REMEMBERING HAROLD DEAN WILCOXSON; Congressional Record Vol. 163, No. 154
(Senate - September 26, 2017)

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[Pages S6130-S6131]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                   REMEMBERING HAROLD DEAN WILCOXSON

 Mr. DAINES. Mr. President, Livingston, MT, lost an incredible 
member of the community on August 30 when Harold Dean Wilcoxson, son of 
Carl and Harriett Esther (Swingley) Wilcoxson, passed away at age 94. 
Harold spent much of his life operating the family-owned business and 
Montana institution, Wilcoxson's Ice Cream shop. Wilcoxson's Ice Cream 
has provided delicious ice cream and fond memories for Montanans for 
over 100 years.
  Harold was born on April 15, 1923, and graduated from Park County 
High School in 1941. He pursued a certificate in electronics repair at 
Kinmen Business University in Spokane, WA, and used his electronics 
expertise for the rest of his life.
  On September 15, 1942, Harold joined the U.S. Navy and served aboard 
the

[[Page S6131]]

U.S.S. Quincey as an electronics chief during World War II. His ship 
was located off of the French coast during the D-Day invasion of 
Normandy in 1944 and was anchored in Sagami Wan during the signing of 
the Japanese Instrument of Surrender in 1945.
  Following his service, Harold returned to Montana to continue 
building Wilcoxson's Ice Cream. Amidst long hours of building the 
family business, Harold also enjoyed racecars. His love and passion for 
fast cars lasted a lifetime.
  From cleaning cream cans as a boy to fixing electrical issues and 
managing new plant projects, Harold ensured Wilcoxson's Ice Cream shop 
would continue in its legacy of gourmet ice cream and service to 
Montanans for generations. Harold Dean Wilcoxson, beloved businessowner 
and mentor, brought much to the Livingston community through his quiet 
leadership and commitment to service and will be missed by 
many.

                          ____________________