to security relations with Europe and Russia, 
including with respect to NATO enlargement, conventional arms 
control negotiations in Europe, and ballistic missile defense.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1701-1705) is similar to 
the House bill with modest changes.
      With respect to NATO enlargement, the Act declares, among 
other things, that Poland, Hungary, and the Czech Republic 
should not be the last emerging democracies in central and 
Eastern Europe admitted to NATO. To implement this policy, the 
Act designates Romania, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and 
Bulgaria as eligible to receive assistance under the NATO 
Participation Act of 1994. This designation gives these 
countries the same status under U.S. law as currently enjoyed 
by Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Slovenia. The Act 
further declares that NATO enlargement should be carried out in 
such a manner as to underscore the Alliance's defensive nature 
and demonstrate to Russia that NATO enlargement will enhance 
the security of all countries in Europe, including Russia.
      With respect to conventional arms control, the Act 
declares that no revisions to the Conventional Armed Forces in 
Europe Treaty will be approved for entry into force with 
respect to the United States that jeopardize fundamental United 
States security interests in Europe or the effectiveness of 
NATO as a defensive alliance by, for example, extending rights 
or imposing responsibilities on new NATO members different from 
those applicable to current NATO members, or by limiting the 
ability of NATO to defend the territory of new NATO members.
      With respect to ballistic missile defense, the Act 
declares that as the United States proceeds with efforts to 
develop defenses against ballistic missile attack, it should 
seek to foster a climate of cooperation with Russia on matters 
related to missile defense. In particular, the United States 
and its NATO allies should seek to cooperate with Russia in 
such areas as early warning.
      To implement this policy, the Act provides that no 
agreement establishing a demarcation between theater and 
strategic missile defense systems may enter into force with 
respect to the United States without the advice and consent of 
the Senate pursuant to Article II, section 2, clause 2 of the 
Constitution. The purpose of this restriction is to prevent the 
Administration from implementing such an agreement on its own 
on the theory that Congress has ``preauthorized'' the 
implementation of such an agreement in prior legislation.
      The Act further implements this policy regarding 
ballistic missile defense by requiring thesubmission of a 
report on cooperative ballistic missile defense efforts with Russia, 
including in the area of early warning, not later than July 1, 1998, 
July 1, 1999, and July 1, 2000. This report shall include, among other 
matters, a discussion of the status of any dialogue with Russia aimed 
at exploring the potential for mutual accommodation of outstanding 
issues between the two countries arising under the ABM Treaty.

 Reports on Claims by U.S. Firms Against the Government of Saudi Arabia

      The House bill (sec. 1703) requires a report every 120 
days on the progress in resolving the commercial disputes 
between U.S. firms and the Government of Saudi Arabia.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1801) is the same as the 
House bill with some modifications to the report requirements.

      Reports on Determinations under title IV of the LIBERTAD Act

      The House bill (sec. 1705) requires the Secretary of 
State to make quarterly reports to the Congress on the 
implementation of Title IV of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic 
Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-114).
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1802) is similar to the 
House language, although it does not amend the permanent law 
but applies through September 30, 1999. The conference 
substitute also clarifies that the reports shall not identify 
the names of entities under review pursuant to Title IV of the 
LIBERTAD Act.

 Report on Compliance with the Hague Convention on International Child 
                               Abduction

      The House bill (sec. 1710) requires periodic reports on 
the compliance of the signatories to the Hague Convention on 
the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1803) is similar to the 
House bill with the addition that the report include efforts by 
the State Department to encourage other countries to become 
signatories of the Convention, and limiting the reporting 
requirement to fiscal years 1998 and 1999.

          Ecumenical Patriarchate by the Government of Turkey

      The House bill (sec. 1711) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the US should recognize the Ecumenical Patriarchate, 
located in Istanbul, Turkey as the spiritual center for more 
than 300 million Orthodox Christians worldwide.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1804) is the same as the 
House bill, except that the reference to the US using its 
influence as a permanent member of the UN Security Council was 
deleted.

                    Report on Relations with Vietnam

      The House bill (sec. 1714) expresses a sense of Congress 
that US-Vietnamese relations should be developed in such a way 
as to facilitate maximum progress in the areas of POW/MIA, 
human rights, and refugee issues, regional stability and 
economic relations.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1805) requires the 
Secretary of State to report on the extent to which the 
Government of Vietnam is 1) cooperating with the US on the 
fullest possible accounting of POW/MIA's; 2) has made progress 
on the release of political and religious prisoners; 3) is 
cooperating on requests by the U.S. to obtain full and free 
access to persons for interviews under the Orderly Departure 
and Resettlement Opportunities for Vietnamese Refugees 
programs; 4) has taken action to end corrupt practices in 
connections with exit visas; and 5) is making efforts to 
interview and resettle former reeducation camp victims and 
other persons.

           Reports concerning human rights violations in Laos

      The House bill (sec. 1723) requires a report on the 
allegations of persecution and abuse of the Hmong and Laotian 
refugees who have returned to Laos.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1806) is identical to the 
House bill.

  Report on an alliance against narcotics trafficking in the Western 
                               Hemisphere

      The Senate amendment (section 1608(a)) expresses the 
sense of the Congress that the President should discuss with 
the democratically-elected Western Hemisphere governments, 
during the President's trips in the region in 1997 and through 
other consultations, the prospect of forming a multilateral 
alliance to address drug trafficking. In such consultations, 
the President should seek such governments' input on the 
possibility of forming alliance structures to (1) develop a 
regional, multilateral strategy to address the drug trafficking 
threat; and (2) establish a new mechanism for improving 
multilateral coordination of drug interdiction and drug-related 
law enforcement activities in the Western Hemisphere.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (section 1807) is the same as 
the Senate amendment with technical changes.

                Taiwan and the World Trade Organization

      House bill (sec. 1722) expresses that Congress favors 
public support by officials of the Department of State for the 
accession of Taiwan to the World Trade Organization.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1808) is the same as the 
House bill with a few modifications.

               Programs and Projects of the IAEA in Cuba

      The House bill (sec. 1801) withholds funds to a country 
in the amount equal to the value of nuclear fuel and related 
assistance provided by that country to Cuba during the 
preceding year.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1809) is the same as the 
House bill.

 Limitation on Assistance to Countries aiding Cuba Nuclear Development

      The House bill (sec. 1801) prohibits assistance to 
countries aiding Cuba's nuclear programs.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1810) is the same as the 
House bill.

                     International Fund For Ireland

      The House bill (sec. 1737) amends the Anglo-Irish 
Agreement Support Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-415) to strongly 
recommend that U.S. contributions ``shall'' be used in a manner 
that effectively increases employment opportunities in 
communities with rates of unemployment ``significantly'' higher 
than the local or urban average of unemployment in Northern 
Ireland (defined as the counties of Antrim, Armagh, Derry, 
Down, Tyrone, and Fermanagh).
      Funding should be provided by the IFI only if individuals 
or entities receiving such funds are in compliance with the 
``principles of economic justice.'' The principles of economic 
justice are defined as the ``MacBride Principles'' as modified, 
include:
      (1) Increasing the representation of individuals, from 
under represented religious groups in the workforce, including 
managerial, supervisory, administrative, clerical, and 
technical jobs,
      (2) Providing adequate security for the protection of 
minority employees at the workplace,
      (3) Banning provocative sectarian or political emblems 
from the workplace,
      (4) Providing that all job openings be advertised 
publicly and providing that special recruitment efforts be made 
to attract applicants from under represented religious groups,
      (5) Providing that layoff, recall and termination 
procedures do not favor a particular religious group,
      (6) Abolishing job reservations, apprenticeship 
restrictions and differential employment criteria which 
discriminate on the basis of religion,
      (7) Providing for the development of training programs 
that will prepare substantial numbers of minority employees for 
skilled jobs, including the expansion of existing programs and 
the creation of new programs to train, upgrade and improve the 
skills of minority employees,
      (8) Establishing procedures to assess, identify and 
actively recruit minority employees with the potential for 
further advancement, and
      (9) Providing for the appointment of a senior management 
staff member to be responsible for the employment efforts of 
the entity and, within a reasonable period of time, the 
implementation of the principles described above.
      The section also includes the principles of economic 
justice to insure that these principles should be applied by 
those individuals or entities who receive any portion of the 
U.S. contribution to the International Fund for Ireland.
      In addition a new provision was added to insure nothing 
shall require quotas or reverse discrimination, which is 
consistent with the intent and purpose of the MacBride 
principles.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1811) is similar to the 
House bill except the mandatoryrequirement that the US 
contributions shall be used in a manner that effectively increases 
employment opportunities in communities with rates of unemployment 
``significantly'' higher than the local or urban average of 
unemployment in Northern Ireland (defined as the counties of Antrim, 
Armagh, Derry, Down, Tyrone, and Fermanagh) is changed to ``should''.

      US Policy with Respect to Jerusalem as the Capital of Israel

      The House bill (sec. 1709) contains four provisions which 
together reaffirm and strengthen U.S. policy as reflected in 
the Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-45) that Jerusalem 
should remain the undivided capital of Israel.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1603) is similar to the House 
bill.
      The conference substitute sec. 1812(a) authorizes the 
appropriation of $25,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and 
$75,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 for the construction of a U.S. 
Embassy in Jerusalem. This subsection restates and updates the 
Jerusalem Embassy Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-45). It reiterates 
Congressional intent concerning the establishment of the U.S. 
Embassy in Jerusalem, Israel, no later than May 31, 1999.
      Subsection (b) urges the President to correct the current 
anomalous situation in which the United States Ambassador to 
Israel, currently resident in Tel Aviv, does not supervise all 
U.S. diplomatic and consular activities in the State of Israel, 
and particularly, does not supervise the Consul General and 
consulate personnel in Jerusalem, Israel.
      Subsection (c) requires new public documents to describe 
Jerusalem as Israel's capital as a prerequisite for funding 
under the bill. This requirement follows State Department 
practice in such publications as the ``Background Notes'' for 
Israel.
      Subsection (d) requires that for purposes of registration 
of birth, certification of nationality, or issuance of a 
passport, that the Secretary of State, upon the request of a 
U.S. citizen born in Jerusalem, record the place of birth as 
Israel. The section does not constitute a requirement that U.S. 
citizens born in Jerusalem have Israel recorded as their place 
of birth.
      A reporting requirement pertaining to subsection (a) is 
required by P.L. 104-45. The committee of conference recommends 
that that report also include information pertaining to 
subsections (b), (c), and (d). Accordingly, the commitment to 
implement subsection (b) should be detailed, the new public 
documents referred to in subsection (c) should be included with 
the report, and the Department of State should indicate the 
steps taken to inform U.S. citizens born in Jerusalem of the 
option they may exercise in seeking implementation of 
subsection (d). The Department of State should also include the 
number of citizens requesting the change permitted by 
subsection (d).

               Support for Democratic Opposition in Iraq

      The conference substitute (sec. 1813) adds a new section 
on Iraq. The committee of conference notes that bringing Saddam 
Hussein and other Iraqi officials to justice for war crimes has 
been a stated goal of President Clinton's administration since 
1993. Legislation encouraging the Administration to pursue this 
course has passed the House (H. Con. Res. 137) and is pending 
in the Senate (S. Con. Res. 78). Secretary of State Albright's 
statement of February 26, 1998 is noted: ``We look forward to 
working effectively with them in the future.'' The overt 
support for political activities and broadcasting by opposition 
forces can have a significant impact inside Iraq. In addition, 
the committee of conference notes that disparate Kurdish, 
Shiite, and Sunni groups havein the past been willing to set 
aside their differences and unite under the umbrella of the Iraqi 
National Congress (INC) to effectively challenge Saddam Hussein. The 
committee of conference recommends supporting efforts to reunite these 
disparate groups under a unified umbrella, whether it be the INC or 
another opposition group, to present a solid, pro-democracy, Iraqi 
front against Saddam Hussein. The Administration is expected to work 
closely with the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
International Relations in the development of the program, including 
the selection of grantees.

                   Development of Democracy in Serbia

      The House bill (sec. 1713) expresses a sense of Congress 
regarding the various methods and actions that can be taken to 
support the development of democracy in the Republic of Serbia. 
The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1814) is similar to the 
House bill with modifications to consolidate the findings.

                            Cuba Assistance

      The House bill (sec. 1901) makes $2 million available for 
democracy programs in Cuba under chapter 4 part II of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1815) is the same as the 
House bill.

Foreign Organizations that Perform or Promote Abortion; Forced Abortion 
                                in China

      The House bill (sec. 2101)
      The Senate amendment had no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1816) combines House bill 
sections 2101 and 2102. Section 2101 concerns U.S. population 
assistance to foreign organizations that perform or promote 
abortions. Section 2102 concerns UN Population Fund (UNFPA) 
activities in the People's Republic of China in relation to 
forced abortions carried out in connection with the Chinese 
government's population program.
      The conference substitute prohibits, inter alia, 
population assistance to foreign organizations that ``engage in 
any activity or effort to alter the laws or governmental 
policies of any foreign country concerning the circumstances 
under which abortion is permitted, regulated, or prohibited.'' 
Such practices include not only overt lobbying for such 
changes, but also such other activities as sponsoring, rather 
than merely attending, conferences and workshops on the alleged 
defects of the abortion laws, as well the drafting and 
distribution of materials or public statements calling 
attention to such alleged defects.

                   Division C--United Nations Reform

                           General Provisions

                              Short title

      The House bill has no similar section.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2001) names this division the 
``United Nations Reform Act of 1997.''
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2001) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                              definitions

      The House bill has no similar section.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2002) defines the terms: 
appropriate congressional committee, designated specialized 
agency, secretary general, United Nations member, United 
Nations peacekeeping operation.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2002) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

              nondelegation of certification requirements

      The House bill has no similar section.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2003) expresses that the Secretary 
of State may not delegate the authority in this chapter to make 
any certification.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2003) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

               TITLE XXI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

      assessed contributions to the united nations and affiliated 
                             organizations

      The House bill (Sec. 1102) provides for $960,389,000 in 
fiscal year 1998 and $987,590,000 in fiscal year 1999 for 
assessed contributions to the United Nations and affiliated 
organizations.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) provides for $938,000,000 in 
fiscal year 1998 and $900,000,000 in fiscal year 1999 for 
assessed contributions to the United Nations and affiliated 
organizations, subject to certifications and conditions 
enumerated below.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) provides 
$901,000,000 for fiscal year 1998 and $900,000,000 for fiscal 
year 1999.

                            no growth budget

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      Of the funds authorized, the Senate bill (Sec. 2101) 
makes available in fiscal years 1998 and 1999, $80,000,000 on a 
semi-annual basis only when the Secretary of State certifies to 
the Congress that no action has been taken by the United 
Nations to increase the United Nations 1998-99 budget of 
$2,533,000,000 during that period without finding an offset 
elsewhere in the United Nations budget during that period.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) amends the 
certification for a no growth budget to become an annual rather 
than a semi-annual certification

                           inspector general

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) withholds 20 percent of the 
funds made available for the United Nations until the Secretary 
of State certifies that the Office of Internal Oversight 
Services (OIOS) continues to function as an independent 
inspector general. This section requires the Director of the 
OIOS to report directly to the Secretary General on the 
adequacy of his resources and to notify inwriting each program, 
project, or activity funded by the United Nations that it has the 
authority to audit, inspect, or investigate it.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) makes several 
technical and conforming amendments to the inspector general 
requirements of the Senate bill. This section requires that all 
reports completed by the Office of Internal Oversight Service, 
including audit, investigation, inspection, and evaluation 
reports, are made available to the United Nations members 
states, regardless of whether or not these reports are provided 
to the Secretary General.

             prohibition on certain u.n. global conferences

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) prohibits U.S. funding of 
U.N. global conferences.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill, except that it exempts conferences that 
were approved by the United Nations prior to enactment of the 
Act. The Conferees agree that the U.N. Global Conferences 
referred to in this section are those organized on a one-time 
basis with universal participation to address a single subject, 
such as the environment or population, outside of the normal 
course of regularly scheduled deliberations by existing U.N. 
bodies. For example, this section would have applied to the Rio 
Earth Summit, the Beijing Women's Conference, or the Habitat 
Conference. Should the U.N. schedule a conference of this kind, 
the U.S. will not fund such a conference nor any arrears 
related to such a conference. This section does not include 
conferences directed to the achievement of a binding 
international agreement, or other legal instrument, on a 
particular matter (such as, the negotiation on the control and 
elimination of anti-personnel land mines in the U.N. Conference 
on anti-personnel land mines in the U.N. Conference on 
Conventional Weapons and the U.N. Conference on Disarmament).

                    reduction in the number of posts

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) requires annual withholding 
of $50,000,000 until the Secretary of State certifies that in 
fiscal year 1998 that 1,000 authorized posts have been 
suppressed at the United Nations, and that in fiscal year 1999 
the United Nations is maintaining a vacancy rate of at least 
five percent for professional staff and 2.5 percent for general 
services staff. Both policies have been presented by Secretary 
General Kofi Annan as part of the 1998-99 budget for the United 
Nations.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) makes several 
technical and conforming amendments to the post reduction 
requirements of the Senate bill. The Conferees note the 
Secretary General's intention to abolish 1,000 posts, and 
understand that this reform represents the deletion of 1,000 
posts that will not be filled. The Conferees intend that the 
transfer of posts due to changes in UN budget methodology, or 
for any other purpose, must not be counted toward the 1,000 
post suppression required by this section. For example, posts 
from the jointly-financed activities which still exist, but are 
deleted from the UN staffing table because of the use of net 
budgeting, would not be included in the 1,000 post suppression.

prohibition on funding organizations other than the united nations from 
                   the united nations regular budget

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) requires the Secretary of 
State to certify that no United States contributions have been 
used to fund other international organizations out of the 
United Nationsregular budget. This certification is not 
intended to refer to the U.N. giving grants or payments to other 
organizations.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) makes several 
technical and conforming amendments to the prohibition on 
funding of other organizations in the Senate bill. The 
Conferees clarified that no portion of the U.S. contribution to 
the United Nations regular budget should be used to fund the 
operating costs of another organization, which has been 
established through a framework treaty. Such organizations are 
those established under separate treaties of a framework 
nature, composed only of parties to the treaties, having their 
own secretariats. This term does not include U.N. human rights 
treaty bodies. Should any such framework treaty organization be 
funded out of the regular budget, the provision will require 
that the U.S. withhold from its U.S. assessment to the U.N. 
budget the U.S. share of the amount budgeted for such 
organizations.

               Limitation on U.S. Assessed Contributions

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) caps the amount authorized in 
assessed contributions to international organizations at 
$901,000,000 for fiscal years 1999 and 2000. Additional 
authorization is required to exceed this amount.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                     Refund of Excess Contributions

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2101) requires that the United 
States continue to press its policy that the organizations in 
this account should have procedures in place to return excess 
contributions to member states when contributions exceed 
expenditures.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2101) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

    Assessed contributions for international peacekeeping activities

      The House bill (Sec. 1102) authorizes $240 million for 
fiscal year 1998 and $240 million for fiscal year 1999 for 
assessed peacekeeping operations and activities.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2103) authorizes $200 million for 
fiscal year 1998 and $205 million for fiscal year 1999 for 
assessed peacekeeping operations and activities. This section 
also consolidates many current reporting requirements regarding 
international peacekeeping activities.
      The Conference substitute (Sec. 2102) authorizes $210 
million for fiscal year 1998 and $220 million for fiscal year 
1999 for assessed peacekeeping operations and activities.

Codification of Required Notice of Proposed United Nations Peacekeeping 
                               Operations

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2103) consolidates many current 
reporting requirements regarding international peacekeeping 
activities.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2102) amends the timing 
of notification and makes amendments to the funding and troop 
levels that trigger notification.

                 TITLE XXII--UNITED NATIONS ACTIVITIES

          United Nations Policy on Israel and the Palestinians

      The House bill (Sec. 1522) requires reports on efforts to 
promote full equality at the UN for Israel. Section 1522 
expresses a sense of Congress to expand Israel's participation 
at the United Nations. The Secretary is required to submit a 
report not later than 90 days after the date of enactment (and 
on a quarterly basis thereafter) that outlines actions taken by 
the United States to encourage the Western European and Other 
Group (WEOG) to accept Israel as a member, and the efforts 
undertaken by the Secretary General of the United States to 
secure Israel's participation in that body. The report must 
include the specific responses of each of the WEOG member 
states regarding their position concerning Israel's membership 
as well as other measures either underway or planned to promote 
Israel's full and equal participation in the United Nations.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2102) provides that it shall be the 
policy of the United States to assist Israel in gaining 
acceptance into a United Nations regional bloc. It states 
further that it shall be the policy of the United States to 
seek the abolition of the U.N. Special Committee to Investigate 
Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian 
People and other Arabs of the Occupied Territories; the U.N.'s 
Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the 
Palestinian People; the U.N.'s Division for the Palestinian 
Rights; and the U.N.'s Division on Public Information on the 
Question of Palestine. The Secretary of State is required to 
consult with the appropriate congressional committees on steps 
taken to these ends, including efforts to bring Israel into the 
Western Europe and Others Groups of the U.N.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2201) requires that the 
it be the policy of the United States to assist Israel in 
gaining acceptance into a United Nations regional bloc. It 
states further that it shall be the policy of the United States 
to seek the abolition of the U.N. Special Committee to 
Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the 
Palestinian People and other Arabs of the Occupied Territories; 
the U.N.'s Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights 
of the Palestinian People; the U.N.'s Division for the 
Palestinian Rights; and the U.N.'s Division on Public 
Information on the Question of Palestine. The section requires 
an annual report on actions taken by the United States to 
encourage the Western European and Other Group (WEOG) to accept 
Israel as a member, and the efforts undertaken by the Secretary 
General of the United States to secure Israel's participation 
in that body. The conference substitute also requires the 
Secretary to consult with Congress when submitting the annual 
report on the specific responses of each of the WEOG member 
states regarding their position concerning Israel's membership 
as well as other measures either underway or planned to promote 
Israel's full and equal participation in the United Nations.

Data on costs incurred in support of United Nations peace and security 
                               operations

      The House bill has no similar division.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2104) requires the United States to 
report annually to the United Nations on the total costs of 
United Nations peacekeeping activities--including assessed, 
voluntary and incremental costs--to the United Nations. The 
section also requires the United States to request that the 
United Nations prepare and publish a report that compiles 
similar information for other United Nations member states.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2202) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill. The Conferees expect that this 
comprehensive reporting will quantify all costs to the United 
States for peacekeeping activities, and enable the Congress to 
consider those costs in relation to the proposed operation or 
expansion of an operation prior to action by the United Nations 
Security Council.

 Reimbursement for goods and services provided by the United States to 
                           the United Nations

      The House bill contains no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (section 2105) requires that the United 
States seek and receive reimbursement for any assistance, 
including personnel, services, supplies, equipment, and 
facilities, to the United Nations, United Nations assessed 
peacekeeping operations, and bilateral assistance designed to 
assist that country to participate in the peacekeeping 
operation.
      The Senate bill is prospective in its application and 
permits the President to waive the provision if he determines 
that an important national interest exists. However, such a 
waiver is subject both to notification requirements of section 
634A of the Foreign Assistance Act and a joint resolution of 
disapproval by Congress if Congress disapproves of the 
President's determination.
      The Senate bill also exempts direct assistance for U.S. 
military personnel. The Administration requested this 
provision, and understands that it is designed only to allow 
for incidental costs in support of U.S. troops such as extra 
blankets, latrines, or other similar services that the U.N. 
does not ordinarily supply for troops carrying out a U.N. 
peacekeeping operation.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2203) makes several 
changes but, like the Senate provision, is intended to ensure 
that the U.S. Government is reimbursed by the U.N. in a timely 
manner for military assistance it provides in support of the 
U.N. or U.N. peacekeeping operations, whether this assistance 
is provided to the U.N. or to another country participating in 
such an operation. The conference substitute makes clear that 
this provision is not intended to apply to civilian police 
monitors, which are funded individually by the nation 
contributing monitors.
      As drafted, the conferees believe that this section does 
not impede the President in his ability to use any 
constitutional authority to provide assistance at any time. The 
conference substitute exempts the deployment of United States 
troops by the President from the requirement of reprogramming 
procedures under section 634A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961. As written, this section does not affect the President's 
constitutional authority as Commander-in-Chief. Nothing in this 
section shall be construed as an authorization of the use of 
force.

  United States policy regarding United Nations peacekeeping missions

      The House bill has no similar section.
      The Senate bill (section 2107) makes clear that the 
policy of the United States is to limit the size and scope of 
United Nations peacekeeping missions. It is not the policy of 
the United States to support major U.N. peacekeeping operations 
such as the United Nations Protection Force (UNPROFOR) in the 
former Yugoslavia. Smaller peacekeeping missions should be 
considered on a case by case basis (with full consultation with 
Congress as required in section 2102 of this Act).
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2204) is nearly identical 
to section 2107 of the Senate bill and also consolidates 
section 2106 of the Senate bill into this provision. Thus, this 
section also makes clear that the stated policy of the United 
States is not to fund peacekeeping activities out of the 
regular budget unless the President determines and notifies 
Congress that an important national security interest exists.
      The Conferees expect that a clear statement of this 
policy will save United States taxpayers millions of dollars as 
it limits the scope and mandate of United Nations peacekeeping 
missions.

 Reform in Budget Decision-making Procedures of the United Nations and 
                          Specialized Agencies

      The House bill (Sec. 1521) extends current law allowing 
the President to withhold 20 percent of appropriated funds for 
the U.N. or any of its specialized agencies if the U.N. or the 
agency fails to implement consensus-based budget decision 
making procedures. The President is directed to notify Congress 
of any decisions to withhold the U.S. share of an assessed 
contribution to the UnitedNations.
      The Senate bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute is nearly identical to the 
House bill.

 Continued Extension of Privileges, Exemptions, and Immunities of the 
          International Organizations Immunities Act to UNIDO

      The House bill (Sec. 1524) extends U.S. privileges and 
immunities to the United Nations Industrial Development 
Organization consistent with longstanding U.S. policy regarding 
U.S. withdrawal from multilateral organizations.
      The Senate bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute is identical to the House bill.

   Sense of the Congress regarding Compliance with Child and Spousal 
            Support Obligations by United Nations Personnel

      The House bill (Sec. 1728) urges the Secretary of State 
to fully comply with regulations regarding compliance with 
child and spousal support obligations by United Nations 
personnel. The House bill also withholds $10 million until the 
Secretary certifies that the U.N. is enforcing child and 
spousal support payments, and reforming its pension policy.
      The Senate bill has no similar provision.
      The conference substitute deletes the withholding 
requirement but continues to urge that the Secretary of State 
ensure that the U.N. is enforcing child and spousal support 
payments.

                    Organization of American States

      The House bill (Sec. 1502) expresses the Sense of the 
Congress that the Secretary of State should make every effort 
to pay the United States share of assessed funding levels for 
the Organization of American States (OAS).
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2108) is identical to the House 
bill.
      The conference substitute deletes this provision. The 
Conferees recognize that the OAS is uniquely important to the 
United States interests in the Western Hemisphere, especially 
in the areas of trade, anti-drug trafficking efforts, support 
for human rights and democracy, and that the OAS is 
disproportionately supported by the United States contribution 
of 59 percent. Responding in part to the leadership of the 
United States, the OAS is continuing broad reforms in its 
agenda and its budget. The Committee notes that the OAS 
operating budget has not grown for the past three years. It was 
the intent of both the Senate and House provisions that the 
State Department consider these factors when allocating 
resources to international organizations.

                TITLE XXII--ARREARS PAYMENTS AND REFORM

               Chapter 1--Arrearage to the United Nations

                    Authorization of appropriations

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2201) section authorizes 
$100,000,000 in fiscal year 1998, $475 millionin fiscal year 
1999, and $244 million in fiscal year 2000 for the repayment of arrears 
to the United Nations, United Nations peacekeeping activities, United 
Nations specialized agencies, and other international organizations.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2301) is nearly 
identical.

                         Disbursement of funds

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2202) outlines the manner in which 
disbursements will be made, and requires that certification of 
specified reforms be completed prior to any disbursement of 
funds by the United States. This section also requires a 30-day 
notification by the Secretary of State to Congress prior to the 
disbursement of any funds.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2302) is nearly 
identical, except that it contains a limited waiver of certain 
conditions. In response to a direct request from the Secretary 
of State, we agreed to grant the Secretary a very limited 
waiver authority upon assurances that it would be exercised 
only if strict conditions are met. We continue to believe that 
achievement of each of the reforms contained in this plan is 
essential if the United Nations is to be able to contend with 
the challenges of the 21st Century. Thus, we expect that all of 
the conditions required by the legislation will be met and that 
there will be no need to use the waiver authority.
      The bill grants the Secretary of State a very limited 
authority to waive one of the conditions in each of the second 
and third years of the U.N. payment plan. This waiver may be 
exercised only if substantial progress has already been made in 
meeting the condition proposed to be waived. Further, prior to 
exercising such a waiver, the Secretary of State must first 
consult with the appropriate Congressional Committees to 
explain in detail why it is important to the national interest 
of the United States to do so.
      Most important, this section prohibits the Secretary from 
waiving requirements to reduce U.S. assessment rates or to 
establish an inspector general in the specialized agencies. The 
Secretary of State, while serving as the U.S. Permanent 
Representative to the United Nations, proposed a bold plan to 
reduce the U.S. assessment to 20 percent. That proposal was 
incorporated into this legislation and its is expected that the 
Administration will achieve this reduction within three years. 
For this reason, this section strictly prohibits the Secretary 
from waiving the requirements on reducing the U.S. assessment 
rates for peacekeeping operations or for the U.N. regular 
budget. Also, the Conferees continue to believe that the 
specialized agencies are in need of serious, independent 
scrutiny. Therefore, the requirement that there be established 
within the World Health Organization (WHO), the Food and 
Agriculture Organization (FAO), and the International Labor 
Organization (ILO) an inspector general to investigate cases of 
waste, fraud and abuse, cannot be waived.
      While we rejected outright the Administration's proposal 
to allow a waiver of the U.S. assessment rates, we are 
persuaded that an unforeseen circumstance may arise which 
prohibits total achievement of the legislative requirements 
related to the assessment rates. For this reason, the 
Administration should be allowed some flexibility if it has 
substantially achieved the requirement to reduce the U.S. 
general budget assessment to 20 percent. If Congress is 
convinced that the Administration has substantially achieved 
the requirement to reduce the U.S. assessment to 20 percent, we 
commit to act expeditiously to consider legislation to release 
the funds in Fiscal Year 2000.
      Throughout the three year reform period, the we expect 
that the Administration will consultwith Congress regularly to 
discuss the status of each of these reforms and to explain well in 
advance if a particular reform cannot be met fully.

   Subchapter B--United States Sovereignty/Certification requirements

                     Supremacy of the Constitution

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United States Constitution controls 
U.S. law and no action by the United Nations or any of its 
agencies has caused the U.S. to violate the Constitution.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                     No United Nations Sovereignty

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that neither the United Nations nor its 
specialized agencies have exercised authority over the United 
States or taken forward steps to require that the U.S. cede 
sovereignty.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                       No United Nations Taxation

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that U.S. law does not give the United Nations 
any legal authority to tax the American people; no taxes or 
comparable fees have in fact been imposed; and there has been 
no effort sanctioned by the United Nations to develop, advocate 
or promote such a taxation proposal.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                    No United Nations Standing Army

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United Nations has not taken formal 
steps to create or develop a standing army under Article 43 of 
the United Nations Charter.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                            No Interest Fees

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that interest fees have not been levied on the 
U.S. for any arrears owed to the United Nations.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                 No United Nations Real Property Rights

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that neither the United Nations nor its 
specialized agencies have exercised any authority or control 
over public or private property in the United States.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill. This section should not be construed to 
override obligations of the parties to the International 
Organizations Immunities Act, the Agreement Regarding the 
Headquarters of the United Nations, supplemental agreements to 
the Agreement, the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities 
of the United Nations, or under any other agreement with the 
United States according the United Nations or its specialized 
agencies privileges and immunities, or apply to property 
occupied or utilized under lease or contract with private or 
government owners.

                   Termination of Borrowing Authority

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United Nations has not engaged in 
external borrowing, nor have the financial regulations of the 
United Nations or any of its specialized agencies been amended 
to permit borrowing, nor has the United States paid any 
interest for any loans incurred through external borrowing by 
the United Nations or its specialized agencies.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

Subchapter C--Reform of Assessments and United Nations Peace Operations

            Certification requirements for fiscal year 1999

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2221) requires that the Secretary 
shall not make her 1999 certification if she determines the 
1998 certifications are no longer valid, and prior to payment 
of authorized arrears in fiscal year 1999, certify that the 
certification requirements set out below have been met.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2321) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

                       Contested Arrears Account

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that prior to 
disbursement of any funds authorized in this title, a contested 
arrears or some other appropriate mechanism has been created 
for the U.S. This account represents the difference between 
what the United Nations says is owed by the United States and 
the amount recognized by the United States Congress. Thus, the 
sum of the obligations that the Congress is authorizing in this 
legislation is the total that the Congress shall authorize to 
be appropriated to the U.N. for its arrears under the regular 
and peacekeeping budgets. Agreement must be reached with the 
United Nations that any monies identified in this account will 
not affect the voting rights of the United States as contained 
in Article 19 of the United Nations charter.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2321) is nearly 
identical, but the timing of the certification was moved to 
fiscal year 1999 certifications at the request of the 
Administration.

                 Limitation on Share of Regular Budget

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2211) requires that the share of 
the total regular budget assessment for the United Nations and 
its specialized agencies does not exceed 22 percent for any 
member.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2311) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

      Limitation on Assessed Share of Budget for Peace Operations

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2221) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the share of the total peacekeeping 
budget for each United Nations assessed peace operation does 
not exceed 25 percent for any member.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2321) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

           Transfer of Regular Budget-Funded Peace Operations

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2221) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the mandates of two peace operations 
funded from the regular budget, the United Nations Truce 
Supervision Organization (UNTSO) and the United Nations 
Military Observer Group in India and Pakistan (UNMOGIP) are 
subject to annual review by the Security Council, and the 
Congressional notification requirements for peacekeeping 
activities.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2321) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

               Subchapter D--Budget and Personnel Reform

                       Certification requirements

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
shall not make her fiscal year 2000 certification if she 
determines the fiscal year 1998 and 1999 certifications are no 
longer valid, and prior to payment of authorized arrears in 
fiscal year 2000, certify that the certification requirements 
set out below have been met.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

             Limitation on Assessed Share of Regular Budget

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the share of the total regular budget 
assessment for the United Nations and its specialized agencies 
does not exceed 20 percent for any member.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

              Inspector General for Certain Organizations

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the three largest specialized agencies, 
the International Labor Organization, the Food and Agriculture 
Organization, and the World Health Organization have each 
established an internal inspector general office comparable to 
the Office of Internal Oversight Services established in the 
United Nations following asimilar certification requirement in 
the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, FY94-95 (section 401 of P.L. 
103-236).
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

              New Budget Procedures for the United Nations

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United Nations is implementing budget 
procedures that require the budget agreed to at the start of a 
budgetary cycle to be maintained, and the system wide 
identification of expenditures by functional categories. For 
purposes of this section, system-wide identification of 
expenditures by functional categories is defined to mean an 
object class distribution of resources. The object class 
distribution should accompany the initial regular assessed 
budget estimates for both the United Nations and its 
specialized agencies.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

           Sunset Policy for Certain United Nations Programs

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United Nations and the International 
Labor Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and 
the World Health Organization have each established an 
evaluation system that requires a determination as to the 
relevance and effectiveness of each program. The United States 
is required to seek a ``sunset'' date for each program unless 
the program demonstrates relevance and effectiveness.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill. The Conferees strongly object to the 
incorporation of funding for terminated programs into the 
baseline of the UN budget for the next biennium. Funding for 
programs which have ceased and one-time expenditures should not 
be carried over into the next budget cycle. The sunset of 
programs should result in financial savings for the member 
states.

   United Nations Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary 
                               Questions

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United States have a seat on the 
United Nations Committee on Administrative and Budgetary 
Questions (ACABQ). Until 1997, the United States has served on 
this committee since the creation of the United Nations. This 
committee is key to the budgetary decisions at the United 
Nations and the United States, as the largest contributing 
nations, should have a seat on this Committee.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

                            National Audits

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the General Accounting Office (GAO) shall 
have access to United Nations financial data so that the GAO 
may perform nationally mandated reviews of all United Nations 
operations.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill. Financial data means data pertaining to the 
financial transactions of the United Nations as well as data 
relating to itsorganization and activities. It is contemplated 
that as a result of this provision, GAO will have access to the data it 
determines it needs to conduct reviews of all U.N. operations.

                               Personnel

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the United Nations is enforcing a 
personnel system based on merit and is enforcing a worldwide 
availability of its international civil servants; a code of 
conduct is being implemented that requires, among other 
standards, financial disclosure statements by senior United 
Nations officials; a personnel evaluation system is being 
implemented; periodic assessments are being completed by the 
United Nations to determine total staffing levels and reporting 
of those assessments; and the United States has completed a 
review of the United Nations allowance system, including 
recommendations for reductions in allowances.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

                    Reduction in Budget Authorities

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the International Labor Organization, the 
Food and Agriculture Organization, and the World Health 
Organization have each approved a budget that reflects a 
decline in the budget approved for 2000-01 from the levels 
agreed to for 1998-99.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

    New Budget Procedures and Financial Regulations for Specialized 
                                Agencies

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2231) requires that the Secretary 
of State certify that the International Labor Organization, the 
Food and Agriculture Organization, and the World Health 
Organization have each established procedures require the 
budget agreed to at the start of a budgetary cycle to be 
maintained; the system wide identification of expenditures by 
functional categories; and approval of supplemental budget 
requests to the secretariat in advance of appropriations for 
those requests.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2331) is nearly identical 
to the Senate bill.

                  Chapter 2--Miscellaneous provisions

          Statutory construction in relation to existing laws

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2241) makes clear that this Act 
does not change or reverse any previous provision of law 
regarding restriction on funding to international 
organizations.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2341) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

Prohibition on payments relating to UNIDO and other organizations from 
       which the United States has withdrawn or rescinded funding

      The House bill has no similar provision.
      The Senate bill (Sec. 2242) prohibits payment to 
organizations from which the United States has withdrawn or 
from which Congress has rescinded funding, including the United 
Nations Industrial Organization and the World Tourism 
Organization.
      The conference substitute (Sec. 2342) is identical to the 
Senate bill.

                            Other Provisions

     Statement concerning Return of Wrongfully Confiscated Foreign 
                               Properties

      The House bill (sec. 1715) expresses a sense of Congress 
supporting efforts and encouraging further actions by post-
communist countries to address the questions of the status of 
wrongly confiscated properties.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1909) is identical to the 
Senate.

                        Payment of Iraqi Claims

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1601), at subsection (a), 
requires that all nondiplomatic accounts of the Government of 
Iraq in the United States that have been blocked pursuant to 
the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 
et seq.) vest in the President. It further requires that the 
President liquidate such accounts within 30 days of the date of 
enactment of the Act, and transfer the amounts from such 
liquidation into the Iraq Claims Fund, established under 
subsection (b).
      The House bill contains no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

       Prohibition on funding for UNESCO World Heritage Programs

      The House bill (sec. 1525) prohibits funds authorized by 
this Act to be made available for the Man and Biosphere Program 
or the World Heritage Program administered by UNESCO.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

   Comprehensive compilation of Arms Control and Disarmament Studies

      The House bill (sec. 1601) repeals a reporting 
requirement to compile arms control and disarmament studies 
because a similar report is produced by another organization.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                              Use of Funds

      The House bill (sec. 1602) amends current law by 
eliminating a requirement to use the Government Printing Office 
and allowing the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency to procure 
printing and binding from local vendors.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

      The House bill (sec. 1707) is a sense of Congress that 
RFE/RL should continue surrogate broadcasting beyond the year 
2000 to countries whose people do not yet fully enjoy freedom 
of expression.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1328) revised the House 
provision to require that the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
issue a report to include an assessment of the need for 
continued funding of RFE/RL broadcasts in the year 2000 and 
beyond.

                 U.S. Citizens held in Prisons in Peru

      The House bill (sec. 1716) expresses a sense of Congress 
that Peru should respect the rights of prisoners to timely 
legal procedures, including the rights of all U.S. citizens 
held in prisons in Peru.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1613) expresses a sense of the 
Senate that the Government of Peru should take all necessary 
steps to ensure that U.S. citizens charged with a crime is 
accorded fair proceedings in a civilian court.
      The conference substitute does not include any provision.

                     Prisoners in Andean Countries

      The House bill (sec. 1730) expresses the Sense of 
Congress that the Governments of the Andean countries should 
respect the rights of prisoners to timely legal procedures.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                 Special Envoys for Mutual Disarmament

      The House bill (sec. 1718) requires the U.S. Ambassador 
to the United Nations to support UN efforts to appoint special 
envoys for conflict prevention to organize and conduct mutual 
disarmament talks in every region of the world.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

          Transfer of nuclear waste from Taiwan to North Korea

      The House bill (sec. 1719) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the Government of Taiwan should refrain from issuing an 
export license for the transfer of nuclear waste to North Korea 
until all parties on the Korean peninsula are assured that 
certain safety precautions are met.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                        Assistance for Ethiopia

      The House bill (sec. 1717) states that the Department of 
State should monitor human rights progress in Ethiopia.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                         Prime Minister Gujral

      The House bill (sec. 1720) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the Administration should support and work closely with 
Indian Prime Minister Gujral to strengthen relations between 
the U.S. and India.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                         Sovereignty of Belarus

      The House bill (sec. 1721) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the Administration urge the Government of President 
Aleksandr Lukashenka of the Republic of Belarus to defend the 
sovereignty of Belarus.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                            Border Closures

      The House bill (sec. 1724) requires a report on any 
border closure or use of an economic or commercial blockade by 
or against any independent state of the former Soviet Union 
against any other country.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as to the Senate 
amendment.

                       Nagorno-Karabagh Conflict

      The House bill (sec. 1725) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the U.S. should take a greater leadership role in working 
for a negotiated settlement of the Nagorno-Karabagh conflict.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                           Crisis in Albania

      The House bill (sec. 1726) expresses a sense of Congress 
that among other things, the U.S.should support the new 
Albanian government as it attempts to reestablish calm and achieve 
political reconciliation.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                                Ukraine

      The House bill (sec. 1727) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the President should ensure that Ukraine receives 
assistance for fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for political and 
economic reforms at a level equal to that allocated to Ukraine 
for fiscal year 1997.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                               Azerbaijan

      The House bill (sec. 1729) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the President should seek cooperation from the governments 
of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Turkey to encourage the 
construction of a pipeline route from Azerbaijan through 
Armenia that could reach Turkey and Mediterranean sea ports.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                        Additional Requirements

      The House bill (sec. 1731) permitted counter narcotic 
military assistance to countries that had been decertified on 
their cooperation on drug-related matters.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

U.S. Policy regarding religious persecution and support of terrorism by 
                                 Sudan

      The House bill (sec. 1733) imposed trade and investment 
sanctions on the government of Sudan until such time as the 
President certifies to Congress that Sudan is no longer 
sponsoring or supporting terrorism.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1605) imposed prohibitions on 
financial transactions on state sponsors of terrorism.
      The conference substitute contains no provision.

                                 Syria

      The House bill (sec. 1734) expresses the sense of 
Congress that the United States should consider applying to 
Syria sanctions which are currently enforced against Iran and 
Libya under the Iran and Libya Sanctions Act of 1996 if the 
Government of Syria does not eliminate its destablizing 
policies.
      The Senate has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                     Abduction of Donald Hutchings

      The House bill (sec. 1735) expresses the sense of 
Congress that the militant organization Al-Faran should release 
Donald Hutchings and three Western Europeans from captivity.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                              cuban cigars

      The House bill (sec. 1736) expresses a sense of Congress 
that the United States should not prohibit the importation into 
the United States of cigars that are the product of Cuba until 
the Government of Cuba has met certain human rights criteria.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is identical to the Senate 
amendment.

                          Lithuania and Latvia

      The House bill (sec. 1738) expresses the sense of 
Congress that adequate assistance should be provided to 
Lithuania and Latvia in fiscal year 1998.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                               East Timor

      The House bill (sec. 1739) states that Congress affirms 
its support for a just and peaceful solution to the conflict in 
East Timor.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                      NATO Enlargement Assistance

      The House bill (sec. 1740) expresses the sense of 
Congress that Romania has made progress toward meeting the 
criteria for accession into NATO and states that the President 
shall designate Romania as eligible to receive assistance under 
the program established under the NATO Participation Act.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1612) expresses a sense of the 
Senate that Romania, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, and Bulgaria 
are to be commended for their progress toward political and 
economic reform. In addition it states that Romania, Estonia, 
Latvia, Lithuania, and Bulgaria are designated as eligible to 
receive assistance under the program established under the NATO 
Participation Act.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                         palestinian land sales

      The House bill (sec. 2201) expresses the sense of 
Congress condemning the policy and practice of murdering 
Palestinian sales of land to Jews.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1622) is similar to the House 
provision.
      The conference substitute does not include any provision.

                                 congo

      The House bill (sec. 2301) makes foreign assistance 
available to the Democratic Republic of Congo.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                                 china

      The House bill (sec. 2401) expresses a sense of Congress 
regarding the imprisonment of Ngawang Choephel in China.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                              buy american

      The House bill (sec. 2501) requires compliance with the 
Buy American Act.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is identical to the Senate 
amendment.

                      foreign aid reporting reform

      The House bill (secs. 2601-2604) requires detailed annual 
reports justifying the foreign assistance programs.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

   programs in latin america, the caribbean and the asia and pacific 
                                 region

      The House bill (sec. 2701) requires aid to be 
proportional by region.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                               indonesia

      The House bill (sec. 2801) expresses the sense of 
Congress on various political and human rights issues within 
Indonesia.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                                 libya

      The House bill (sec. 2901) prohibits foreign aid to any 
country that assists Libya in circumventing U.N. sanctions.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                                 russia

      The House bill (sec. 3101) prohibits foreign aid to 
Russia if Russia transfers missiles to China.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                                belarus

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1602) expresses the sense of 
the Congress that if Belarus concludes a treaty of unification 
with another country the U.S. Permanent Representative to the 
U.N. should introduce resolutions abrogating the sovereign 
status of Belarus within the U.N.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                              italian case

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1611) states that the Congress 
urges the Italian government to seek a negotiated settlement 
with an American citizen whose property was confiscated over 
twenty years ago without fair and proper compensation.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                               iran-iraq

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1615) expresses the sense of 
the Senate to urge the Clinton Administration to enforce the 
provisions of the Iran-Iraq Arms Non-Proliferation Act of 1992.
      The House bill has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                     christian minorities in china

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1616) expresses the sense of 
the Senate that the government of the People's Republic of 
China be urged to release from incarceration all those held for 
participation in religious activities outside the aegis of the 
official churches and cease prosecuting those who participate 
in such religious activities.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                                  nato

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1617) expresses a sense of 
Congress that NATO should consider a formal dispute resolution 
process within the Alliance prior to its December 1997 
ministerial meeting.
      The House bill has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                            aviation safety

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1619) expresses a sense of 
Congress that the need for cooperative efforts in 
transportation and aviation safety be placed on the agenda for 
the Summit of the Americas to be held in March 1998.
      The House bill has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                                 china

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1620) expresses the sense of 
the Senate that the U.S. should limit the granting of U.S. 
visas to Chinese government official who work in entities 
implementing China's laws and directives on religious practices 
and coercive family planning.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                          rule of law in china

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1621) expresses the sense of 
the Senate to encourage the National Endowment for Democracy to 
expand its activities in China and Hong Kong.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                   facilities in beijing and shanghai

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1623) authorizes 
appropriations for the renovation and construction of housing 
and diplomatic facilities at the Embassy in Beijing and the 
Consulate in Shanghai, China.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute (sec. 1101(4)(B)) is the same 
as the House bill.

                      Return of Hong Kong to China

      The House bill (sec. 1712) expresses the sense of 
Congress that the People's Republic of China should respect the 
rule of law, and the freedom of press, speech, association and 
movement that the people of Hong Kong currently enjoy.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                    Radio Free Asia/Voice of America

      The House bill (sec. 1108) expresses a sense of Congress 
that U.S. broadcasting through Radio Free Asia and the Voice of 
America should increase to 24 hours broadcasting to China.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                        Procurement of Services

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1123) amends the State 
Department Basic Authorities Act to enable the Department to 
use personal services contracts to obtain expert and other 
support services for international claims and proceedings. 
Currently, the law allows the Legal Adviser's Office to obtain 
these services by contracting with firms. In many cases, the 
same services could be obtained at half the cost by contracting 
with an individual. This amendment would permit the Department, 
for example, to hire an individual accountant or records 
manager to work on a particular project, rather than having to 
retain an accounting firm to perform the same task, usually at 
more than twice the cost.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                  Restrictions on Lobbying Activities

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1132) amends Section 207 of 
title 18, United States Code, regarding ``Restrictions on 
former officers, employees, and elected officials of the 
executive and legislative branches'', to also prohibit any 
person who serves in the position of chief of mission within 
the category of senior executive branch personnel who are 
restricted, for one year after they leave the chief of mission 
position, from knowingly making representations on behalf of 
someone with an interest in a matter that is before any officer 
or employee of the department or agency in which they served.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

               Recovery of Costs of Health Care Services

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1133) has been requested by 
the Administration. This section, which implements 
recommendations of the Department of State's Office of the 
Inspector General, amends section 904 of the Foreign Service 
Act of 1980 to authorize the Department to recover and retain 
the costs incurred by the Department for health care services 
provided to eligible USG employees and their families and to 
other eligible individuals. The proposed legislation would 
permit the Department to recover and retain such costs from 
third-party payers, and to recover directly from the employee 
if the employee chooses to be uninsured. The Departments of 
Defense and Veterans Affairs, as well as the Indian Health 
Service, already have similar authority.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                International Arms Sales Code of Conduct

      The House bill (sec. 2001) expresses the sense of the 
Congress that the President should attempt to achieve the 
foreign policy goal of an international arms sales code of 
conduct with all Wassenaar Arrangement countries.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable amendment.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                     Arms Transfers Code of Conduct

      The House bill (secs. 3001-3006) establishes policy 
guidelines regarding the provision of U.S. military assistance 
and arms transfers to foreign governments by prohibiting such 
assistance and transfers to countries that fail to promote 
democracy and respect human rights, are engaged in armed 
aggression, and do not fully participate in the U.N. register 
of conventional arms.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

Inadmissibility of Members of former Soviet Union Intelligence Services

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1154) denies United States 
visas to individuals who were employed by the intelligence 
services of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics prior to 
the collapse of the Soviet Union at the end of 1991.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

              Withholding of Assistance for Parking Fines

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1212) expands upon current law 
which requires withholding the proportional amount of foreign 
aid to what a country owes Washington, D.C. in parking fines, 
plus ten percent. Section 1212 expands this requirement to New 
York City, Virginia, and Maryland.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                   Greenhouse Gas Emissions Agreement

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1609) requires that the 
President prepare a detailed and comprehensive report on the 
economic and environmental impacts of the final negotiating 
text of any proposed international agreement under the U.N. 
Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC) to reduce 
greenhouse gas emissions.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

 Sense of the Senate on use of funds in Japan-United States Friendship 
                               Trust Fund

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1215) expresses the sense of 
the Senate that the Japan-United States Friendship Commission 
shall be able to use amounts in the Trust Fund in pursuit of 
the original mandate of the Commission.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

                   International Information programs

      The Senate amendment (sec. 1318) would change the name of 
the salaries and expense account for the U.S. Information 
Agency to International Information Programs.
      The House bill has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the House bill.

               Authorized Strength of the Foreign Service

      The House bill (sec. 1321) establishes personnel end 
strengths for the Foreign Service.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is identical to the Senate 
amendment.

Statement concerning return of or compensation for wrongly confiscated 
                           foreign properties

      The House bill (sec. 1715) expresses a sense of Congress 
supporting efforts and encouraging further actions by post-
Communist countries to address the question of the status of 
wrongfully confiscated properties.
      The Senate amendment has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is the same as the Senate 
amendment.

                     Extension of Au Pair Programs

      The House bill (sec. 1401) permanently extends the Au 
Pair program as authorized in P.L. 104-72.
      The Senate amendment (sec. 1314) is virtually identical 
to the House bill.
      The conference substitute does not include the provision. 
The extension was passed as a separate bill (P.L. 105-48).

                              Peace Corps

      The Senate amendment (secs. 1401-1403) authorizes 
appropriations for the Peace Corps. In addition, section 1403 
makes certain modifications to current law regarding personal 
services contractors, overseas travel, and other technical 
changes.
      The House has no comparable provision.
      The conference substitute is identical to the House bill.
      GPS Standards Negotiations. The Committee of Conference 
finds that the U.S. Department of Defense developed and 
operated Global Positioning System provides crucial information 
for global navigation, position location and precision timing. 
With its various military, scientific and commercial uses, GPS 
is making important contributions to the national security, 
foreign policy, economic growth, and trade goals of the United 
States.
      The Committee of Conference further finds that, by 
seeking to establish GPS as an international standard, the 
United States can advance national security interests, 
strengthen cooperative security relations with our allies, and 
support the competitive leadership of American industry in 
providing GPS products and services to the global marketplace. 
The broad use of GPS spurs global economic growth as it 
contributes to improving infrastructures of both developing and 
industrial countries.
      The Committee of Conference is pleased that the U.S. 
Department of State is undertaking an important leadership role 
in coordinating efforts within the executive branch in pursuit 
of regional agreements with U.S. allies, starting with Japan, 
that seek to achieve three critical goals: (1) ensure the 
operation of the GPS on a continuous worldwide basis free of 
direct user fees; (2) establish GPS and its augmentations as an 
acceptable international standard; (3) eliminate any foreign 
barriers to, and other restrictions of foreign governments on, 
peaceful applications of GPS.
      The Committee of Conference therefore directs that, not 
later than 60 days after the enactment of this legislation, and 
annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit a 
report to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and 
the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
Representatives that provides the status, prospects and results 
of cooperative activities undertaken by the United States with 
the governments of other countries to achieve regional 
agreements that establish GPS and its augmentations as an 
acceptable international standard.

                For consideration of the House bill and the 
                Senate amendment, and modifications committed 
                to conference:
                                   Benjamin A. Gilman,
                                   Henry Hyde,
                                   Christopher H. Smith,

                For consideration of the House bill (except 
                title XXI) and the Senate amendment, and 
                modifications committed to conference:
                                   William Goodling,
                                   Dan Burton,
                                   Doug Bereuter,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Jesse Helms,
                                   Paul Coverdell,
                                   Chuck Hagel,
                                   Rod Grams,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.