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                                                       Calendar No. 187
104th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE

   1st Session                                                  104-143
_______________________________________________________________________


 
      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                        APPROPRIATION BILL, 1996

                                _______


   September 14 (legislative day, September 5), 1995.--Ordered to be 
                                printed

_______________________________________________________________________


  Mr. McConnell, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1868]

    The Committee on Appropriations to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 1868), making appropriations for Foreign Assistance 
and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1996, and for other purposes, reports the same to the Senate 
with amendments and recommends that the bill as amended do 
pass.


Amounts in new budget authority

Fiscal year 1995 appropriations......................... $13,537,221,750
Fiscal year 1996 budget estimate........................  14,773,904,666
Amount of bill as passed by House.......................  11,901,375,000
Amount of bill as reported to Senate....................  12,343,914,000
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to:
    1995 appropriations.................................  -1,193,307,750
    Budget estimate.....................................  -2,429,990,666
    House passed bill...................................    +442,539,000

                                                     SUMMARY TABLE: AMOUNTS IN NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY                                                     
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                   Increase (+) or decrease (-),  Senate
                                                                                                                            bill compared with          
                         Item                            Budget estimate     House reported      Recommended by  ---------------------------------------
                                                                                  bill         Senate  Committee                        House reported  
                                                                                                                    Budget estimate          bill       
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Export assistance.....................................       $750,854,000       $675,633,000        $693,854,000       -$57,000,000        +$18,221,000 
Economic assistance--Bilateral........................      7,997,497,000      6,877,624,000       7,017,213,331       -980,283,669        +139,589,331 
Military assistance...................................      3,351,908,000      3,275,679,000       3,142,933,000       -128,756,000         -20,046,000 
Economic assistance--Multilateral.....................      2,753,864,666      1,185,139,000       1,489,913,669     -1,263,950,997        +304,774,669 
                                                       -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, fiscal year 1996.........................     14,773,904,666     11,901,375,000      12,343,914,000     -2,429,990,666        +442,539,000 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of total budget authority in the bill....................     5
Historical totals of foreign assistance..........................     5
Items of special interest........................................    20
    Foreign aid reform...........................................    20
Title I--Export assistance:
    Export-Import Bank of the United States......................    25
    Overseas Private Investment Corporation......................    25
    Trade and Development Agency.................................    26
Title II--Bilateral economic assistance:
    Economic assistance..........................................    27
    International disaster assistance............................    39
    Payment to the foreign service retirement and disability fund    40
    AID operating expenses.......................................    40
    Operating expenses of the Office of Inspector General........    41
    Other bilateral economic assistance..........................    41
    International Fund for Ireland...............................    41
    Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States..........    42
    Assistance for the New Independent States of the former 
      Soviet Union...............................................    43
    Independent Agencies:
        African Development Foundation...........................    48
        Inter-American Foundation................................    48
        Peace Corps..............................................    48
    Department of State:
        International narcotics control..........................    48
        Migration and refugee assistance.........................    49
        Emergency refugee and migration assistance fund..........    52
        Antiterrorism............................................    52
        Nonproliferation and disarmament fund....................    52
Title III--Military assistance:
    International military education and training................    53
    Foreign military financing...................................    55
    Special defense acquisition fund.............................    58
    Peacekeeping operations......................................    58
Title IV--Multilateral economic assistance:
    International financial institutions summary.................    60
    International Bank for Reconstruction and Development........    60
    International Development Association........................    61
    International Finance Corporation............................    62
    Inter-American Development Bank..............................    63
    Asian Development Bank.......................................    64
    Asian Development Fund.......................................    64
    African Development Bank and Fund............................    65
    European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.............    66
    North American Development Bank..............................    67
    Enhanced structural adjustment facility of the International 
      Monetary Fund..............................................    67
    Department of State: Voluntary contributions to international 
      organizations and programs.................................    68
Title V--General provisions......................................    70
Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI of the standing rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    73
Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI of the standing rules 
  of the Senate..................................................    73
Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the standing rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    74
Budget impact statement..........................................    80
Tables...........................................................    81
             SUMMARY OF TOTAL BUDGET AUTHORITY IN THE BILL

    The Committee recommends a net total of $12,343,914,000 in 
new budget authority, divided into the following categories:

Multilateral economic assistance........................  $1,489,913,669
Bilateral economic assistance...........................   7,017,213,331
Military assistance.....................................   3,142,933,000
Export-import assistance................................     693,854,000

    The Committee recommendations represent a total decrease of 
$2,429,990,666 below the President's fiscal year 1996 request.
    The Committee recommends budget authority of $1,229,913,669 
for the international financial institutions, which is 
$1,073,950,997 below the requested amount.

                HISTORICAL TOTALS OF FOREIGN ASSISTANCE

    As in the past, the Committee is including in its report 
several tables and graphs, updated with the latest available 
data, which illustrate certain trends in U.S. foreign 
assistance.

         Table 1.--Foreign Aid Expenditures by Donor Countries

    The following table shows the amounts expended by donor 
countries on foreign aid in 1994 and what percent of their GNP 
that amount represents:

                                   OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE [ODA] 1994                                   
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                            GNP       Aid capita
                              Country                                      Amount        (percent)    per donor 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Australia..........................................................             $1,087          .38       $61.76
Austria............................................................                561          .29        71.01
Belgium............................................................                677          .30        67.70
Canada.............................................................              2,230          .42        77.43
Denmark............................................................              1,450         1.03       278.84
Finland............................................................                289          .31        56.67
France.............................................................              8,447          .64       146.90
Germany............................................................              6,751          .33        83.66
Ireland............................................................                105          .24        30.00
Italy..............................................................              1,967          .20        34.45
Japan..............................................................             13,238          .29       106.32
Luxembourg.........................................................                 59          .40       151.76
Netherlands........................................................              2,531          .76       165.42
New Zealand........................................................                111          .24        31.71
Norway.............................................................              1,137         1.05       264.41
Portugal...........................................................                250          .28        25.51
Spain..............................................................              1,247          .26        31.57
Sweden.............................................................              1,703          .90       195.75
Switzerland........................................................                978          .36       137.75
United Kingdom.....................................................              3,085          .30        53.28
United States......................................................              9,851          .15        38.21
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
      Total DAC....................................................             57,754          .29  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


        Table 2.--U.S. Foreign Assistance, Fiscal Years 1946-94

    The following tables illustrate the total amount of foreign 
assistance furnished to other nations by the United States 
during the fiscal years 1946-94 and amounts by region and 
country for 1946-94:


              U.S. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE, FISCAL YEARS 1946-94             
                        [In millions of dollars]                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Economic     Military              
                                    assistance   assistance     Total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total economic and military                                             
 assistance, fiscal years 1946-94    293,865.9    158,629.3    452,495.2
Total other U.S. loans and                                              
 grants, fiscal years 1946-94....     82,521.5  ...........     82,521.5
                                  --------------------------------------
      Grand total................    376,387.4    158,629.3    535,016.7
------------------------------------------------------------------------


U.S. ECONOMIC AND MILITARY ASSISTANCE: DETAIL BY REGION AND BY COUNTRY--
                          FISCAL YEARS 1946-94                          
                        [In millions of dollars]                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Economic     Military              
             Country                assistance   assistance     Total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Near East:                                                              
    Algeria......................        206.2          1.1        207.3
    Bahrain......................          2.4          1.7          4.1
    Cento........................         39.6  ...........         39.6
    Egypt........................     22,798.9     19,908.6     42,707.5
    Iran.........................        767.7      1,404.9      2,172.6
    Iraq.........................         56.4         50.0        106.4
    Israel.......................     22,870.5     36,627.4     59,497.9
    Jordan.......................      2,004.7      1,935.4      3,940.1
    Lebanon......................        431.3        278.4        709.7
    Morocco......................      2,198.0      1,221.8      3,419.8
    Near East regional...........        733.7           .1        733.8
    Oman.........................        192.1        155.9        348.0
    Saudi Arabia.................         31.8        292.3        324.1
    Sinai support mission........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Syria........................        352.3           .1        352.4
    Tunisia......................      1,263.6        770.4      2,034.0
    West Bank/Gaza...............        106.4  ...........        106.4
    Yemen Arab Republic..........        483.4         30.3        513.7
    Yemen, Peoples Democratic                                           
     Republic of.................         26.5  ...........         26.5
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     54,565.5     62,678.3    117,243.8
                                  ======================================
Sub-Saharan Africa:                                                     
    Africa regional..............      1,445.4         52.4      1,497.8
    Angola.......................        182.8  ...........        182.8
    Benin........................        147.5          1.0        148.5
    Botswana.....................        357.8         35.0        392.8
    Burkina FASO.................        368.0          1.2        369.2
    Burundi......................        197.2          1.9        199.1
    Cameroon.....................        317.7         36.3        354.0
    Cape Verde...................        118.9          1.2        120.1
    Central African Republic.....         73.2          2.3         75.5
    Chad.........................        271.7         37.4        309.1
    Comoros......................         16.9           .5         17.4
    Congo........................         52.8           .8         53.6
    Cote d'Ivoire................        166.2          3.4        169.6
    Djibouti.....................         51.8         15.9         67.7
    East Africa (Regional                                               
     Development Office).........         33.3  ...........         33.3
    Entente states...............          8.5  ...........          8.5
    Equatorial Guinea............         16.6          1.8         18.4
    Eritrea......................         40.5           .1         40.6
    Ethiopia.....................      1,191.7        261.4      1,453.1
    Gabon........................         42.8         26.0         68.8
    Gambia, the..................        155.6          1.2        156.8
    Ghana........................        719.3          5.6        724.9
    Guinea.......................        482.1         10.8        492.9
    Guinea-Bissau (formerly                                             
     Portuguese Guinea)..........         76.6          1.0         77.6
    Kenya........................        994.2        282.9      1,277.1
    Lesotho......................        329.0           .6        329.6
    Liberia......................        989.2         95.0      1,084.2
    Libya........................        212.5         17.6        230.1
    Madagascar...................        322.2          5.3        327.5
    Malawi.......................        511.2          9.3        520.5
    Mali.........................        576.2          5.5        581.7
    Mauritania...................        191.6           .8        192.4
    Mauritius....................         82.3           .3         82.6
    Mozambique...................        834.2           .5        834.7
    Namibia......................         53.9           .8         54.7
    Niger........................        531.1         33.4        564.5
    Nigeria......................        522.9          3.1        526.0
    Rwanda.......................        297.4          2.5        299.9
    Sahel regional...............        260.6  ...........        260.6
    Sao Tome and Principe........         15.3           .8         16.1
    Senegal......................        741.3         52.4        793.7
    Seychelles...................         39.8           .6         40.4
    Sierra Leone.................        235.4          2.4        237.8
    Somalia......................        880.0        240.8      1,120.8
    South Africa.................        466.7           .1        466.8
    Southern Africa region-Osarac        161.1  ...........        161.1
    Sudan........................      1,609.2        375.7      1,984.9
    Swaziland....................        190.3           .8        191.1
    Tanzania.....................        543.5           .7        544.2
    Togo.........................        186.5           .8        187.3
    Uganda.......................        417.1          1.5        418.6
    Zaire........................      1,218.7        438.7      1,657.4
    Zambia.......................        513.6           .6        514.2
    Zimbabwe.....................        665.0          3.1        668.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     21,126.6      2,073.7     23,200.3
                                  ======================================
Latin America:                                                          
    Argentina....................        195.5        269.6        465.1
    Bahamas......................          6.0           .6          6.6
    Barbados.....................          4.2           .5          4.7
    Belize.......................        140.2          5.0        145.2
    Bolivia......................      1,608.1        227.5      1,835.6
    Brazil.......................      2,457.9        640.8      3,098.7
    Caribbean regional...........        721.2         47.6        768.8
    Central America regional.....  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Chile........................      1,342.7        221.1      1,563.8
    Colombia.....................      1,719.5        510.1      2,229.6
    Costa Rica...................      1,730.7         40.1      1,770.8
    Cuba.........................          4.0         16.1         20.1
    Dominican Republic...........      1,551.0        102.7      1,653.7
    Ecuador......................        830.3        191.3      1,021.6
    El Salvador..................      4,080.4      1,174.7      5,255.1
    Grenada......................         60.1           .2         60.3
    Guatemala....................      1,615.9         75.8      1,691.7
    Guyana.......................        117.0          6.0        123.0
    Haiti........................      1,107.9         15.3      1,123.2
    Honduras.....................      1,607.3        553.5      2,160.8
    Jamaica......................      1,810.0         48.1      1,858.1
    Latin America regional.......      1,588.1         25.4      1,613.5
    Mexico.......................        670.2         18.8        689.0
    Nicaragua....................        915.7         30.5        946.2
    Panama.......................      1,050.0         77.4      1,127.4
    Paraguay.....................        237.3         32.1        269.4
    Peru.........................      2,145.9        348.3      2,494.2
    Regional Office Central                                             
     America and Panama [ROCAP]..        752.8  ...........        752.8
    Suriname.....................         22.9           .3         23.2
    Trinidad and Tobago..........         43.2          2.3         45.5
    Uruguay......................        202.0         92.7        294.7
    Venezuela....................        209.4        154.7        364.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     30,547.3      4,929.2     35,476.5
                                  ======================================
Asia:                                                                   
    Afghanistan..................        729.2          5.6        734.8
    Asia regional................      1,140.7  ...........      1,140.7
    Associated Southeastern Asian                                       
     Nations [ASEAN].............         10.2  ...........         10.2
    Bangladesh...................      2,905.7          4.7      2,910.4
    Bhutan.......................          8.0  ...........          8.0
    China, Peoples Republic of...          3.2  ...........          3.2
    Hong Kong....................         43.8  ...........         43.8
    India........................     12,061.8        149.5     12,211.3
    Indochina Associated States..        825.6        731.5      1,557.1
    Indonesia....................      3,809.3        692.7      4,502.0
    Japan........................      2,685.9      1,239.6      3,925.5
    Kampuchea....................      1,006.6      1,280.4      2,287.0
    Korea........................      6,086.9      8,796.3     14,883.2
    Laos.........................        917.3      1,606.7      2,524.0
    Malaysia.....................         92.0        196.9        288.9
    Maldives.....................          2.7           .4          3.1
    Mongolia.....................         74.1           .2         74.3
    Myanmar......................        231.3         90.5        321.8
    Nepal........................        537.2          4.3        541.5
    Pakistan.....................      7,939.9      2,951.5     10,891.4
    Philippines..................      4,963.7      2,345.6      7,309.3
    Ryukyu Islands (U.S.)........        413.8  ...........        413.8
    Singapore....................          2.8         19.6         22.4
    Sri Lanka....................      1,438.5          8.1      1,446.6
    Taiwan.......................      2,218.7      4,360.4      6,579.1
    Thailand.....................      1,086.1      2,318.6      3,404.7
    Viet Nam (South), Republic of      6,952.5     16,416.1     23,368.6
    Western Samoa................         23.2           .1         23.3
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     58,210.9     43,219.3    101,430.2
                                  ======================================
Europe:                                                                 
    Albania......................         99.6           .5        100.1
    Austria......................      1,136.1        122.1      1,258.2
    Belgium......................        589.1      1,275.3      1,864.4
    Berlin, West.................        131.9  ...........        131.9
    Bosnia Hercegovina...........         86.7  ...........         86.7
    Bulgaria.....................         24.4           .9         25.3
    Croatia......................         18.9  ...........         18.9
    Cyprus.......................        266.4  ...........        266.4
    Czech Republic...............          3.9          1.0          4.9
    Czechoslovakia...............        195.6          1.0        196.6
    Denmark......................        276.5        640.1        916.6
    East European regional.......      1,132.3  ...........      1,132.3
    European regional............      1,082.4           .2      1,082.6
    Finland......................         51.2           .8         52.0
    France.......................      3,917.0      4,548.6      8,465.6
    Germany, Democratic Republic                                        
     of..........................           .8  ...........           .8
    Germany, Federal Republic of.      3,844.0        939.4      4,783.4
    Greece.......................      1,901.6      8,495.4     10,397.0
    Hungary......................         42.2          2.6         44.8
    Iceland......................         76.9           .3         77.2
    Italy........................      3,420.8      2,545.3      5,966.1
    Latvia.......................         10.0           .3         10.3
    Lithuania....................         52.7           .3         53.0
    Macedonia....................         15.5  ...........         15.5
    Malta........................         84.1           .7         84.8
    Netherlands..................      1,027.6      1,284.7      2,312.3
    Norway.......................        299.9        943.8      1,243.7
    Poland.......................        955.9          2.6        958.5
    Portugal.....................      1,367.5      1,797.7      3,165.2
    Republic of Ireland (formerly                                       
     Ireland)....................        326.8           .1        326.9
    Romania......................        151.8           .6        152.4
    Slovak Republic..............          1.0           .4          1.4
    Slovenia.....................          1.0           .2          1.2
    Spain........................      1,084.5      3,446.5      4,531.0
    Sweden.......................        109.0  ...........        109.0
    Switzerland..................  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Turkey.......................      4,851.8     12,925.6     17,777.4
    United Kingdom...............      7,672.1      1,107.4      8,779.5
    U.S.S.R......................        186.4  ...........        186.4
    Yugoslavia...................      1,836.4        723.7      2,560.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     38,332.2     40,808.0     79,140.2
                                  ======================================
New Independent States:                                                 
    Armenia......................        183.3  ...........        183.3
    Azerbaijan...................         21.3  ...........         21.3
    Belarus......................        103.9           .2        104.1
    Estonia......................         10.0           .2         10.2
    Georgia......................        137.1           .1        137.2
    Kazakhstan...................        109.6           .3        109.9
    Kyrgyz Republic..............        114.4  ...........        114.4
    Moldova......................        105.4           .1        105.5
    New Independent States.......        743.8           .3        744.1
    Russia.......................      1,593.6           .9      1,594.5
    Tajikistan...................         72.4  ...........         72.4
    Turkmenitan..................         60.5           .1         60.6
    Ukraine......................        194.0          1.0        195.0
    Uzbekistan...................         26.1  ...........         26.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............      3,475.6          3.1      3,478.7
                                  ======================================
Oceania and others:                                                     
    Australia....................          8.0        115.6        123.6
    Fiji.........................  ...........  ...........  ...........
    New Zealand..................          4.3          4.3          8.6
    Oceania regional.............        289.5          1.9        291.4
    Pacific Islands, Trust                                              
     Territory of the............        824.2  ...........        824.2
    Papua New Guinea.............         17.6           .8         18.4
    Solomon Islands..............  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Tonga........................  ...........  ...........  ...........
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............      1,143.5        122.7      1,266.2
                                  ======================================
Canada...........................         17.5         13.0         30.5
                                  ======================================
Interregional activities.........     86,446.8      4,782.3     91,229.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Grand total................    293,865.9    158,629.3    452,495.2
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       Table 3.--Appropriations for Bilateral Foreign Assistance

    The following graphs show the amounts appropriated for 
bilateral economic and military assistance for 1982-95 in 
constant and current dollars:


   Table 4.--Appropriations for International Financial Institutions

    The following graphs show the amounts appropriated for 
multilateral assistance for 1982-95 in constant and current 
dollars:


                  Table 5.--AID Assistance Per Country

    The following table lists the total dollar AID assistance 
per country by ascending per capita gross national product:

  AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT, TOTAL DOLLAR ASSISTANCE PER COUNTRY LISTED BY PER CAPITA GROSS NATIONAL 
                                                     PRODUCT                                                    
                                             [Dollars in thousands]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                             Fiscal year 1993      Fiscal year 1994 \1\    Fiscal year 1995 \1\ 
                                GNP per  -----------------------------------------------------------------------
           Country              capita      Dollar    Cumulative    Dollar    Cumulative    Dollar    Cumulative
                                (1993)       level      percent      level      percent      level      percent 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Afghanistan.................     ( \2\ )     $20,000  ..........      $1,995  ..........  ..........  ..........
Bosnia-Hercegovina, Croatia.     ( \2\ )  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........     $40,737  ..........
Cambodia....................     ( \2\ )      31,834  ..........      29,475  ..........      33,493  ..........
Eritrea.....................     ( \2\ )       6,000  ..........       9,999  ..........       9,000  ..........
Haiti.......................     ( \2\ )      67,287  ..........      62,857  ..........     152,501  ..........
Liberia.....................     ( \2\ )  ..........  ..........       3,696  ..........          23  ..........
Somalia.....................     ( \2\ )       6,000  ..........      15,941  ..........       5,500  ..........
Burma.......................     ( \3\ )  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........         100  ..........
Yemen.......................     ( \3\ )       4,000  ..........       2,999  ..........       7,000  ..........
Mozambique..................          90      35,000  ..........      36,400  ..........      39,296  ..........
Tanzania....................          90      20,800  ..........      19,685  ..........      25,963  ..........
Ethiopia....................         100      32,260  ..........      32,416  ..........      29,971  ..........
Sierra Leone................         150         500  ..........         468  ..........         497  ..........
Viet Nam (South)............         170  ..........  ..........         688  ..........  ..........  ..........
Burundi.....................         180      16,790  ..........       4,497  ..........       4,996  ..........
Uganda......................         180      38,150  ..........      33,862  ..........      35,000  ..........
Nepal.......................         190      20,919  ..........      16,799  ..........      15,144  ..........
Malawi......................         200      15,000  ..........      28,190  ..........      26,998  ..........
Chad........................         210      10,250  ..........       5,150  ..........       1,970  ..........
Rwanda......................         210       3,600  ..........  ..........  ..........       8,287  ..........
Bangladesh..................         220      33,902  ..........      43,200  ..........      39,793  ..........
Madagascar..................         220      35,500  ..........      27,590  ..........      25,492  ..........
Guinea-Bissau...............         240       3,900  ..........       4,100  ..........       4,955  ..........
Kenya.......................         270      14,828  ..........      17,183  ..........      18,179  ..........
Mali........................         270      30,555  ..........      34,204  ..........      27,979  ..........
Niger.......................         270      14,750  ..........      16,115  ..........      15,984  ..........
Burkina.....................         300       2,685  ..........       2,627  ..........         357  ..........
India.......................         300      24,330  ..........      35,684  ..........      59,239  ..........
Nigeria.....................         300      11,489  ..........       5,893  ..........      11,780  ..........
Albania.....................         340  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      38,138  ..........
Nicaragua...................         340     135,301  ..........      77,730  ..........      29,872  ..........
Togo........................         340       1,253  ..........           4  ..........  ..........  ..........
Gambia......................         350       7,600  ..........       6,750  ..........       1,481  ..........
Guyana......................         350       3,702  ..........       2,559  ..........       1,044  ..........
Sao Tome....................         350         300  ..........         800  ..........         300  ..........
Zambia......................         380      18,249  ..........      18,850  ..........      20,689  ..........
Mongolia....................         390       8,100  ..........       7,000  ..........       8,292  ..........
Central African Republic....         400       2,314  ..........       2,316  ..........       2,696  ..........
Benin.......................         430      16,409  ..........      20,061  ..........      16,783  ..........
Ghana.......................         430      39,894  ..........      33,135  ..........      33,999  ..........
Pakistan....................         430  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       9,000  ..........
Tajikistan..................         470  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       9,550  ..........
Guinea......................         500      22,840  ..........      18,437  ..........      19,973  ..........
Zimbabwe....................         520      18,169  ..........      15,747  ..........      19,500  ..........
Comoros.....................         560  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........         300  ..........
Georgia.....................         580  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      26,678  ..........
Honduras....................         600      32,582  ..........      19,060  ..........      15,091  ..........
Sri Lanka...................         600      15,714  ..........      12,200  ..........      10,241  ..........
Cote d'Ivoire...............         630       5,673  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Lesotho.....................         650       7,700  ..........       2,072  ..........       2,879  ..........
Armenia.....................         660  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      41,416  ..........
Egypt.......................         660     747,000  ..........     591,642  ..........   1,113,289  ..........
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..............  ..........   1,583,129       41.82   1,320,076       40.55   2,061,444       39.31
                             ===================================================================================
Angola......................     ( \4\ )  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       4,998  ..........
Lebanon.....................     ( \4\ )      10,301  ..........       1,661  ..........      15,632  ..........
West Bank/Gaza..............     ( \4\ )      29,579  ..........      56,769  ..........      76,823  ..........
Turkmenistan................     ( \4\ )  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       6,048  ..........
Azerbaijan..................         730  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       9,973  ..........
Indonesia...................         740      43,481  ..........      13,405  ..........      71,971  ..........
Senegal.....................         750      19,700  ..........      30,925  ..........      18,955  ..........
Bolivia.....................         760      86,958  ..........      50,781  ..........      36,279  ..........
Djibouti....................         780       2,000  ..........       1,000  ..........  ..........  ..........
Cameroon....................         820       8,925  ..........          49  ..........       1,926  ..........
Macedonia...................         820  ..........  ..........       5,000  ..........      14,952  ..........
Kirghizstan.................         850  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      26,206  ..........
Philippines.................         850      81,706  ..........      45,214  ..........      35,163  ..........
Cape Verde..................         920         950  ..........         800  ..........       1,791  ..........
Congo.......................         950         700  ..........         700  ..........         894  ..........
Uzbekistan..................         970  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      13,718  ..........
Morocco.....................       1,040      32,724  ..........      17,571  ..........      13,100  ..........
Moldova.....................       1,060  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      28,655  ..........
Guatemala...................       1,100      32,428  ..........      26,777  ..........      23,532  ..........
Bulgaria....................       1,140  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      39,237  ..........
Romania.....................       1,140       1,999  ..........  ..........  ..........      43,408  ..........
Jordan......................       1,190      65,000  ..........      28,000  ..........      12,200  ..........
Swaziland...................       1,190       7,246  ..........       6,255  ..........       5,799  ..........
Ecuador.....................       1,200      12,779  ..........       9,625  ..........       8,350  ..........
Dominican Republic..........       1,230      19,507  ..........      10,719  ..........       8,003  ..........
El Salvador.................       1,320     141,363  ..........      56,425  ..........      64,563  ..........
Lithuania...................       1,320  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      17,896  ..........
Colombia....................       1,400      15,970  ..........         172  ..........         850  ..........
Jamaica.....................       1,440      16,925  ..........       8,929  ..........      10,004  ..........
Peru........................       1,490      43,264  ..........      37,612  ..........      25,776  ..........
Paraguay....................       1,510  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       1,513  ..........
Kazakhstan..................       1,560  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      55,031  ..........
Tunisia.....................       1,720       3,611  ..........         985  ..........  ..........  ..........
Namibia.....................       1,820       1,633  ..........      12,799  ..........       8,800  ..........
Slovakia....................       1,950  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      33,114  ..........
Latvia......................       2,010  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       9,682  ..........
Thailand....................       2,110       6,429  ..........       5,082  ..........  ..........  ..........
Fiji........................       2,130  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Costa Rica..................       2,150       5,970  ..........       3,257  ..........       2,510  ..........
Ukraine.....................       2,210  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........     187,208  ..........
Poland......................       2,260  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      96,282  ..........
Russia......................       2,340  ..........  ..........      90,000  ..........     512,865  ..........
Belize......................       2,450       4,800  ..........       2,196  ..........       2,164  ..........
Panama......................       2,600       8,595  ..........       4,346  ..........       6,859  ..........
Czech Republic..............       2,710  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      21,286  ..........
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..............  ..........     704,543       18.61     527,054       16.19   1,574,016       30.01
                             ===================================================================================
Botswana....................       2,790       6,300  ..........       4,775  ..........       2,698  ..........
Belarus.....................       2,870  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       7,050  ..........
Brazil......................       2,930  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       4,650  ..........
Turkey......................       2,970     200,000  ..........  ..........  ..........     166,003  ..........
South Africa................       2,980      79,750  ..........     133,674  ..........      99,996  ..........
Estonia.....................       3,080  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       3,489  ..........
Chile.......................       3,170  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       2,205  ..........
Hungary.....................       3,350  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........      38,841  ..........
Mexico......................       3,610  ..........  ..........         500  ..........      23,800  ..........
Oman........................       4,850  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Seychelles..................       6,280       1,850  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Slovenia....................       6,490  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........       6,316  ..........
Portugal....................       9,130  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Cyprus......................      10,380      10,000  ..........      29,999  ..........      15,000  ..........
Ireland.....................      13,000  ..........  ..........      39,408  ..........      39,198  ..........
Israel......................      13,920   1,200,000  ..........   1,200,000  ..........   1,200,000  ..........
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal..............  ..........   1,497,900       39.57   1,408,356       43.26   1,609,246       30.68
                             ===================================================================================
      Total country programs  ..........    3,785,57                                                            
                                                   2      100.00   3,255,486      100.00   5,244,706      100.00
      Total noncountry                                                                                          
       programs.............  ..........   1,613,974  ..........   3,170,886  ..........   1,845,044  ..........
                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total...........  ..........   5,399,546  ..........   6,426,372  ..........   7,089,749  ..........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Country levels do not include attributions of regional and central funds as in the fiscal year 1996         
  congressional presentation.                                                                                   
\2\ Estimated to be low income ($695 or less).                                                                  
\3\ Estimated to be lower middle income ($696 to $2,785.                                                        
\4\ Data not available.                                                                                         

    Table 6.--Unliquidated Balances of the Agency for International 
                              Development

    Below is a table showing the unliquidated balances of the 
Agency for International Development:


UNLIQUIDATED BALANCES OF THE AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


(As of December 31, 1994)

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Development assistance:                                           Amount
    Development Assistance Program......................      1,152,146 
    Agriculture, rural development, and nutrition.......        235,743 
    Population planning.................................        564,320 
    Health..............................................         73,219 
    AIDS prevention.....................................          9,344 
    Child survival......................................         50,857 
    Education and human resources development...........         57,802 
    Private sector, environment and energy..............         80,615 
    In-transit/reconciling items........................       (762,895)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, functional development assistance.......      1,461,151 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    American schools and hospitals abroad...............         28,543 
    Operating expenses..................................        145,569 
    Operating expenses, inspector general...............         15,704 
    International disaster assistance...................        126,391 
    Sub-Saharan and South Africa development............      1,790,918 
    Central America reconciliation assistance...........          1,418 
    Private sector revolving fund.......................         10,698 
    Special assistance initiatives......................        733,754 
    Foreign Service retirement fund.....................................
    New Independent States..............................      1,438,964 
    African disaster assistance.........................         16,953 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, development assistance.....................      5,770,063 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Economic support fund...................................      2,467,319 
Demobilization and transition fund......................         15,818 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, unliquidated balances......................      8,253,200 

Note: Above listing excludes trade and development at $60,356,000, for 
which AID keeps accounting records for the Trade and Development Agency.
                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST

                           Foreign Aid Reform

    For the past 3 years, the Committee has expressed a strong 
bipartisan concern about the need to reform the administration 
of U.S. assistance programs. In 1993, the Committee noted the 
following:

          The Committee must state candidly that it is 
        disappointed at the meager results of foreign aid 
        reform in the first year of the new administration. An 
        invaluable window of opportunity to forge a new and 
        stronger consensus between Congress and the executive 
        branch on the nature and goals of U.S. assistance in 
        the post-cold war era was missed. This task still lies 
        ahead and must be carried out fully if the steep 
        decline in foreign aid resources * * * is to be halted 
        and reversed, and if U.S. foreign assistance is to be 
        focused more effectively on advancing U.S. interests in 
        a rapidly changing global environment.

    Six years after the collapse of the Berlin Wall and 
communism, the Committee remains concerned that the 
administration of our Nation's foreign assistance programs has 
not kept pace with the global changes or our national 
requirements.
    The Committee believes that congressional and public 
support for foreign aid has eroded in large measure due to the 
perception that American aid and interests are disconnected. In 
part, our ability to target foreign aid effectively has been 
crippled by the outmoded and unduly complicated Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961. Thirty-three goals combined with 
seventy-five priorities are legislated in the act. Amended over 
the past 30 years, there no longer is a sense of coherence, 
strategy, or focus to the law or our aid programs. 
Unfortunately, Congress and the administration have not reached 
agreement on authorization legislation to simplify and 
revitalize our foreign assistance programs.
    The Committee remains committed to working with the 
administration to reform the legislative foundation for the 
administration of assistance programs. However, the Committee 
also believes there is ample opportunity to substantially 
improve the effectiveness of our program within existing 
legislative guidelines.
    To develop a more complete understanding of the impact of 
American aid around the world, the Committee decided to conduct 
hearings concentrating on performance in specific geographic 
regions rather than examining the merits of broad functions or 
categories such as security assistance or humanitarian 
programs. The hearings offered an opportunity to consider and 
evaluate the connection between American foreign policy 
priorities and the coordination and provision of assistance.
    Although there has been a quantitative shift in resources 
to address demands and opportunities in central Europe and the 
New Independent States, there has not been a correlating, 
needed change in the approach to programs. Dynamic times have 
not produced new, innovative thinking. Priorities, projects, 
and activities in Russia are identified, funded, and managed in 
much the same way as they would be in Malawi. Senior regional 
officials representing the Agency for International Development 
and the Department of State emphasized the need to maintain an 
American role abroad through existing levels of support for 
ongoing programs. Testimony in 1995 did not differ in 
substance, direction, or initiatives from testimony offered in 
1992.
    The requirement to revitalize our foreign aid programs is 
driven not only by the dramatic changes around the world. The 
congressional commitment to balance the national budget 
necessarily reduced overall discretionary spending as well as 
the allocation for foreign operations, export, and related 
programs.
    The Committee believes it is in our national interests to 
remain actively engaged abroad. Effectively administered, 
foreign assistance can and should protect U.S. security and 
promote American economic and political interests. These goals 
cannot be achieved by sustaining a business as usual approach. 
The Committee expects the foreign assistance and export 
promotion agencies to accomplish more with less resources by 
consolidating responsibilities, eliminating duplication, 
establishing a new order of country and program priorities, and 
more effectively leveraging public and private sector 
resources.
    The Committee believes that restoring public confidence in 
foreign operations programs can be achieved if aid is more 
clearly linked to American interests. Global economic and 
political change have compelled a shift in the Committee 
funding commitments. The Committee has established both 
regional and functional priorities and consolidated some 
funding accounts to maximize the administration's flexibility 
and to better serve American objectives.

           new opportunities: trade and investment promotion

    The Committee shares the administration's commitment to 
advance free market economies. The Committee supports the 
administration's efforts to encourage economic policy reforms 
including promoting free trade and investment, protecting 
private property, ownership and interests, and limiting state 
control over the private sector.
    Accordingly, the Committee has offered strong budgetary 
support for export promotion, trade, and investment 
initiatives. Export finance programs offered to corporations by 
Japan, Germany, France, and other American competitors 
substantially exceed the availability of resources to United 
States companies. A recent World Bank study estimated that 
developing nations are likely to spend $200,000,000,000 
upgrading their infrastructure needs over the next 5 years.
    With nearly 40 percent of U.S. economic growth and 300,000 
jobs linked to exports, trade promotion activities clearly 
serve American economic interests. The Committee believes that 
strong support for finance, insurance, and guarantee programs 
generate American jobs, income and enable American business to 
compete fairly in emerging markets.

                              new threats

    New opportunities are matched by new threats. The tragic 
bombing of the Federal building in Oklahoma City drew national 
attention to our collective vulnerability to terrorism. 
Similarly, international criminal organizations are expanding 
both their activities and areas of operation. Of direct 
interest to the security of all Americans are problems 
associated with narcotics trafficking and the increasing 
incidence of smuggling of nuclear material. The Committee has 
increased funding for activities which address these threats.

                   new approach: economic assistance

    American commercial and political interests are also served 
by investing in economic growth and crisis prevention. The 
Committee is encouraged by the Agency for International 
Development's initiatives to streamline activities and reduce 
the number of redundant and unnecessary missions abroad. The 
Committee expects this consolidation to progress expeditiously 
in light of budgetary pressures.
    Nevertheless, the Committee recognizes the urgent needs of 
many nations which the United States for humanitarian, 
technical, and historical reasons is uniquely qualified to 
help. To afford the administration the maximum flexibility to 
respond to the development requirements in these nations, the 
Committee has consolidated a number of accounts into one 
economic assistance fund. The Committee urges the 
administration to establish performance-based criteria when 
providing assistance from this fund.

                            promoting peace

    New evidence of Iraq's chemical and biological weapons 
capability, a widening of an international campaign of terror 
waged by political extremists based in the region, continued 
United States reliance on regional energy supplies, among other 
factors impel the Committee's commitment to contribute to 
regional solutions for peace and economic growth in the Middle 
East. The Committee believes that U.S. engagement, support and 
leadership have been key to securing stability over the past 
decade.
    The Committee continues to believe this support is 
essential and has earmarked resources for our Camp David 
partners. In addition, the Committee has provided authority for 
the Department of Defense to drawdown security assistance 
resources to support Jordan's efforts to control terrorism.

             the new independent states and central europe

    When the Committee began funding activities after the 
collapse of communism, each report emphasized the importance of 
expanding the private sector to generate economic growth. The 
Committee has consistently supported efforts to privatize and 
improve the management and productivity of state enterprises. 
At the same time the Committee directed the administration to 
substantially expand support for rule of law initiatives 
believing that crime, corruption, and the lack of national 
commercial codes, rational tax structures and regulatory and 
judicial enforcement mechanisms would impede critical private 
foreign investment. Moreover, the expansion of organized 
criminal activities into the international community represents 
a direct threat to the United States.
    Understanding that it is the decision of each government 
and parliament to pass meaningful trade, tax, investment, and 
commercial laws, the Committee is disappointed with the level 
of support the administration has offered in meeting regional 
legal and law enforcement needs. For example, in the fiscal 
year 1995 legislation, the Congress recommended $30,000,000 be 
spent on local and regional law enforcement training and 
investigations; the administration dedicated less than 
$7,000,000 to these activities. Statistics on capital flight in 
Russia illustrate the consequences of this regionwide problem. 
Although the international monetary fund is supporting 
macroeconomic stabilization with a standby loan of 
$6,800,000,000 disbursed at a rate of approximately 
$500,000,000 a month, and administration officials draw 
attention to the fact that nearly 100,000 enterprises have been 
privatized, conservative estimates indicate between 
$12,000,000,000 and $15,000,000,000 leaves Russia in annual 
capital flight.
    The Committee renews its commitment to strengthening the 
legal environment to encourage expansion of the private sector. 
In particular, funds are earmarked to establish legal attache 
programs and support regional activities in Ukraine, the 
Baltics, and central Asia.
    In addition to expanding legal initiatives, the Committee 
has shifted the emphasis in the commitment of resources from 
Russia to Ukraine, Armenia, Georgia, and Moldova. The Committee 
reiterates the position it has held for 3 years. The Western 
NIS countries and caucuses have suffered many of the same 
problems as Russia without the same benefit of United States 
technical or economic support. It is U.S. interest to reverse 
this trend and strengthen emerging market economies and 
democracy in the region.

              regional security, training, and cooperation

    The Committee maintains its commitment to provide resources 
to enhance European security cooperation and supports the 
President's Warsaw initiative. Including former communist 
states under the NATO umbrella reinforces democratic trends and 
contributes to regional stability. The Committee supports the 
administration's efforts to expand central European 
participation in NATO training and exercises as a means to 
build confidence and cooperation.
    The Committee has reduced the availability of international 
military education and training [IMET] funds to reflect the 
action taken by the Armed Services Committee to supplement 
Committee resources by authorizing the Secretary of Defense to 
draw up to $20,000,000 from existing Defense Department 
resources for IMET programs. The Committee strongly supports 
IMET activities and seeks to fully fund the program at the 
administration's request level.

                      international organizations

    The Committee has substantially reduced resources made 
available to international organizations due to budgetary 
pressures and ongoing concerns about financial management 
practices. To offer incentive for necessary improvements, the 
Committee has not earmarked funds for specific agencies. The 
Committee encourages the administration to use the limited 
resources to effect necessary changes in the management of 
agencies receiving voluntary contributions. Specifically, the 
Committee urges the administration to refrain from contributing 
to any agency unable to meet existing standards for an 
unqualified audit.
                                TITLE I

                           EXPORT ASSISTANCE

                Export-Import Bank of the United States

                         subsidy appropriation

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $786,551,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     823,000,000
House allowance.........................................     786,551,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             795,000,000

                        administrative expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $45,228,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      47,000,000
House allowance.........................................      45,228,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              46,000,000

    The Committee recommends a subsidy appropriation of 
$795,000,000 to support direct loans, tied-aid grants, and 
interest subsidies at the Export-Import Bank of the United 
States. The Committee recommends $46,000,000 for administrative 
expenses.
    The Committee commends the Export-Import Bank for creating 
American jobs by responding aggressively to export 
opportunities in emerging markets. The Committee welcomed the 
decision to reactivate services in Ukraine.
    The Committee has provided resources at the request level 
for the so-called tied aid war chest. The Committee opposes the 
trade distorting effects of tied aid, but recognizes the 
resources made available are essential to countering 
concessionary financing by competitors' governments.
    The Committee has renewed the Bank's authority to transfer 
surplus resources to other trade agencies to assure the best 
use of export and investment resources.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation

                         subsidy appropriation

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $33,944,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      79,000,000
House allowance.........................................      69,500,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              79,000,000

                           operating expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................      $7,933,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      16,000,000
House allowance.........................................      15,500,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              15,000,000

                   noncredit administrative expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $16,389,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      11,000,000
House allowance.........................................      11,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              11,000,000

    The Committee recommends $79,000,000 for the subsidy cost 
of OPIC's direct and guaranteed loans. In addition, the 
Committee recommends $15,000,000 for operating expenses and 
$11,000,000 for noncredit administrative expenses. The 
Committee has included bill language which combines the 
operating and administrative expenses of OPIC into one account 
and limits the total of these expenses to $26,000,000.
    The Committee has not specified limits on the guaranteed or 
direct loan programs to provide flexibility to OPIC. The 
Committee expects the subsidy appropriation to support 
approximately $1,571,000,000 in loan activity.
    The Committee strongly supports the expansion of OPIC's 
financing activities, particularly efforts to provide funding 
to small and medium businesses and cooperatives. Once again, 
OPIC is to be commended for carrying out financing and 
insurance activities on a self-sustaining basis. The Committee 
shares the House Committee's interest in determining the 
effects of privatizing OPIC's activities while sustaining the 
same level of commitment to the American business community.
    To date, the Committee has supported OPIC's raising the 
amount of financing and insurance provided an individual 
project, but is concerned that the emphasis may affect small- 
and medium-size business access to OPIC resources.

                      Trade and Development Agency

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $44,986,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      67,000,000
House allowance.........................................      40,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              40,000,000

    Like the House, the Committee recommends an appropriation 
of $40,000,000 for the Trade and Development Agency [TDA] for 
fiscal year 1996.
    In last year's report, the Committee directed TDA to 
explore the concept of becoming at least partially self-
sustaining with reimbursements from companies that have earned 
profits from investments that originated with TDA feasibility 
studies. TDA recently provided the Committee with its 
assessment of this issue. TDA identifies legitimate problems 
associated with seeking reimbursement from grants awarded to 
host governments which in turn fund technical assistance from 
U.S. technical consultants. Given the extraordinary budget 
pressures, the Committee recommends that TDA increase its 
emphasis on private investor projects such as those carried out 
in the NIS which offer the opportunity to share and recoup 
costs.
                                TITLE II

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                  AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                          Economic Assistance

Appropriations, 1995

                                                    \1\ ($2,510,665,000)

Budget estimate, 1996

                                                     \1\ (2,694,465,000)

House allowance

                                                     \2\ (2,108,160,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                          2,117,099,331 

\1\ The amounts listed in the above table for fiscal year 1995 
appropriations and fiscal year 1996 administration request includes 
funding appropriated or requested under the Development Assistance Fund, 
population, development assistance, the Development Fund for Africa, 
debt restructuring, micro and small enterprise development, housing and 
other credit guarantee programs, the African Development Foundation, the 
Inter-American Foundation, and non-Middle East economic support funds. 
Account details are contained in the table at the end of this report 
(comparative statement of new budget (obligational) authority for fiscal 
year 1995 and budget estimates and amounts recommended in the bill for 
fiscal year 1996).
\2\ The amount listed in the above table for the House includes those 
items listed under footnote 1--in addition, the House includes in this 
amount $100,000,000 for UNICEF which is requested and appropriated in 
this legislation under the ``International organizations and programs'' 
account under title IV, multilateral economic assistance.

    To maximize the President's flexibility in light of the 
overall reduction in foreign assistance resources, the 
Committee recommends consolidation of a number of accounts 
including the ``Development assistance'' account, the 
Development Fund for Africa, non-Middle East economic support 
funds, and funds requested for the Africa Development 
Foundation and the Inter-American Foundation. The appropriate 
statutory authorities for activities and programs are included 
in the recommendation with a minimum of earmarking or 
designation of levels of assistance for the consolidated 
accounts. While the Committee has minimized earmarks, it does 
provide for specific levels of funding under the ``Economic 
assistance'' account for Cyprus, Burma, debt restructuring, 
micro and small enterprise development programs, and the 
Housing Guaranty Program.
    It is the Committee's intention, through consolidation of 
these accounts, to provide the President flexibility in order 
to respond to development, economic, and humanitarian 
requirements. However, in the interests of assuring no one 
account bears an unreasonable share of any reductions, the 
Committee has included language in the bill which requires a 
proportional allocation among activities, programs, and 
accounts consistent with appropriated levels in fiscal year 
1995.
    Although the Committee shares the House commitment to 
protecting the most vulnerable sectors of society and agrees 
there should be a special emphasis on children, the Committee 
believes limiting the categories, types, or amount of 
assistance to be made available would be counterproductive.
    An estimated 13 million children die each year from easily 
preventable diseases. Therefore, the Committee strongly 
supports improving the health of the world's children by 
sustaining funding for child survival and vitamin A and 
micronutrient programs. The Committee also believes that basic 
education programs are essential both to the well-being of the 
world's children and to achieving long-term development goals 
of economic growth. The Committee defines basic education 
programs to include early childhood education, and primary and 
secondary education. The Committee believes that strong support 
for these programs should be maintained, and requests AID to 
report to the Committee on the effectiveness of these programs, 
including rates of enrollment, the number of families served by 
literacy programs, and increases in the literacy rates of women 
and girls in these programs.
    As with other programs and activities which the Committee 
intends to be funded through the ``Economic assistance'' 
account, at a minimum, levels of funding for these activities 
should be protected consistent with prior year commitments.

                         Education and Training

    Development assistance should promote activities that 
encourage and enable developing countries to become self-
reliant. To this end, the Committee believes that education and 
training programs that increase the pool of human capital in 
developing countries should be integral components of 
sustainable development. Such activities are essential to 
achieving rapid economic growth, lower child mortality rates, 
protection of the environment, improvements in child and family 
health, and democratic governance and the rule of law. 
Education and training are particularly relevant to the 
development of capable leadership and a cadre of individuals 
that are the foundation of effective and accountable indigenous 
political, economic, and social institutions. The Committee 
calls on AID to increase its efforts to rely on human capacity 
development as a principle means of assisting individuals, 
communities, and nations in attaining self-reliance. The 
Committee expects the Agency to identify education and training 
as specific strategic objectives of development assistance.

                                 africa

    The Committee strongly supports continued development 
assistance to Africa, the poorest continent. Although the 
Committee has not designated a separate ``Development Fund for 
Africa'' [DFA] account in this bill, it has included language 
in the bill to ensure that assistance to sub-Saharan Africa not 
be reduced beyond the proportional share of assistance the 
region received in fiscal year 1995. In not maintaining the 
separate DFA, the Committee in no way intends to suggest a lack 
of long-term support for Africa, where the United States has 
important humanitarian and economic interests.

                                 CYPRUS

    The Committee commends the President for appointing a 
special envoy and renewing serious efforts to achieve a stable 
solution and peaceful reunification of Cyprus. Consistent with 
the President's request and the House recommendation, the 
Committee has earmarked $15,000,000 for bicommunal confidence 
building initiatives in Cyprus. The Committee directs the 
administration to provide a report on the activities funded 
through this earmark by January 15, 1996.

                                 BURMA

    In both House, Senate and conference reports for the past 2 
years, AID has been directed to provide meaningful assistance 
to refugees and exiles supporting a restoration of democracy in 
Burma. These recommendations have been ignored.
    In recognition of the unique opportunity presented by Aung 
San Suu Kyi's release from confinement, the Committee has 
earmarked $2,000,000 to support the restoration of democracy 
and free market activities in Burma. Funds may support Burmese 
students and groups both inside and outside Burma. The 
Committee directs the Department of State and AID to coordinate 
and provide a report on a plan for the expenditure of these 
funds no later than December 15, 1995.

    PRIVATE ENTERPRISE, PUBLIC/PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS and PRIVATE and 
                        VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS

    The Committee recognizes the unique role private and 
voluntary organizations and cooperatives have played in the 
successful delivery of U.S. assistance while representing 
American humanitarian values. These organizations have often 
proven to be one of the most cost-effective ways to deliver 
development assistance, and the Committee encourages expanded 
use of not-for-profits when their unique capabilities are 
needed. However, the Committee also notes that recent 
experience suggests that maximum benefit can be obtained in 
many circumstances when taxpayer resources are combined to 
leverage for-profit private sector funds, equipment, resources, 
and skills. In addition to these partnerships, the Committee 
believes that the U.S. private sector has a proven record of 
providing essential professional and technical services in 
carrying out economic assistance programs. Selected through 
competitive means, the private sector entities, alone or in 
partnership, have contributed to savings by reducing overhead, 
infrastructure, and personnel costs.
    Consistent with the Committee's intent to improve 
effectiveness and maximize flexibility in the administration of 
economic assistance, the Committee has deleted the House 
requirement that private and voluntary organizations be 
guaranteed funding at levels consistent with prior years. The 
Committee believes this may increase costs, curb competition, 
and unduly restrict the effective administration of limited 
resources.

                           DEBT RESTRUCTURING

    The Committee has provided $15,000,000 to meet the 
administration's debt restructuring requirements as a component 
of economic assistance. The Committee joins the House in 
requesting a report which addresses the concern that nations 
provided the opportunity to engage in debt restructuring not be 
burdened with new or excessive debt.

             MICRO and SMALL ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT [MSED]

    The Committee has provided $1,500,000 to fund a request of 
$1,800,000 for micro and small enterprise development programs. 
MSED has effectively mobilized credit to strengthen the private 
sector. The Committee has not funded the administration's 
request for a new Enhanced Credit Program due to budgetary 
constraints.

                 HOUSING GUARANTEE [HG] PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee has provided resources to expand the housing 
guarantee [HG] program. The program's supports U.S. private 
sector initiatives which provide long-term financing for 
housing and urban infrastructure requirements such as sewage 
and water facilities. The Committee supports this program as an 
effective public/private partnership and urges special emphasis 
to carry out initiatives in South Africa, consistent with the 
President's commitment.

                               POPULATION

    The Committee again expresses its strong belief that 
stabilizing population growth rates is essential to reducing 
poverty, improving health, protecting the environment, and 
promoting economic development. The 1994 International 
Conference on Population and Development in Cairo opened with 
an instructive time-perspective on current population growth 
rates. In sum, it took 10,000 generations for the world's 
population to reach 2 billion people. Yet over the past 50 
years, population has increased from 2 billion to more than 
5\1/2\ billion. And it is on a trajectory to increase to 9 or 
10 billion (estimates range as high as 14 billion) over the 
next 50 years. Ten thousand generations to reach a population 
of 2 billion and then in one human lifetime--ours--it leaps 
from 2 billion toward 10 billion. The Committee finds these 
statistics both alarming and compelling, and restates its 
intent to support a strong, focused population program at AID.
    To this end, the Committee remains dissatisfied by the 
Agency's inability or unwillingness to place responsibility, 
accountability, and leadership for implementing its population 
strategy into the central Office of Population. Despite the 
Committee's recommendations on this matter over the past 6 
years, AID seems no closer to that goal. Indeed, there appears 
to be a relationship between the determination of the Committee 
to strengthen the program and the resolve of the Agency to 
weaken it. The Committee reiterates that it has taken almost 30 
years for the Office of Population to become as streamlined, 
efficient, and effective as it is, and its program is 
recognized worldwide as perhaps the best in existence. Members 
who have followed the program for that duration strongly resist 
the changes AID continues to make in the spirit of 
experimentation.
    The Committee reluctantly agreed last year to forego a 
precise earmark for the central Office of Population because of 
assurance by the Agency that its new budgeting system would 
cement the Office of Population's technical leadership in 
allocating those funds and that the innovative work of that 
Office would continue undiminished. It is the Committee's 
dismayed observation that this has not happened. To correct 
this ongoing disappointment and to demonstrate the Committee's 
interest in achieving an impact, the Committee is once again 
earmarking $350,000,000 for the central Office of Population.
    The Committee's interest in population extends to all 
resources available, both financial and human. It appears that 
the allocation of technical personnel in population has lagged 
behind funding available for the strategic plan. The Committee 
is convinced that the central Office of Population must become 
more responsible and accountable for the acquisition and 
allocation of technical staff to implement the strategic plan 
and achieve results. This would be a worthwhile trial in the 
further reorganization of the Agency; the lessons learned 
through this experience in population could be applied 
agencywide to other important technical sectors like health and 
environment. It is a source of continuing wonderment that AID 
fails to use this exemplary program as a model for others in 
the Agency, and instead seems eager to make it less successful 
in service to untried management strategies.
    Owing to severely constrained finances, there will 
undoubtedly be increased pressure to broaden the definition of 
family planning to include activities that have traditionally 
been funded from other accounts. The Committee continues to 
believe that population funds should be used for purposes that 
bear directly on reducing population growth rates.

                MIDDLE EAST REGIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM

    The Committee continues its strong support of the Middle 
East Regional Cooperative Program [MERC] and expects the 
administration to continue funding it at last year's level of 
$7,000,000. MERC programs have helped nurture and deepen the 
peace process by fostering cooperative projects of a scientific 
and technological nature between Israel and its neighbors. 
Common problem solving by MERC projects in the fields of 
agriculture, health, energy, the environment, education, water 
resources, and the social sciences has helped lead to common 
understanding in the region.

   COOPERATIVE PROJECTS AMONG UNITED STATES, ISRAEL, AND DEVELOPING 
                               COUNTRIES

    The Committee strongly urges funding for the cooperative 
development research [CDR] and cooperative development projects 
[CDP] programs among the United States, Israel, and developing 
and newly democratic countries at last year's levels of 
$10,000,000. Israel has the unique advantage of having highly 
technical expertise, critical language skills, and recent 
experiences in development that are relevant to both developing 
countries and the emerging democracies of Eastern Europe and 
the former Soviet Union. These programs have proven remarkably 
successful in boosting these nations' science and technology 
infrastructure and should be continued.

                           West Bank and Gaza

    The Committee recommends that funding in fiscal year 1996 
for the West Bank and Gaza be maintained at the current level. 
The Committee regards this as a crucial investment in the 
Middle East peace process, and believes that rapid, visible 
improvement in the lives of Palestinians is essential for peace 
to prevail.
    Recognizing the importance of private sector investment in 
order to ensure stable economic development in the West Bank 
and Gaza, the Committee strongly endorses the efforts of 
Builders for Peace to support the Middle East peace process by 
promoting direct private sector development in these areas. The 
Committee urges the Builders for Peace be funded at its current 
level with the understanding that the project expects to 
transition to a self-sustaining entity.

                 AMERICAN SCHOOLS and HOSPITALS ABROAD

    The Committee continues to strongly support the important 
work carried out by institutions funded under the American 
Schools and Hospitals Abroad [ASHA] Program. The Committee 
support is based in part on the effective use of public 
resources to leverage private sector funds.
    The Committee believes that several institutions which have 
received funding under ASHA have distinguished records and 
deserve further support. They include:
  --The Feinberg Graduate School [FGS] of the Weizmann 
        Institute of Science, chartered in New York, has 
        effectively used ASHA resources to purchase American 
        made scientific equipment as well as support 
        collaboration between U.S. research centers and 
        universities and FGS/Weizmann. A model of American 
        scientific education, the program has attracted 
        students from Latin American, Asia, Africa, and the 
        Middle East.
  --The American University in Beirut has trained Middle 
        Eastern leaders for 130 years in a strong liberal arts 
        tradition encouraging freedom of expression, private 
        initiative, and tolerance. Its academic quality, 
        longstanding relationship with regional governments, 
        network of prominent alumni and distinction as a hub of 
        high level global expertise make the university a 
        primary resource for regional development.
  --The Lebanese American University (formerly Beirut 
        University College) is the most rapidly growing 
        institution of higher learning in Lebanon and is an 
        increasingly important resource for talent in this 
        expanding region.
  --The Hadassah Medical Organization has established an 
        important record of outreach and service. In addition 
        to excellent quality medical care provided without 
        discrimination, Hadassah has operated several effective 
        educational health care and welfare training programs.

                             CREDIT UNIONS

    The Committee supports the continuation of a program to 
strengthen credit unions overseas through a core grant of 
$600,000 and up to $5,000,000 in country specific support. 
United States credit unions currently engage in partnerships in 
20 countries including Russia, South Africa, and Poland. These 
private sector to private sector partnerships provide important 
training in basic accounting, finance, and marketing and 
encourage self-sufficiency, savings, and investment, key to 
stabilizing free market economies and developing U.S. trading 
partners.

               u.s. telecommunications training institute

    The Committee recommends that AID, TDA, and other U.S. 
agencies provide $800,000 to the U.S. Telecommunications 
Institute, [USTTI]. USTTI has rendered critical support to 
developing countries, graduating over 3,900 students to operate 
the communications systems in 151 developing nations while 
helping U.S. corporations identify emerging market 
opportunities. Primarily funded by the private sector, the 
Committee believes the U.S. Government should expand funding 
and training support to guarantee global access and outreach.

               UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recognizes that U.S. universities have a 
significant role to play in U.S. development policies 
throughout the globe. Therefore, the Committee encourages AID 
and the Department of State to expand the involvement of 
colleges and universities in development activities. The 
Committee takes note of the important contribution made by a 
number of universities in this regard including:
  --The Postharvest Collaborative Agribusiness Support Program 
        [CASP] conducted at Mississippi State University, 
        Kansas State University, the University of Illinois, 
        and University of Idaho, provide technical assistance 
        to increase opportunities for joint ventures and 
        exports of value added agricultural products. The 
        Committee directs that this program be provided at 
        least $1,500,000 to continue these activities.
  --The University of Hawaii has played a key role in Pacific 
        regional development. The Committee strongly encourages 
        the administration to support programs conducted by the 
        university including providing resources for the 
        International Center for Democracy and not less than 
        $1,000,000 for a postgraduate, continuing education 
        program between the Fiji School of Medicine and the 
        Burns Medical School. In addition, the Committee 
        encourages AID to collaborate with the university as it 
        develops a new initiative to train health and human 
        service professionals.
  --Florida International University's [FIU] Latin American 
        Journalism Program is making an important contribution 
        to strengthening democratic institutions by matching 
        Federal funding with private sector support. The 
        Committee supports FIU's request for $700,000 to 
        complete the Government's commitment to the project's 
        funding cycle.
  --The University of Northern Iowa has effectively managed the 
        Orava project in Slovakia which has incorporated 
        democratic concepts and practices into schools and 
        teacher education programs. The Committee encourages 
        AID to continue to support this important work.
  --The Committee recommends continued support of the Caribbean 
        Law Institute [CLI]. This institute has become a viable 
        and effective organization in fostering and promoting 
        the study and reform of law, especially laws relating 
        to commerce, trade, and investment in Caribbean 
        nations. Continuation and expansion of the efforts of 
        the CLI will further facilitate investment and commerce 
        in this important region.

                    CASS/ECESP SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS

    The Committee has strongly supported the scholarship 
programs currently known as the Cooperative Association of 
States for Scholarships [CASS] and the East Central European 
Scholarship Program [ECESP] since it initially earmarked funds 
for the CASS Program in 1985. Both of these programs utilize 
more than 30 community-based institutions around the United 
States, primarily for 2-year programs offering degrees in 
various technical and vocational fields. The Committee believes 
AID should continue funding for this program at the same level 
provided in fiscal year 1995.

                    MICROENTERPRISE POVERTY PROGRAMS

    Although the Committee has not designated a specific level 
of support for microenterprise poverty programs, the Committee 
notes strong bipartisan commitment to these activities. The 
Committee supports the program's efforts to encourage micro and 
small businesses as a means to lift the truly poor from 
poverty. The Committee shares the view that these programs 
promote sustainable, market-based development at relatively 
little cost and deserve support substantially consistent with 
last year's level.

                           FOOD FOR THE POOR

    Food for the Poor is a nonprofit humanitarian relief 
organization that performs valuable work in the Caribbean 
region. The Committee directs AID to allocate $250,000 to Food 
for the Poor so that it may carry out in-kind donations of 
food, medical supplies, educational, and other relief and 
development aid.

                          WOMEN in DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee encourages AID to sustain its past level of 
support for the Office of Women in Development. The Committee 
recognizes that without the full participation of women, the 
development of economically productive, democratic societies 
will not occur. The Committee remains dedicated to ensuring 
that this principle becomes fully integrated into U.S. foreign 
aid programs and policy.

                                HIV/AIDS

    Over the years, the Committee has strongly supported 
funding to combat the spread of HIV/AIDS. According to the 
World Health Organization, 40 million people are likely to be 
infected with HIV by the year 2000. Ninety percent of these 
cases will occur in the developing countries, of which one-half 
are expected to be among women. The Committee is encouraged by 
efforts by the United Nations to consolidate and coordinate its 
AIDS programs. The Committee believes the United States should 
maintain its current level of support for both bilateral and 
multilateral AIDS prevention and control programs, and 
recommends that funding through nongovernmental organizations 
that implement programs at the community level be maximized.

                           POLIO ERADICATION

    The Committee urges AID to support a program to eradicate 
polio. The Committee has been advised that an effective program 
to target eradication, including the purchase of vaccines, 
education, and establishing a delivery infrastructure would 
cost up to $20,000,000.

                              TUBERCULOSIS

    Tuberculosis now infects 1.9 billion people, killing 3 
million annually, making it the leading cause of death in 
adults from a single infectious agent. The Committee is 
concerned by the resurgence of tuberculosis in the United 
States and the fact that domestic efforts to control the 
problem are impeded by the global epidemic. AID is urged to 
more effectively coordinate and contribute to global education 
and treatment strategies.

                          ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    The Committee strongly feels that environmental health is a 
key programmatic area for AID to address. The Committee notes 
that many environmental health areas such as water and air 
pollution, wastewater treatment, and prevention of disease 
offer important opportunities for increasing access to markets 
for U.S. goods and services as well as further child survival 
goals around the globe. The Committee recommends that these 
programs receive up to $6,000,000 for fiscal year 1996.

                          INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    The Committee supports the continuing work of AID in the 
area of infectious diseases. It shares the House concern about 
the threat posed by emerging infections to American citizens 
and members of our Armed Forces. The Committee also supports 
the work done by the Gorgas Memorial Institute on regional 
surveillance of food and waterborne vibrios (cholera), dengue, 
and other infections. The Committee agrees with the House 
recommendation that $350,000 be made available to support these 
activities including the establishment of a cost-effective 
surveillance network involving several domestic and regional 
institutions. The Committee requests a report on the 
establishment of a surveillance system be made available by May 
1, 1996.

                           ROMANIAN CHILDREN

    The plight of children in Romanian institutions as 
documented repeatedly in the media and by the government after 
the fall of the Ceausescu regime, has touched most Americans. 
USAID, working through Holt International Children's Services 
developed a training program which is making a critical impact 
in the child welfare structure in Romania, including a 
significant increase in Romanian children being adopted by 
Romanian families. This program, under a 3-year grant to be 
completed in December 1995, received a little more than 
$1,827,000. The Committee believes that AID should continue the 
project for another 3-year period, though at a reduced level of 
$1,000,000.

                   PATRICK J. LEAHY WAR VICTIMS FUND

    The Committee strongly supports the Patrick J. Leahy War 
Victims Fund, a $5,000,000 special program to provide medical 
and related assistance to people who have suffered disabling 
war injuries. The fund has been used primarily to assist 
victims of landmine explosions in countries where the need is 
great and the United States has had little presence for many 
years, such as Vietnam. The Committee is pleased that American 
veterans and medical professionals have participated in this 
program. The Committee strongly supports the use of the fund in 
Angola, where landmines have already claimed 70,000 amputees.

                      USAID Biodiversity Programs

    For nearly a decade, the Committee has directed USAID to 
allocate development assistance funding for the conservation of 
biological diversity and the protection of tropical forests 
overseas. The Committee remains committed to these programs, 
and favorably notes significant improvements in the 
administration of USAID's biodiversity conservation activities.
    The Committee recognizes that global biological wealth is 
vital to U.S. security and key to our own agricultural and 
pharmaceutical interests. It is also critical to the economic 
well-being of developing nations. Tropical rain forests are 
extremely threatened, and while they comprise approximately 4 
percent of the planet's land surface, they are believed to 
contain up to 50 percent of the world's biodiversity. These key 
tropical forest areas should remain priorities for USAID 
conservation activities.
    The Committee emphasizes the following aspects of USAID 
biodiversity conservation programs: (1) As USAID makes efforts 
to downsize, it should remain active in regions that are 
significant for global biodiversity, even in nonpresence 
countries and countries where missions have been closed; (2) 
NGO's are often the most cost-effective channels for delivering 
development assistance; (3) USAID conservation programs should 
be based on sound science, and should further the economic and 
cultural interests of local communities.

                             Parks in Peril

    The Committee notes AID's success in implementing Parks in 
Peril, a 10-year public-private partnership to protect the 
Western Hemisphere's most threatened ecosystems by the year 
2000. Together with AID, conservation organizations are 
achieving this goal by ensuring on-the-ground protection 
activities in national parks and reserves throughout Latin 
America and the Caribbean, and by integrating these areas into 
the economic and cultural livelihoods of local communities. The 
program has made contributions toward democratization of the 
region by promoting the involvement of local citizens and 
strengthening private institutions. The Committee is pleased 
that Parks in Peril has leveraged significant private sector 
matching funds, both from sources in the United States and 
overseas.

               PRIVATE and VOLUNTARY ASSISTANCE to MEXICO

    The Committee strongly encourages AID to support the work 
of World Organization for Private and Voluntary Assistance, 
Mexico branch. The Committee has been advised that PVO Mexico 
has effectively combined and leveraged resources and skills 
from the public and private sector to provide relief to some of 
the poorest communities in Mexico.

                        vitamin c fortification

    The Committee has included language for the last 3 years, 
urging AID to increase vitamin C fortification in grains 
exported through the Public Law 480 title II Food for Peace 
Program. Recognizing AID's concerns regarding stability of the 
vitamin during the shipping and cooking processes, the 
Committee has urged AID to address and resolve these issues and 
remains concerned that AID has yet to do so. Because the AID 
study to test the stability of vitamin C in the shipping 
process was flawed, and an independent study conducted with 
AID's approval proved that vitamin C is stable during the 
cooking process, the Committee believes no further studies 
should be undertaken. Thus, fortification levels of vitamin C 
should be increased for the corn soy blend [CSB] and wheat soy 
blend [WSB] exports. Studies show the health benefits of 
fortifying foods at the RDA levels especially for new mothers 
and infants.
    The Committee directs AID to perform a pilot program, as 
recommended in the House Committee report, utilizing up to 
$500,000 to increase the vitamin C fortification to the RDA 
level (90 mg per 1 gram ration for pregnant and lactating 
women) for CSB and WSB and other exported grains and cereals. 
AID will report back to the Committee by April 1, 1996, 
regarding the progress and any available results of the pilot 
program.

                           DAIRY DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee continues to place a high priority on dairy 
development, and encourages AID to maintain funding for this 
program.

                            FARMER-TO-FARMER

    The Committee strongly supports maintaining funding for the 
Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance [VOCA] Farmer-to-
Farmer Program, especially in the former Soviet Union. This is 
a cost-effective way to transfer practical skills and know-how 
to farmers and agribusinesses. The Committee also continues to 
support two-way programs in which new agribusiness 
entrepreneurs and private farm leaders are brought to the 
United States for training.

                      Neotropical Migratory Birds

    The Committee recommends $600,000 in fiscal year 1996 for 
nongovernmental organizations including the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation for a neotropical migratory bird 
conservation initiative. The decline in populations in 
neotropical migratory birds has been linked to habitat loss and 
degradation in Central America and the Caribbean. The Committee 
believes that this program is essential to the protection of 
these threatened areas, and urges AID to continue to work 
closely with other Federal agencies and parties to the 
interagency memorandum of understanding to approve projects 
funded by this initiative. The Committee is concerned that 
despite its recommendations that AID fund this program in 
fiscal year 1995, AID has not yet done so.

                          treaty on fisheries

    The Treaty on Fisheries between the United States and the 
Governments of certain Pacific Island States, popularly known 
as the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Treaty, requires that 
$14,000,000 in economic assistance be provided annually to the 
South Pacific Island States. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends that the treaty obligations be met through the 
payment of the full $14,000,000 in fiscal year 1996.

                            renewable energy

    The Committee urges AID to continue the unique programs at 
its Office of Energy, Environment, and Technology, supporting 
its U.S. renewal energy private sector initiatives such as 
project preparation, training, multimedia, and related 
activities in cooperation with the Committee on Renewable 
Energy, Commerce, and Trade.

                 international executive service corps

    The Committee finds that the International Executive 
Service Corps [IESC] is and has been, for the past 31 years, an 
excellent vehicle for promoting technology transfer, economic 
growth and sustainable development around the world, while also 
opening new areas of economic participation to American firms. 
The Committee also finds that IESC's involvement in supporting 
U.S. foreign policy and national interests has greatly 
increased over the past several years, while their costs have 
risen only modestly. The Committee, therefore, strongly urges 
that the Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International 
Development provide IESC annually with grant funds sufficient 
to support the operations of their headquarters and to ensure 
the continued availability of their services worldwide.

                   globalizing agricultural programs

    The globalizing agricultural programs [GAP] initiative, 
proposed by members of the land-grant universities, will 
enhance the international content of university curricula and 
develop faculty and staff's competency to utilize agricultural 
technologies developed overseas that are not presently 
available in the United States. The GAP initiative will 
increase the ability of U.S. faculty and staff to compete in 
global markets, conduct joint international research, and to 
educate our public on market opportunities and global trade 
laws. The global research on the environment and agricultural 
nexus [GREAN] initiative will create new opportunities for U.S. 
scientists to work in close collaboration with the centers of 
the consultative group for international agricultural research 
[CGIAR] and the agricultural research systems of recipient 
countries to rapidly generate and apply available technologies, 
ensuring that U.S. scientists are able to bring home newly 
developing technologies. It is the intent of the Committee that 
the State Department, the Agency for International Development, 
and the Department of Agriculture work together with the land-
grant universities to explore the opportunities for developing 
the GAP and GREAN initiatives.

              office of private and voluntary cooperation

    The Committee recommends continued strong support for AID's 
Office of Private and Voluntary Cooperation in fiscal year 
1996. The Committee also recognizes the important contribution 
of private voluntary organizations and cooperatives in 
establishing and administering food aid programs overseas. The 
Committee suggests that funding be made available for these 
organizations under the title II Food Aid Institutional Support 
Program at a level comparable with prior years.

                   institute for contemporary studies

    The Committee feels that the International Center for 
Economic Growth and the International Center for Self-
Governance, both programs of the Institute for Contemporary 
Studies, are examples of what U.S. economic assistance should 
be designed to accomplish: the promotion of economic growth, 
free market reforms, human development, and democratic 
governance. Both are cost-effective programs that seek to 
expand their funding beyond U.S. Government sources and are 
worthy of continued support by the entities that carry out U.S. 
economic assistance policy.

                   International Disaster Assistance

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $169,998,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     200,000,000
House allowance.........................................     200,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             175,000,000

    The Committee recommends $175,000,000 for the 
``International disaster assistance'' account for fiscal year 
1996.
    The Committee recommends an increase in the appropriation 
for international disaster assistance over fiscal year 1995 
levels. The Committee recognizes the unique role the United 
States has played in responding to emergencies, however, 
budgetary pressures have limited the amount of that increase.
    The Committee is aware that a significant cost associated 
with U.S. food and relief efforts overseas is grain spoilage 
and loss at ports of entry. To make better use of decreasing 
foreign aid funds, the Committee believes that significant 
effort needs to be made to improve grain storage. Accordingly, 
the Committee directs AID's Office of Foreign Disaster 
Assistance to expend up to $3,000,000 to initiate demonstration 
projects at overseas locations to improve weatherproof storage 
and reduce grain loss.

     Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $45,118,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      43,914,000
House allowance.........................................      43,914,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              43,914,000

    The Foreign Service retirement and disability fund is a 
mandatory expense of the Agency for International Development.

                         AID Operating Expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $517,500,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     529,000,000
House allowance.........................................     465,750,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             490,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $490,000,000 
for the ``Operating expenses'' account of the Agency for 
International Development for fiscal year 1996, a reduction of 
$39,000,000 from the requested amount. The Committee expects 
the Agency to continue with its reductions in headquarters 
personnel, mission closures, and consolidation of redundant and 
unnecessary activities.

                         AID MANAGEMENT REFORMS

    The formal planning stage for AID's reorganization is 
drawing to a close and full implementation is anticipated to 
begin soon. The Committee commends the Agency for its eagerness 
to self-improve, and is watching its progress with interest.
    There is a perception among those who are familiar with the 
internal workings of the Agency that the focus of the 
reengineering has been more on systems enhancements than on 
substantial management change. Specifically, that there is 
less, not more, flexibility in the movement between project 
design and implementation; less delegation of authority to line 
managers to be fully responsible and accountable for actions 
they take; and more middle and upper management layering 
instead of streamlining. The Committee would welcome a report 
from AID that concretely, with specific examples cited and 
clear statements of cost savings and program benefits shown, 
refutes these perceptions.
    Members of the Committee opined during hearings for the 
fiscal year 1995 Foreign Operations appropriations bill that 
the proposed budgeting system might greatly increase the level 
of effort needed to reach consensus on allocation and use of 
field support funds, but without any clear improvement in speed 
or strategy in meeting program goals. The Committee requests 
that AID submit a report no later than January 15, 1996, that 
demonstrates clearly what has been gained through the new 
budgeting system, and that reflects views from the field more 
than from the senior Agency managers responsible for creating 
this new system.

       Operating Expenses of the Office of the Inspector General

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $39,118,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      39,118,000
House allowance.........................................      35,200,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              30,200,000

    Budgetary pressure and the anticipated proportional 
reduction and consolidation of the Agency have resulted in the 
Committee recommendation.

                  Other Bilateral Economic Assistance

                            middle east fund

Appropriations, 1995

                                                    \1\ ($2,015,000,000)

Budget estimate, 1996

                                                     \2\ (2,015,000,000)

House allowance

                                                     \3\ (2,015,000,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                          2,015,000,000 

\1\ In fiscal year 1995, this amount for the Middle East was included as 
part of the economic support fund appropriation, earmarked 
$1,200,000,000 for Israel and $815,000,000 for Egypt.
\2\ Budget estimate requests an identical amount as was appropriated in 
the current fiscal year for Israel and Egypt as part of the economic 
support fund.
\3\ The House Committee does not earmark funding for the Middle East in 
its legislation, but the report accompanying that legislation recommends 
that not less than $1,200,000,000 be provided for Israel and not less 
than $815,000,000 be provided for Egypt. With respect to fiscal year 
1995 appropriations, the fiscal year 1996 request, and the House 
legislation, the table under ``Economic assistance'' includes the non-
Middle East ESF amounts.

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,015,000,000 
for fiscal year 1996.
    The Committee recommends that this account be earmarked as 
follows: $1,200,000,000 for Israel and $815,000,000 for Egypt, 
in both cases the administration's requested levels for 
assistance. The Committee believes that this support is crucial 
to sustain American interests in peace, stability, and 
prosperity in the region.

            TELECOMMUNICATIONS and ECONOMIC REFORM in EGYPT

    The Committee takes note of the fact that AID has funded 
telecommunications projects for Egypt over the past decade. 
These projects have increased the efficiency of the 
telecommunications sector which, in turn, has encouraged 
private investment and economic growth as well as U.S. market 
access.
    The Committee has supported projects known as Telecom I-V 
and urges AID to furnish full funding for the final phases of 
Telecom V as planned. The Committee agrees with AID that the 
continuation of Egyptian economic reforms are key to future 
support. The Committee welcomes President Mubarek's leadership 
in securing these reforms. The Committee encourages AID to 
continue efforts to establish and monitor the implementation of 
performance benchmarks.

                     International Fund for Ireland

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $19,600,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................................
House allowance.........................................      19,600,000

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    The Committee supports continued efforts to bring peace and 
stability to Northern Ireland. However, given budget 
considerations and Ireland's unique access to European 
Community resources, the Committee believes the United States 
can play a more effective role in encouraging investment and 
trade rather than the provision of grant aid.

          Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $359,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     480,000,000
House allowance.........................................     324,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             335,000,000

    The Committee recommends $335,000,000 for the Eastern 
Europe special assistance initiative.
    The Committee supports House-passed provisions which afford 
the administration greater flexibility in the management of 
this account. The Committee attaches high priority to the 
transition to free market democracies in the region. Recent 
election results suggest a continued U.S. role is important in 
order to sustain the progress made in this transition.

                           LEGAL INITIATIVES

    The Committee encourages the administration to continue 
support for rule of law activities in the region. These 
programs, particularly efforts by the American Bar Association 
central and East European law initiative, provide an essential 
foundation for successful political and economic change. 
Although the gains made to date are encouraging, the Committee 
believes it is imperative to continue to contribute to the 
development of sound legal and regulatory systems and 
institutions. Rule of law activities, including the development 
of a systems to protect individual and property rights, enforce 
commercial transactions and rationalize customs, tax and 
financial structures, are key to securing economic growth and 
democracy. The Committee urges AID to sustain support for 
CEELI, particularly given the cost-effective leveraging of time 
and expertise volunteered by the judges, attorneys, and legal 
scholars participating in the program.

                      RURAL TELEPHONE COOPERATIVES

    The expansion of rural telephone service in Eastern Europe 
and other developing countries is essential to political 
democracy, agriculture growth, and expanded commerce in these 
countries.
    The Committee supports the self-help cooperative approach 
to bringing telephone service to the rural communities of these 
countries. U.S. rural telephone cooperatives are willing to 
volunteer their training and expertise to assist in the 
establishment of privatized, multiprovider telephone networks.

        central and eastern european graduate fellowship program

    The Committee supports the continuation of the Central and 
Eastern European Graduate Fellowship Program [CEEGF]. The CEEGF 
Program enables students from that region to participate in 
masters degree programs in the United States in a number of 
fields of direct relevance to the transition to market 
economies and democratic political systems in central and 
Eastern Europe. The program is a useful counterpart to the 
Muskie Fellowship Program, which provides similar opportunities 
for graduate students from the former Soviet Union and is also 
funded in this legislation. The Committee recommends that the 
level of funding for this program in fiscal year 1996 be the 
same as that in fiscal year 1995, with recruitment, selection, 
and placement of fellows to be conducted on a competitive basis 
by qualified nonprofit organizations.

  Assistance for the New Independent States of the Former Soviet Union

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $842,500,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     788,000,000
House allowance.........................................     580,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             705,000,000

    The Committee recommends $705,000,000 for the New 
Independent States [NIS] of the former Soviet Union for fiscal 
year 1996.
    The Committee has been disappointed by the administration's 
meager efforts to address important requirements in non-Russian 
countries which receive funding under this account. The 
Committee believes that supporting and strengthening free 
market democracies throughout the NIS enhances U.S. interests 
through increased stability, security, and prosperity. 
Accordingly, the Committee has earmarked increased levels of 
support for Ukraine and Armenia and has earmarked funds for 
Georgia. The Committee also requires the President to establish 
a Trans-Caucasus Enterprise Fund.

                                UKRAINE

    The Committee believes that economic growth in Ukraine 
depends on developing energy self-sufficiency and strengthening 
the private sector, particularly through the development of 
agribusiness. The Committee has included a number of provisions 
which address these requirements including earmarking resources 
for the Western NIS Enterprise Fund.
    The Committee requires the administration to move forward 
with necessary technical assistance to develop fuel specific, 
safe, nuclear regulatory procedures, and institutions. Fuel 
derived from warheads transferred under the trilateral 
agreement provides less than one-third of Ukraine's nuclear 
energy needs. In view of this shortfall and of periodic strains 
in Ukrainian-Russian relations which cause suspension of energy 
shipments, the Committee has provided funding for technical 
assistance to promote energy self-sufficiency.
    The Committee has also recommended funding for improved 
safety at existing nuclear facilities. Specifically, the 
Committee expects the administration to provide safety 
parameter display and control systems to prevent the 
possibility of accidents like the event at Chernobyl. The 
Committee expects the coordinator of U.S. assistance at the 
Department of State to intervene in the improvement of 
management of the Department of Energy's program designed to 
accelerate the provision of essential safety-related technical 
assistance.

                                ARMENIA

    The Committee recommends an increase in assistance to 
Armenia in recognition of progress that country has made on 
important economic and political reforms. As with Ukraine, the 
Committee believes energy self-sufficiency is essential to 
Armenia's full recovery and, therefore, encourages the 
coordinator to develop a plan which will support private sector 
efforts to develop an oil and gas pipeline in the region.

              russian nuclear technology transfer to iran

    Early in 1995, the Committee learned of Russian intentions 
to sell Iran a nuclear reactor and provide associated training, 
equipment, and technology. The Committee notes the 
administration's efforts to oppose this transaction. 
Nonetheless, in September 1995, the Russian Government 
announced intentions to proceed with an expanded sale of four 
reactors.
    The Committee strongly opposes this sale because it 
introduces nuclear technology, equipment, and training to a 
state with no existing capability which is actively and 
currently sponsoring international terrorism. The Committee has 
conditioned assistance to Russia on assurances by the President 
that the sale has been terminated.

                          CRIME and CORRUPTION

    The Committee continues to believe that private sector 
investment is the primary key to economic growth in the NIS. As 
in the past, the Committee emphasizes the importance of rule of 
law activities to support the drafting, passage, and 
enforcement of private property and investment legislation. For 
example, in Russia, according to private sector trade 
associations, key laws on Federal-State jurisdiction, taxes, 
accounting and auditing, arbitration, securities and stock 
transactions, insurance, land transfer and ownership, leasing, 
pricing, customs, privatization, and the U.S. Bilateral 
Investment Treaty, among other legal matters, have yet to be 
passed by the parliament and signed by the President.
    The Committee strongly supports initiatives to expand 
training and joint cooperation in investigations and law 
enforcement. Last year, the Committee recommended that 
$30,000,000 be designated for these activities, though the 
administration provided less than $7,000,000.
    The incidence of crime and corruption have markedly 
increased since last year's recommendation. The Committee is 
deeply concerned about reports that more than 5,000 organized 
criminal enterprises have developed throughout the NIS and are 
expanding into Western Europe and the United States. The number 
of reported incidents of smuggling of nuclear material for 
potential use by terrorists has also sharply escalated. To 
address these concerns, the Committee has earmarked funds which 
expand in-country training and activities of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation.

                         RESEARCH and TRAINING

    The Committee agrees with the House that funding for 
Russian, Eurasian, and East European research (title VIII) 
should be provided through funds made available under the NIS 
and SEED accounts. This program is the only United States 
Government-sponsored initiative to support American research, 
training, and language expertise concerning Eastern Europe and 
the successor states of the Soviet Union. The Committee 
recommends that at least $7,500,000 be made available to 
continue this important effort.

                       PRIVATE SECTOR INITIATIVES

    The Committee encourages the administration to expand 
programs which leverage private sector resources to establish 
self-sustaining, free enterprise joint ventures, and 
development projects. The Committee has strongly supported the 
Food Systems Restructuring Program [FSRP], a private/public 
partnership leveraging the expertise and capital resources of 
American agribusiness to improve distribution and productivity 
in the NIS. The Committee recommends that funding for this 
program be continued. The Committee directs AID to provide a 
report no later than December 15, 1995, including 
recommendations on how the FSRP can be expanded and used as a 
model for additional private/public partnerships.

                      BUSINESS TRAINING in the NIS

    The Committee recommends that $3,000,000 be made available 
to the Ohr Torah Institutions to maintain and expand their 
training programs in western business, accounting, marketing, 
management, and computer science. Free market democracies 
depend on the development of entrepreneurial skills. The 
Committee believes Ohr Torah has demonstrated an ability to 
contribute to the self-reliance of citizens and economic growth 
in the NIS.

                           PUSHCHINO PROJECT

    The Russian-United States technical, education, and 
economic development consortium has made significant progress 
implementing a project entitled, ``Uniting Science and 
Education and the Transfer of Technology to Support Sustainable 
Economic Development and Environmental Protection of South 
Central European Russia.'' The so-called Pushchino project has 
carried out activities which promote economic development, 
restore the environment and train entrepreneurs, 
agriculturalists, and environmental professionals. The results 
have been mutually beneficial particularly in the testing and 
development of technologies with practical applications 
including the control of wheat and barley root disease and 
remediation of environmental pollutants. The Committee urges 
continued funding for this collaboration between research 
institutions, universities, and private firms.

                        sustainable agriculture

    The Committee strongly encourages AID to emphasize 
sustainable agriculture techniques in its technical assistance, 
food systems, agribusiness, farmer-to-farmer, and related 
agriculture programs in the former Soviet Union and central 
Europe.

                              PEACE CORPS

    The request includes $14,000,000 which had been included in 
prior years in the overall levels provided the NIS. The 
Committee's recommendation reflects an expectation that the 
administration will continue to provide appropriate support 
from the NIS account to the Peace Corps for small business 
development.

                               exchanges

    The Committee supports continuation of a broad range of 
exchanges, similar to the current academic and professional 
programs carried out by USIA, to bring people from the NIS to 
the United States, to take part in study, training, and other 
programs. Technical training exchanges and professional 
linkages are undertaken in several sectors including business 
management, environment and energy, agriculture, housing, 
economics, and health. The Committee again urges the 
administration to match exchange and training funds with 
contributions from civic groups, local and State governments, 
businesses, schools, and universities.

                      secondary school initiatives

    The Committee considers the NIS secondary school exchange 
program administered by the United States Information Agency 
one of the most successful components of our assistance to the 
former Soviet Union. Since January 1993, over 12,000 students 
from Russia and the former Republics of the Soviet Union have 
participated in the program, forming the foundation for 
improving relations between our nations.
    The Committee recommends that the secondary school exchange 
program receive $25,000,000. The funds appropriated for this 
program should be transferred to USIA in a timely, efficient 
manner.

                           Eurasia Foundation

    For the past 2 years, the Committee has recognized the 
Eurasia Foundation's impressive efforts to deliver small grant 
assistance to NIS groups working toward economic and democratic 
reform. For every Eurasia Foundation dollar invested, over $2 
from other private and Government sources have been invested in 
Eurasia Foundation grant projects. In the past, the Congress 
has urged AID to provide the Foundation with enough funding to 
maximize its cost effectiveness. The Committee is concerned 
that AID is not fully funding the Foundation, and requests AID 
to consult with the Committee before any decision is made on 
the amount of funding for the Foundation for fiscal year 1996.

                            russian far east

    The Russian far east is increasingly being recognized as 
vital to the overall development of Russia's market economy. 
Its rich natural resource base and proximity to the rapidly 
expanding Pacific Rim economies have won it the attention of 
increasing numbers of industries and companies. However, 
attempts to coordinate trade promotional efforts between the 
two regions have been sporadic and often ill conceived.
    Meanwhile U.S. competitors in the region have been 
effective in integrating public and private sector activities. 
Partly in response to this situation, the United States and 
Russian Governments agreed during the December 1994 meeting of 
the Gore-Cher- nomyrdin Commission [GCC] in Moscow, to 
establish the United States west coast-Russian far east ad hoc 
working group. The working group is charged with developing a 
bilaterally sanctioned framework to increase trade and 
investment opportunities between the Russian far east and the 
United States west coast.
    The role this working group can play to increase 
opportunities between our two regions is significant. The 
Committee recommends that authority and funding for this group 
and the subsequent initiatives approved by this bilateral body 
be given priority.

             RUSSIAN-AMERICAN OIL AND GAS TECHNOLOGY CENTER

    A collaborative effort between the United states and Russia 
for the efficient production of petroleum has been brought to 
the Committee's attention. The Russian-American Oil and Gas 
Technology Center, funded by FREEDOM Support Act funds 
transferred to the Department of Energy, has been established 
as a clearinghouse and educational center aimed at collecting, 
organizing, and disseminating petroleum technical information 
and technology including innovative petroleum environmental 
technologies, supporting personnel exchanges and other training 
activities to enhance professional skills of petroleum industry 
personnel, and facilitating market opportunities to increase 
the amount of oil and gas business between the two countries.
    The Russian-American Oil and Gas Technology Center is 
housed in Tyumen, Western Siberia; the United States base is 
located at the University of Tulsa. The Committee strongly 
supports the continued commitment of USAID to this important 
project and urges the third-year transfer of funds from USAID 
to DOE as stipulated in the Participating Agency Services 
Agreement.

                    nondefense research and training

    The Committee continues to support defense conversion 
efforts in the New Independent States, and recognizes that both 
the United States and the NIS benefit from such efforts. 
Assisting NIS scientists and engineers in the transition from 
military projects to nondefense research and development 
endeavors has expanded the region's market economy, helped 
stabilize emigration, reduced the proliferation of weapon 
technology, and has established important links between U.S. 
scientists and engineers and their counterparts in the NIS. 
Therefore, the Committee recommends that the Agency for 
International Development provide $5,000,000 of private sector 
initiative funds to support nondefense research and scientific 
activities as authorized and defined by section 511 of Public 
Law 102-511. The Committee believes that developing the private 
enterprise/private-sector economy in the former Soviet Union 
will advance United States investment, technical assistance, 
and exports, and should be a priority for the administration.

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                     African Development Foundation

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $16,905,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      17,405,000
House allowance.........................................      11,500,000
Committee recommendation................................         ( \1\ )

\1\ Funding for this account has been included under the consolidated 
``Economic assistance'' account.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       Inter-American Foundation

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $30,960,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      31,760,000
House allowance.........................................      20,000,000
Committee recommendation................................         ( \1\ )

\1\ Funding for this account has been included under the consolidated 
``Economic assistance'' account.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Peace Corps

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $219,745,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     234,000,000
House allowance.........................................     210,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             200,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $200,000,000 
for the Peace Corps for fiscal year 1996.
    The Committee is forced to recommend a reduction to the 
request due to severe budgetary constraints, but notes that 
also recommended is continued funding and transfer authority 
under the NIS account for Peace Corps activities.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                    International Narcotics Control

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $105,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     213,000,000
House allowance.........................................     113,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             150,000,000

    The Committee recommends $150,000,000 for the International 
Narcotics Control Program.
    The recommendation reflects the Committee's concern about 
the continuing escalation of international crime and narcotics 
trafficking. Included in this recommendation is an earmark of 
$1,800,000 to support the expansion of FBI activities in Cairo, 
Egypt, and an earmark of $5,000,000 to support FBI and Secret 
Service programs in Latin America.
    The Committee strongly recommends that not less than 
$6,500,000 be made available to the Department of State 
technical support working group to carry out field 
demonstrations of the pulsed fast neutron analysis technology, 
a system designed to nonintrusively detect a wide range of 
explosives and hazardous toxic substances.

                    Migration and Refugee Assistance

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $671,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     671,000,000
House allowance.........................................     671,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             671,000,000

    The Committee recommends $671,000,000 for the Migration and 
Refugee Assistance Program, of which $80,000,000 is earmarked 
for refugees from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 
and other refugees resettling in Israel.

                          Indochinese Refugees

    As the comprehensive plan of action [CPA] comes to a close 
in 1996, more than 40,000 Indochinese asylum seekers in the 
region will have to return to Vietnam or be resettled in third 
countries. The United States has an obligation to seek a 
peaceful and honorable close to the CPA and should continue to 
resist the forcible repatriation of asylum seekers. In light of 
continuing concerns about flaws in the screening process, the 
Committee urges the State Department to continue to develop 
credible approaches for the reinterviewing of asylum seekers as 
they transit out of the first asylum camps or in transit in 
Vietnam. This proposal should be developed in consultation with 
the countries of first asylum, the UNHCR, and nongovernmental 
organizations.
    In addition, the Committee is aware that a substantial 
number of asylum seekers have safely and voluntarily returned 
to their country of origin, and believes that U.S. support of 
reintegration efforts is essential for those who have returned 
and those who are still to return in order to ensure the 
opportunity for a successful and monitored repatriation. The 
Committee urges maintaining and expanding U.S. support for 
reintegration of asylum seekers who are not determined to be 
genuine refugees.

                    Orderly Departure Program [ODP]

    While much of the ODP has become a family reunification 
immigration program, important refugee elements continue, 
especially with regard to former political prisoners. This 
program to bring those with special ties to the United States 
should be completed with care and thoroughness to assure that 
all eligible for this program are given an adequate opportunity 
to apply. The Committee believes that the State Department must 
renew its efforts to assure that the ODP continues to meet 
these basic criteria. Further, after such long and hard 
separation from their families in the past, the former 
prisoners should not find their acceptance into the United 
States conditioned on further separation by requiring that they 
leave their children behind. This was not the original 
intention of the ODP.

                                 Hmong

    There are a significant number of Hmong with refugee status 
who wish to resettle in the United States. The Committee 
appreciates the State Department's continuing effort to obtain 
Thai Government concurrence to allow access to resettlement for 
this group and hope that will occur in the near future. In 
addition, the Committee believes that the small number of 
screened-out Hmong in Thailand camps should be allowed an 
interview by a United States official along the lines of the 
reinterview process presently under consideration for the 
Vietnamese screened-out.
    The Committee urges that monitoring of Hmong returnees by 
the UNHCR and the United States Embassy should be increased. 
There is no orderly departure program in Laos and almost no 
nonimmigrant or immigrant visas have been issued by the United 
States Embassy to Hmong applicants. The Embassy should have a 
Hmong language staff person to permit monitoring of returnees 
and to interview Hmong visa applicants.

                                Cambodia

    The tremendous international support for the peace process 
that led to the return of approximately 400,000 Cambodian 
refugees and plan to reintegrate 200,000 internally displaced 
in 1993 must be followed with targeted support for those 
initiatives that would most contribute to lasting peace and 
stability in Cambodia. Of particular interest, the Committee 
urges the United States to continue its support for demining 
efforts critical to the provision of adequate land for 
returnees and internally displaced, many of whom have been 
displaced several times. For the many vulnerable populations in 
Cambodia, from handicapped, to women who must now provide for 
their families alone, innovative small credit programs should 
be created. In addition, the Committee recognizes the need to 
provide the means for a demobilization program, implemented 
with partners from international nongovernmental organizations, 
to ensure that those soldiers defecting from the Khmer Rouge 
and those no longer needed by the Cambodian Army do not become 
an additional source of instability and destabilization.

                                 Burma

    The Committee urges the State Department to work with the 
UNHCR to assure that Rohingya refugees returning from 
Bangladesh to Arakhan province in Burma should be closely 
monitored. In addition, nongovernmental organizations should be 
permitted access both for monitoring and assistance.

                                 Rwanda

    Over 2 million Rwandan refugees remain in the camps in 
Zaire, Tanzania, and Burundi. It is clear, both from the 
actions of host governments (notably Zaire) and from 
environmental and humanitarian signs, that the existence of 
such large numbers of refugees along these borders is not 
sustainable. The Committee urges the United States to support 
comprehensive measures to encourage voluntary repatriation and 
reintegration of Rwandan refugees. This effort may require 
additional expedited support for the judicial system inside 
Rwanda, for the international tribunal in Arusha, Tanzania, and 
support for local mediation and monitoring efforts to ensure 
successful reintegration. The Committee notes, however, that 
forcible return of refugees by Zairian Government or others 
violates the 1951 refugee convention, and urges the United 
States to continue to make clear the position that any such 
action is unacceptable. The United States should emphasize to 
host countries in the region that monitoring the flow of arms 
to the camps is a priority. As the militarized atmosphere in 
the camps is a serious deterrent to repatriation, possible 
approaches to demilitarize the camps should be seriously 
considered.

                                Burundi

    Conditions in Burundi continue to deteriorate despite the 
efforts of the international community. Because of this, the 
United States should stress the ongoing need for asylum for 
Burundi refugees by neighboring Tanzania and Zaire.
    The Committee expresses the desire that the United States 
continue to support efforts to prevent further exacerbation of 
ethnic tensions and blood shed in Burundi, including 
initiatives to restrict visa and banking access to those 
clearly identified as instigators of extremist violence, and 
exploring ways to combat extremist messages. Recognizing the 
tremendous impact that total impunity has had on the escalation 
of violence there, we call on the United States to provide 
support for the commission of inquiry into the events 
surrounding the 1993 coup d'etat and for the commission's 
subsequent recommendations. In addition, we support all efforts 
to try to end this impunity through initiatives of judicial and 
law enforcement reform.

                                 Bosnia

    Although NATO's recent intervention has given new hope to 
the situation in Bosnia, the war has persisted for over 40 
months now. The Bosnian safe areas are still besieged and 
access to them by humanitarian convoys is still severely 
restricted. There are hundreds of thousands of refugees and 
internally displaced persons; these masses bring with them 
concerns regarding their resettlement, housing, and 
accountability for the thousands still missing. There is also a 
concern of whether the resettlement municipalities will be able 
to absorb these additional civilians and how they can develop 
their economies to rebuild self-sustaining systems.
    The United States must continue to press the Bosnian Serbs 
to account for missing civilians, allow full access to 
humanitarian organizations and their convoys, recognize U.N. 
safe areas and cooperate in peace negotiations. United States 
participation in these peace efforts should stress the 
territorial partition plan which would protect Bosnian 
Federation sovereignty, safe, voluntary return of refugees, 
mutual recognition of all the states and the introduction of 
international monitoring within the Balkans.

                                Chechnya

    The Committee urges the State Department to assess the 
needs of the over 400,000 internally displaced persons living 
in and around Chechnya, and to fund those projects and programs 
best suited to meet the needs of these internally displaced 
populations. There are already several programs operated by IOM 
and the United Nations which are jeopardized for lack of 
funding. This includes the World Food Program, which has run 
out of funding and may be forced to leave Chechnya.

            Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $50,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      50,000,000
House allowance.........................................      50,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              50,000,000

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for the Emergency 
Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund.

                             Antiterrorism

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $15,244,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      15,000,000
House allowance.........................................      17,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              15,000,000

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for the Department of 
State's Antiterrorism Program, the same as the administration's 
request.
    The Committee expects that expanded assistance for training 
and law enforcement will be provided to the FBI in the NIS 
section, and will be coordinated with ATA programs.

                 Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      25,000,000
House allowance.........................................      20,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              20,000,000

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the 
nonproliferation and disarmament fund.
                               TITLE III

                          MILITARY ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

             International Military Education and Training

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $25,500,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      39,781,000
House allowance.........................................      39,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              19,000,000

    The Committee recommends $19,000,000 for the International 
Military Education and Training [IMET] Program. The Committee 
strongly supports full funding for the IMET program. The 
Committee recommendation reflects the Defense authorization 
committee's legislation which allows the Secretary to draw down 
$20,000,000 in allocated DOD funds for IMET. That legislation, 
together with the Committee's recommendation for this account, 
fully meets the administration's request for this important 
program.
    The following tables detail the amounts provided for IMET 
in constant and current dollars:


                       Foreign Military Financing

                          total program level

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $3,770,929,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   4,027,020,000
House allowance.........................................   3,755,279,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           3,751,500,000

                              grant level

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $3,151,279,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   3,262,020,000
House allowance.........................................   3,211,279,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           3,207,500,000

                (limitation on administrative expenses)

Appropriations, 1995....................................   ($22,150,000)
Budget estimate, 1996...................................    (24,020,000)
House allowance.........................................    (24,000,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                            (22,500,000)

                  subsidy appropriations--direct loans

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $47,917,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      89,888,000
House allowance.........................................      64,400,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              64,400,000

                        (estimated loan program)

Appropriations, 1995....................................  ($619,650,000)
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   (765,000,000)
House allowance.........................................   (544,000,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                           (544,000,000)

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$3,751,500,000 for the Foreign Military Financing Program. Of 
this amount, $3,207,500,000 are for military grants, including 
an earmarked $1,800,000,000 for Israel, and $1,300,000,000 for 
Egypt. As provided in previous years, funds appropriated for 
Israel must be disbursed within 30 days of enactment of this 
act, or by October 1, 1995.

                           WARSAW INITIATIVE

    The Committee strongly supports the President's initiative 
to provide equipment and support to enhance the military 
interoperability of NATO members and nations involved in the 
Partnership for Peace. The United States has a vital interest 
in extending the stabilizing influence of NATO to include the 
emerging democracies in central Europe and the NIS.

                           GREECE and TURKEY

    The Committee supports the House provision which maintains 
the balance of military assistance to Greece and Turkey at a 
ratio of 7 to 10.

                                 TURKEY

    The Committee notes that a State Department report 
submitted earlier this year concluded that U.S. origin 
equipment had been used in the evacuation and destruction of 
Kurdish villages. The Committee requests that the Secretary of 
State submit a report by June 1, 1996, on efforts of the 
Turkish Government and the administration to improve monitoring 
of the use of United States origin equipment and to prevent its 
use in operations that can reasonably be expected to endanger 
civilians.

                               LANDMINES

    The Committee recommends retention of House bill language 
permitting demining equipment used to locate and clear 
landmines for humanitarian purposes to be made available on a 
grant basis to foreign countries. The Committee strongly 
supports continued use of FMF funds for activities which assist 
in locating and destroying some of the estimated 100 million 
unexploded landmines that contaminate 60 countries. The 
Committee intends that these funds will be used to assist in 
the clearing of other unexploded ordnance which, like 
landmines, causes injury of innocent civilians often long after 
a conflict ends, for example in Laos.
    The following graphs detail the amounts provided for the 
Foreign Military Financing Program in constant and current 
dollars and amounts of U.S. military export sales:


    a/ Foreign military financing treasury rate loans.
    b/ Foreign Military Financing Program concessional rate loans.
    c/ Foreign Military Financing Program grant funding. Prior to 
fiscal year 1989 funds provided in the form of nonrepayable FMS 
credits.
    d/ Military Assistance Program grant funding after 1981 merged into 
FMS trust fund for the purchase of defense goods and services under the 
Arms Export Control Act, pursuant to section 503(a)(3) FAA.

    Notes: Fiscal year 1991: Includes $53,500,000 deobligation/
reobligation of prior-year funds; fiscal year 1993 and prior: Reflects 
net budget authority after rescission of $45,750,000 and $91,720,000.


    a/ Foreign military financing treasury rate loans.
    b/ Foreign Military Financing Program concessional rate loans.
    c/ Foreign Military Financing Program grant funding. Prior to 
fiscal year 1989 funds provided in the form of nonrepayable FMS 
credits.
    d/ Military Assistance Program grant funding after 1981 merged into 
FMS trust fund for the purchase of defense goods and services under the 
Arms Export Control Act, pursuant to section 503(a)(3) FAA.

    Notes: Fiscal year 1991: Includes $53,500,000 deobligation/
reobligation of prior-year funds; fiscal year 1993 and prior: Reflects 
net budget authority after rescission of $45,750,000 and $91,720,000.

                    Special Defense Acquisition Fund

    The Committee recommends no new obligational authority for 
the special defense acquisition fund [SDAF] for fiscal year 
1996. The language included in the fiscal year 1993 bill, which 
requires that all receipts into the fund be returned to the 
Treasury, remains in effect and will reduce the deficit by 
approximately $200,000,000 in fiscal year 1996.

                        Peacekeeping Operations

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $75,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................      68,300,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              72,033,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $72,033,000, a 
reduction to the request of $27,867,000. Although the account 
is designed to afford the administration a measure of 
flexibility to respond to emerging problems, the Committee has 
not been satisfied with the administration's record in 
fulfilling commitments. After the Senate had approved support 
for a Baltic peacekeeping battalion, the administration 
transferred the funds for use in Haiti. Within budget 
constraints, the Committee will restore funding to peacekeeping 
if an adequate arrangement can be made to assure commitments 
which are approved by the Senate are subsequently funded. To 
that end, the Committee has included bill language which 
requires notification before any of the funds provided for this 
account may be obligated or expended.
                                TITLE IV

                    MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

              International Financial Institutions Summary

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $1,805,880,750
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   2,328,864,666
House allowance.........................................   1,030,139,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           1,229,913,568

    The Committee recommends the total level of paid-in and 
callable capital funding shown above for the international 
financial institutions funded by this bill--the International 
Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International 
Development Association, the International Finance Corporation, 
the Inter-American Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank 
and Fund, the African Development Bank and Fund, the European 
Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the North American 
Development Bank, and the enhanced structural adjustment 
facility of the International Monetary Fund.
    The Committee recognizes the important role of 
international financial institutions in leveraging donor 
resources. The Committee shares the House view that the 
leveraging impact of more than $20 made available to developing 
economies for every dollar Congress has appropriated has 
facilitated reductions in bilateral aid commitments.
    Unfortunately, given the size of the international 
institutional requests, budget pressures have compelled 
reductions in virtually every account. The Committee urges the 
administration to consult carefully before concluding 
negotiations for replenishment of institutional resources.

         International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $23,009,101
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      28,189,963
House allowance.........................................      23,009,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              28,189,963

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $743,923,914
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     911,475,013
House allowance.........................................     743,900,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             911,475,013

                      global environment facility

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $90,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     110,000,000
House allowance.........................................      30,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              50,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $28,189,963 
for paid-in capital and a limitation on callable capital of 
$911,475,013 for the World Bank. The Committee also recommends 
$50,000,000 for the Global Environment Facility.
    The administration's budget request for paid-in and 
callable capital in fiscal year 1996 would complete the U.S. 
payments for the general capital increase for the World Bank, 
agreed to in 1988. Budgetary constraints require that the 
Committee recommend an appropriation, somewhat less, but equal 
to last year's appropriation.
    Budgetary constraints also require a lower recommendation 
than the administration's request for the Global Environmental 
Facility, $50,000,000 rather than the $110,000,000 requested. 
The Committee believes this is the minimum necessary to 
maintain U.S. leadership in this vital organization, which 
seeks to combat ocean pollution, ozone depletion, loss of 
biodiversity, and other serious threats to the Earth's 
environment.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the World Bank, as 
well as the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                        ACTUAL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS                       
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
     Through fiscal year 1995         Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................      $10,858     $1,964.4         18.1
Callable.........................      165,580     28,869.0         17.4
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................      176,438     30,833.0         17.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                              CURRENT REPLENISHMENT                                             
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1994               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in......................................       $2,244       $420.8         18.7        $392.6          93.3
Callable.....................................       72,556     13,604.5         18.7      12,693.0          93.3
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................       74,800     14,025.3         18.7      13,085.6          93.3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 International Development Association

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $1,175,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   1,368,168,000
House allowance.........................................     575,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             775,000,000

    The Committee has provided $775,000,000 for the 
International Development Association [IDA], the soft loan 
window of the World Bank. The Committee regrets that it cannot 
fund the full request for this important organization, which 
supports economic development in the poorest countries which 
have enormous potential as markets for American exports. 
However, the Committee notes that in consultations with the 
administration during negotiations on the 10th replenishment of 
IDA, the Committee warned that it would be very difficult to 
support an increase in U.S. contributions under IDA-10. Yet an 
increase was approved, and budget constraints have borne out 
the Committee's fears. The Committee assumes the administration 
will take this into account during negotiations on any new 
replenishment.
    The Committee assumes that the administration will factor 
in this action during negotiations on any new replenishment.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the IDA, as well as 
the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                          ACTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS                          
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
     Through fiscal year 1995         Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contribution.....................      $86,033      $20,018        23.27
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                              CURRENT REPLENISHMENT                                             
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1994               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
9th replenishment............................      $14,725       $3,180         21.6      $3,106.2          97.7
10th replenishment...........................       18,100        3,750         20.9       2,189.3          58.4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   International Finance Corporation

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $68,743,028
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      67,556,000
House allowance.........................................      67,550,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              67,550,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $67,550,000 
for a U.S. contribution to the IFC.
    The Committee strongly supports the IFC, which was 
established as part of the World Bank Group in 1956 to 
encourage economic growth in developing member countries by 
promoting private investment. According to Treasury Department 
justification material, IFC's main role is to make medium and 
long-term loans and equity investments at market-determined 
rates without Government guarantees to support private sector 
projects.
    Like the House, the Committee believes the IFC should adopt 
information disclosure and environmental assessment procedures 
which are comparable to the other international financial 
institutions. The Committee is concerned about a proposed IFC 
loan to finance a liquefied natural gas plant off the coast of 
Nigeria and a gas pipeline through the Niger delta to the 
north. There are a number of important questions about the 
potential environmental and social consequences of this 
project, and the Committee requests to be kept informed by the 
Treasury Department on progress in addressing these concerns.

                    Inter-American Development Bank

                     interregional paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $28,111,959
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      25,952,110
House allowance.........................................      25,950,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              25,952,110

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $1,594,568,180
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   1,523,767,142
House allowance.........................................   1,523,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           1,523,767,142

                      fund for special operations

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $21,338,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      20,835,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                                              20,000,000

        enterprise for the americas multilateral investment fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $75,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................      70,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              70,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $25,952,110, 
the budget request for paid-in capital together with 
$1,523,767,142 in callable capital and $70,000,000 for the 
Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment Fund. The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,000,000 for the 
Fund for Special Operations.
    Over the last 10 years, the Inter-American Development 
Bank, under the leadership of Enrique Iglesias as president has 
made significant progress in improving its efficiency and the 
quality of its programs and projects.
    The Committee is concerned, however, with the bank's 
interference in the activities of the Enterprise for the 
Americas Multilateral Investment Fund. While the donors to the 
fund fully intended the bank to provide technical services, it 
was expected that the fund's directors and management would 
independently make decisions with regard to fund projects and 
programs. The Committee expects the bank to refrain from 
further interference in fund decisionmaking.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the IDB, as well as 
the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                        ACTUAL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS                       
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1994        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................     $3,338.7     $1,149.4         34.4
Callable.........................     57,524.9     19,984.4         34.7
FSO..............................      8,675.0      4,715.9         54.4
IIC..............................        200.0         51.0         25.5
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................     69,738.6     26,900.7         37.1
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                          CURRENT REPLENISHMENT (IDB-8)                                         
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1995               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IDB-8:                                                                                                          
    Paid-in..................................       $1,000       $153.6         30.0         $28.1          18.3
    Callable.................................       39,000      9,022.3         30.0       1,594.6          17.7
    FSO......................................        1,000         82.3          8.2          21.3          25.8
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................       41,000      9,258.2  ...........         1,644          17.6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Asian Development Bank

                            PAID-IN CAPITAL

Appropriations, 1995....................................................
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     $13,221,596
House allowance.........................................      13,200,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              13,221,596

                     LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL

Appropriations, 1995....................................................
Budget estimate, 1996...................................    $647,858,204
House allowance.........................................     647,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             647,858,204

    The Committee recommends the provision of $13,221,596 in 
paid-in capital and $647,858,204 in callable capital, the 
amounts requested by the administration. This appropriation 
represents the first installment of the 6-year capital 
subscription to the fourth general capital increase of this 
institution. The Asian Development Bank has consistently been 
one of the better run multilateral development banks.

                         Asian Development Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $167,960,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     304,528,525
House allowance.........................................     100,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             110,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $110,000,000 
for the soft-loan window of the Asian Development Bank, known 
as the Asian Development Fund [ADF].
    The Committee supports the operations of the Asian 
Development Fund and regrets that budgetary considerations 
require that it recommends a significant reduction to the 
request.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the ADB, as well as 
the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                   ACTUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS/CONTRIBUTIONS                   
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1994        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................     $3,113.2       $483.9         15.5
Callable.........................     27,038.2      3,546.8         13.1
Asian Development Fund...........     18,371.7      2,087.9         11.4
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................     48,523.1      6,118.6         12.6
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                   CURRENT REPLENISHMENT (ADB-GCI-IV, ADF-VI)                                   
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1995               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fourth general capital increase:                                                                                
    Paid-in..................................       $427.1        $66.6         16.0  ............  ............
    Callable.................................     20,931.3      3,264.2         16.0  ............  ............
Fifth replenishment (1991): Asian Development                                                                   
 Fund (VI)...................................      4,200.0        680.0         16.2        $243.0          35.7
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................     25,558.4      4,010.8         15.7         243.0           6.1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   African Development Bank and Fund

                        African Development Bank

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $133,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................................
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................      $2,002,540
Budget estimate, 1996...................................................
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

                        african development fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $62,215,309
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     127,247,025
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    The Committee concurs with the House recommendation that no 
funding be provided to the African Development Fund. There are 
a number of significant issues outstanding with regard to the 
current replenishment, including financial accountability, 
which must be addressed before the Committee will entertain 
funding requests for this institution.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the AFDF, as well 
as the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                          ACTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS                          
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1994        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contribution.....................       $9,737       $1,295         13.3
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                         CURRENT REPLENISHMENT (AFDF-7)                                         
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1995               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7th replenishment............................       $2,630         $315         11.9  ............  ............
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $69,180,353
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      81,916,447
House allowance.........................................      69,180,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              70,000,000

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $161,420,824
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     191,138,376
House allowance.........................................     161,400,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             163,333,333

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development is 
playing an increasingly important role in Eastern Europe and 
the former Soviet Union, and it is anticipated that this role 
will continue. The Committee notes that this institution is 
living up to its original commitments that it would emphasize 
private sector projects in the region.
    The Committee believes that the EBRD deserves strong 
support and regrets that budgetary constraints do not allow the 
appropriation of the entire request.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the EBRD, as well 
as the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                        ACTUAL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS                       
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1994        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................     $2,652.9       $268.2           10
Callable.........................      6,190.2        625.8           10
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................      8,843.1        894.0           10
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                              CURRENT REPLENISHMENT                                             
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1995               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in......................................       $3,501       $350.1           10        $268.2            77
Callable.....................................        8,169        816.9           10         625.8            77
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................       11,670      1,167.0           10         894.0            77
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    North American Development Bank

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................................
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     $56,250,000
House allowance.........................................      56,250,000

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1995....................................................
Budget estimate, 1996...................................    $318,750,000
House allowance.........................................     318,750,000

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

 Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility of the International Monetary 
                                  Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $25,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      25,000,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    Budgetary constraints require the Committee to concur with 
the House recommendation that no funding be provided for this 
facility in fiscal year 1996. The Committee believes that other 
institutions, particularly the International Development 
Association, along with regular IMF programs can provide 
support for programs intended to be funded under this facility.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

  Voluntary Contributions to International Organizations and Programs

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $374,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     425,000,000
House allowance.........................................     155,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             260,000,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $260,000,000 for this 
account. The administration requested $425,000,000.
    The reduction in funding has been accompanied by a minimum 
of earmarks. The House level reflects an assumption that 
$100,000,000 will be provided for UNICEF from the House Child 
Survival Fund, boosting the House recommendation for programs 
under IO&P; to a total of $255,000,000.

        korean peninsula energy development organization [keds]

    The Committee has included a provision which restricts 
funding for the Korean Peninsula Energy Development 
Organization [KEDO] until there has been additional improvement 
in the relationship between North and South Korea. KEDO is an 
international consortium organized to finance and supply a 
light water reactor for North Korea as well as meet interim 
energy requirements.
    In 1994, the administration signed an agreed framework 
between the United States and the Democratic People's Republic 
of Korea. The Committee supports the framework's goal of 
dismantling North Korea's graphite-moderated reactors and 
related sites and facilities. However, the Committee notes that 
there is no date established for accomplishing this goal nor 
for North Korea's full compliance with its existing safeguards 
agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency.
    Provision II of the framework agreement requires full 
normalization of political and economic relations between North 
Korea and the United States including opening or consular 
offices and, within 3 months, reducing barriers to trade and 
investment and eliminating restrictions on telecommunications 
services and financial transactions. The Committee understands 
this provision was considered necessary incentive to assure 
progress on dismantling North Korea's nuclear program.
    The Committee is concerned that improvements exclusively in 
the bilateral United States relationship with North Korea with 
comparable, parallel progress in the North Korea's relationship 
with South Korea will have an adverse impact on United States 
interests in long-term stability and security. Thus, the 
Committee has required a certification that the steps taken to 
improve United States-North Korean ties are accompanied by 
similar, parallel steps in the North-South relationship.

             unrepresented nations and peoples organization

    The Committee notes that the fate of indigenous peoples and 
minorities is a matter of great concern in a time when ethnic 
conflicts and unchecked development threaten their very 
existence. There is a pressing need to assist these groups in 
defending their way of life without violence. UNPO provides a 
unique forum for occupied nations, indigenous peoples, 
minorities, and other groups that are not represented in 
established international organizations. The Committee 
recommends a contribution of $75,000 to UNPO, either from the 
international organizations and programs account, or through 
the Agency for International Development.

                    organization of american states

         international commission for support and verification

    The Committee believes that the International Commission 
for Support and Verification of the Organization of American 
States has made a major contribution to the transition to 
democracy in Nicaragua. The Commission's mission is scheduled 
to end in June 1996. The Committee believes that the 
Commission's mission should be extended through June 1997 to 
enable it to continue its work through the upcoming election.

          united nations voluntary fund for victims of torture

    The United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture 
provides modest financial grants to treatment programs for 
victims of torture. These programs provide medical and 
psychological services to victims both in countries of refuge 
and in the victim's country of origin. Programs exist in 
California, Illinois, Minnesota, and New York. Most U.S. 
programs receive or are applying for assistance from the 
voluntary fund.
    Therefore, the Committee recommends that the administration 
maintain the U.S. contribution to the voluntary fund in fiscal 
year 1996 at its current level of $1,500,000. The Committee 
also urges the Department of State to undertake diplomatic 
activity to encourage other governments to increase their own 
contributions.

                       preserving the environment

    The Committee recognizes the importance of international 
environmental organizations and programs as crucial to 
protecting the health and environment of the American people. 
The Committee urges that adequate funding be provided for these 
activities.
                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The following explains changes the Committee is 
recommending to the general provisions contained in previous 
law, as well as new provisions recommended by the Committee:
    Section 504 amends current law by prohibiting funding of 
entertainment expenses by the Agency for International 
Development.
    Section 505 prohibits funds from the following accounts for 
use as entertainment expenses; Foreign Military Financing 
Program, funds available to the Inter-American Foundation, the 
Peace Corps, and the Trade and Development Agency.
    Section 509 amends current law by allowing transfers 
between accounts specifically provided for in this act.
    Section 513 amends current law by requiring notification 
from the Chairman of the Board of the Export-Import Bank 
pursuant to waiver allowed under the provision.
    Section 514 amends current law by adding the North American 
Development Bank.
    Section 515 amends current law by striking accounts which 
have been eliminated from the appropriations legislation and 
adding new ones.
    Section 516 amends current law by dropping a provision 
relating to contributions to groups which do not have 
internationally recognized attributes of statehood.
    Section 517 amends current law by changing an appropriation 
account name.
    Section 518 amends current law by dropping language which 
reaffirms congressional commitment to population assistance.
    The Committee has not retained a separate functional 
account for international population assistance. However, the 
Committee supports these programs and has included language in 
the bill to ensure that AID's efforts to provide voluntary 
family planning assistance continue.
    Section 520 amends current law to revise the list of 
countries for special notification by dropping El Salvador, 
Indonesia, Russia, and Rwanda.
    Section 523 amends current law by changing waiver authority 
from ``national interest'' to ``national security interest''.
    Section 526 amends current law by dropping unneeded 
authorization language relative to several international 
financial institutions, military spending, and other matters.
    Section 531A is a new provision which amends the Arms 
Export Control Act.
    Section 531B amends current law by updating stockpile of 
defense articles legislation.
    Section 532 amends current law by deleting reference to the 
Philippine multilateral assistance initiative.
    Section 533 amends current law by including ``North 
American Development Bank'' in the provision.
    Section 534 amends current law by eliminating the section 
on import sanctions relative to U.N. sanctions against Iraq.
    Section 540 amends current law by changing certification 
requirement by eliminating need to certify that U.S. allies are 
prepared to join in military assistance effort.
    Section 540A is a new provision relative to restrictions on 
the termination of sanctions against Serbia and Montenegro, as 
well as modifying section 660 of the Foreign Assistance Act.
    Section 541 amends current law by eliminating application 
of special authority to Haiti and displaced Burmese, and by 
modifying language relative to the Khmer Rouge.
    The Committee notes that a decade and a half after the 
genocidal Khmer Rouge were forced from power, they continue to 
engage in military operations that cause untold civilian 
casualties and limit the effectiveness of United States 
assistance programs in Cambodia. Because of the Committee's 
concern about Thai military and Chinese support for the Khmer 
Rouge, current law prohibits assistance to any country or 
organization that is cooperating, tactically or strategically, 
with the Khmer Rouge in their military operations. The 
Committee is alarmed by reports that there continues to be 
persistent cooperation between Thai military personnel and the 
Khmer Rouge in the extraction of large quantities of timber 
inside Cambodia. The timber is transported across the Thai-
Cambodia border for export where the Khmer Rouge reportedly 
earns in excess of $10,000,000 per month from these sales which 
helps fund their military operations. Accordingly, the 
Committee has modified current law in order to deter commercial 
cooperation between the Thai military, or any other country or 
organization, and the Khmer Rouge.
    Section 542 amends current law by eliminating ``findings'' 
section.
    Section 543 amends current law by updating appropriation 
account name.
    Section 544 amends current law by updating section cite.
    Section 546 amends current law by eliminating requirement 
that the provision of excess defense articles to Jordan is 
subject to section relating to Iraq sanctions.
    Section 551 amends current law by dropping provision which 
limited funding to PVO's not registered with AID.
    Section 555 amends current law by making technical change 
due to bill title reorganization.
    Section 557 amends current law which limited applicability 
of section to Albania by expanding it to countries eligible to 
participate in the Partnership for Peace.
    Section 558 amends current law by adding provision amending 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993.
    Section 560 amends current law by making a technical 
substitution of the word ``subsection'' for ``restriction''.
    Section 562 is a new provision which extends nonovertime 
differential pay to AID's foreign service officer criminal 
investigators, bringing them on a par with civil service 
criminal investigators.
    Section 565 is a new provision which withholds assistance 
to countries which support a specific nuclear plant in Cuba.
    Section 570 is a new provision restricting international 
narcotics control assistance to the Government of Burma.
    Section 570A is a new section authorizing appropriations 
for paid-in shares of the Asian Development Bank.
    Section 575 is a new provision which requires certain 
presidential determinations and certifications before funding 
is made available to the Korean Peninsula Energy Development 
Organization.
    Section 576 is a new provision providing for drawdown 
authority for Jordan of defense articles and services.
    Title VI is a new title, the Middle East Peace Facilitation 
Act of 1995, to allow the suspension of certain provisions of 
law regarding the PLO subject to Presidential certification and 
consultation. The bill uses the phrase ``complied with'' in 
place of ``abide by'' to conform with the terminology of the 
PLO Commitments Compliance Act. No substantive change from 
existing law or past practice is intended by this purely 
stylistic revision.
  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment, with particularity, which proposes 
an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the 
provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act 
or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that 
session.
    Several items provide funding for fiscal year 1996 which 
are either over Senate-passed authorization or lack 
authorization altogether. Those items are as follows:

Export-Import Bank tied-aid grants......................    $100,000,000
Economic assistance, including economic support fund, 
    Inter-American Foundation, African Development 
    Foundation, Development Fund for Africa, development 
    assistance, debt restructuring (except for the 
    Export-Import Bank).................................   2,117,099,331
Middle East Fund........................................   2,015,000,000
International disaster assistance.......................     175,000,000
Micro and Small Enterprise Development Program..........       2,000,000
Housing Guaranty Program................................      15,000,000
AID operating expenses..................................     490,000,000
AID operating expenses, Office of Inspector General.....      30,200,000
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltics...........     335,000,000
Assistance for the New Independent States of the former 
    Soviet Union........................................     705,000,000
Peace Corps.............................................     200,000,000
International narcotics control.........................     150,000,000
Migration and refugee assistance........................     671,000,000
Antiterrorism assistance................................      15,000,000
Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund...................      20,000,000
International military education and training...........      19,000,000
Foreign Military Financing Program......................   3,271,900,000
Trade and Development Agency............................      40,000,000
Peacekeeping operations.................................      72,033,000
Asian Development Bank..................................      13,221,596
Global Environment Fund.................................      50,000,000
International organizations and programs................     260,000,000

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the accompanying 
bill was ordered reported from the Committee, subject to 
amendment and subject to appropriate scoring, by recorded vote 
of 28-0, a quorum being present.
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Hatfield
Mr. Stevens
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Gramm
Mr. Bond
Mr. Gorton
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Mack
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Jeffords
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Johnston
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Bumpers
Mr. Lautenberg
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kerrey
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee report on 
a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute or 
part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                           reciprocal leasing

    The accompanying bill would amend section 61(a) of the Arms 
Export Control Act or extend the leasing authority of that 
section through fiscal year 1994, as follows:

    Sec. 61. Leasing Authority.--(a) The President may lease 
defense articles in the stocks of the Department of Defense to 
an eligible foreign country or international organization if--
          (1) he determines that there are compelling foreign 
        policy and national security reasons for providing such 
        articles on a lease basis rather than on a sales basis 
        under this Act;
          (2) he determines that the articles are not for the 
        time needed for public use; and
          (3) the country or international organization has 
        agreed to pay in United States dollars all costs 
        incurred by the United States Government in leasing 
        such articles, including reimbursement for depreciation 
        of such articles while leased, the costs of restoration 
        or replacement cost (less any depreciation in the 
        value) if the articles are lost or destroyed while 
        leased.
    The requirement for paragraph (3) shall not apply to leases 
entered into for purposes of cooperative research or 
development, military exercises, or communications or 
electronics interface projects, or to any defense article which 
has passed three-quarters of its normal service life.
    The President may waive the requirement of paragraph (3) 
with respect to a lease which is made in exchange with the 
lessee for a lease on substantially reciprocal terms of defense 
articles for the Department of Defense, except that this waiver 
authority--
          (A) may be exercised only if the President submits to 
        the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
        Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate, in accordance with the 
        regular notification procedures of those Committees, a 
        detailed notification for each lease with respect to 
        which the authority is exercised; and
          (B) may be exercised only during the fiscal year 
        [1995] 1996 and only with respect to one country, 
        unless the Congress hereafter provides otherwise.

     competitive pricing for sales of defense articles and services

    The accompanying bill would amend section 22 of the Arms 
Export control Act, as follows:

    Sec. 22. Procurement of Cash Sales.--Except as otherwise 
provided in this section, the President may, without 
requirement for charge to any appropriation or contract 
authorization otherwise provided, enter into contracts for the 
procurement of defense articles or defense services for sale 
for United States dollars to any foreign country or 
international organization if such country or international 
organization provides the United States Government with a 
dependable undertaking (1) to pay the full amount of such 
contract which will assure the United States Government against 
any loss on the contract, and (2) to make funds available in 
such amounts and at such times as may be required to meet the 
payments required by the contract and any damages and costs 
that may accrue from the cancellation of such contract, in 
advance of the time such payments, damages, or costs are due. 
Interest shall be charged on any net amount by which any such 
country or international organization is in arrears under all 
of its outstanding unliquidated dependable undertakings, 
considered collectively. The rate of interest charged shall be 
a rate not less than a rate determined by the Secretary of the 
Treasury taking into consideration the current average market 
yield on outstanding short-term obligations of the United 
States as of the last day of the month preceding the net 
arrearage and shall be computed from the date of net arrearage.
    (b) The President may, if he determines it to be in the 
national interest, issue letters of offer under this section 
which provide for billing upon delivery of the defense article 
or rendering of the defense service and for payment within one 
hundred and twenty days after the date of billing. This 
authority may be exercised, however, only if the President also 
determines that the emergency requirements of the purchaser for 
acquisition of such defense articles and services exceed the 
ready availability to the purchaser of funds sufficient to make 
payments on a dependable undertaking basis and submits both 
determinations to the Congress together with a special 
emergency request for authorization and appropriation of 
additional funds to finance such purchases under this Act. 
Appropriations available to the Department of Defense may be 
used to meet the payments required by the contracts for the 
procurement of defense articles and defense services and shall 
be reimbursed by the amounts subsequently received from the 
country or international organization to whom articles or 
services are sold.
    (c) The provisions of the Renegotiation Act of 1951 do not 
apply to procurement contracts, heretofore or hereafter entered 
into under this section, section 29, or predecessor provisions 
of law.
            (d) Competitive Pricing.--Procurement contracts made 
        in implementation of sales under this section for 
        defense articles and defense services wholly paid from 
        funds made available on a nonrepayable basis shall be 
        priced on the same costing basis with regard to profit, 
        overhead, independent research and development, bid and 
        proposal, and other costing elements, as is applicable 
        to procurements of like items purchased by the 
        Department of Defense for its own use.

                         location of stockpiles

    The accompanying bill would amend section 514 of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as follows:

    Sec. 514. Stockpiling of Defense Articles for Foreign 
Countries.--(a) No defense article in the inventory of the 
Department of Defense which is set aside, reserved, or in any 
way earmarked or intended for future use by any foreign country 
may be made available to or for use by any foreign country 
unless such transfer is authorized under this Act or the Arms 
Export control Act, or any subsequent corresponding 
legislation, and the value of such transfer is charged against 
funds authorized under such legislation or against the 
limitations specified in such legislation, as appropriate, for 
the fiscal period in which such defense article is transferred. 
For purposes of this subsection, ``value'' means the 
acquisition cost plus crating, packing, handling, and 
transportation costs incurred in carrying out this section.
    (b)(1) The value of defense articles to be set aside, 
earmarked, reserved, or intended for use as war reserve stocks 
for allied or other foreign countries (other than for purposes 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or in the 
implementation of agreements with Israel) in stockpiles located 
in foreign countries may not exceed in any fiscal year an 
amount that is specified in security assistance authorizing 
legislation for the fiscal year.
    [(2) The value of such additions to stockpiles in foreign 
countries shall not exceed a total of $200,000,000 for 
stockpiles in Israel for fiscal years 1994 and 1995, up to 
$40,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles in the 
Republic of Korea, and up to $10,000,000 may be made available 
for stockpiles in Thailand for fiscal year 1995.]
    (2)(A) The value of such additions to stockpiles of defense 
articles in foreign countries shall not exceed $50,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 1996 and 1997.
    (B) Of the amount specified in subparagraph (A) for each of 
the fiscal years 1996 and 1997, not more than $40,000,000 may 
be made available for stockpiles in the Republic of Korea and 
not more than $10,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles 
in Thailand.
    [(c) Except for stockpiles in existence on the date of 
enactment of the International Security Assistance and Arms 
Export Control Act of 1976 and for stockpiles located in the 
Republic of Korea, Thailand, or countries which are members of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or major non-NATO 
allies, no stockpile may be located outside the boundaries of a 
United States military base or military base used primarily by 
the United States.]
            (c) Location of Stockpiles of Defense Articles.--
                  (1) Limitation.--Except as provided in 
                paragraph (2), no stockpile of defense articles 
                may be located outside the boundaries of a 
                United States military base or a military base 
                used primarily by the United States.
                  (2) Exceptions.--Paragraph (1) shall not apply 
                with respect to stockpiles of defense articles 
                located in the Republic of Korea, Thailand, any 
                country that is a member of the North Atlantic 
                Treaty Organization, any country that is a major 
                non-NATO ally, or any other country the 
                President may designate. At least 15 days before 
                designating a country pursuant to the last 
                clause of the preceding sentence, the President 
                shall notify the congressional committees 
                specified in section 634A(a) in accordance with 
                the procedures applicable to reprogramming 
                notifications under that section.
    (d) No defense article transferred from any stockpile which 
is made available to or for use by any foreign country may be 
considered an excess defense article for the purpose of 
determining the value therof.

    The accompanying bill would amend section 660 of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as follows:

    Sec. 660. Prohibiting Police Training.--(a) On and after 
July 1, 1975, none of the funds made available to carry out 
this Act, and none of the local currencies generated under this 
Act, shall be used to provide training or advice, or provide 
any financial support, for police, prisons, or other law 
enforcement forces for any foreign government or any program of 
internal intelligence or surveillance on behalf of any foreign 
government within the United States or abroad.
    (b) Subsection (a) of this section shall not apply--
          (1) with respect to assistance rendered under section 
        515(c) of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets 
        Act of 1968 with respect to any authority of the Drug 
        Enforcement Administration or the Federal Bureau of 
        Investigation which relates to crimes of the nature 
        which are unlawful under the laws of the United States, 
        or with respect to assistance authorized under section 
        482 of this Act;
          (2) to any contract entered into prior to the date of 
        enactment of this section with any person, 
        organization, or agency of the United States Government 
        to provide personnel to conduct, or assist in 
        conducting, any such program;
          (3) with respect to assistance, including training, 
        in maritime law enforcement and other maritime skills; 
        [or]
          (4) with respect to assistance provided to police 
        forces in connection with their participation in the 
        regional security system of the Eastern Caribbean 
        states[.]; or
          (5) with respect to assistance, including training, 
        relating to sanctions monitoring and enforcement.
Notwithstanding clause (2), subsection (a) shall apply to any 
renewal or extension of any contract referred to in such 
paragraph entered into on or after such date of enactment.
    (c) Subsection (a) shall not apply with respect to a 
country which has a longstanding democratic tradition, does not 
have standing armed forces, and does not engage in a consistent 
pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human 
rights.
    (d) Notwithstanding the prohibition contained in subsection 
(a), assistance may be provided to Honduras or El Salvador for 
fiscal years 1986 and 1987 if, at least 30 days before 
providing assistance, the President notifies the Committee on 
Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, in accordance 
with the procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications 
pursuant to section 634A of this Act, that he has determined 
that the government of the recipient country has made 
significant progress, during the preceding six months, in 
eliminating any human rights violations including torture, 
incommunicado detention, detention of persons solely for the 
non-violent expression of their political views, or prolonged 
detention without trial. Any such notification shall include a 
full description of the assistance which is proposed to be 
provided and of the purposes to which it is to be directed.

                               guarantees

    The accompanying bill would amend section 251(b)(2) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended, as shown:

SEC. 251. ENFORCING DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

          * * * * * * *
    (b) Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--* * *.
          * * * * * * *
    (2) When OMB submits a sequestration report under section 
254(g) or (h) for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 
1996, 1997, or 1998 (except as otherwise indicated), OMB shall 
calculate (in the order set forth below), and the sequestration 
report, and subsequent budgets submitted by the President under 
section 1105(a) of title 21, United States Code, shall include, 
adjustments to discretionary spending limits (and those limits 
as adjusted) for the fiscal year and each succeeding year 
through 1998, as follows:
    (A) IRS funding.--* * *.
          * * * * * * *
    (G) Net Guarantee Costs.--The net costs for fiscal year 
[1994 and 1995] 1996 of the appropriation made under section 
601 of Public Law 102-391 are not subject to the discretionary 
spending limits or the Appropriations Committee's Foreign 
Operations Subcommittee's 602(b) allocation in fiscal year 
[1994 and 1995] 1996.

                               landmines

    The accompanying bill would amend section 1365(c) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993, as 
follows:

    (a) Findings.--* * *.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--* * *.
    (c) Moratorium on Transfers of Anti-Personnel Landmines 
Abroad.--[During the four-year period beginning on October 23, 
1992] During the five-year period beginning on October 23, 
1993--
          (1) no sale may be made or financed, no transfer may 
        be made, and no license for export may be issued, under 
        the Arms Export Control Act, with respect to any anti-
        personnel landmine; and
          (2) no assistance may be provided under the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961, with respect to the provision 
        of any anti-personnel landmine.
    (d) Definition.--* * *.

                      nonovertime differential pay

    The accompanying bill would amend title 5 of the United 
States Code as follows:


                       subchapter v--premium pay


Sec. 5541. Definitions

    For the purpose of this subchapter--
          (1) ``agency'' means--* * *
          (2) ``employee'' means--* * *
                  (xiv) a Foreign Service officer, except for a 
                Foreign Service Officer who is a criminal 
                investigator for the Agency for International 
                Development, Office of Inspector General;
                  (xv) a member of the Senior Foreign Service;
                  (xvi) member of the Senior Executive Service; 
                or
                  (xvii) a member of the Federal Bureau of 
                Investigation and Drug Enforcement 
                Administration Senior Executive Service; and
          (3) ``law enforcement officer'' means an employee 
        who--* * *

                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL                                            
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS  
                                                     AMENDED                                                    
                                            [In millions of dollars]                                            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays        
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount of    Committee    Amount of 
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill   
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations                                                    
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the First Concurrent                                                        
 Resolution for 1996: Subcommittee on Foreign Operations,                                                       
 Export Financing, and Related Programs:                                                                        
    Defense discretionary...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Nondefense discretionary................................       12,368       12,368       13,918   \1\ 13,791
    Violent crime reduction fund............................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Mandatory...............................................           44           44           44           44
Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation:                                                      
    1996....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........    \2\ 5,953
    1997....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        2,965
    1998....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,406
    1999....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........          840
    2000 and future year....................................  ...........  ...........  ...........          715
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 1996                                                    
 in bill....................................................           NA  ...........           NA  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.                                                          
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.                                                          
                                                                                                                
NA: Not applicable.                                                                                             


                 COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1995 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 1996                
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                          Senate Committee recommendation compared with (+ or -)
                                                                    1995                                                  Committee     --------------------------------------------------------
                            Item                               appropriation     Budget estimate    House allowance     recommendation          1995                                            
                                                                                                                                           appropriation     Budget estimate    House allowance 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                                                
         TITLE I--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
          EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Limitation of Program Activity:                                                                                                                                                                 
    Subsidy appropriations.................................      $786,551,000       $823,000,000       $786,551,000       $795,000,000        +$8,449,000       -$28,000,000        +$8,449,000 
    Administrative expenses................................        45,228,000         47,000,000         45,228,000         46,000,000           +772,000         -1,000,000           +772,000 
    Negative subsidy.......................................       -49,656,000        -89,646,000        -89,646,000        -89,646,000        -39,990,000   .................  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export-Import Bank of the United States.......       782,123,000        780,354,000        742,133,000        751,354,000        -30,769,000        -29,000,000         +9,221,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
          OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Operating expenses.........................................         7,933,000         16,000,000         15,500,000         15,000,000         +7,067,000         -1,000,000           -500,000 
Non-credit administrative expenses.........................        16,389,000         11,000,000         11,000,000         11,000,000         -5,389,000   .................  .................
Insurance fees and other offsetting collections............      -151,620,000       -202,500,000       -202,500,000       -202,500,000        -50,880,000   .................  .................
Direct loans:                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Loan subsidy...........................................         8,214,000          4,000,000          4,000,000          4,000,000         -4,214,000   .................  .................
    (Loan authorization)...................................       (19,895,000)       (79,523,000)       (79,523,000)       (79,523,000)      (+59,628,000)  .................  .................
Guaranteed loans:                                                                                                                                                                               
    Loan subsidy...........................................        25,730,000         75,000,000         65,500,000         75,000,000        +49,270,000   .................        +9,500,000 
    (Loan authorization)...................................      (481,913,000)    (1,491,054,000)    (1,302,000,000)    (1,491,054,000)   (+1,009,141,000)  .................     (+189,054,000)
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Overseas Private Investment Corporation.......       -93,354,000        -96,500,000       -106,500,000        -97,500,000         -4,146,000         -1,000,000         +9,000,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                Trade and Development Agency                                                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Trade and development agency...............................        44,986,000         67,000,000         40,000,000         40,000,000         -4,986,000        -27,000,000   .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, title I, Export and investment assistance.....       733,755,000        750,854,000        675,633,000        693,854,000        -39,901,000        -57,000,000        +18,221,000 
          (Loan authorizations)............................      (501,808,000)    (1,570,577,000)    (1,381,523,000)    (1,570,577,000)   (+1,068,769,000)  .................     (+189,054,000)
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
          TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Economic assistance........................................  .................  .................  .................     2,117,099,331     +2,117,099,331     +2,117,099,331     +2,117,099,331 
Children and disease programs fund.........................  .................  .................       592,660,000   .................  .................  .................      -592,660,000 
Development assistance fund................................       840,500,000      1,300,000,000        655,000,000   .................      -840,500,000     -1,300,000,000       -655,000,000 
Population, development assistance.........................       450,000,000   .................  .................  .................      -450,000,000   .................  .................
Development Fund for Africa................................       802,000,000        802,000,000        528,000,000   .................      -802,000,000       -802,000,000       -528,000,000 
Debt restructuring.........................................         7,000,000         25,500,000          7,000,000        (15,000,000)        -7,000,000        -25,500,000         -7,000,000 
Micro and Small Enterprise Development program:                                                                                                                                                 
    Subsidy appropriations.................................         1,500,000         12,000,000          1,500,000         (1,500,000)        -1,500,000        -12,000,000         -1,500,000 
    Administrative expenses................................           500,000          2,500,000            500,000           (500,000)          -500,000         -2,500,000           -500,000 
    (Direct loan authorization)............................        (1,000,000)        (3,540,000)        (1,435,000)        (1,435,000)         (+435,000)       (-2,105,000)  .................
    (Guaranteed loan authorization)........................       (18,564,000)      (138,880,000)       (16,700,000)       (16,700,000)       (-1,864,000)     (-122,180,000)  .................
Housing and other credit guaranty programs:                                                                                                                                                     
    Subsidy appropriations.................................        19,300,000         16,760,000   .................        (8,000,000)       -19,300,000        -16,760,000   .................
    Operating expenses.....................................         8,000,000          7,240,000          7,000,000         (7,000,000)        -8,000,000         -7,240,000         -7,000,000 
    (Guaranteed loan authorization)........................      (137,474,000)      (141,886,000)  .................       (67,400,000)      (-70,074,000)      (-74,486,000)      (+67,400,000)
Economic Support Fund (part)...............................       334,000,000        479,300,000        285,000,000   .................      -334,000,000       -479,300,000       -285,000,000 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                    Independent Agencies                                                                                                                                                        
                                                                                                                                                                                                
               African Development Foundation                                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Appropriations.............................................        16,905,000         17,405,000         11,500,000   .................       -16,905,000        -17,405,000        -11,500,000 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                 Inter-American Foundation                                                                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Appropriations.............................................        30,960,000         31,760,000         20,000,000   .................       -30,960,000        -31,760,000        -20,000,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Economic assistance........................     2,510,665,000      2,694,465,000      2,108,160,000      2,117,099,331       -393,565,669       -577,365,669         +8,939,331 
International disaster assistance..........................       169,998,000        200,000,000        200,000,000        175,000,000         +5,002,000        -25,000,000        -25,000,000 
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability                                                                                                                                        
 Fund......................................................        45,118,000         43,914,000         43,914,000         43,914,000         -1,204,000   .................  .................
Operating expenses of the Agency for International                                                                                                                                              
 Development...............................................       517,500,000        529,000,000        465,750,000        490,000,000        -27,500,000        -39,000,000        +24,250,000 
Operating expenses of the Agency for International                                                                                                                                              
 Development Office of Inspector General...................        39,118,000         39,118,000         35,200,000         30,200,000         -8,918,000         -8,918,000         -5,000,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal.............................................     3,282,399,000      3,506,497,000      2,853,024,000      2,856,213,331       -426,185,669       -650,283,669         +3,189,331 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            Other Bilateral Economic Assistance                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Middle East Fund...........................................     2,015,000,000      2,015,000,000      2,015,000,000      2,015,000,000   .................  .................  .................
International fund for Ireland.............................        19,600,000   .................        19,600,000   .................       -19,600,000   .................       -19,600,000 
Assistance for Eastern Europe..............................       359,000,000        480,000,000        324,000,000        335,000,000        -24,000,000       -145,000,000        +11,000,000 
Assistance for the New Independent States of the Soviet                                                                                                                                         
 Union.....................................................       842,500,000        788,000,000        580,000,000        705,000,000       -137,500,000        -83,000,000       +125,000,000 
Procurement: General provisions............................        -1,598,000   .................  .................  .................        +1,598,000   .................  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Bilateral Economic Assistance........     3,234,502,000      3,283,000,000      2,938,600,000      3,055,000,000       -179,502,000       -228,000,000       +116,400,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Total, Funds Appropriated to the President...........     6,516,901,000      6,789,497,000      5,791,624,000      5,911,213,331       -605,687,669       -878,283,669       +119,589,331 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
                        Peace Corps                                                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Appropriations.............................................       219,745,000        234,000,000        210,000,000        200,000,000        -19,745,000        -34,000,000        -10,000,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
                    Department of State                                                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                                                                                
International narcotics control............................       105,000,000        213,000,000        113,000,000        150,000,000        +45,000,000        -63,000,000        +37,000,000 
Migration and refugee assistance...........................       671,000,000        671,000,000        671,000,000        671,000,000   .................  .................  .................
Refugee resettlement assistance............................         6,000,000   .................         5,000,000   .................        -6,000,000   .................        -5,000,000 
United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance                                                                                                                                        
 Fund......................................................        50,000,000         50,000,000         50,000,000         50,000,000   .................  .................  .................
Anti-terrorism assistance..................................        15,244,000         15,000,000         17,000,000         15,000,000           -244,000   .................        -2,000,000 
Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund......................        10,000,000         25,000,000         20,000,000         20,000,000        +10,000,000         -5,000,000   .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of State...........................       857,244,000        974,000,000        876,000,000        906,000,000        +48,756,000        -68,000,000        +30,000,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title II, Bilateral economic assistance.......     7,593,890,000      7,997,497,000      6,877,624,000      7,017,213,331       -576,676,669       -980,283,669       +139,589,331 
          (By transfer)....................................  .................  .................  .................  .................  .................  .................  .................
          (Loan authorizations)............................      (157,038,000)      (284,306,000)       (18,135,000)       (85,535,000)      (-71,503,000)     (-198,771,000)      (+67,400,000)
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
               TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
International Military Education and Training..............        25,500,000         39,781,000         39,000,000         19,000,000         -6,500,000        -20,781,000        -20,000,000 
    (By transfer)..........................................          (850,000)  .................  .................  .................         (-850,000)  .................  .................
Military to military contact...............................        12,000,000   .................  .................  .................       -12,000,000   .................  .................
Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                                             
    Grants.................................................     3,151,279,000      3,262,020,000      3,211,279,000      3,207,500,000        +56,221,000        -54,520,000         -3,779,000 
    (Limitation on administrative expenses)................       (22,150,000)       (24,020,000)       (24,000,000)       (22,500,000)         (+350,000)       (-1,520,000)       (-1,500,000)
    Direct concessional loans:                                                                                                                                                                  
        Subsidy appropriations.............................        47,917,000         89,888,000         64,400,000         64,400,000        +16,483,000        -25,488,000   .................
        (Loan authorization)...............................      (619,650,000)      (765,000,000)      (544,000,000)      (544,000,000)      (-75,650,000)     (-221,000,000)  .................
    FMF program level......................................    (3,770,929,000)    (4,027,020,000)    (3,755,279,000)    (3,751,500,000)      (-19,429,000)     (-275,520,000)       (-3,779,000)
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Foreign military assistance...................     3,199,196,000      3,351,908,000      3,275,679,000      3,271,900,000        +72,704,000        -80,008,000         -3,779,000 
Special Defense Acquisition Fund: Offsetting collections...      -282,000,000       -220,000,000       -220,000,000       -220,000,000        +62,000,000   .................  .................
Peacekeeping operations....................................        75,000,000        100,000,000         68,300,000         68,300,000         -6,700,000        -31,700,000   .................
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title III, Military assistance programs.......     3,029,696,000      3,271,689,000      3,162,979,000      3,139,200,000       +109,504,000       -132,489,000        -23,779,000 
          (By transfer)....................................          (850,000)  .................  .................  .................         (-850,000)  .................  .................
          (Limitation on administrative expenses)..........       (22,150,000)       (24,020,000)       (24,000,000)       (22,500,000)         (+350,000)       (-1,520,000)       (-1,500,000)
          (Loan authorization).............................      (619,650,000)      (765,000,000)      (544,000,000)      (544,000,000)      (-75,650,000)     (-221,000,000)  .................
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
         TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            International Financial Institutions                                                                                                                                                
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                      World Bank Group                                                                                                                                                          
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Contribution to the International Bank for Reconstruction                                                                                                                                       
 and Development:                                                                                                                                                                               
    Paid-in capital........................................        23,009,101         28,189,963         23,009,000         28,189,963         +5,180,862   .................        +5,180,963 
    (Limitation on callable capital).......................      (743,923,914)      (911,475,013)      (743,900,000)      (911,475,013)     (+167,551,099)  .................     (+167,575,013)
    Contribution to the International Finance Corporation..        68,743,028         67,556,000         67,550,000         67,550,000         -1,193,028             -6,000   .................
    Contribution to the Global Environment Facility........        90,000,000        110,000,000         30,000,000         50,000,000        -40,000,000        -60,000,000        +20,000,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the International Bank for                                                                                                                                         
       Reconstruction and Development......................      (925,676,043)    (1,117,220,976)      (864,459,000)    (1,057,214,976)     (+131,538,933)      (-60,006,000)     (+192,755,976)
Contribution to the International Development Association..     1,175,000,000      1,368,168,000        575,000,000        775,000,000       -400,000,000       -593,168,000       +200,000,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, World Bank Group..............................    (2,100,676,043)    (2,485,388,976)    (1,439,459,000)    (1,832,214,976)     (-268,461,067)     (-653,174,000)     (+392,755,976)
          Budget authority.................................     1,356,752,129      1,573,913,963        695,559,000        920,739,963       -436,012,166       -653,174,000       +225,180,963 
          (Limitation on callable capital).................      (743,923,914)      (911,475,013)      (743,900,000)      (911,475,013)     (+167,551,099)  .................     (+167,575,013)
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank:                                                                                                                                            
    Inter-regional paid-in capital.........................        28,111,959         25,952,110         25,950,000         25,952,110         -2,159,849   .................            +2,110 
    (Limitation on callable capital).......................    (1,594,568,180)    (1,523,767,142)    (1,523,000,000)    (1,523,767,142)      (-70,801,038)  .................         (+767,142)
    Fund for special operations............................        21,338,000         20,835,000   .................        20,000,000         -1,338,000           -835,000        +20,000,000 
    Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment                                                                                                                                         
     Fund..................................................        75,000,000        100,000,000         70,000,000         70,000,000         -5,000,000        -30,000,000   .................
    Inter-American Investment Corporation..................           190,000   .................  .................  .................          -190,000   .................  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the Inter-American Development                                                                                                                                     
       Bank................................................    (1,719,208,139)    (1,670,554,252)    (1,618,950,000)    (1,639,719,252)      (-79,488,887)      (-30,835,000)      (+20,769,252)
Contribution to the Asian Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                     
    Paid-in capital........................................  .................        13,221,596         13,200,000         13,221,596        +13,221,596   .................           +21,596 
    (Limitation on callable capital).......................  .................      (647,858,204)      (647,000,000)      (647,858,204)     (+647,858,204)  .................         (+858,204)
    Development fund.......................................       167,960,000        304,528,525        100,000,000        110,000,000        -57,960,000       -194,528,525        +10,000,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the Asian Development Bank....      (167,960,000)      (965,608,325)      (760,200,000)      (771,079,800)     (+603,119,800)     (-194,528,525)      (+10,879,800)
Contribution to the African Development Fund...............        62,215,309        127,247,025   .................  .................       -62,215,309       -127,247,025   .................
Contribution to the African Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                   
    Paid-in capital........................................           133,000   .................  .................  .................          -133,000   .................  .................
    (Limitation on callable capital).......................        (2,002,540)  .................  .................  .................       (-2,002,540)  .................  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the African Development Bank..        (2,135,540)  .................  .................  .................       (-2,135,540)  .................  .................
Contribution to the European Bank for Reconstruction and                                                                                                                                        
 Development:                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Paid-in capital........................................        69,180,353         81,916,447         69,180,000         70,000,000           +819,647        -11,916,447           +820,000 
    (Limitation on callable capital).......................      (161,420,824)      (191,138,376)      (161,400,000)      (163,333,333)       (+1,912,509)      (-27,805,043)       (+1,933,333)
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the European Bank for                                                                                                                                              
       Reconstruction and Development......................      (230,601,177)      (273,054,823)      (230,580,000)      (233,333,333)       (+2,732,156)      (-39,721,490)       (+2,753,333)
North American Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                                
    Paid-in capital........................................  .................        56,250,000         56,250,000   .................  .................       -56,250,000        -56,250,000 
    (Limitation on callable capital).......................  .................      (318,750,000)      (318,750,000)  .................  .................     (-318,750,000)     (-318,750,000)
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                International Monetary Fund                                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Contribution to the enhanced structural adjustment facility        25,000,000         25,000,000   .................  .................       -25,000,000        -25,000,000   .................
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Total, contribution to International Financial                                                                                                                                            
       Institutions........................................    (4,307,796,208)    (5,921,853,401)    (4,424,189,000)    (4,476,347,361)     (+168,551,153)   (-1,445,506,040)      (+52,158,361)
          Budget authority.................................     1,805,880,750      2,328,864,666      1,030,139,000      1,229,913,669       -575,967,081     -1,098,950,997       +199,774,669 
          (Limitation on callable capital).................    (2,501,915,458)    (3,592,988,735)    (3,394,050,000)    (3,246,433,692)     (+744,518,234)     (-346,555,043)     (-147,616,308)
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
          International Organizations and Programs                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
International organizations and programs...................       374,000,000        425,000,000        155,000,000        260,000,000       -114,000,000       -165,000,000       +105,000,000 
    (By transfer)..........................................  .................  .................       (15,000,000)       (15,000,000)      (+15,000,000)      (+15,000,000)  .................
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title IV, contribution for Multilateral                                                                                                                                            
       Economic Assistance.................................    (4,681,796,208)    (6,346,853,401)    (4,579,189,000)    (4,736,347,361)      (+54,551,153)   (-1,610,506,040)     (+157,158,361)
          Budget authority.................................     2,179,880,750      2,753,864,666      1,185,139,000      1,489,913,669       -689,967,081     -1,263,950,997       +304,774,669 
          (By transfer)....................................  .................  .................       (15,000,000)       (15,000,000)      (+15,000,000)      (+15,000,000)  .................
          (Limitation on callable capital).................    (2,501,915,458)    (3,592,988,735)    (3,394,050,000)    (3,246,433,692)     (+744,518,234)     (-346,555,043)     (-147,616,308)
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Grand total, all titles:                                                                                                                                                                  
          New budget (obligational) authority..............    13,537,221,750     14,773,904,666     11,901,375,000     12,340,181,000     -1,197,040,750     -2,433,723,666       +438,806,000 
          (By transfer)....................................          (850,000)  .................       (15,000,000)       (15,000,000)      (+14,150,000)      (+15,000,000)  .................
          (Limitation on administrative expenses)..........       (22,150,000)       (24,020,000)       (24,000,000)       (22,500,000)         (+350,000)       (-1,520,000)       (-1,500,000)
          (Limitation on callable capital).................    (2,501,915,458)    (3,592,988,735)    (3,394,050,000)    (3,246,433,692)     (+744,518,234)     (-346,555,043)     (-147,616,308)
          (Loan authorizations)............................    (1,278,496,000)    (2,619,883,000)    (1,943,658,000)    (2,200,112,000)     (+921,616,000)     (-419,771,000)     (+256,454,000)
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
         TITLE I--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Export Assistance Appropriations...........................       935,031,000      1,043,000,000        967,779,000        986,000,000        +50,969,000        -57,000,000        +18,221,000 
Negative Subsidies and Offsetting Collections..............      -201,276,000       -292,146,000       -292,146,000       -292,146,000        -90,870,000   .................  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export Assistance.............................       733,755,000        750,854,000        675,633,000        693,854,000        -39,901,000        -57,000,000        +18,221,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
          TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Bilateral Development Assistance...........................     4,359,388,000      4,714,497,000      3,939,024,000      3,962,213,331       -397,174,669       -752,283,669        +23,189,331 
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance........................     3,234,502,000      3,283,000,000      2,938,600,000      3,055,000,000       -179,502,000       -228,000,000       +116,400,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bilateral Economic Assistance.................     7,593,890,000      7,997,497,000      6,877,624,000      7,017,213,331       -576,676,669       -980,283,669       +139,589,331 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
               TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                   
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                                             
    Grants.................................................     3,151,279,000      3,262,020,000      3,211,279,000      3,207,500,000        +56,221,000        -54,520,000         -3,779,000 
    Direct loans, subsidy costs............................        47,917,000         89,888,000         64,400,000         64,400,000        +16,483,000        -25,488,000   .................
    (Estimated level of direct loans)......................      (619,650,000)      (765,000,000)      (544,000,000)      (544,000,000)      (-75,650,000)     (-221,000,000)  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                             
          Budget authority.................................     3,199,196,000      3,351,908,000      3,275,679,000      3,271,900,000        +72,704,000        -80,008,000         -3,779,000 
          (Program level)..................................    (3,770,929,000)    (4,027,020,000)    (3,755,279,000)    (3,751,500,000)      (-19,429,000)     (-275,520,000)       (-3,779,000)
Other, Military............................................       112,500,000        139,781,000        107,300,000         87,300,000        -25,200,000        -52,481,000        -20,000,000 
Special Defense Acquisition Fund...........................      -282,000,000       -220,000,000       -220,000,000       -220,000,000        +62,000,000   .................  .................
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Military Assistance Programs..................     3,029,696,000      3,271,689,000      3,162,979,000      3,139,200,000       +109,504,000       -132,489,000        -23,779,000 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
         TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Contributions to International Financial Institutions......     1,780,880,750      2,303,864,666      1,030,139,000      1,229,913,669       -550,967,081     -1,073,950,997       +199,774,669 
International Monetary Fund (IMF)..........................        25,000,000         25,000,000   .................  .................       -25,000,000        -25,000,000   .................
International organizations and programs...................       374,000,000        425,000,000        155,000,000        260,000,000       -114,000,000       -165,000,000       +105,000,000 
                                                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution for Multilateral Economic                                                                                                                                             
       Assistance..........................................     2,179,880,750      2,753,864,666      1,185,139,000      1,489,913,669       -689,967,081     -1,263,950,997       +304,774,669 
                                                            ====================================================================================================================================
      Grand total, all titles..............................    13,537,221,750     14,773,904,666     11,901,375,000     12,340,181,000     -1,197,040,750     -2,433,723,666       +438,806,000 
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