Daily Digest

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Daily Digest

HIGHLIGHTS

    Senate confirmed the nomination of Mike Pompeo, of Kansas, to be Secretary of State.

Senate

Chamber Action

Routine Proceedings, pages S2447–S2500

Measures Introduced: Thirty-one bills and fifteen resolutions were introduced, as follows: S. 2760–2790, and S. Res. 486–500.
Pages S2484–85

Measures Reported:

S. 994, to amend title 18, United States Code, to provide for the protection of community centers with religious affiliation, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.

S. 2644, to ensure independent investigations and judicial review of the removal of a special counsel, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.
Page S2484

Measures Passed:

Second Chance Month: Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from further consideration of S. Res. 440, designating April 2018 as ``Second Chance Month'', and the resolution was then agreed to.
Page S2497


Take Our Daughters And Sons To Work Day: Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions was discharged from further consideration of S. Res. 464, supporting the goals and ideals of Take Our Daughters And Sons To Work Day, and the resolution was then agreed to.
Page S2498


World Malaria Day: Senate agreed to S. Res. 489, supporting the goals and ideals of World Malaria Day.
Page S2498


Financial Literacy Month: Senate agreed to S. Res. 490, designating April 2018 as ``Financial Literacy Month''.
Page S2498


Recognizing the Independent Transportation Network of America: Senate agreed to S. Res. 491, recognizing the Independent Transportation Network of America on the occasion of providing 1,000,000 rides to older and visually challenged people of the United States.
Page S2498


National Safe Digging Month: Senate agreed to S. Res. 492, supporting the goals and ideals of National Safe Digging Month.
Page S2498


Congratulating the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish: Senate agreed to S. Res. 493, congratulating the Fighting Irish of the University of Notre Dame women's basketball team for winning the 2018 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I women's basketball championship.
Page S2498


Congratulating the Indiana University Hoosiers: Senate agreed to S. Res. 494, congratulating the Hoosiers of Indiana University for winning the 2018 Women's National Invitation Tournament.
Page S2498


Public Service Recognition Week: Senate agreed to S. Res. 495, expressing the sense of the Senate that, during Public Service Recognition Week, public servants should be commended for their dedication and continued service to the United States.
Page S2498


El Dia de los Ninos: Senate agreed to S. Res. 496, recognizing April 30, 2018, as ``El Dia de los Ninos--Celebrating Young Americans''.
Page S2498


Recognizing Cinco de Mayo: Senate agreed to S. Res. 497, recognizing the cultural and historical significance of the Cinco de Mayo holiday.
Page S2498


National Small Business Week: Senate agreed to S. Res. 498, expressing support for the designation of the week of April 29 through May 5, 2018, as ``National Small Business Week'' while commending the entrepreneurial spirit of small business owners of the United States, and the impact they have on their communities.
Page S2498


National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month: Senate agreed to S. Res. 499, recognizing and supporting the goals and ideals of National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month.
Page S2498


Authorizing Representation by Senate Legal Counsel: Senate agreed to S. Res. 500, to authorize representation by the Senate Legal Counsel in the case of Peter P. Truman v. Paula Armstrong, et al.
Page S2498


Pro Forma Sessions--Agreement:
A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that the Senate adjourn, to then convene for pro forma sessions only, with no business being conducted on the following dates and times, and that following each pro forma session, the Senate adjourn until the next pro forma session: Monday, April 30, 2018 at 2:30 p.m.; Thursday, May 3, 2018 at 10:30 a.m.; and that when the Senate adjourns on Thursday, May 3, 2018, it next convene at 3 p.m., on Monday, May 7, 2018.
Page S2498


Engelhardt Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Kurt D. Engelhardt, of Louisiana, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Fifth Circuit.
Page S2464

[Page:D456]


A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, and pursuant to the unanimous-consent agreement of Thursday, April 26, 2018, a vote on cloture will occur at 5:30 p.m., on Monday, May 7, 2018.
Pages S2464–65

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S2464

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S2464

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that Senate resume consideration of the nomination at approximately 3 p.m., on Monday, May 7, 2018; and that notwithstanding the provisions of Rule XXII, the cloture motions filed on Thursday, April 26, 2018 ripen at 5:30 p.m., on Monday, May 7, 2018.
Page S2498


Brennan Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Michael B. Brennan, of Wisconsin, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit.
Page S2465

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Kurt D. Engelhardt, of Louisiana, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Fifth Circuit.
Page S2465

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S2465

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S2464


Carson Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Joel M. Carson III, of New Mexico, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Tenth Circuit.
Page S2465

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Michael B. Brennan, of Wisconsin, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit.
Page S2465

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S2465

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S2465


Nalbandian Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of John B. Nalbandian, of Kentucky, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Sixth Circuit.
Page S2465

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Joel M. Carson III, of New Mexico, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Tenth Circuit.
Page S2465

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S2465

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S2465


Scudder Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Michael Y. Scudder, of Illinois, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit.
Page S2465

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of John B. Nalbandian, of Kentucky, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Sixth Circuit.
Page S2465

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

[Page:D457]

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S2465

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S2465


St. Eve Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Amy J. St. Eve, of Illinois, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit.
Page S2465

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Michael Y. Scudder, of Illinois, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit.
Pages S2465–66

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S2465

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S2465


Zais Nomination--Agreement: A unanimous-consent-time agreement was reached providing that at a time to be determined by the Majority Leader, in consultation with the Democratic Leader, Senate begin consideration of the nomination of Mitchell Zais, of South Carolina, to be Deputy Secretary of Education; that there then be 10 hours of debate, equally divided in the usual form, and that following the use or yielding back of time, Senate vote on confirmation of the nomination, with no intervening action or debate.
Page S2466


Nominations Confirmed: Senate confirmed the following nominations:

By 57 yeas to 42 nays (Vote No. EX. 84), Mike Pompeo, of Kansas, to be Secretary of State.
Pages S2448–60

During consideration of this nomination today, Senate also took the following action:

By 57 yeas to 42 nays (Vote No. 83), three-fifths of those Senators duly chosen and sworn, having voted in the affirmative, Senate agreed to the motion to close further debate on the nomination.
Page S2460

By 56 yeas to 42 nays (Vote No. EX. 85), Richard Grenell, of California, to be Ambassador to the Federal Republic of Germany.
Pages S2460–61

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that notwithstanding Rule XXII, the motion to invoke cloture on the nomination, be withdrawn.
Page S2460

Thomas J. Hushek, of Wisconsin, to be Ambassador to the Republic of South Sudan.

Hannibal Ware, of the Virgin Islands, to be Inspector General, Small Business Administration.

Andrea L. Thompson, of South Dakota, to be Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security.

Yleem D. S. Poblete, of Virginia, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (Verification and Compliance).

Kenneth Steven Barbic, of the District of Columbia, to be an Assistant Secretary of Agriculture.

Joseph L. Falvey, Jr., of Michigan, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims for the term of fifteen years.

Rohit Chopra, of New York, to be a Federal Trade Commissioner for the unexpired term of seven years from September 26, 2012.

Noah Joshua Phillips, of Maryland, to be a Federal Trade Commissioner for the term of seven years from September 26, 2016.

Joseph Simons, of Virginia, to be a Federal Trade Commissioner for the term of seven years from September 26, 2017.

Christine S. Wilson, of Virginia, to be a Federal Trade Commissioner for the unexpired term of seven years from September 26, 2011.

Christine S. Wilson, of Virginia, to be a Federal Trade Commissioner for the term of seven years from September 26, 2018.

Kirsten Dawn Madison, of Florida, to be an Assistant Secretary of State (International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs).

John Cary Bittick, of Georgia, to be United States Marshal for the Middle District of Georgia for the term of four years.

Timothy A. Garrison, of Missouri, to be United States Attorney for the Western District of Missouri for the term of four years.

Steven L. Gladden, of North Carolina, to be United States Marshal for the Middle District of North Carolina for the term of four years.

Nicola T. Hanna, of California, to be United States Attorney for the Central District of California for the term of four years.

David L. Lyons, of Georgia, to be United States Marshal for the Southern District of Georgia for the term of four years.

Rodney D. Ostermiller, of Montana, to be United States Marshal for the District of Montana for the term of four years.

Kenji M. Price, of Hawaii, to be United States Attorney for the District of Hawaii for the term of four years.

Paul R. Lawrence, of Virginia, to be Under Secretary for Benefits of the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Jon Parrish Peede, of Mississippi, to be Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities for a term of four years.

[Page:D458]

Brendan O. Heffner, of Illinois, to be United States Marshal for the Central District of Illinois for the term of four years.

Theodor G. Short, of Maine, to be United States Marshal for the District of Maine for the term of four years.

Rebecca Kelly Slaughter, of Maryland, to be a Federal Trade Commissioner for the term of seven years from September 26, 2015.

3 Air Force nominations in the rank of general.

19 Army nominations in the rank of general.

11 Marine Corps nominations in the rank of general.

56 Navy nominations in the rank of admiral.

Routine lists in the Air Force, Army, Foreign Service, Marine Corps, and Navy.
Pages S2466–68, S2473–74


Nominations Received: Senate received the following nominations:

John Lowry III, of Illinois, to be Assistant Secretary of Labor for Veterans' Employment and Training.

2 Marine Corps nominations in the rank of general.

1 Navy nomination in the rank of admiral.

Routine lists in the Air Force, and Army.
Page S2498


Messages from the House:
Page S2483


Measures Referred:
Page S2483


Executive Communications:
Page S2483


Petitions and Memorials:
Pages S2483–84


Executive Reports of Committees:
Page S2484


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages S2485–87


Statements on Introduced Bills/Resolutions:
Pages S2487–97


Additional Statements:
Pages S2479–82


Authorities for Committees to Meet:
Page S2497


Privileges of the Floor:
Page S2497


Record Votes: Three record votes were taken today. (Total--85)
Pages S2460, S2464


Adjournment: Senate convened at 9:30 a.m. and adjourned at 5:38 p.m., until 2:30 p.m. on Monday, April 30, 2018. (For Senate's program, see the remarks of the Majority Leader in today's Record on page S2498.)

Committee Meetings

(Committees not listed did not meet)

APPROPRIATIONS: DEFENSE HEALTH PROGRAM

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Department of Defense concluded a hearing to examine proposed budget estimates and justification for fiscal year 2019 for the Defense Health Program, after receiving testimony from Lieutenant General Nadja West, USA, Surgeon General of the Army, Vice Admiral C. Forrest Faison, III, USN, Surgeon General of the Navy, Lieutenant General Mark A. Ediger, USAF, Surgeon General of the Air Force, and Stacy Cummings, Program Executive Officer, Defense Healthcare Management Systems, all of the Department of Defense.

APPROPRIATIONS: MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND FAMILY HOUSING

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies concluded a hearing to examine proposed Department of Defense budget estimates and justification for fiscal year 2019 for military construction and family housing, after receiving testimony from Lucian Niemeyer, Assistant Secretary for Energy, Installations and Environment, Lieutenant General Gwendolyn Bingham, USA, Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management, Vice Admiral Dixon R. Smith, USN, Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Fleet Readiness and Logistics, Major General Vincent A. Coglianese, USMC, Commander, Marine Corps Installations Command and Assistant Deputy Commandant, Installations and Logistics (Facilities), and Major General Timothy S. Green, USAF, Director of Civil Engineers and Deputy Chief of Staff for Logistics, Engineering and Force Protection, all of the Department of Defense.

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE BUDGET

Committee on Armed Services: Committee concluded a hearing to examine the Department of Defense budget posture in review of the Defense Authorization Request for fiscal year 2019 and the Future Years Defense Program, after receiving testimony from James N. Mattis, Secretary, David L. Norquist, Under Secretary (Comptroller), and General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr., USMC, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, all of the Department of Defense.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING AND ABUSE OVERSIGHT

Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs: Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations concluded an oversight hearing to examine Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Homeland Security efforts to protect unaccompanied alien children from human trafficking and abuse, including actions still needed to improve transfers and monitoring of care, after receiving testimony from James W. McCament, Deputy Under Secretary, Office of Strategy, Policy, and Plans, Department of Homeland Security; Steven Wagner, Acting Assistant Secretary, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services; Kathryn A. Larin, Director, Education, Workforce, and Income Security, Government Accountability Office; Allison E. Herre, Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio, Cincinnati; Jessica A. Ramos, Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, Inc., Dayton, Ohio; Kelsey R. Wong, Shenandoah Valley Juvenile Center, Staunton, Virginia; Pattiva McKean Cathell, Sussex Central High School, Georgetown, Delaware; and Laura Carothers Graham, Community Legal Aid Society, Inc., Wilmington, Delaware.

[Page:D459]

BUSINESS MEETING

Committee on the Judiciary: Committee ordered favorably reported the following business items:

S. 2644, to ensure independent investigations and judicial review of the removal of a special counsel, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute; and

The nominations of Gregory Allyn Forest, to be United States Marshal for the Western District of North Carolina, and Bradley A. Maxwell, to be United States Marshal for the Southern District of Illinois, both of the Department of Justice.

INTELLIGENCE

Select Committee on Intelligence: Committee met in closed session to receive a briefing on certain intelligence matters from officials of the intelligence community.

House of Representatives

Chamber Action


Public Bills and Resolutions Introduced: 21 public bills, H.R. 5624–5644; and 7 resolutions, H. Con. Res. 119; and H. Res. 849–854, were introduced.
Pages H3705–06


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages H3707–08


Reports Filed: Reports were filed today as follows:

H.R. 4743, to amend the Small Business Act to strengthen the Office of Credit Risk Management within the Small Business Administration, and for other purposes, with an amendment (H. Rept. 115–655);

H.R. 2121, to require the appropriate Federal banking agencies to revise regulations to specify that certain funds shall not be taken into account when calculating any supplementary leverage ratio for custodial banks, and for other purposes, with amendments (H. Rept. 115–656); and

H.R. 5076, to amend the Federal Deposit Insurance Act to extend the examination cycle for certain insured depository institutions, with an amendment (H. Rept. 115–657).
Page H3705


Speaker: Read a letter from the Speaker wherein he appointed Representative Harper to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
Page H3577


Recess: The House recessed at 11:21 a.m. and reconvened at 12 noon.
Page H3587


Guest Chaplain: The prayer was offered by the Guest Chaplain, Chaplain Phil Crenshaw, Lubbock, TX.
Page H3587


Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act of 2018: The House considered H.R. 4, to reauthorize programs of the Federal Aviation Administration. Consideration is expected to resume tomorrow, April 27th.
Pages H3590–H3688

Agreed to:

Shuster amendment (No. 1 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that improves aviation safety by addressing issues such as airline engines, air ambulances, certification processes, and airspace operations; adjusts FAA authorization levels to conform with updated CBO baseline for FY 2018; makes counter-UAS systems AIP eligible; continues the contract weather observer program and requires the Secretary to define the roles and responsibilities of the FAA Tech Center; reforms and provides transparency to FAA organization and programs; addresses consumer concerns, including sexual misconduct on flights, treatment of passengers with disabilities, and harmonization of service animal standards; and improves the Airport Investment Partnership Program;
Pages H3636–43

[Page:D460]


Shuster en bloc amendment No. 1 consisting of the following amendments printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650: Lewis (GA) (No. 2) that allows AIP and PFC funds to purchase generators in passenger areas of the airport, to separate backup power supplies from main power supplies, and for similar projects; Soto (No. 3) that requires sinks or sanitizing equipment to be provided in any Mothers' Rooms at airports; Watson Coleman (No. 4) that requires medium or large hub airports to maintain baby changing tables in one men's and one women's restroom in each passenger terminal building; McMorris Rodgers (No. 5) that exempts Airports with more than 25,000 passenger enplanements in calendar year 2014 from any cost-share requirements under the contract tower program; Westerman (No. 6) that clarifies the application of Qualifications-Based Selection procedures on airport projects; Krishnamoorthi (No. 7) that adds ``economic impacts'' to the study on the effects of airport noise on communities near busy airports; Jayapal (No. 8) that adds the city of Seattle to the list of communities to be studied on the potential health impacts of overflight noise; Lipinski (No. 9) that adds contract tower construction as an eligible activity under 49 USC 47116, the AIP small airport fund; Smith (NE) (No. 10) that extends small airport regulatory relief for Fiscal Years 2018, 2019, and 2020; Torres (No. 11) that amends section 158, the Environmental Mitigation Pilot Program, to allow DOD to provide additional funding for mitigation projects on sites previously managed by DOD; Ted Lieu (CA) (No. 12) that requires a report from the Secretary of Transportation and the National Research Council on aviation gasoline that assesses non-leaded fuel alternatives to the aviation gasoline used by piston-powered general aviation aircraft; Meng (No. 14) that permits the Secretary to carry out an aircraft noise, emission, and fuel burn reduction research and development program (CLEEN II); Bass (No. 15) that requires a Report to Congress on the status of Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSAS) implementation across all completed NextGen Metroplexes with specific information provided by airline regarding the adoption and equipping of aircraft and the training of pilots in its use; Speier (No. 16) that requires a GAO report studying: (1) while maintaining safety as the top priority, whether air traffic controllers and airspace designers are trained on noise and health impact mitigation in addition to efficiency; and (2) the prevalence of vectoring flights due to over-crowded departure and arrival paths, and alternatives to this practice; McSally (No. 18) that adds a representative to the Safety Oversight and Certification Advisory Committee for airport owners and operators; Kildee (No. 19) that requires the FAA to allow airports to use non-fluorinated chemicals in firefighting foam as long as it abides by the National Fire Protection Association's standards; Estes (No. 20) that expands the scope of the FAA Task Force on Flight Standards Reform to address issues involving flight standards offices and aircraft originalequipment manufacturers; Soto (No. 21) that requires the Administrator to also consider the potential emergency medical needs of pregnant women when evaluating the minimum contents of approved medical kits--currently the bill only specifies the consideration of children's emergency medical needs; Keating (No. 22) that directs FAA to lead efforts to publish guidance for improving workforce readiness, and directs GAO to include in their report recommendations for strengthening and developing aviation workforce training programs; Long (No. 23) that directs the FAA Administrator to review the current safety procedures regarding unoccupied exit rows on commercial aircraft; Crist (No. 24) that commissions a GAO study on whether or not FAA ``Compliance Philosophy''--favoring communication over enforcement--is effective; Sanford (No. 25), as modified, that clarifies and tightens the 336 modelers exemption to ensure that those utilizing the exemption are following an appropriate course of safety, and allows the FAA to create rules for recreational UAS; DeFazio (No. 26) that modifies existing prohibition in regard to FAA issuing any regulation on model aircraft flown for hobby/recreational purposes and provides FAA flexibility to collaborate with industry to update operational parameters needed for unmanned aircraft flown for hobby/recreational purposes, to mitigate risks to aviation safety and national security; Hanabusa (No. 27) that ensures the role of state and local government is considered during an emergency situation where an unmanned aircraft system may pose a threat to public safety; Lewis (MN) (No. 28) that codifies the Department of Transportation's Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration Pilot Program; Schiff (No. 29) that directs FAA to establish a program to utilize available remote detection and identification technologies for safety oversight, including enforcement actions against operators of unmanned aircraft systems that are not in compliance with applicable Federal aviation laws, including regulations; requires annual reporting by FAA to Congress to report the number of drones entering restricted airspace, the number of enforcement cases brought by FAA or other agencies, and recommendations by FAA for detection and mitigation systems; and Grothman (No. 30) that requires the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to issue regulations necessary to authorize the use of certain actively tethered public unmanned aircraft systems by government public safety agencies without any requirement to obtain a certification of waiver, certificate of authorization, or other approval by the Federal Aviation Administration;
Pages H3643–51

[Page:D461]


Roskam amendment (No. 13 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that directs the FAA Administrator to study the relationship between jet aircraft approach and takeoff speeds and corresponding noise impacts on communities surrounding airports; requires the FAA Administrator to submit the results of the study in a report to Congress;
Page H3651

Denham amendment (No. 17 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that harmonizes the statute of limitations for Section 1309 of Public Law 114–94 with other Department of Transportation projects;
Pages H3651–52

Shuster en bloc amendment No. 2 consisting of the following amendments printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650: Cramer (No. 31) that requires the FAA, NTIA and the FCC to submit to Congress a report on whether UAS operations should be permitted to operate on spectrum designated for aviation use; the report would also include recommendations of other spectrum frequencies (such as LTE) that may be appropriate for flying UAS; LoBiondo (No. 32) that requires the FAA to review interagency coordination and standards for the authorized federal use of C–UAS systems; Davis (CA) (No. 33) that directs the FAA to partner with non-governmental organizations, state, and local agencies to prevent recreational unmanned aircrafts from interfering with the efforts of emergency responders; Sanford (No. 34) that aligns the FAA's critical programs supporting UAS integration and the development of commercial UTM; Cicilline (No. 35) that requires air carriers to outline rebooking options, refunds, meals, and lodging to the public in instances where a costumer's flight is diverted; Cárdenas (No. 36) that requires a study on the impact of over-booking policies of air carriers on the US economy, including effects on cost to passengers; Meng (No. 37) that requires GAO to submit a report to Congress reviewing airlines' training policies for employees and contractors regarding racial, ethnic, and religious nondiscrimination, and requires the Secretary of Transportation to develop and disseminate best practices based upon the findings of the report; Bonamici (No. 38) that creates the position of Aviation Consumer Advocate at the FAA; the Aviation Consumer Advocate would assist consumers in resolving complaints with air carriers, recommend actions the FAA could take to improve enforcement of consumer protection rules, and recommend policies to more effectively resolve complaints; Langevin (No. 39) that ensures passengers with disabilities receive timely and effective assistance at the airport and on the aircraft; personnel providing physical assistance to passengers with disabilities may be required to receive hands on training to perform assistance and use any needed equipment; O'Halleran (No. 40) that requires the Comptroller General to include in its report an analysis of the impact of any option for EAS reform on local communities with airports receiving EAS funding; Espaillat (No. 43) that states that not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of theUnited States shall conduct a study that examines the ground transportation options at the Nation's 10 busiest airports in order to understand the impact of new and emerging transportation options for travelers to get into and out of airports, including the fees charged to ground transportation providers for airport access; Sanford (No. 45) that requires the GAO to study airport finances under  47107(b)(2) of title 49, United States Code; Fleischmann (No. 48) that states that the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration will encourage the use of durable, resilient, and sustainable materials, including the use of geosynthetic materials and other innovative technologies in carrying out the activities of the Federal Aviation Administration; Meng (No. 50) that requires the Secretary to issue a rule creating designated areas at airports at which pets and service animals traveling with their owners may relieve themselves; Mitchell (No. 51) that establishes a pilot program with specified parameters for aircraft with certain NextGen avionics to have limited preferential access to certain airports designated by the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration; the pilot program has a sunset and a reporting requirement; Mitchell (No. 52) that requires the Inspector General of the Department of Transportation to study the potential impacts of a significantly delayed, significantly diminished, or completely failed delivery of the Next Generation Air Transportation System modernization initiative by the Federal Aviation Administration, including impacts to the air traffic control system and the national airspace system as a whole; DeGette (No. 54) that limits FAA regulation of non-federally sponsored property to facilitate airports' ability to generate non-aeronautical revenue; Banks (No. 55) that designates the main hangar at Smith Field in Fort Wayne, Indiana, as the National Airmail Museum, as the United States Postal Service began commercial airmail service at Smith Field in 1930; Sinema (No. 56) that directs the Administrator of the FAA to conduct a review of the effectiveness, safety, and consistency of its approval process for air tankers used for wildland firefighting, with the goal of developing standardized next-generation requirements for air tankers; requires an FAA report to Congress describing the outcome of its review; Biggs (No. 57) that ensures the Secretary of Transportation must publicize for comment a cost-benefit analysis before implementing the additional baggage reporting requirements of 14 CFR 234.6; Esty (No. 58) that directs the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to create and facilitate the Women in Aviation Advisory Board; the Board would promote organizations and programs that provide education, training, mentorship, outreach, and recruitment of women into the aviation industry; Graves (MO) (No. 59) that creates a GAO study on the use of proprietary exclusive rights by airports; Kilmer (No. 61) that requires the FAA to consider the emergency preparedness needs of a community served by an airport when evaluating that airport's master plan under the Airport Improvement Program; Panetta (No. 62) that directs the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration to evaluate alternative metrics to the current average day night level standard, such as the use of actual noise sampling and other methods, to address community airplane noise concerns and provide a report to Congress; Hill (No. 64) that requires the FAA to report on the status of the LIT VORTAC Agreement; and Lowey (No. 65) that requires the FAA to study and submit a report on the prevalence of allergic reactions on board flights, the reporting of reactions on flights, and the frequency of first aid inventory checks;
Pages H3652–58

[Page:D462]


Higgins (LA) amendment (No. 41 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that requires the Administrator of the FAA to initiate a pilot program to permit the operator of a State 2 airplane to operate that airplane in non-revenue service into medium hub airports or non-hub airports if certain parameters are met;
Page H3658

Cohen amendment (No. 46 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650), as modified, that alleviates delays in compliance with existing federal regulations to vet prospective pilots, by enabling 3rd party access to the National Driver Register;
Page H3660

Burgess amendment (No. 47 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that establishes prohibitions to prevent the use of unmanned aircraft systems as a weapon while operating in the national airspace;
Pages H3660–61

Perlmutter amendment (No. 49 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that implements recommendations from the FAA's Rotorcraft Occupant Protection Working Group to require all newly manufactured helicopters to meet certain standards to improve helicopter fuel system crash resistance within 18 months;
Pages H3661–63

Shuster en bloc amendment No. 3 consisting of the following amendments printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650: Fortenberry (No. 66) that allows Airport Improvement Program funds to be used to construct storage facilities to shelter snow removal, aircraft rescue, and firefighting equipment meeting certain conditions regardless of whether federal funding was used to acquire the equipment; Suozzi (No. 69) that asks for a report on airline and passenger safety pertaining to aging commercial aircraft: the average age of commercial aircraft owned and operated by United States carriers, overall use of planes, including average lifetime of commercial aircraft, the number of hours the aircraft are in flight, and the impact of metal fatigue on aircraft safety, review on contractor assisted maintenance of commercial aircraft and re-evaluation of the rules on inspection of aging airplanes; Maxine Waters (CA) (No. 70) that requires the FAA to issue a report on diversions of aircraft from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) to Hawthorne Municipal Airport; Pearce (No. 71) that makes a technical correction to the Military Airport Program (MAP) to ensure MAP benefits are available to all former installations, as was the original intent of the enacting law; Fleischmann (No. 72) that states if the Secretary determines that safety is not affected, highway specifications of a State may be used for airfield pavement construction and improvement at nonprimary airports with aircraft under 60,000 pounds; Takano (No. 73) that provides a sense of Congress that the Administrator of the FAA and Secretary should produce a smart airports initiative plan that focuses on creating a more connected and consumer-friendly airport experience; Speier (No. 74) that directs the FAA Administrator to review and evaluated the design and effectiveness of commercial airline oxygen masks, and determine whether changes to the design could increase correct passenger usage; Gibbs (No. 76) that amends age adjustment for Part 135 and Part 91 that perform at least 150,000 turbojet operations; Hastings (No. 77) that requires the FAA to study and submit to Congress a report on technologies developed by international entities that have been installed in American airports and aviation systems, and aviation safety technology implemented by international entities that may assist in improving American aviation operations and safety; Denham (No. 80) that sets a one year deadline for FAA to issue a rulemaking in accordance with Section 2209 of the FAA Extension, Safety, and Security Act of 2016 to establish procedures for unauthorized UAV use over critical infrastructure; Doggett (No. 82) that requires second-class medical certifications for operators of a commercial air balloon; Carter (GA) (No. 83) that requires federal agencies, in their cost-benefit analysis for acquisition of heavy equipment, to factor in renting as a viable alternative; Lance (No. 85) that requires the FAA to study the economic impact of TFRs on local airports and recommend ways to mitigate negative effects, including but not limited to, the potential of using security procedures to allow limited use of certain airports during a TFR; Jayapal (No. 86) that directs the FAA Administrator to conduct astudy on the infrastructure needs of fast-growing airports; Meng (No. 89) that requires the FAA to develop a 5-year aircraft noise research and mitigation strategy; Meng (No. 90) that requires the FAA within 1 year of enactment of the bill to complete the ongoing evaluation of alternative metrics to the current Day Night Level (DNL) 65 standard; Meadows (No. 91) that codifies a directive of President Clinton's 1993 Executive Order 12866, Section 1(b)(8), which stipulates that, whenever possible, any new standards promulgated by the FAA shall be performance-based standards providing an equal or higher level of safety; DeSaulnier (No. 92) that requires a review of the feasibility of expanding the use of systems capable of detecting wrong surface alignment; DeSaulnier (No. 93) that requires recommendations to ensure aviation safety in the event of power outages at airports; DeSaulnier (No. 94) that requires a review of the risks and benefits of equipping aircraft with runway awareness advisory systems; DeSaulnier (No. 95) that requires a progress report on improving the Aviation Safety Information Analysis and Sharing program; Lawrence (No. 98) that requires FAA to develop and transmit to Congress a report on cybersecurity and artificial intelligence standards plan for FAA operations; Cárdenas (No. 99) that expresses a sense of Congress that the aviation industry should hire more of the Nation's veterans; Lipinski (No. 100) that directs a GAO study to quantify the costs and burdens imposed by significant airline network disruptions; and Moore (No. 101) that authorizes FAA to take steps to improve compliance with the existing Department of Transportation Prompt Payment rule that requires subcontractors to be paid within a certain time period for satisfactory performance of their contracts; would also require the FAA to keep track of violations of this rule;
Pages H3666–70

[Page:D463]


Smith (NE) amendment (No. 68 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that directs the Comptroller General to assess the current state of the aviation workforce, barriers to entry to the aviation workforce, and options to increase the future supply of individuals in the aviation workforce;
Pages H3670–71

Lewis (MN) amendment (No. 75 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that clarifies that MPOs established prior to December 18, 1991 should also have local elected officials on their governing boards;
Pages H3671–72

González-Colón amendment (No. 81 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that requires a study/assessment and data collection of the air cargo traffic in the Caribbean region;
Pages H3677–78

Comstock amendment (No. 84 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650), as modified, that requires a study on possible funding options for a potential federal grant program for spaceport activities; requires a report on a National Spaceports Policy which evaluates the national security and civil space launch demands; proposes policies designed to ensure a robust and resilient orbital and suborbital spaceport infrastructure; reviews the development and investments made by international competitors; and other aspects; establishes an Office of Spaceports within the FAA to support, promote, and enable infrastructure improvements at FAA-licensed spaceports in the U.S.;
Pages H3678–80

Zeldin amendment (No. 96 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that requires the FAA administrator to review the North Shore Helicopter Route to address the noise impact on affected communities, to improve altitude enforcement, and to assess alternatives including an all water route over the Atlantic Ocean;
Pages H3682–83

Lawrence amendment (No. 97 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that requires the FAA Administrator to conduct a study on the diversity of the cybersecurity workforce of the FAA in order to develop recommendations to increase the size, quality and diversity of such workforce; and
Page H3683

Denham amendment (No. 79 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that clarifies the intent of the Federal Aviation Administration Authorization Act of 1994 for motor carrier meal and rest regulations (by a recorded vote of 222 ayes to 193 noes, Roll No. 159).
Pages H3673–77, H3686–87

Rejected:

Beyer amendment (No. 67 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to require the FAA to review and revise helicopter flight paths for all helicopters, including military helicopters, flying in the National Capital Region--identifying and issuing new official paths if helicopters are able to fly at higher altitudes (agreed by unanimous consent to withdraw the earlier request for a recorded vote to the end that the Chair put the question de novo);
Pages H3670, H3677

Meng amendment (No. 88 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to require the FAA to develop global-scale probabilistic convection guidance capability so that aircraft can avoid encounters with convection that causes turbulence;
Pages H3681–82

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DeFazio amendment (No. 42 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to repeal a prohibition on U.S. regulation of air transportation of flammable lithium batteries unless there has been an accident; restores the DOT's authority to regulate lithium batteries beyond international baselines, without waiting for an accident to occur (by a recorded vote of 192 ayes to 223 noes, Roll No. 155);
Pages H3658–60, H3684

Rohrabacher amendment (No. 60 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to ensure that aircraft transitioning from flight over ocean to flight over land fly at safe altitude and no lower than specific flight operations require (by a recorded vote of 37 ayes to 375 noes, Roll No. 156);
Pages H3663–64, H3684–85

King (IA) amendment (No. 63 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to ensure that none of the funds authorized by the Act are used to implement, administer, or enforce the prevailing wage requirements of the antiquated Davis-Bacon Act (by a recorded vote of 172 ayes to 243 noes, Roll No. 157);
Pages H3664–66, H3685–86

Lipinski amendment (No. 78 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to direct a DOT rulemaking to require airlines to interline and provide accommodations to passengers who are displaced due to events within an airline's control (by a recorded vote of 92 ayes to 323 noes, Roll No. 158); and
Pagess H3672–73, H3686

Lynch amendment (No. 87 printed in part A of H. Rept. 115–650) that sought to direct the FAA Administrator to engage and cooperate with air carriers to identify and facilitate opportunities for air carriers to retrofit aircraft with devices that mitigate noise, including vortex generators (by a recorded vote of 187 ayes to 227 noes, Roll No. 160).
Pages H3680–81, H3687

H. Res. 839, the rule providing for consideration of the bills (H.R. 4) and (H.R. 3144) was agreed to yesterday, April 25th.

Suspension--Proceedings Resumed: The House agreed to suspend the rules and pass the following measure. Consideration began Tuesday, April 24th.
Iran Human Rights and Hostage-Taking Accountability Act: H.R. 4744, amended, to impose additional sanctions with respect to serious human rights abuses of the Government of Iran, by a \2/3\ yea-and-nay vote of 410 yeas to 2 nays, Roll No. 161.
Page H3688


Authorizing the printing of ``United States Capitol Grounds: Landscape Architect Frederick Law Olmstead's Design for Democracy'' as a House document: The House agreed to discharge from committee and agree to H. Con. Res. 118, authorizing the printing of ``United States Capitol Grounds: Landscape Architect Frederick Law Olmstead's Design for Democracy'' as a House document.
Pages H3688–89


Senate Referral: S. 2758 was held at the desk.

Senate Message: Message received from the Senate today appears on page H3643.

Quorum Calls--Votes: One yea-and-nay vote and six recorded votes developed during the proceedings of today and appear on pages H3684, H3684–85, H3685–86, H3686, H3686–87, H3687, and H3688. There were no quorum calls.

Adjournment: The House met at 10 a.m. and adjourned at 8:17 p.m.

Committee Meetings

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies held a markup on the FY 2019 MILCON/VA Appropriations Bill. The FY 2019 MILCON/VA Appropriations Bill was forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

APPROPRIATIONS--FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION; FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION; U.S. MARITIME ADMINISTRATION

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies held a budget hearing on the Federal Highway Administration, the Federal Transit Administration, and the U.S. Maritime Administration. Testimony was heard from Rear Admiral Mark H. Buzby, Administrator, U.S. Maritime Administration; Brandye Hendrickson, Acting Administrator, Federal Highway Administration; and K. Jane Williams, Acting Administrator, Federal Transit Administration.

APPROPRIATIONS--SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government held a budget hearing on the Securities and Exchange Commission. Testimony was heard from Jay Clayton, Chairman, Securities and Exchange Commission.

[Page:D465]

FY 2019 PUBLIC WITNESS HEARING

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies held a budget hearing entitled ``FY 2019 Public Witness Hearing''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

APPROPRIATIONS--U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs held a budget hearing on the U.S. Agency for International Development. Testimony was heard from Mark Green, Administrator, U.S. Agency for International Development.

APPROPRIATIONS--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies held a budget hearing on the Department of Justice. Testimony was heard from Jefferson B. Sessions III, Attorney General, Department of Justice.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Legislative Branch held a markup on the FY 2019 Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill. The FY 2019 Legislative Branch Appropriations Bill was forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

APPROPRIATIONS--ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies held a budget hearing on the Environmental Protection Agency. Testimony was heard from Scott Pruitt, Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency; and Holly Greaves, Chief Financial Officer, Environmental Protection Agency.

APPROPRIATIONS--FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government held a budget hearing on the Federal Communications Commission. Testimony was heard from Ajit Pai, Chairman, Federal Communications Commission.

MEMBER DAY

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Homeland Security held a budget hearing entitled ``Member Day''. Testimony was heard from Representatives Long, Schneider, Johnson of Ohio, Hill, and Jackson Lee.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Armed Services: Subcommittee on Readiness held a markup on H.R. 5515, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019''. H.R. 5515 was forwarded to the full Committee, as amended.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Armed Services: Subcommittee on Emerging Threats and Capabilities held a markup on H.R. 5515, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019''. H.R. 5515 was forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Armed Services: Subcommittee on Military Personnel held a markup on H.R. 5515, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019''. H.R. 5515 was forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Armed Services: Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces held a markup on H.R. 5515, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019''. H.R. 5515 was forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Armed Services: Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces held a markup on H.R. 5515, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019''. H.R. 5515 was forwarded to the full Committee, as amended.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURE

Committee on Armed Services: Subcommittee on Strategic Forces held a markup on H.R. 5515, the ``National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019''. H.R. 5515 was forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

WORKER-MANAGEMENT RELATIONS: EXAMINING THE NEED TO MODERNIZE FEDERAL LABOR LAW

Committee on Education and the Workforce: Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions held a hearing entitled ``Worker-Management Relations: Examining the Need to Modernize Federal Labor Law''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Health held a markup on April 25, 2018, on H.R. 3528, the ``Every Prescription Conveyed Securely Act''; H.R. 449, the ``Synthetic Drug Awareness Act of 2017''; H.R. 5261, the ``TEACH to Combat Addiction Act of 2018''; H.R. 1925, the ``At-Risk Youth Medicaid Protection Act of 2017''; H.R. 4275, the ``Empowering Pharmacists in the Fight Against Opioid Abuse Act''; H.R. 5041, the ``Safe Disposal of Unused Medication Act''; H.R. 5554, to amend the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act to reauthorize user fee programs relating to new animal drugs and generic new animal drugs; legislation on FDA and International Mail; H.R. 4284, the ``Indexing Narcotics, Fentanyl, and Opioids Act of 2017''; H.R. 5228, the ``Stop Counterfeit Drugs by Regulating and Enhancing Enforcement Now Act''; H.R. 4684, the ``Ensuring Access to Quality Sober Living Act of 2017''; H.R. 5176, the ``Preventing Overdoses While in Emergency Rooms Act of 2018''; H.R. 5197, the ``Alternatives to Opioids (ALTO) in the Emergency Department Act''; H.R. 5272, the ``Reinforcing Evidence-Based Standards Under Law in Treating Substance Abuse Act of 2018''; H.R. 5327, the ``Comprehensive Opioid Recovery Centers Act 2018''; H.R. 5353, the ``Eliminating Opioid-Related Infectious Diseases Act of 2018''; H.R. 3331, to amend title XI of the Social Security Act to promote testing of incentive payments for behavioral health providers for adoption and use of certified electronic health record technology; legislation on Welcome to Medicare; legislation on Post-Surgical Injections as an Opioid Alternative; legislation on Alternative Payment Model for Treating Substance Use Disorder; legislation on Use of Telehealth to Treat Opioid Use Disorder; legislation on Incentivizing Non-Opioid Drugs; legislation on Mandatory Lock-In; legislation on Beneficiary Education; legislation on Evaluating Abuse Deterrent Formulations; legislation on CMS Action Plan; legislation on Adding Resources on Non-Opioid Alternatives to the Medicare Handbook; legislation on Prescriber Notification; legislation on Prescriber Education; legislation on Medication Therapy Management (MTM) Expansion; legislation on CMS/Plan Sharing; H.R. 5002, the ``ACE Research Act''; H.R. 5009, the ``Jessie's Law''; H.R. 5102, the ``Substance Use Disorder Workforce Loan Repayment Act of 2018''; legislation to improve fentanyl testing and surveillance; H.R. 4841, the ``Standardizing Electronic Prior Authorization for Safe Prescribing Act of 2018''; H.R. 3192, the ``CHIP Mental Health Parity Act''; legislation on Prescriber Education; legislation on Medicaid IMD ADDITIONAL INFO Act; legislation on Require Medicaid Programs to Report on All Core Behavioral Health Measures; legislation on HUMAN CAPITAL in Medicaid Act; legislation on Medicaid Pharmaceutical Home Act; legislation on Limited repeal of the IMD Exclusion for adult Medicaid beneficiaries with substance use disorder; legislation on Medicaid DRUG Improvement Act; legislation on Medicaid PARTNERSHIP Act; legislation on Medicaid Graduate Medical Education Transparency Act; H.R. 5202, the ``Ensuring Patient Access to Substance Use Disorder Treatments Act of 2018''; legislation on Improving Access to Remote Behavioral Health Treatment Act of 2018; legislation to amend title XIX of the Social Security Act to provide for Medicaid coverage protections for pregnant and postpartum women while receiving inpatient treatment for a substance use disorder; legislation on 21st Century Tools for Pain and Addiction Treatments; legislation on FDA Opioid Sparing; legislation on FDA Misuse/Abuse; legislation on FDA Packaging and Disposal; legislation to enhance and improve state-run prescription drug monitoring programs; legislation to support the peer support specialist workforce; H.R. 5329, the ``Poison Center Network Enhancement Act of 2018''. H.R. 3528, H.R. 449, H.R. 5261, H.R. 1925, H.R. 4275, H.R. 5041, H.R. 5554, legislation on FDA and International Mail, H.R. 4284, H.R. 5228, H.R. 4684, H.R. 5176, H.R. 5197, H.R. 5272, H.R. 5327, and H.R. 5353 were ordered reported, as amended. H.R. 3331, legislation on Welcome to Medicare, legislation on Post-Surgical Injections as an Opioid Alternative, legislation on Alternative Payment Model for Treating Substance Use Disorder, legislation on Use of Telehealth to Treat Opioid Use Disorder, legislation on Incentivizing Non-Opioid Drugs, legislation on Mandatory Lock-In, legislation on Beneficiary Education, legislation on Evaluating Abuse Deterrent Formulations, legislation on CMS Action Plan, legislation on Adding Resources on Non-Opioid Alternatives to the Medicare Handbook, legislation on Prescriber Notification, legislation on Prescriber Education, legislation on Medication Therapy Management (MTM) Expansion, legislation on CMS/Plan Sharing, H.R. 5002, H.R. 5009, H.R. 5102, legislation to improve fentanyl testing and surveillance, H.R. 4841, H.R. 3192, legislation on Prescriber Education, legislation on Medicaid IMD ADDITIONAL INFO Act, legislation on Require Medicaid Programs to Report on All Core Behavioral Health Measures, legislation on HUMAN CAPITAL in Medicaid Act, legislation on Medicaid Pharmaceutical Home Act, legislation on Limited repeal of the IMD Exclusion for adult Medicaid beneficiaries with substance use disorder, legislation on Medicaid DRUG Improvement Act, legislation on Medicaid PARTNERSHIP Act, legislation on Medicaid Graduate Medical Education Transparency Act, H.R. 5202, legislation on Improving Access to Remote Behavioral Health Treatment Act of 2018, legislation to amend title XIX of the Social Security Act to provide for Medicaid coverage protections for pregnant and postpartum women while receiving inpatient treatment for a substance use disorder, legislation on 21st Century Tools for Pain and Addiction Treatments, legislation on FDA Opioid Sparing, legislation on FDA Misuse/Abuse, legislation on FDA Packaging and Disposal, legislation to enhance and improve state-run prescription drug monitoring programs, legislation to support the peer support specialist workforce, and H.R. 5329 were ordered reported, without amendment.

[Page:D466]

THE FISCAL YEAR 2019 ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY BUDGET

Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Environment held a hearing entitled ``The Fiscal Year 2019 Environmental Protection Agency Budget''. Testimony was heard from Scott Pruitt, Administrator, Environmental Protection Agency.

PERSPECTIVES ON REFORM OF THE CFIUS REVIEW PROCESS

Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection held a hearing entitled ``Perspectives on Reform of the CFIUS Review Process''. Testimony was heard from Richard E. Ashooh, Assistant Secretary, Export Administration, Department of Commerce; Heath P. Tarbert, Assistant Secretary, International Markets and Investment Policy, Department of the Treasury; and public witnesses.

OVERSIGHT OF THE SEC'S DIVISION OF CORPORATION FINANCE

Committee on Financial Services: Subcommittee on Capital Markets, Securities, and Investment held a hearing entitled ``Oversight of the SEC's Division of Corporation Finance''. Testimony was heard from William Hinman, Director, Division of Corporation Finance, Securities and Exchange Commission.

MASS MIGRATION IN EUROPE: ASSIMILATION, INTEGRATION, AND SECURITY

Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats held a hearing entitled ``Mass Migration in Europe: Assimilation, Integration, and Security''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

GRADING COUNTERTERRORISM COOPERATION WITH THE GCC STATES

Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Terrorism, Nonproliferation, and Trade; and Subcommittee on the Middle East and North Africa held a joint hearing entitled ``Grading Counterterrorism Cooperation with the GCC States''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

STRENGTHENING THE SAFETY AND SECURITY OF OUR NATION: THE PRESIDENT'S FY2019 BUDGET REQUEST FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Committee on Homeland Security: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Strengthening the Safety and Security of Our Nation: The President's FY2019 Budget Request for the Department of Homeland Security''. Testimony was heard from Kirstjen M. Nielsen, Secretary, Department of Homeland Security.

FILTERING PRACTICES OF SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS

Committee on the Judiciary: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Filtering Practices of Social Media Platforms''. Testimony was heard from Representatives Himes and Blackburn.

EXAMINING THE CRITICAL IMPORTANCE OF OFFSHORE ENERGY REVENUE SHARING FOR GULF PRODUCING STATES

Committee on Natural Eesources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources held a hearing entitled ``Examining the Critical Importance of Offshore Energy Revenue Sharing for Gulf Producing States''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

LEGISLATIVE MEASURES

Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Indian, Insular and Alaska Native Affairs held a hearing on H.R. 211, the ``Chugach Region Lands Study Act''; and H.R. 5317, to repeal section 2141 of the Revised Statutes to remove the prohibition on certain alcohol manufacturing on Indian lands. Testimony was heard from Representative Herrera Beutler; Darryl LaCounte, Acting Deputy Bureau Director, Office of Trust Services, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of the Interior; Glenn Casamassa, Associate Deputy Chief, National Forest System, U.S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture; and public witnesses.

WASTE AND INEFFICIENCY IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT: GAO'S 2018 DUPLICATION REPORT

Committee on Oversight and Government Reform: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Waste and Inefficiency in the Federal Government: GAO's 2018 Duplication Report''. Testimony was heard from Gene Dodaro, Comptroller General of the United States, Government Accountability Office.

[Page:D468]

SURVEYING THE SPACE WEATHER LANDSCAPE

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology: Subcommittee on Environment; and Subcommittee on Space held a joint hearing entitled ``Surveying the Space Weather Landscape''. Testimony was heard from Neil Jacobs, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Environmental Observation and Prediction, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Jim Spann, Chief Scientist, Heliophysics Division, Science Mission Directorate, National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and public witnesses.

NO MAN'S LAND: MIDDLE-MARKET CHALLENGES FOR SMALL BUSINESS GRADUATES

Committee on Small Business: Subcommittee on Contracting and Workforce held a hearing entitled ``No Man's Land: Middle-Market Challenges for Small Business Graduates''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

IDENTIFYING INNOVATIVE PRACTICES AND TECHNOLOGY IN HEALTH CARE

Committee on Ways and Means: Subcommittee on Health held a hearing entitled ``Identifying Innovative Practices and Technology in Health Care''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

FISCAL YEAR 2019 BUDGET HEARING

Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence: Subcommittee on the Central Intelligence Agency held a hearing entitled ``Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Hearing''. This hearing was closed.

Joint Meetings

ARMENIA

Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe: Commission received a briefing on the protest movement in Armenia from Stephen Nix, International Republican Institute, Washington, D.C.; and Elen Aghekyan, New York, New York.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS FOR FRIDAY,

APRIL 27, 2018

(Committee meetings are open unless otherwise indicated)

Senate

No meetings/hearings scheduled.

House

Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection, hearing entitled ``Do Not Call: Combating Robocalls and Caller ID Spoofing'', 9 a.m., 2123 Rayburn.

Committee on Financial Services, Subcommittee on Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit, hearing entitled ``Implementation of FinCEN's Customer Due Diligence Rule--Financial Institution Perspective'', 9:30 a.m., 2128 Rayburn.

Joint Meetings

Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe: to hold hearings to examine the Bitkov case and the United Nations International Commission Against Impunity in Guatemala, 9:15 a.m., 2172, Rayburn Building.

[Page:D469]

Next Meeting of the
SENATE

2:30 p.m., Monday, April 30

Senate Chamber

Program for Monday: Senate will meet in a pro forma session.

Next Meeting of the
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

9 a.m., Friday, April 27

House Chamber

Program for Friday: Complete consideration of H.R. 4--FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

Extensions of Remarks, as inserted in this issue








HOUSE


Barletta, Lou, Pa., E549

Black, Diane, Tenn., E553

Blum, Rod, Iowa, E552

Brady, Kevin, Tex., E545

Buchanan, Vern, Fla., E551

Clark, Katherine M., Mass., E543

Comstock, Barbara, Va., E546

Crawford, Eric A. ``Rick'', Ark., E554

Davis, Rodney, Ill., E547

Doyle, Michael F., Pa., E548

Frelinghuysen, Rodney P., N.J., E543, E549

Gallagher, Mike, Wisc., E549, E555

Graves, Sam, Mo., E553, E553

Green, Gene, Tex., E550

Hanabusa, Colleen, Hawaii, E553

Joyce, David P., Ohio, E552

Kaptur, Marcy, Ohio, E546, E547, E551, E555

Keating, William R., Mass., E549

Kinzinger, Adam, Ill., E545

LaHood, Darin, Ill., E548

Lamborn, Doug, Colo., E541

Levin, Sander M., Mich., E550, E554

Nadler, Jerrold, N.Y., E546

Newhouse, Dan, Wash., E553

O'Halleran, Tom, Ariz., E552

Pascrell, Bill, Jr., N.J., E544

Perlmutter, Ed, Colo., E545, E545, E546, E547, E548, E548, E549, E550, E550, E551

Renacci, James B., Ohio, E554

Rogers, Harold, Ky., E542

Schweikert, David, Ariz., E541

Sensenbrenner, F. James, Jr., Wisc., E553

Sewell, Terri A., Ala., E548

Smith, Christopher H., N.J., E541

Swalwell, Eric, Calif., E553

Thompson, Mike, Calif., E544

Valadao, David G., Calif., E545

Veasey, Marc A., Tex., E542

Westerman, Bruce, Ark., E550

Yoder, Kevin, Kans., E547

Young, Don, Alaska, E542, E543, E544

[Page:D470]